Sample records for qc sample results

  1. PGDP (Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant)-UF/sub 6/ handling, sampling, analysis and associated QC/QA and safety related procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, R.L. (comp.)

    1987-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant procedures on UF/sub 6/ handling, sampling, and analysis, along with associated QC/QA and safety related procedures. It was assembled for transmission by the US Department of Energy to the Korean Advanced Energy Institute as a part of the US-Korea technical exchange program.

  2. Reinforcing of QA/QC programs in radiotherapy departments in Croatia: Results of treatment planning system verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurkovi?, Slaven; Švabi?, Manda; Dikli?, Ana; Smilovi? Radoj?i?, ?eni; Dundara, Dea [Clinic for Radiotherapy and Oncology, Physics Division, University Hospital Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Kasabaši?, Mladen; Ivkovi?, Ana [Department for Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Faj, Dario, E-mail: dariofaj@mefos.hr [Department of Physics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of advanced techniques in clinical practice can greatly improve the outcome of radiation therapy, but it also makes the process much more complex with a lot of room for errors. An important part of the quality assurance program is verification of treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric verifications in anthropomorphic phantom were performed in 4 centers where new systems were installed. A total of 14 tests for 2 photon energies and multigrid superposition algorithms were conducted using the CMS XiO TPS. Evaluation criteria as specified in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Reports Series (IAEA TRS) 430 were employed. Results of measurements are grouped according to the placement of the measuring point and the beam energy. The majority of differences between calculated and measured doses in the water-equivalent part of the phantom were in tolerance. Significantly more out-of-tolerance values were observed in “nonwater-equivalent” parts of the phantom, especially for higher-energy photon beams. This survey was done as a part of continuous effort to build up awareness of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) importance in the Croatian radiotherapy community. Understanding the limitations of different parts of the various systems used in radiation therapy can systematically improve quality as well.

  3. QA QC Questionnaire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL: ShalePutting veteransQ&A87QA/QC

  4. Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations Review of Oak Ridge process and QC activities by David Wood,...

  5. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM MCU SOLIDS OUTAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Oji, L.; Coleman, C.; Poirier, M.

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has received several solid and liquid samples from MCU in an effort to understand and recover from the system outage starting on April 6, 2014. SRNL concludes that the presence of solids in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) is the likely root cause for the outage, based upon the following discoveries ? A solids sample from the extraction contactor #1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the scrub contactor#1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? An archived sample from Tank 49H taken last year was shown to contain a fine precipitate of sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the extraction contactor #1 drain pipe from extraction contactor#1 proved to be mostly sodium aluminosilicate ? A liquid sample from the SSFT was shown to have elevated levels of oxalate anion compared to the expected concentration in the feed Visual inspection of the SSFT indicated the presence of precipitated or transferred solids, which were likely also in the Salt Solution Receipt Tank (SSRT). The presence of the solids coupled with agitation performed to maintain feed temperature resulted in oxalate solids migration through the MCU system and caused hydraulic issues that resulted in unplanned phase carryover from the extraction into the scrub, and ultimately the strip contactors. Not only did this carryover result in the Strip Effluent (SE) being pushed out of waste acceptance specification, but it resulted in the deposition of solids into several of the contactors. At the same time, extensive deposits of aluminosilicates were found in the drain tube in the extraction contactor #1. However it is not known at this time how the aluminosilicate solids are related to the oxalate solids. The solids were successfully cleaned out of the MCU system. However, future consideration must be given to the exclusion of oxalate solids into the MCU system. There were 53 recommendations for improving operations recently identified. Some additional considerations or additional details are provided below as recommendations. ? From this point on, IC-Anions analyses of the DSSHT should be part of the monthly routine analysis in order to spot negative trends in the oxalate leaving the MCU system. Care must be taken to monitor the oxalate content to watch for sudden precipitation of oxalate salts in the system. ? Conduct a study to optimize the cleaning strategy at ARP-MCU through decreasing the concentration or entirely eliminating the oxalic acid. ? The contents of the SSFT should remain unagitated. Routine visual observation should be maintained to ensure there is not a large buildup of solids. As water with agitation provided sufficient removal of the solids in the feed tank, it should be considered as a good means for dissolving oxalate solids if they are found in the future. ? Conduct a study to improve prediction of oxalate solubility in salt batch feed materials. As titanium and mercury have been found in various solids in this report, evaluate if either element plays a role in oxalate solubility during processing. ? Salt batch characterization focuses primarily on characterization and testing of unaltered Tank 21H material; however, non-typical feeds are developed through cleaning, washing, and/or sump transfers. As these solutions are processed through MCU, they may precipitate solids or reduce performance. Salt batch characterization and testing should be expanded to encompass a broader range of feeds that may be processed through ARPMCU.

  6. Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

  7. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

  8. Sample Results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

  9. Annual Monitoring Results A REPORT OF THE REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grainsize 33 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN)33 Trace Metals34 Trace Organics34 Quality Assurance / Quality Control (QA/QC) 37 QA/QC of Percent Solids37 QA/QC of Grain Size 37 QA/QC of TotalAnnual Monitoring Results 2012 A REPORT OF THE REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR WATER QUALITY

  10. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 for the Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 5 strategy are identified. Results of the analyses of the Tank 21H samples from this report in conjunction with the findings of the previous report, indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics.

  11. Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

  12. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E.

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

  13. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

  14. GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

  15. GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

  16. Aquifer Sampling Tube Results for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Peterson, Robert E.

    2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and discusses results of the fiscal year 2003 sampling event associated with aquifer tubes along the Columbia River in the northern Hanford Site. Aquifer tube data help define the extent of groundwater contamination near the river, determine vertical variations in contamination, monitor the performance of interim remedial actions near the river, and support impact studies.

  17. Integrity of Data Samples and Results in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    plots from the Particle Data Group; each point is cum avg. #12;But there is also good in us... http articles so far; now about 1/week. · Data also contain many well understood processes that can be usedIntegrity of Data Samples and Results in High Energy Physics Jeffrey D. RichmanJeffrey D. Richman

  18. QC Solar Suzhou Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:ThisPublicPutnam County,4991939°,Lake,QC Solar

  19. QA/QC QUESTIONNAIRE for SUPPLIERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL: ShalePutting veteransQ&A87QA/QC

  20. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 4 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H to qualify them for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 4 processing. All sample results agree with expectations based on prior analyses where available. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 4 strategy are identified. This revision includes additional data points that were not available in the original issue of the document, such as additional plutonium results, the results of the monosodium titanate (MST) sorption test and the extraction, scrub strip (ESS) test. This report covers the revision to the Tank 21H qualification sample results for Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 4 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). A previous document covers initial characterization which includes results for a number of non-radiological analytes. These results were used to perform aluminum solubility modeling to determine the hydroxide needs for Salt Batch 4 to prevent the precipitation of solids. Sodium hydroxide was then added to Tank 21 and additional samples were pulled for the analyses discussed in this report. This work was specified by Task Technical Request and by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP).

  1. Plutonium Mobility Studies: 216-Z-9 Trench Sample Analysis Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Arey, Bruce W.

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of analyses were conducted on selected sediment samples collected from two wells (299 W15-46 and 299-W15-48) drilled near the 216-Z-9 Trench to elucidate the form and potential for Pu and Am to be mobilized under present conditions and those that could be expected in future remediation scenarios. Analyses included moisture content, determination of the less than sand size fraction (silt plus clay), carbon analysis, SEM/EDS analysis, microwave-assisted acid digestions for total element analysis, and extraction tests using Hanford groundwater as the leachate. Results of the extraction tests were used as input to conduct equilibrium geochemical modeling of the solutions with Geochemist’s Workbench®. Geochemical modeling results for Pu were evaluated in terms of recent conclusions regarding the solubility and redox reactions of Pu by Neck et al. (2007a, 2007b). It was found that the highest concentrations of Pu and Am were associated with sediments of low silt/clay content and occur above silt/clay rich layers within the sediment profile. It was also found that the Pu and Am were relatively enriched in the silt/clay portion of these samples. The fact that the highest concentrations of Pu and Am occurred in sediments with low silt/clay contents suggests that waste solutions had perched on top of the low permeability silt/clay rich layers and interactions with the high silt/clay layers was minimal. SEM/EDS analysis indicated that the Pu and Am in these sediments does not occur as discrete micron size particles, and therefore must occur as mononuclear or polynuclear/ nanoclusters size particles adsorbed throughout the sediment samples. Leaching of these samples with Hanford groundwater indicates that release of Pu and Am from the sediments is correlated most significantly with the acidity of the water and not the initial concentrations of Pu and Am in the sediments. Only extracts that were acidic after contact with the sediments (pH 4.3 to 5.4) contained detectable concentrations of extractable Pu and Am. Water extracts from samples containing high concentrations of TBP suggest that if the TBP degradation products DBP and MBP are available in these sediments, they do not significantly increase the extractability of Pu or Am. Geochemical modeling results suggest that the concentrations of Am in water in contact with these sediments is not controlled by the solubility of Am(OH)3(c), but rather by desorption of Am that has been previously adsorbed to the sediments during the period of active wastewater disposal. Sediment extracts that had measureable concentrations of Am only occurred in samples that were fairly acidic (pH 4.3 to 4.6), indicating that Am will remain effectively sequestered to sediments when pH conditions approach those of normal Hanford groundwater (mildly alkaline, ~ pH 8). The geochemical modeling results indicate that Pu in acidic extracts is significantly undersaturated with respect to PuO2(am). However, recent reviews of Pu solubility and redox reactions suggest that the data used for these calculations is incomplete (Neck et al. 2007a, 2007b). The results of Neck et al. (2007a, 2007b) suggest that Pu concentrations in solutions in contact with the 216-Z-9 Trench sediment samples might be controlled by a mixed valent solid phase [(PuV)2x(PuIV)1-2xO2+x(am)] with various dissolved Pu(V) complexes and Pu(IV)O2(am) colloids or nanoclusters being the dominant species in solution for typical Hanford groundwater conditions. Adsorption is likely to have a major impact on the mobility of these species (Neck et al. 2007a, 2007b; Clark et al. 2006; Kaplan et al. 2006; Powell et al. 2005). Further research is planned to verify these hypotheses.

  2. Introducing the report series on XRF QA/QC Crocker Nuclear Laboratory (CNL), University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    Introducing the report series on XRF QA/QC Crocker Nuclear Laboratory (CNL), University of California, Davis For IMPROVE samples collected since June 1992, CNL has used XRF for the analysis in December 2001, CNL has also used XRF for the analysis of the lighter elements (Na-Fe). These analyses

  3. Rheology and TIC/TOC results of ORNL tank samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Hansen, E. K.

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)) was requested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), and rheological measurements for several Oak Ridge tank samples. As received slurry samples were diluted and submitted to SRNL-Analytical for TIC and TOC analyses. Settled solids yield stress (also known as settled shear strength) of the as received settled sludge samples were determined using the vane method and these measurements were obtained 24 hours after the samples were allowed to settled undisturbed. Rheological or flow properties (Bingham Plastic viscosity and Bingham Plastic yield stress) were determined from flow curves of the homogenized or well mixed samples. Other targeted total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations samples were also analyzed for flow properties and these samples were obtained by diluting the as-received sample with de-ionized (DI) water.

  4. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  5. Results For The First Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted; The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit but below the estimated limit; {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits. However, they are below the limits established; The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from the WAC; The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from WAC; Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples; The values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument, however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  6. Results from tests of TFL Hydragard sampling loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is operational, processed radioactive sludge will be transferred in batches to the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), where glass frit will be added and the contents concentrated by boiling. Batches of the slurry mixture are transferred from the SME to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). Hydragard{reg_sign} sampling systems are used on the SME and the MFT for collecting slurry samples in vials for chemical analysis. An accurate replica of the Hydragard sampling system was built and tested in the thermal Fluids Laboratory (TFL) to determine the hydragard accuracy. It was determined that the original Hydragard valve frequently drew a non-representative sample stream through the sample vial that ranged from frit enriched to frit depleted. The Hydragard valve was modified by moving the plunger and its seat backwards so that the outer surface of the plunger was flush with the inside diameter of the transfer line when the valve was open. The slurry flowing through the vial accurately represented the composition of the slurry in the reservoir for two types of slurries, different dilution factors, a range of transfer flows and a range of vial flows. It was then found that the 15 ml of slurry left in the vial when the Hydragard valve was closed, which is what will be analyzed at DWPF, had a lower ratio of frit to sludge as characterized by the lithium to iron ratio than the slurry flowing through it. The reason for these differences is not understood at this time but it is recommended that additional experimentation be performed with the TFL Hydragard loop to determine the cause.

  7. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (i) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (ii) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (iii) The reported detection limit for {sup 242m}Am is greater than the requested limit from Attachment 8.4 of the WAC. (iv) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (v) The reported concentration of Isopropanol is greater than the limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (vi) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  8. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2012 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the estimated limit in Reference 3; (3) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. however, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples, the values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and (7) The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  9. RESULTS FOR THE SECOND QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibling, R.

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Second Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on April 4, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 59}Ni is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the established limit in Reference 3. (3) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. (4) The reported concentration of {sup 242m}Am is above the target in Listed in Attachment 8.4 of the Saltstone WAC. (5) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (6) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13{sup 5} is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (7) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (8) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  10. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2011 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 59}Ni is above both the requested limits from Reference 2 and the established limits in Reference 3; (3) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. This is a change from previously reported results; (4) The reported concentration of {sup 242m}Am is above the target in Listed in Attachment 8.4 of the Saltstone WAC. This is a change from the previously reported results; (5) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (6) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (7) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; and (8) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  11. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Third Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on July 7, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report.

  12. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Fourth Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on October 12, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report.

  13. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological and seawater samples from the marine and terrestrial environment of Amchitka Island adjacent to the three detonation sites and at a background or reference site, Adak Island, 180 miles to the east. Consistent with the goals of the Amchitka LTS&M Plan, four data quality objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 2011 sampling event.

  14. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

  15. The AmeriFlux QA/ QC group was created to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    also provides secondary standards and reference sensors (e.g. lab quality PPFD sensors) to Ameri, this special issue is dedicated to all the engi- neers and technicians of Fluxnet who ensure the sensors keep and evaluation. Our modular system and a group of dedi- cated people in the QA/ QC lab allows quick and effective

  16. QA/QC QUESTIONNAIRE for SUPPLIERS Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    facility have a written QA Program or Quality Management System? (if so, a description or full copy personnel at Supplying Facility: 8. Number of QA/QC Personnel: 9. Check if facility quality system is based on: ISO 9001, NQA1, other Seller's Responsible Manager Seller's Quality

  17. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION MST, ESS AND PODD SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 5 processing. This qualification material was a composite created from recent samples from Tank 21H and archived samples from Tank 49H to match the projected blend from these two tanks. Additionally, samples of the composite were used in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and extraction-scrub-strip (ESS) tests. ARP and ESS test results met expectations. A sample from Tank 21H was also analyzed for the Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) requirements. SRNL was able to meet all of the requirements, including the desired detection limits for all the PODD analytes. This report details the results of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP), Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) and Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) samples of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP).

  18. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-1403/1404/1405/1406/1407/1408: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-1403, MCU-13-1404, MCU-13-1405, MCU-13-1406, MCU-13-1407, and MCU-13-1408 received on September 17, 2013 are reported. This sample was taken after the addition of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) cocktail to produce a NGS-MCU blended solvent. The results show that the solvent contains a slight excess of Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and TiDG when compared to the target composition. Addition of TiDG trim is recommended. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and that the value has returned to levels observed in 2011. In contrast to what was observed in the heel prior to adding the NGS cocktail, no organic impurities were detected in these solvent samples.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic layer graphene Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphene Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic layer graphene Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Graphite Handout Graphite is a...

  20. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  1. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for Tank 241-AP-103 grab samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Three grab samples (3AP-97-2, 3AP-97-3, and 3AP-97-4) were taken from Riser 1 of Tank 241-AP-103 on August 21, 1997, and received by 222-S Laboratory on August 22, 1997. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1997 (TSAP) (Field, 1997) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste and Compatibility Program (Mulkey et. al., 1995) (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results. Appearance and Sample Breakdown Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analyses and identifies their sources. Furthermore, this reference relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory Information Management System sample numbers. Table 1 summarizes appearance information and over-the-top (OTR) dose readings performed on each sample. For each sample, two 20 ml subsamples were created for inorganic and radiochemical analyses.

  2. 60-Day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for AY-102 grab samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Four grab samples (2AY-96-15, 2AY-96-16, 2AY-96-17, and 2AY-96-18) were taken from Riser 15D of Tank 241-AY-102 on October 8, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 8, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results.

  3. RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF THE MACROBATCH 4 TANK 49H CONFIRMATORY SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 49H in support of qualification of Salt (Macro)Batch 4 for the Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports the results of the analyses of the confirmatory sample of Tank 49H. All sample results either agree with expectations based on prior analyses or are considered trivial enough not to warrant concern. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 4 strategy are identified. This report describes the laboratory results of Salt (Macro)Batch 4 confirmatory sample. These results will be used by Tank Farm Engineering for their blend calculations. This work was specified by Technical Task Request (TTR) and by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP).

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - analogue procedure soap Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sample search results for: analogue procedure soap Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 gSOAP for web services in C and C++ Computing Laboratory Summary: gSOAP for web services in C and C++...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - aps mihhail fetissov Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sample search results for: aps mihhail fetissov Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Value-Added Web Services Composition Using Automatic Program Synthesis Summary: Value-Added Web...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health risks Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: adverse health risks Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Health Care through the Lens of Risk Call for Papers for a four part special issue of...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - asjalikkus ja kord Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sample search results for: asjalikkus ja kord Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 VITA -Kord S. Smith I. PERSONAL DATA Summary: VITA - Kord S. Smith I. PERSONAL DATA Name: Kord Sterling...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual tree rings Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: annual tree rings Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 D Smith and D b d s , Univemily of Victorfa, V'ictoriq I@ XKn Ekevier B.V. All rightsr w w d ....

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual growth rings Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: annual growth rings Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 D Smith and D b d s , Univemily of Victorfa, V'ictoriq I@ XKn Ekevier B.V. All rightsr w w d ....

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute gamma ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absolute gamma ray Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Characterizing the Memory Behavior of CompilerParallelized...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated factor viia Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: activated factor viia Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 GENOMICS 36, 440448 (1996) ARTICLE NO. 0489 Summary: GENOMICS 36, 440-448 (1996) ARTICLE NO....

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - anchored linkage map Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: anchored linkage map Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 GENOMICS 11.806-827 (1991) Genomic Mapping by Anchoring Random Clones Summary: of anchors. In...

  13. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification MST Solids Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 7 processing. The Marcrobatch 7 material was received with visible fine particulate solids, atypical for these samples. The as received material was allowed to settle for a period greater than 24 hours. The supernatant was then decanted and utilized as our clarified feed material. As part of this qualification work, SRNL performed an Actinide Removal Process (ARP) test using the clarified feed material. From this test, the residual monosodium titanate (MST) was analyzed for radionuclide uptake after filtration from H-Tank Farm (HTF) feed salt solution. The results of these analyses are reported and are within historical precedent.

  14. MINERALOGY AND PETROLOGY OF COMET WILD2 NUCLEUS SAMPLES --FINAL RESULTS OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Lawrence

    MINERALOGY AND PETROLOGY OF COMET WILD2 NUCLEUS SAMPLES -- FINAL RESULTS OF THE PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION TEAM. Stardust Mineralogy/Petrology Subteam: Michael Zolensky1 , Phil Bland2 , John Bradley3" results from the mineralogical and petrological analyses that will have been performed. Mineralogy/Petrology

  15. RESULTS FOR THE MAY 19, 2010 INADVERTENT TRANSFER TO THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY SLURRY: SAMPLE ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Cozzi, A.

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical analysis results for the characterization of the May 19, 2010 inadvertent transfer from the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). On May 19, 2010, the Saltstone Processing Facility (SPF) inadvertently transferred approximately 1800 gallons of untreated low-level salt solution from the salt feed tank (SFT) to Cell F of Vault 4. The transfer was identified and during safe configuration shutdown, approximately 70 gallons of SFT material was left in the Saltstone hopper. After the shutdown, the material in the hopper was undisturbed, while the SFT has received approximately 1400 gallons of drain water from the Vault 4 bleed system. The drain water path from Vault 4 to the SFT does not include the hopper (Figure 1); therefore it was determined that the material remaining in the hopper was the most representative sample of the salt solution transferred to the vault. To complete item No.5 of Reference 1, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to analyze the liquid sample retrieved from the hopper for pH, and metals identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). SRNL prepared a report to complete item No.5 and determine the hazardous nature of the transfer. Waste Solidification Engineering then instructed SRNL to provide a more detailed analysis of the slurried sample to assist in the determination of the portion of Tank 50 waste in the hopper sample.

  16. Analytical Results of DWPF Glass Sample Taken During Pouring of Canister S01913

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) (Macrobatch 3) in December 2001 as part of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 208. Macrobatch 3 consists of the contents of Tank 40 and Tank 8 in approximately equal proportions. A glass sample was obtained while pouring Canister S01913 and was sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells for characterization. This report contains observations of the glass sample, results for the density, the chemical composition, the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the radionuclide results needed for the Production Record for Canister S01913. The following conclusions are drawn from this work: (1) The glass sample taken during the filling of canister S01913 received at SRNL weighed 33.04 grams and was dark and reflective with no obvious inclusions indicating the glass was homogeneous. (2) The results of the composition for glass sample S01913 are in good agreement ({+-} 15%) with the DWPF SME results for Batch Number 254, the SME Batch that was being fed to the melter when the sample was collected. (3) The calculated WDF was 2.58. (4) Acid dissolution of the glass samples may not have completely dissolved the noble metals rhodium and ruthenium. (5) The PCT results for the glass (normalized boron release of 1.18 g/L) indicate that it is greater than seven standard deviations more durable than the EA glass; thus, the glass meets the waste acceptance criterion for durability. (6) The measured density of the glass was 2.56 {+-} 0.03 g/cm{sup 3}.

  17. Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake Watershed: Sampling Design, Methods and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opsomer, Jean

    Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake Watershed: Sampling Design, Methods and Results by J Association June 11, 2001 Iowa State University Ames, Iowa #12;2 Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake health assessment, are briefly described in the article. All the selected plots and stream locations were

  18. Results of Remediation and Verification Sampling for the 600-270 Horseshoe Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the 2005 remedial action and verification soil sampling conducted at the 600-270 waste site after removal of soil containing residual concentrations of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its breakdown products dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane. The remediation was performed in response to post-closure surface soil sampling performed between 1998 and 2003 that indicated the presence of residual DDT contamination exceeding the Record of Decision for the 1100 Area National Priorities List site cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg that was established for the original 1994 cleanup activities.

  19. Problems with "GR without SR: A gravitational-domain description of first-order Doppler effects" (gr-qc/9807084)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Baird

    2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein's goal of producing an advanced gravitational model that was independent of special relativity's "non-gravitational" derivations has arguably still not been achieved. The author produced a paper in 1998 outlining a possible method of attack on the problem based on shift equivalence principles ("Doppler mass shift"). Some problems with this paper have since come to light. We list some further developments, some papers not cited in gr-qc/9807084, some experimental results missed by the author, and identify a problem with the paper's approach to aberration effects.

  20. Results Of Initial Analyses Of The Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Salt (Macro) Batch 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) through ARP/MCU. This document reports the initial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. Further results on the chemistry and other tests will be issued in the future. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. Based upon a SRNL settling test, the solids should settle well within the months-long settling period to be employed in Tank 21H. However, SRNL recommends analyzing the solids to provide input to OLI modeling in order to evaluate the impacts of these solids to present and future salt batches.

  1. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The concentration of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC Limits and Targets, unless noted in this section; Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; Diisooctyl adipate (or diisooctyl hexanedioate) and 5-methyl-3-hexanol, plasticizers, were measured at 1.30E+00 mg/L and 3.00E+00 mg/L, respectively, in one of two replicate measurements conducted on an at-depth sample. The organic analysis of the at-depth sample was conducted at the request of SRR. These analytes were below the detection limits for the surface sample; and, The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  2. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2013 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: ? SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminants unless noted in this section. ? {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, and {sup 251}Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations. However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL. ? Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility of these materials in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50. ? The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species. The semivolatile organic analysis (SVOA) method employed in the measurement of Norpar 13 and tributyl phosphate (TBP) has resulted in the erroneous reporting of a variety of small chain alcohols, including 4-methyl-3-hexanol and 5-methyl-3-hexanol, in previous quarterly sample reports. It has now been determined that these alcohols are an artifact of the sample preparation. Further work is being conducted in SRNL to delineate the conditions that produce these alcohols, and these findings will be reported separately.

  3. Concordant plutonium-241-americium-241 dating of environmental samples: results from forest fire ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murrell, Michael T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katzman, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the Pu, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 151}Sm isotopic systematics for a set of forest fire ash samples from various locations in the western U.S. including Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and New Mexico. The goal of this study is to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu (t{sub 1/2} = 14.4 y)-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections. Environmental samples often contain mixtures of components including global fallout. There are a number of approaches for subtracting the global fallout component for such samples. One approach is to use {sup 242}/{sup 239}Pu as a normalizing isotope ratio in a three-isotope plot, where this ratio for the nonglobal fallout component can be estimated or assumed to be small. This study investigates a new, complementary method of normalization using the long-lived fission product, {sup 151}Sm (t{sub 1/2} = 90 y). We find that forest fire ash concentrates actinides and fission products with {approx}1E10 atoms {sup 239}Pu/g and {approx}1E8 atoms {sup 151}Sm/g, allowing us to measure these nuclides by mass spectrometric (MIC-TIMS) and radiometric (liquid scintillation counting) methods. The forest fire ash samples are characterized by a western U.S. regional isotopic signature representing varying mixtures of global fallout with a local component from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Our results also show that {sup 151}Sm is well correlated with the Pu nuclides in the forest fire ash, suggesting that these nuclides have similar geochemical behavior in the environment. Results of this correlation indicate that the {sup 151}Sm/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio for global fallout is {approx}0.164, in agreement with an independent estimate of 0.165 based on {sup 137}Cs fission yields for atmospheric weapons tests at the NTS. {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating of the non-global fallout component in the forest fire ash samples yield ages in the late 1950's-early 1960's, consistent with a peak in NTS weapons testing at that time. The age results for this component are in agreement using both {sup 242}Pu and {sup 151}Sm normalizations, although the errors for the {sup 151}Sm correction are currently larger due to the greater uncertainty of their measurements. Additional efforts to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections are underway with emphasis on soil cores.

  4. Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup ?} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup ?}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report. The Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble chromium and technetium (i.e., effective Cr and Tc oxidation fronts). Residual reduction capacity

  5. Results For The Second Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by Saltstone Facility Engineering (SFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  6. Results for the second quarter 2014 tank 50 WAC slurry sample chemical and radionuclide contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2014 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  7. Results For The Third Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  8. RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF NGS CONCENTRATE DRUM SAMPLES [Next Generation Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Williams, M.

    2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared two drums (50 gallons each in ?Drum#2? and ?Drum#4?) of NGS-MCU (Next Generation Solvent-Modular CSSX Unit) concentrate for future use at MCU in downblending the BOBCalixC6 based solvent to produce NGS-MCU solvent. Samples of each drum were sent for analysis. The results of all the analyses indicate that the blend concentrate is of the correct composition and should produce a blended solvent at MCU of the desired formulation.

  9. Results for the Third Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical and Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  10. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  11. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2007 TANK 50H WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low activity wastewater streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the high level waste (HLW) storage tanks, are stored as a mixture in Tank 50H until it can be pumped to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. Specific waste acceptance criteria (WAC) must be met for the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Saltstone Facility. Low level waste which meets the WAC can be transferred, stored and treated in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) for subsequent disposal as saltstone in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested through a Technical Task Request (TTR) that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measure the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants listed in the currently approved Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). A Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and Analytical Study Plan has been written for this request. WAC determinations are needed on a quarterly basis for chemical contaminants and every first and third quarter for radioactive contaminants. This memorandum presents the results for the chemical and radionuclide contaminants in the third quarter, from the samples taken from Tank 50 in September, 2007.

  12. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  13. Results For The First Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminates unless noted in this section; {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, and {sup 251}Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations. However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL; Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and, The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  14. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on July 6 and 7, 2010. Additionally, a water sample was obtained at one well known as the 29-6 Water Hole, several miles west of the Gasbuggy site. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. The one water well sample was analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  15. Sample results from the integrated salt disposition program macrobatch 6 tank 21H qualifications MST solids sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 6 processing. As part of this qualification work, SRNL performed an Actinide Removal Process (ARP) test. From this test, the residual monosodium titanate (MST) was analyzed for radionuclide uptake. The results of these analyses are reported and are within historical precedent.

  16. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  17. Sulfur, Chlorine, and Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. III: Observations and Results for a Final Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. B. Kwitter; R. B. C. Henry; J. B. Milingo

    2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the fourth in a series whose purpose is to study the interstellar abundances of sulfur, chlorine, and argon in the Galaxy using a sample of 86 planetary nebulae. Here we present new high-quality spectrophotometric observations of 20 Galactic planetary nebulae with spectral coverage from 3700-9600 Angstroms. A major feature of our observations throughout the entire study has been the inclusion of the near-infrared lines of [S III] 9069,9532, which allows us to calculate accurate S+2 abundances and to either improve upon or convincingly confirm results of earlier sulfur abundance studies. For each of the 20 objects here we calculate ratios of S/O, Cl/O, and Ar/O and find average values of S/O=1.1E-2+/-1.1E-2, Cl/O=4.2E-4+/-5.3E-4, and Ar/O=5.7E-3+/-4.3E-3. For six objects we are able to compare abundances of S+3 calculated directly from available [S IV] 10.5 micron measurements with those inferred indirectly from the values of the ionization correction factors for sulfur. In the final paper of the series, we will compile results from all 86 objects, search for and evaluate trends, and use chemical evolution models to interpret our results.

  18. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-14-135/136 AND MCU-14-214/215/216: FEBRUARY AND MARCH 2014 MONTHLY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL received two sets of SHT samples (MCU-14-135-136 in February 2014 and MCU-14-214-216 in March 2014) for analysis. The samples were analyzed for composition. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar® L trimming at this time. However, the addition of TiDG (suppressor) to the blended solvent is recommended. Evidence of possible (slight) isomerization of the solvent, probably Isopar®L or TiDG degradation products, was observed.

  19. Results and Discussion Filter and denuder samples collected at the Lost Dutchman site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    and bases. Each sampling train has a cyclone separator to remove particles larger than the designed cut

  20. Results of Stainless Steel Canister Corrosion Studies and Environmental Sample Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Charles R; Enos, David

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. The work involves both characterization of the potential physical and chemical environment on the surface of the storage canisters and how it might evolve through time, and testing to evaluate performance of the canister materials under anticipated storage conditions. To evaluate the potential environment on the surface of the canisters, SNL is working with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to collect and analyze dust samples from the surface of in-service SNF storage canisters. In FY 13, SNL analyzed samples from the Calvert Cliffs Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI); here, results are presented for samples collected from two additional near-marine ISFSI sites, Hope Creek NJ, and Diablo Canyon CA. The Hope Creek site is located on the shores of the Delaware River within the tidal zone; the water is brackish and wave action is normally minor. The Diablo Canyon site is located on a rocky Pacific Ocean shoreline with breaking waves. Two types of samples were collected: SaltSmart™ samples, which leach the soluble salts from a known surface area of the canister, and dry pad samples, which collected a surface salt and dust using a swipe method with a mildly abrasive ScotchBrite™ pad. The dry samples were used to characterize the mineralogy and texture of the soluble and insoluble components in the dust via microanalytical techniques, including mapping X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. For both Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon canisters, dust loadings were much higher on the flat upper surfaces of the canisters than on the vertical sides. Maximum dust sizes collected at both sites were slightly larger than 20 ?m, but Phragmites grass seeds ~1 mm in size, were observed on the tops of the Hope Creek canisters. At both sites, the surface dust could be divided into fractions generated by manufacturing processes and by natural processes. The fraction from manufacturing processes consisted of variably-oxidized angular and spherical particles of stainless steel and iron, generated by machining and welding/cutting processes, respectively. Dust from natural sources consisted largely of detrital quartz and aluminosilicates (feldspars and clays) at both sites. At Hope Creek, soluble salts were dominated by sulfates and nitrates, mostly of calcium. Chloride was a trace component and the only chloride mineral observed by SEM was NaCl. Chloride surface loads measured by the Saltsmart™ sensors were very low, less than 60 mg m{sup –2} on the canister top, and less than 10 mg m{sup –2} on the canister sides. At Diablo Canyon, sea-salt aggregates of NaCl and Mg-SO{sub 4}, with minor K and Ca, were abundant in the dust, in some cases dominating the observed dust assemblage. Measured Saltsmart™ chloride surface loads were very low (<5 mg m{sup –2}); however, high canister surface temperatures damaged the Saltsmart™ sensors, and, in view of the SEM observations of abundant sea-salts on the package surfaces, the measured surface loads may not be valid. Moreover, the more heavily-loaded canister tops at Diablo Canyon were not sampled with the Saltsmart™ sensors. The observed low surface loads do not preclude chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (CISCC) at either site, because (1) the measured data may not be valid for the Diablo Canyon canisters; (2) the surface coverage was not complete (for instance, the 45ş offset between the outlet and inlet vents means that near-inlet areas, likely to have heavier dust and salt loads, were not sampled); and (3) CISCC has been experimentally been observed at salt loads as low as 5-8 mg/m{sup 2}. Experimental efforts at SNL to assess corrosion of interim storage canister materials include three tasks in FY14. First, a full-diameter canister mockup, made using materials and techniques identical to those used to make interim st

  1. Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BELL, K.E.

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

  2. H02 WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM WATER CHEMISTRY SAMPLING AND RESULTS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, M; Michael Serrato, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-02 Wetland Treatment System (Figure 1) is used to remove heavy metals (e.g., copper and zinc) from the H-Area process and storm water discharge. Routine flow enters an equalization basin by inlets on either the east (Location 1) or west end (Location 2). The west end influent constitutes 75% of the average flow into the basin which has an average residence time of approximately 3 days at low pool (i.e., 120 gal/min. through a volume of 0.5 million gallons). The water then exits via the basin outlet on the east end. Next, the water flows to a splitter box (Location 3) which evenly separates the flow between two wetland cells for a design flow of 60 gal/min. per wetland cell with a residence time in the cell of approximately 2 days. The wetland effluent is then combined (Location 4) and flows through a spillway before reaching the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) measurement point near Road 4. During initial operation, it was observed that the pH of the water leaving the equalization basin was elevated compared to the influent pH. Furthermore, the elevated pH remained through the wetland cells so that there was an average pH of 10 leaving the wetland cells during the daytime which exceeds the upper NPDES limit of 8.5. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the cause of the increase in pH within the equalization basin of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. Possible mechanisms included algal activity and inorganic chemistry interactions (e.g., interactions with the clay and/or bentonite liner). Water quality parameters were evaluated throughout the H-02 Wetland Treatment system and over time in order to determine the cause of high pH values measured in the basin and wetland. Fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and accompanying changes in pH would be expected in systems where algae are an influencing factor. An unexpected increase or decrease in the concentration of inorganic substances may indicate operational changes or an inorganic chemistry influence on pH. In addition, alternative methods to alleviate or mitigate the pH increase were evaluated. This study documents the results of sampling activities undertaken and conveys the analytical results along with suggestions for operation of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. The water samples collected and the water quality data generated from this activity are for analytical purposes only, and as such, were not collected in support of compliance activities.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - a-exposed atlantic cod Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    portions of freshly landed Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, were either directly stored in ice... during certain seasons. Materials and Methods Sample Preparation Eviscerated...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic cod pineal Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    portions of freshly landed Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, were either directly stored in ice... during certain seasons. Materials and Methods Sample Preparation Eviscerated...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic cod piscidin Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    portions of freshly landed Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, were either directly stored in ice... during certain seasons. Materials and Methods Sample Preparation Eviscerated...

  6. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES POURED AUGUST 29, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Best, D.; Reigel, M.

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples poured 8/29/12 were received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642 was within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.6.1, 8.7.1, and 8.5.3 as measured using method ASTM E 1311 met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density of each sample met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.5.1, 8.6.3, and 8.7.3 did not meet the lower bound. The samples, as received, were not wrapped in a moist towel as previous samples and appeared to be somewhat drier. This may explain the lower hydrogen partial density with respect to previous samples.

  7. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES POURED AUGUST 29, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.; Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples poured 8/29/12 were received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642 was within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.6.1, 8.7.1, and 8.5.3 as measured using method ASTM E 1311 met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density of each sample met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.5.1, 8.6.3, and 8.7.3 did not meet the lower bound. The samples, as received, were not wrapped in a moist towel as previous samples and appeared to be somewhat drier. This may explain the lower hydrogen partial density with respect to previous samples.

  8. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON NOVEMBER 21, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  9. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  10. Analytical Results For MOX Colemanite Concrete Samples Received On November, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  11. Analytical Results For MOX Colemanite Concrete Samples Received On September 4, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  12. 2003 Horseshoe Beach Lease Area, Dixie County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  13. 2004 Gulf Jackson Lease Area, Levy County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  14. 2002 Dog Island Lease Area, Levy County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (AQ/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (AQ/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  15. 2003 Body A Lease Area, Brevard County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  16. 2003 Pine Island Lease Area, Dixie County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  17. 2002 Body A Lease Area, Brevard County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  18. 2002 Pine Island Lease Area, Dixie County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  19. 2003 Dog Island Lease Area, Levy County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  20. 2003 Gulf Jackson Lease Area, Levy County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  1. 2002 Gulf Jackson Lease Area, Levy County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  2. arXiv:gr-qc/0012068v119Dec2000 International Journal of Modern Physics D,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Robert T.

    arXiv:gr-qc/0012068v119Dec2000 International Journal of Modern Physics D, c World Scientific of applications to black hole physics, culminating in the "membrane paradigm" for treating the black hole horizon2 and physics around black holes. Their approach to the integral version of Maxwell's equations is based

  3. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar? L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

  4. Illumina GA IIx& HiSeq 2000 Production Sequenccing and QC Analysis Pipelines at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daum, Christopher; Zane, Matthew; Han, James; Kennedy, Megan; San Diego, Matthew; Copeland, Alex; Li, Mingkun; Lucas, Susan

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute's (JGI) Production Sequencing group is committed to the generation of high-quality genomic DNA sequence to support the mission areas of renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental characterization and clean-up. Within the JGI's Production Sequencing group, a robust Illumina Genome Analyzer and HiSeq pipeline has been established. Optimization of the sesequencer pipelines has been ongoing with the aim of continual process improvement of the laboratory workflow, reducing operational costs and project cycle times to increases ample throughput, and improving the overall quality of the sequence generated. A sequence QC analysis pipeline has been implemented to automatically generate read and assembly level quality metrics. The foremost of these optimization projects, along with sequencing and operational strategies, throughput numbers, and sequencing quality results will be presented.

  5. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2012 at Rulison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 8, 2012. The samples were shipped to GEL Laboratories in Charleston, South Carolina, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry; tritium was analyzed using two methods. The conventional tritium method has a detection limit on the order of 400 pCi/L, and a select set of samples was analyzed for tritium using the enriched method, which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - amsr aqua amsr-e Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on AQUA offer horizontal resolutions of 6x4 km at 89... 2 12;12;Operational Sea Ice Remote Sensing with AMSR-E 89 GHz Channels (Invited Paper) Gunnar... ). The sampling...

  7. Characterization Results For The 2013 HTF 3H Evaporator Overhead Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report tabulates the radiochemical analysis of the 3H evaporator overhead sample for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 129}I to meet the requirements in the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) (rev. 6). This report identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. All data was found to be within the ETP WAC (rev. 6) specification for the Waste Water Collection Tanks (WWCT).

  8. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JANUARY 15, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received twelve samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on January 15, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the hydrogen partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. All of the samples met or exceeded the boron partial density lower bound with the exception of samples G3-M11-2000-H, G3-M11-3000-M, and G5-M1-3000-H which are below the limit of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3}.

  9. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JANUARY 15, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Best, D.

    2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received twelve samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on January 15, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1311, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the hydrogen partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. All of the samples met or exceeded the boron partial density lower bound with the exception of samples G3-M11-2000-H, G3-M11-3000-M, and G5-M1-3000-H which are below the limit of 1.65E-01 g/cm3.

  10. Letter Report for Analytical Results for five Swipe Samples from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility, Muskegon Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Wade

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received five swipe samples on December 10, 2013 from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility in Norton Shores, Michigan. The samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14 according to the NRC Form 303 supplied with the samples. The sample identification numbers are presented in Table 1 and the tritium and carbon-14 results are provided in Table 2. The pertinent procedure references are included with the data tables.

  11. Analytical results, statistical analyses, and sample-locality maps of rocks from the Anchorage Quadrangle, southern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, D.J.; Arbogast, B.F.; O'Leary, R.M.; Van Trump, G. Jr.; Silberman, M.L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report give the analytical results, statistical analyses, and sample-locality maps of rocks from the Anchorage Quadrangle in southern Alaska is presented.

  12. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011 at Rulison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 18, 2011. The samples were shipped to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed, with the exception of the determination of tritium concentration by the enrichment method. The laboratory no longer provides that service. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional method. Starting in 2012, DOE will retain a different laboratory that provides the enriched tritium analysis service.

  13. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco site for the LTHMP on May 16 and 17, 2011. The samples were shipped to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed, with the exception of the determination of tritium concentration by the enrichment method, because the laboratory no longer provides that service. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and tritium using the conventional method. Starting in 2012, DOE will retain a different laboratory that provides the enriched tritium analysis service.

  14. THE SMALL ISOLATED GAS-RICH IRREGULAR DWARF (SIGRID) GALAXY SAMPLE: DESCRIPTION AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Jerjen, Helmut [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Meurer, Gerhardt R., E-mail: david@mso.anu.edu.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, M468, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an optically unbiased selection process based on the HIPASS neutral hydrogen survey, we have selected a sample of 83 spatially isolated, gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the southern hemisphere with cz between 350 and 1650 km s{sup -1}, and with R-band luminosities and H I masses less than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The sample is an important population of dwarf galaxies in the local universe, all with ongoing star formation, and most of which have no existing spectroscopic data. We are measuring the chemical abundances of these galaxies, using the integral-field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope, the Wide-Field Spectrograph. This paper describes our survey criteria and procedures, lists the survey sample, and reports on initial observations.

  15. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JULY 22, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Best, D.

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the boron oxide content of the colemanite raw aggregate material prior to it being mixed into the concrete. SRNL received ten samples of colemanite for analysis on July 22, 2013. The elemental boron content of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The boron oxide content was calculated using the oxide conversion factor for boron.

  16. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JULY 22, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Best, D.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the boron oxide content of the colemanite raw aggregate material prior to it being mixed into the concrete. SRNL received ten samples of colemanite for analysis on July 22, 2013. The elemental boron content of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The boron oxide content was calculated using the oxide conversion factor for boron.

  17. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 1 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. King, CHP, PMP

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 22, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses. The comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ? 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty. The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties. Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. A comparison of split sample results, using the DER equation, indicates one set with a DER greater than 3. A DER of 3.1 is calculated for gross alpha results from ORAU sample 5198W0003 and NFS sample MCU-310212003. The ORAU result is 0.98 ± 0.30 pCi/L (value ± 2 sigma) compared to the NFS result of -0.08 ± 0.60 pCi/L. Relatively high DER values are not unexpected for low (e.g., background) analyte concentrations analyzed by separate laboratories, as is the case here. It is noted, however, NFS uncertainties are at least twice the ORAU uncertainties, which contributes to the elevated DER value. Differences in ORAU and NFS minimum detectable activities are even more pronounced. comparison of ORAU and NFS split samples produces reasonably consistent results for low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  18. Analytical test results for archived core composite samples from tanks 241-TY-101 and 241-TY-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, M.A.

    1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the analytical tests performed on archived core composite samples form a 1.085 sampling of the 241-TY-101 (101-TY) and 241-TY-103 (103-TY) single shell waste tanks. Both tanks are suspected of containing quantities of ferrocyanide compounds, as a result of process activities in the late 1950`s. Although limited quantities of the composite samples remained, attempts were made to obtain as much analytical information as possible, especially regarding the chemical and thermal properties of the material.

  19. HTGR Unit Fuel Pebble k-infinity Results Using Chord Length Sampling, invited T.J. Donovan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    HTGR Unit Fuel Pebble k-infinity Results Using Chord Length Sampling, invited T.J. Donovan Lockheed) fuel pebble element. This paper presents comparison results of k calculations performed on a LEUPRO-1 where the TRISO fuel particles within the pebble are randomly distributed. Finally, the heterogeneous

  20. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 4 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUELS SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on June 12, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ≤ 3 indicates at a 99% confidence interval that split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report specifies 95% confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0014 was the exception. The ORAU gross beta result of 6.30 ? 0.65 pCi/L from location NRD is well above NFS?s non-detected result of 1.56 ? 0.59 pCi/L. NFS?s data package includes no detected result for any radionuclide at location NRD. At NRC?s request, ORAU performed gamma spectroscopic analysis of sample 5198W0014 to identify analytes contributing to the relatively elevated gross beta results. This analysis identified detected amounts of naturally-occurring constituents, most notably Ac-228 from the thorium decay series, and does not suggest the presence of site-related contamination.

  1. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-T-110 push mode samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-110. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 2 and 6 between January 29, 1997, and February 7, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-110 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO.

  2. Recent Results of the Investigation of a Microfluidic Sampling Chip and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronicCurvesSpeedingScientificof ScientificQ LA-UR-Raymond Davis,Sampling

  3. Results of the Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program for April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, Cheryl L.

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 58 urine samples and 10 fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010) to General Engineering Laboratories, South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am 235U, 238U, elemental uranium and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year as well as four tissue samples for 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am and 241Pu. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.3% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 33% of the analyses processed by GEL during the third year of this contract were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 21 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty (Table 4).

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - army research institute Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: army research institute Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons resulting Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Summary: fuel. (d) Lubricating oil. - 300 400 Wavelength (nm) Results Concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons... Aust. J....

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic yeast yarrowia Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: aerobic yeast yarrowia Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Evolutionary Genomics: Yeasts Accelerate beyond BLAST Summary: hansenii, and Yarrowia lipolytica. Yeast 20,...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates fatty liver Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: on hepato- cytes, resulting in down-regulation of NKT cells...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous pbsc grafts Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    peripheral blood progenitor... of CD34 cells in autologous PBPC transplantation. The infusion of 5x106 CD34kg minimum results in rapid... . No assesment of CD34 cells was...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - artery internal jugular Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ICA) territory within 5 min. Incorporation of the complete CoW resulted... saline infusion (ICSI) in which cold saline is infused into the internal carotid artery (ICA) via......

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - astra critical facility Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: astra critical facility Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 FoneAstra: Enabling Remote Monitoring of Vaccine Cold-Chains Using Commodity Mobile Phones Summary: FoneAstra:...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute confusional state Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: acute confusional state Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Arch Womens Ment Health . Author manuscript Care in a mother-baby psychiatric unit: analysis of separation...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute psychiatric wards Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: acute psychiatric wards Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Arch Womens Ment Health . Author manuscript Care in a mother-baby psychiatric unit: analysis of separation...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - air force aircrew Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: air force aircrew Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CAPTAIN BENJAMIN H. SMITH Captain Ben Smith is Recruiting Flight Commander for the Air Force Reserve Officer...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - astronomical hard x-ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: astronomical hard x-ray Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Reverse Drift Bursts in the 0.8-4.5 GHz Band and their Relation to X-Rays Summary: and causing radio...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - air distribution results Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yang, Ph.D.1 Summary: . Simulated results of various air distribution methods for ice rink No 6. Case Average CO concentration (ppm... type used by the resurfacer as well as...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - azido auxins synthesis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: azido auxins synthesis Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Funct Integr Genomics (2003) 3:135143 DOI 10.1007s10142-003-0093-7 Summary: :1237-1251 Melhado LL, Jones...

  17. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-108: Results from samples collected on 10/27/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W. [and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-108 (referred to as Tank BY-108). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Trends in NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O samples indicated a possible sampling problem. Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, the authors looked for the 40 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 15 analytes. Of these, 17 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Also, eighty-one organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal standard response factors. The nine organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1 and account for approximately 48% of the total organic components in the headspace of Tank BY-108. Three permanent gases, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were also detected. Tank BY-108 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  18. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE PBC-44.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.; Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Sample PBC-44.2 was received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.03 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm3. The average partial hydrogen density was 6.64E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.70E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  19. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE POURED MAY 4, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Best, D.; Reigel, M.

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use Colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Sample 04 May 12/Test/S1-1, S1-2, and S1-3 was received on 5/9/2012 and analyzed. The total density measure by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.00 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The partial hydrogen density of 6.35E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The measured partial boron density of 1.88E-01 g/cm{sup 3} exceeded the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} when the sodium peroxide fusion dissolution method was used in place of the prescribed ASTM C 1301 method.

  20. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE POURED JULY 25, 2012 - CURED 28 DAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A. D.; Best, D. R.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use Colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples 8.1.2, 8.2.2, 8.3.2, and 8.4.2 were received on 8/1/2012 and analyzed after curing for 28 days. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.09 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density was 7.48E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.71E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  1. Analytical Results Of MOX Colemanite Concrete Sample PBC-44.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A. D.; Best, D. R.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Sample PBC-44.2 was received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.03 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density was 6.64E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.97E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  2. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 3 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on March 20, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0012 was the exception. The ORAU result of 9.23 {+-} 0.73 pCi/L from location MCD is well above NFS?s result of -0.567 {+-} 0.63 pCi/L (non-detected). NFS?s data package included a detected result for U-233/234, but no other uranium or plutonium detection, and nothing that would suggest the presence of beta-emitting radionuclides. The ORAU laboratory reanalyzed sample 5198W0012 using the remaining portion of the sample volume and a result of 11.3 {+-} 1.1 pCi/L was determined. As directed, the laboratory also counted the filtrate using gamma spectrometry analysis and identified only naturally occurring or ubiquitous man-made constituents, including beta emitters that are presumably responsible for the elevated gross beta values.

  3. Results of the Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program For April 1, 2006 Through March 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, Cheryl L.

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 66 urine samples, 6 blank fecal and 6 spiked artificial fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2006 through March 31, 2007) to General Engineering Laboratories, South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for tritium, Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am 235U, 238U, elemental uranium and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.7% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 36% of the analyses processed by GEL during the second year of this contract were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 16 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work. IDP concluded that GEL was performing well for all analyses tested, and concerns identified earlier were satisfactorily resolved.

  4. Results of The Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program For April 1, 2010 Through March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, Cheryl L.

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 76 urine samples and 10 spiked fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011) to GEL Laboratories, LLC in South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for 14C, Sr, for 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 235U, 238U, 238U-mass and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.1% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 31% of the analyses processed by GEL during the first year of contract 112512 were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 23 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty except the slightly elevated relative bias for 243,244Cm (Table 4).

  5. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT PROGRAM REAL WASTE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  6. Sample Results From The Next Generation Solvent Program Real Waste Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  7. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  8. Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) Model: Documentation and Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Margolis, R.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) model is a bottom-up, market penetration model that simulates the potential adoption of photovoltaics (PV) on residential and commercial rooftops in the continental United States through 2030. NREL developed SolarDS to examine the market competitiveness of PV based on regional solar resources, capital costs, electricity prices, utility rate structures, and federal and local incentives. The model uses the projected financial performance of PV systems to simulate PV adoption for building types and regions then aggregates adoption to state and national levels. The main components of SolarDS include a PV performance simulator, a PV annual revenue calculator, a PV financial performance calculator, a PV market share calculator, and a regional aggregator. The model simulates a variety of installed PV capacity for a range of user-specified input parameters. PV market penetration levels from 15 to 193 GW by 2030 were simulated in preliminary model runs. SolarDS results are primarily driven by three model assumptions: (1) future PV cost reductions, (2) the maximum PV market share assumed for systems with given financial performance, and (3) PV financing parameters and policy-driven assumptions, such as the possible future cost of carbon emissions.

  9. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 5 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 21, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference, are tabulated. All DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  10. Results of Fall 1994 sampling of gunite and associated tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Memorandum, was developed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.01.41.12.02. 11 (Activity Data Sheet 3301, ``WAG 1``). This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with analytical results from liquid and sludge samples from the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT). Information provided in this report forms part of the technical basis for criticality safety, systems safety, engineering design, and waste management as they apply to the GAAT treatability study and remediation.

  11. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-TY-101: Results from samples collected on 4/6/95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinger, G.S.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Olsen, K.B.; Bredt, O.P.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TY-101 (referred to as Tank TY-101). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Off these, 5 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. One tentatively identified compound (TIC) was observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The six organic analyses identified are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank TY-101. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected. Tank TY-101 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  12. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-C-112: Results from samples collected on 8/11/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H. [and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-112 (referred to as Tank C-112). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Five organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, we looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. None were observed above the 2-ppbv detection limit. The five organic analytes with the highest concentration are listed in Table 1 and account for 100% of the total organic components in Tank C-112.

  13. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-C-107: Results from samples collected on 9/29/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W. [and others

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-107 (referred to as Tank C-107). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Twenty organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, the authors looked for the 55 TO-14 extended analytes. Of these, 3 were observed above the 5-ppbv detection limit. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1 and account for approximately 96% of the total organic components in Tank C-107. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide, were also detected.

  14. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia); Yahya, Redzuan [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  15. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-14-667-672 AND MCU-14-846-847: AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER 2014 MONTHLY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL received two sets of SHT samples (MCU-14-667-672, pulled 8/27/2014 and MCU-14-846-847, pulled on 9/22/2014) for analysis. The samples were analyzed for composition. It is recommended that the solvent receives Isopar® L and TiDG trimming at this time. Analysis of sample MCU-14-846-847 indicates the solvent has evaporated Isopar®L and has lost TiDG to a level below the recommended minimum 1 mM level. Since the addition of MaxCalix to the SHT in early July 2014, the MaxCalix concentration in the solvent has reached nominal values. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurity or degradation of the solvent components.

  16. 2004 Indian River Lease Area, Indian River County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (QA/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  17. Results of analyses of fur samples from the San Joaquin Kit Fox and associated soil and water samples from the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Tupman, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II; Rosen, A.E.; Beauchamp, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kato, T.T. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether analysis of the elemental content of fur from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and of water and soil from kit fox habitats could be used to make inferences concerning the cause of an observed decline in the kit fox population on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Fur samples that had been collected previously from NPR-1, another oil field (NPR-2), and two sites with no oil development were subjected to neutron activation analysis. In addition, soil samples were collected from the home ranges of individual foxes from undisturbed portions of major soil types on NPR-1 and from wastewater samples were collected from tanks and sumps and subjected to neutron activation analysis. Most elemental concentrations in fur were highest at Camp Roberts and lowest on the undeveloped portions of NPR-I. Fur concentrations were intermediate on the developed oil fields but were correlated with percent disturbance and with number of wells on NPR-1 and NPR-2. The fact that most elements covaried across the range of sites suggests that some pervasive source such as soil was responsible. However, fur concentrations were not correlated with soft concentrations. The kit foxes on the developed portion of NPR-1 did not have concentrations of elements in fur relative to other sites that would account for the population decline in the early 1980s. The oil-related elements As, Ba, and V were elevated in fox fur from oil fields, but only As was sufficiently elevated to suggest a risk of toxicity in individual foxes. However, arsenic concentrations suggestive of sublethal toxicity were found in only 0.56% of foxes from developed oil fields, too few to account for a population decline.

  18. Tank 241-S-111 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and SEC 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEEN, F.H.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-S-111 (S-111) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank S-111 samples were performed as directed in Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999 (Sasaki 1999a,b). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. The notification limit for {sup 137}Cs was exceeded on two samples. Results are discussed in Section 5.3.2. No other notification limits were exceeded.

  19. The Soft X-Ray Properties of a Complete Sample of Optically Selected Quasars II. Final Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Fabrizio Fiore; Martin Elvis; Belinda J. Wilkes; Jonathan C. McDowell

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the final results of a ROSAT PSPC program to study the soft X-ray emission properties of a complete sample of low $z$ quasars. The main results are: 1. There is no evidence for significant soft excess emission or excess foreground absorption by cold gas in 22 of the 23 quasars. 2. The mean 0.2-2 keV continuum of quasars agrees remarkably well with an extrapolation of the mean 1050-350A continuum recently determined by Zheng et al. (1996), indicating that there is no steep soft component below 0.2 keV. 3. The occurrence of warm absorbers in quasars is rather rare, in sharp contrast to lower luminosity AGN. 4. The strongest correlation found is between the spectral slope, alpha_x, and the Hb FWHM. This remarkably strong correlation may result from a dependence of alpha_x on L/L_Edd, as seen in Galactic black hole candidates. 5. There appears to exist a distinct class of ``X-ray weak'' quasars. These may be quasars where the direct X-ray source is obscured, and only scattered X-rays are observed. 6. Thin accretion disk models cannot reproduce the observed optical to soft X-ray spectral shape. An as yet unknown physical mechanism maintains a strong correlation between the optical and soft X-ray emission. 7. The well known difference in alpha_x between radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars may be due only to their different Hb FWHM. 8. The agreement of the 21 cm and X-ray columns implies that He in the diffuse H II component of the Galactic ISM is ionized to He II or He III (shortened abstract).

  20. Letter Report for Analytical Results for Two Soil Samples Associated with the Westinghouse Hematite Decommisioning Project in Hematite Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Wade

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received two soil samples on September 26, 2013 from the Westinghouse Hetnatite Decomminsioning project in Hematite, Missouri. The samples were analyzed for thorium-232, radium-226, uranium-235, and uranium-238 by gamma spectrometry and technetium-99 by liquid scintillation analysis. The samples were received in good condition. The sample collection data and identification numbers are tabulated. Also presented are the gamma spectrometry and technetium-99 data, respectively. The pertinent procedure references are included with the data tables.

  1. Tank 241-AP-106, Grab samples, 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 Analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-106 grab samples. Three grab samples 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 were taken from riser 1 of tank 241-AP-106 on May 28, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on May 28, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded. The request for sample analysis received for AP-106 indicated that the samples were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suspects. The results of this analysis indicated that no PCBs were present at the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) regulated limit of 50 ppm. The results and raw data for the PCB analysis are included in this document.

  2. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank And Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 5 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 5 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 4 samples indicate generally consistent operations. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in the Actinide Removal process (ARP).

  3. Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on October 16, 1996. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, K.B.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-B-103 (Tank B-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constituents. Two risers (Riser 2 and Riser 7) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL.

  4. Results for the Independent Sampling and Analysis of Used Oil Drums at the Impact Services Facility in Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), via the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, perform independent sampling and analysis of used oils contained within eight 55 gallon drums stored at the former IMPACT Services facility, located at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These drums were originally delivered by LATA Sharp Remediation Services (LSRS) to IMPACT Services on January 11, 2011 as part of the Bldg. K-33 demolition project, and the drums plus contents should have been processed as non-hazardous non-radiological waste by IMPACT Services. LSRS received a certificate of destruction on August 29, 2012 (LSRS 2012a). However, IMPACT Services declared bankruptcy and abandoned the site later in 2012, and eight of the original eleven K-33 drums are currently stored at the facility. The content of these drums is the subject of this investigation. The original drum contents were sampled by LSRS in 2010 and analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), using both compositing and grab sampling techniques. The objective of this 2013 sample and analysis effort was to duplicate, to the extent possible, the 2010 sampling and analysis event to support final disposition decisions. Part of that decision process includes either verifying or refuting the assertion that oils that are currently stored in drums at the IMPACT Services facility originated from Bldg. K-33 equipment.

  5. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank U-204, Results from samples collected on August 8, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-204 (Tank U-204) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the results is listed. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text.

  6. Response to the ISRP comments, Project 198909600 1. Sample sizes are based on a combination of simulation results (Kalinowski 2002)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). However, in the Little Sheep steelhead data we see almost no ambiguous triplets (one measure of power). 4 per population, per year. It quickly became clear that a great deal of power was still possible with virtual certainty, even if only half the true parents were sampled. Obtaining an accurate and precise

  7. Comparison of analytical results for chloride, sulfate and nitrate obtained from adjacent ice core samples by two ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    and sulfate but not for nitrate. 2% of the data indicate real differences in concentrations across the ice atmosphere. Ice core data are widely used to understand environmental and climate processes in the past.1 suited for the analysis of low concentrations of soluble ions in ice core samples without pretreatment.5

  8. RESULTS OF CAUSTIC DISSOLUTION OF ALUMINOSILICATE SCALE AND CHARACTERIZATION DATA FOR SAMPLES FROM THE EVAPORATOR POT AND GRAVITY DRAIN LINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilmarth, B; Rita Sullivan, R; Chris Martino, C

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The build-up of sodium aluminosilicate scale in the 2H Evaporator system continues to cause operational difficulties. The use of a nitric acid cleaning operation proved successful in 2001. However, the operation required additional facilities to support spent cleaning solution neutralization and was quite costly. A proposed caustic cleaning flowsheet has many advantages over the acid flowsheet. Therefore, samples were retrieved from the evaporator system (gravity drain line and pot) for both chemical and radiological characterization and dissolution testing. The characterization of these scale samples showed the presence of nitrated cancrinite along with a dehydrated zeolite. Small amounts of depleted uranium were also found in these samples as expected and the amount of uranium ranged from 0.5 wt% to 2 wt%. Dissolution in sodium hydroxide solutions of various caustic concentrations showed that the scale slowly dissolves at elevated temperature (90 C). Data from similar testing indicate that the scale removed from the GDL in 2005 dissolves slower than that removed in 1997. Differences in the particle size of these samples of scale may well explain the measured dissolution rate differences.

  9. Tank vapor characterization project - Tank 241-U-112 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on December 6, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sklarew, D.S.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C. [and others] [and others

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-U-112 (Tank U-112) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constitutents. Two risers (Riser 3 and Riser 6) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan.

  10. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-13-143, MCU-13-144, MCU-13-145, MCU-13-146, MCU-13-147 AND MCU-13-148: quarterly sample from January 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Peters, T. B.

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-143, MCU-13-144, MCU-13-145, MCU-13-146, MCU-13-147 and MCU-13-148 received 29 January 2012 are reported. The results show that the solvent at MCU does not require an Isopar® L addition, but it will require addition of trioctylamine. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2012.

  11. Tank 241-AN-101, grab samples, 1AN-98-1, 1AN-98-2 and 1AN-98-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AN-101 grab samples. Three grab samples 1AN-98-1, 1AN-98-2 and 1AN-98-3 were taken from riser 16 of tank 241-AN-101 on April 8, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on April 9, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program'' (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded.

  12. Tank 241-ER-311, grab samples, ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2, ER311-98-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for catch tank 241-ER-311 grab samples. Three grab samples ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2 and ER311-98-3 were taken from East riser of tank 241-ER-311 on August 4, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on August 4, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998)and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). No notification limits were exceeded.

  13. Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-BX-104 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on June 10, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.270% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.675% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  14. Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-S-102 temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on September 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S. [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from analysis of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm as specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank S-102 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 2.948% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <3.659% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Tables S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  15. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results For MCU-13-814, MCU-13-815, MCU-13-816, MCU-13,817, MCU-13-818 And MCU-13-819: Quarterly Sample From May 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Taylor-Pashow, K. M.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-814, MCU-13-815, MCU-13-816, MCU-13-817, MCU-13-818 and MCU-13-819 received May 28, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent at MCU does not require an Isopar® L addition, but it will require addition of trioctylamine despite of the 272 g of TOA that was added to the solvent on June 5, 2013 based on the solvent containing a TOA level of 45% of nominal. A new TOA analysis method (HCl titration) has been used and its output was statistically similar to the results from the SVOA-TOA method. This method provides an independent method for measuring TOA and TiDG in MCU-NG solvent. An impurity containing a tert-butyl group was detected in the solvent and further analytical analysis is needed to identify it. SRNL recommends determining the impact of this impurity on the mass transfer ability of the solvent. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is above the results observed from the January 2013.

  16. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant: Niles Station Boiler No. 2. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE-PETC) during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electrical utilities. The results of this study will be used by the US Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate whether regulation of HAPs emissions from utilities is warranted. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling/Results/Special Topics describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data. The Special Topics section of Volume 1 reports on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/particle distributions of toxic chemicals. Volume 2: Appendices include field sampling data sheets, quality assurance results, and uncertainty calculations. The chemicals measured at Niles Boiler No. 2 were the following: five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); ammonia and cyanide; elemental carbon; radionuclides; volatile organic compounds (VOC); semivolatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and polychlorinated dioxins and furans; and aldehydes.

  17. Waste Tank Vapor Program: Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-T-107. Results from samples collected on January 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D. [and others

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-T-107 (referred to as Tank T-107). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, I was observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Six organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The estimated concentration of all 7 organic analytes observed in the tank headspace are listed in Table I and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank T-107. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected in the tank-headspace samples.

  18. Final report : results of aquifer pumping and groundwater sampling at Everest, Kansas, in January-March 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 8-9, 2005, representatives of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), and Argonne National Laboratory met at the KDHE's offices in Topeka to review the status of the CCC/USDA's environmental activities in Kansas. As a result of this meeting, the KDHE recommended several additional activities to augment the CCC/USDA's investigations at Everest, Kansas, and assist in the selection of remedial approaches to be evaluated as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for this site. The requested actions included the following: (1) Construction of several additional interpretive cross sections illustrating the hydrogeologic setting along the apparent main plume migration pathway to the north-northwest of the former CCC/USDA facility, as well as in the vicinity of the Nigh property. (2) Installation of additional permanent monitoring wells, to better constrain the apparent western, northern, and northwestern margins of the existing groundwater plume. (3) Development of technical recommendations for a phased pumping study of the Everest aquifer unit in the area near and to the north of the Nigh property.

  19. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  20. Job Description of Inventory QA-QC coordinator, ASICO LLC General Job Description: Great opportunity with a established Medical instrument company. Applicant must be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    for specials. 9. Coordinate ISO 13485 and FDA/CE follow up. 10. Create purchase order for all vendors based evaluations- as per new forms(ISO) 6. Developing and evaluation of alternate vendors.(ISO) 7. Developing new and Delivery analysis.(ISO) 16. QA/QC for 2 or 3 items weekly comparing with manufacturing drawing. 17. Review

  1. The Fraunhofer Quantum Computing Portal - www.qc.fraunhofer.de - A web-based Simulator of Quantum Computing Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helge Rose'; Torsten Asselmeyer-Maluga; Matthias Kolbe; Falk Niehoerster; Andreas Schramm

    2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Fraunhofer FIRST develops a computing service and collaborative workspace providing a convenient tool for simulation and investigation of quantum algorithms. To broaden the twenty qubit limit of workstation-based simulations to the next qubit decade we provide a dedicated high memorized Linux cluster with fast Myrinet interconnection network together with a adapted parallel simulator engine. This simulation service supplemented by a collaborative workspace is usable everywhere via web interface and integrates both hardware and software as collaboration and investigation platform for the quantum community. The beta test version realizes all common one, two and three qubit gates, arbitrary one and two bit gates, orthogonal measurements as well as special gates like Oracle, Modulo function, Quantum Fourier Transformation and arbitrary Spin-Hamiltonians up to 31 qubits. For a restricted gate set it feasible to investigate circuits with up to sixty qubits. URL: http://www.qc.fraunhofer.de

  2. Letter Report for Analytical Results for Two Concrete and Three Soil Samples Associated with the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Wade

    2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute tor Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received two concrete core and three soil samples on August 26, 2013 from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts. The samples were received in good condition. The samples were analyzed tor activation and fission products by gamma spectrometry. The sample collection data and identification numbers are tabulated and the gamma spectrometry data are presented. The pertinent procedure reference is included with the data table.

  3. Results of 2001 Groundwater Sampling in Support of Conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the Vicinity of the INTEC at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meachum, Teresa Ray

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of sampling five groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in 2001. Information on general sampling practices, quality assurance practices, parameter concentrations, representativeness of sampling results, and cumulative cancer risk are presented. The information is provided to support a conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center.

  4. Results of 2001 Groundwater Sampling in Support of Conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the Vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meachum, T.R.

    2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of sampling five groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in 2001. Information on general sampling practices, quality assurance practices, parameter concentrations, representativeness of sampling results, and cumulative cancer risk are presented. The information is provided to support a conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center.

  5. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  6. Experimental and Sampling Design for the INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the experimental and sampling design developed to assess sampling approaches and methods for detecting contamination in a building and clearing the building for use after decontamination. An Idaho National Laboratory (INL) building will be contaminated with BG (Bacillus globigii, renamed Bacillus atrophaeus), a simulant for Bacillus anthracis (BA). The contamination, sampling, decontamination, and re-sampling will occur per the experimental and sampling design. This INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test is being planned by the Validated Sampling Plan Working Group (VSPWG). The primary objectives are: 1) Evaluate judgmental and probabilistic sampling for characterization as well as probabilistic and combined (judgment and probabilistic) sampling approaches for clearance, 2) Conduct these evaluations for gradient contamination (from low or moderate down to absent or undetectable) for different initial concentrations of the contaminant, 3) Explore judgment composite sampling approaches to reduce sample numbers, 4) Collect baseline data to serve as an indication of the actual levels of contamination in the tests. A combined judgmental and random (CJR) approach uses Bayesian methodology to combine judgmental and probabilistic samples to make clearance statements of the form "X% confidence that at least Y% of an area does not contain detectable contamination” (X%/Y% clearance statements). The INL-2 experimental design has five test events, which 1) vary the floor of the INL building on which the contaminant will be released, 2) provide for varying the amount of contaminant released to obtain desired concentration gradients, and 3) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. Desirable contaminant gradients would have moderate to low concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations down to zero in other rooms. Such gradients would provide a range of contamination levels to challenge the sampling, sample extraction, and analytical methods to be used in the INL-2 study. For each of the five test events, the specified floor of the INL building will be contaminated with BG using a point-release device located in the room specified in the experimental design. Then quality control (QC), reference material coupon (RMC), judgmental, and probabilistic samples will be collected according to the sampling plan for each test event. Judgmental samples will be selected based on professional judgment and prior information. Probabilistic samples were selected with a random aspect and in sufficient numbers to provide desired confidence for detecting contamination or clearing uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas. Following sample collection for a given test event, the INL building will be decontaminated. For possibly contaminated areas, the numbers of probabilistic samples were chosen to provide 95% confidence of detecting contaminated areas of specified sizes. For rooms that may be uncontaminated following a contamination event, or for whole floors after decontamination, the numbers of judgmental and probabilistic samples were chosen using the CJR approach. The numbers of samples were chosen to support making X%/Y% clearance statements with X = 95% or 99% and Y = 96% or 97%. The experimental and sampling design also provides for making X%/Y% clearance statements using only probabilistic samples. For each test event, the numbers of characterization and clearance samples were selected within limits based on operational considerations while still maintaining high confidence for detection and clearance aspects. The sampling design for all five test events contains 2085 samples, with 1142 after contamination and 943 after decontamination. These numbers include QC, RMC, judgmental, and probabilistic samples. The experimental and sampling design specified in this report provides a good statistical foundation for achieving the objectives of the INL-2 study.

  7. Tank 241U102 Grab Samples 2U-99-1 and 2U-99-2 and 2U-99-3 Analytical Results for the Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEEN, F.H.

    1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for tank 241-U-102 grab samples. Five grab samples were collected from riser 13 on May 26, 1999 and received by the 222-S laboratory on May 26 and May 27, 1999. Samples 2U-99-3 and 2U-99-4 were submitted to the Process Chemistry Laboratory for special studies. Samples 2U-99-1, 2U-99-2 and 2U-99-5 were submitted to the laboratory for analyses. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal year 1999 (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1999) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Fowler 1995, Mulkey and Miller 1998). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. None of the subsamples submitted for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), total organic carbon (TOC) and plutonium 239 (Pu239) analyses exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP.

  8. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  9. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

  10. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-11-314, MCU-11-315, MCU-11-316, MCU-11-317, MCU-11-318 AND MCU-11-319

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-11-314, MCU-11-315, MCU-11-316, MCU-11-317, MCU-11-318 and MCU-11-319 are reported. The results show that the solvent at MCU does not require an Isopar{reg_sign} L addition, but it will require addition of trioctylamine. Cesium mass transfer testing with the solvent matches expected extraction behavior but shows a slightly lower stripping efficiency than seen in the original process demonstration for Macrobatch 3. The entrained aqueous solution indicates the scrub wash is significantly out of specification. As a result, the facility replaced the scrub wash. Unlike the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require minor Isopar{reg_sign} L trimming at this time. However, addition of TOA is warranted. These findings indicate that the new protocols for solvent monitoring and control are yielding favorable results. Nevertheless, the deviation in the TOA concentration since the last analysis indicates continued periodic (i.e., quarterly) monitoring is recommended. The {sup 137}Cs mass transfer results from the solvent sample testing show possible evidence of slightly reduced stripping efficiency. An evaluation (using a model) of expected system performance for MCU using the measured distribution values predicts an {approx}50% decline in DFs given the ESS test results. The customer should consider pulling a SHT sample for reanalysis.

  11. 6 Year Graduation Model for Full-time Freshmen (Non-SEEK) Students * Students labeled `Not Enrolled' in the charts are either stop outs (may return to QC after a semester off) or drop outs or transfers in this study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    6 Year Graduation Model for Full-time Freshmen (Non-SEEK) Students * Students labeled `Not Enrolled' in the charts are either stop outs (may return to QC after a semester off) or drop outs or transfers Graduation Model for Full-time Transfer Students * Students labeled `Not Enrolled' in the charts are either

  12. Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Results of Field Sampling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, D.R.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L. [and others

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP). It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The objectives of the BSCP consist of the following: determine background concentrations of organics, metals, and radionuclides in natural soils that are key to environmental restoration projects; provide remediation projects with 100% validated data on background concentrations, which are technically and legally defensible; and quantify baseline risks from background constituents for comparison of risks associated with contaminated sites.

  13. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  14. Microsoft Word - Ventilation System Sampling Results 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimizationFor Immediate48Ventilation

  15. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing the SNOX innovative clean coal technology demonstration. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utilities. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study; Results presents the concentration data on HAPs in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data; and Special Topics report on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/solid distributions of HAPs. Volume 2: Appendices include quality assurance/quality control results, uncertainty analysis for emission factors, and data sheets. This study involved measurements of a variety of substances in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration (ICCT) of the Wet Sulfuric Acid-Selective Catalytic Reduction (SNOX) process. The SNOX demonstration is being conducted at Ohio Edison`s Niles Boiler No. 2 which uses cyclone burners to burn bituminous coal. A 35 megawatt slipstream of flue gas from the boiler is used to demonstrate SNOX. The substances measured at the SNOX process were the following: 1. Five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; 2. Acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); 3. Ammonia and cyanide; 4. Elemental carbon; 5. Radionuclides; 6. Volatile organic compounds (VOC); 7. Semi-volatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); and 8. Aldehydes.

  16. INTRODUCTION Current roadway quality control and quality acceptance (QC/QA) procedures for the Louisiana Department ofTransportation and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    , and air voids in hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements and thickness and compressive strength for Portland-place determination of pavement properties, resulting in an increase in sampling frequency to supplement coring obtained from cores and cylinders to field properties obtained from LWD and PSPA. OBJECTIVE

  17. Ćthereal Multiverse: Selected Problems of Lorentz Symmetry Violation, Quantum Cosmology, and Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukasz Andrzej Glinka

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Draft of book strictly based on the author research results presented in the arXiv papers: 0906.3827[gr-qc], 0906.3825[gr-qc], 0905.3916[hep-ph], 0902.4811[hep-ph], 0902.2829[hep-th], 0812.0551[hep-th], 0809.5216[gr-qc], 0808.1035[gr-qc], 0804.3516[gr-qc], 0803.1533[gr-qc], 0801.4157[gr-qc], 0712.2769[hep-th], 0712.1674[gr-qc], 0711.1380[gr-qc], 0707.3341[gr-qc], gr-qc/0612079.

  18. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Miller III, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling di?usive transition paths Thomas F. Miller III ?the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for thedynamics I. INTRODUCTION Transition path sampling (TPS) is a

  19. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino; Panetta, Paul D.; Pardini, Allan F.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Tucker, Brian J.; Weier, Dennis R.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Miller, James H.

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle “quality” qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.

  20. A DOE manual: DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goheen, S.C.; Fadeff, S.K.; Sklarew, D.S.; McCulloch, M.; Mong, G.M.; Riley, R.G.; Thomas, B.L.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a guidance/methods document supporting environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) (collectively referred to as EM) sampling and analysis activities at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is intended to supplement existing guidance documents (e.g., the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, SW-846), which apply to low-level or non-radioactive samples, and the complexities of waste and environmental samples encountered at DOE sites. The document contains quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC), safety, sampling, organic analysis, inorganic analysis, and radio-analytical guidance as well as sampling and analytical methods. It is updated every six months (April and October) with additional methods. As of April 1994, DOE methods contained 3 sampling and 39 analytical methods. It is anticipated that between 10 and 20 new methods will be added in October 1994. All methods are either peer reviewed and contain performance data, or are included as draft methods.

  1. Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caprio, G.S.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents sampling data resulting from the June 8, 1995, sampling of SST 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System.

  2. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2010-October 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (No.LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  3. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: May 1, 2010-October 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (#LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  4. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2012-October 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  5. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  6. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  7. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  8. ESPC IDIQ Contract Sample

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document displays a sample indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  9. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  10. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  11. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  12. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  13. COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198) This sample program suggests one way CS 181: Foundations of Computer Science II CS 180: Foundations of Computer Science I CS 191

  14. Phase 1, Background study results under the Council of Great Lake Governors program to perform stack sampling and analysis of emissions from densified refuse derived fuels (d-RDF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the first part of the study. Chapter 2 contains a summary of the d-RDF literature which was surveyed. Chapter 3 contains a compilation of existing and proposed regulation information from the seven participating Great Lakes States. Chapter 4 includes identification of pellet producers in the region. Chapter 5 contains a description of the pellet producers and test burn facilities selected for the experimental work to be undertaken in the second part of the program study. Chapter 6 contains a list of references. 27 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  16. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  17. IDENTIFICATION Your Sample Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Ag Quad Ln, Blacksburg VA 24061, in sturdy, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and soluble salts) NoCharge $16.00 Organic Matter $4.00 $6.00 Fax with soil sample and form; make check or money order payable to "Treasurer, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE

  18. Sampling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  19. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    /Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  20. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  1. Some results on optimum allocation for sampling on two occasions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizugawa, Hisako

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Optimum allocation of m and u fcr the estimation of Y when the total oost is fixed to cO + c R . n 21 2. Optimum allocation of m and u. for the estimation of Y when the total cost is fixed to cO + c n, (i. e. , u R n). The minimum variance of y ~ (1/Q... - I/H) S . . . 2$ Optimum allocation of m and u for the estimation oi' Y 2 when the variance of y is fixed to (1/Qd ? I/I) S . . . 25 4. Optimum allocation of m and u for the estimation of I 2 Y when the variance of y is fixed to (1/n - I/K) S d...

  2. DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Using these calculations, scientists estimate the overall potential excess cancer risk is at or below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acceptable risk range;...

  3. DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOEDepartment|Amchitka, Alaska, Site |

  4. News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing nanorodSizeprogram NEWSEnergy

  5. Sample Changes and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EIA-914 Survey and HPDI. Figure 2 shows how this could change apparent production. The blue line shows the reported sample production as it would normally be reported under the...

  6. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  7. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  8. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  9. TANK 5 SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  10. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  11. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  12. PreparationSampleGuide:StartQuickISX Sample Preparation Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    straining the sample through a 70 micron nylon mesh strainer. If sample aggregation is a problem, we suggest

  13. arXiv:1210.2156v2[gr-qc]4Dec2012 NON-UNIQUENESS OF SOLUTIONS TO THE CONFORMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holst, Michael J.

    ((, w), ) = 0 when = c 13 4. Some Key Technical Results 14 4.1. Existence of a Critical Value c 14 4-dimensional closed manifold (M, ^gab) with no conformal killing field are non-unique. More specifically, we source on (M, ^g) exhibit non-uniqueness in the case that the scalar curvature is positive and constant

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - actual waste sample Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for characterizing solid waste have evolved significantly since... of the area's waste stream. A total of 249 ... Source: Barlaz, Morton A. - Department of Civil, Construction,...

  15. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  16. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  17. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  18. Experimental Scattershot Boson Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bentivegna; Nicolň Spagnolo; Chiara Vitelli; Fulvio Flamini; Niko Viggianiello; Ludovico Latmiral; Paolo Mataloni; Daniel J. Brod; Ernesto F. Galvăo; Andrea Crespi; Roberta Ramponi; Roberto Osellame; Fabio Sciarrino

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Boson Sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialised quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, Scattershot Boson Sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric downconversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. Here we report the first Scattershot Boson Sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We employ recently proposed statistical tools to analyse our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy.

  19. Waste tank characterization sampling limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a result of the Plant Implementation Team Investigation into delayed reporting of the exotherm in Tank 241-T-111 waste samples. The corrective actions identified are to have immediate notification of appropriate Tank Farm Operations Shift Management if analyses with potential safety impact exceed established levels. A procedure, WHC-IP-0842 Section 12.18, ``TWRS Approved Sampling and Data Analysis by Designated Laboratories`` (WHC 1994), has been established to require all tank waste sampling (including core, auger and supernate) and tank vapor samples be performed using this document. This document establishes levels for specified analysis that require notification of the appropriate shift manager. The following categories provide numerical values for analysis that may indicate that a tank is either outside the operating specification or should be evaluated for inclusion on a Watch List. The information given is intended to translate an operating limit such as heat load, expressed in Btu/hour, to an analysis related limit, in this case cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations. By using the values provided as safety flags, the analytical laboratory personnel can notify a shift manager that a tank is in potential violation of an operating limit or that a tank should be considered for inclusion on a Watch List. The shift manager can then take appropriate interim measures until a final determination is made by engineering personnel.

  20. Environmental Science: Sample Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Environmental Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Core GE 100 & 124) MA 115 Statistics Summer Environmental Internship Junior Year CH 171 Chem for Health Sciences CH in Environmental Sciences is 17 courses. Courses taken to satisfy CAS major requirements (required, principal, core

  1. Characterization of sampling cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray Edward

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Farland, who' provided an excellent opportunity for the enhancement of my engineering career. To Dr. Best for his patient snd competent assistance in this project. To Dr. Parish who gave his service to my graduate committee. To Bob DeOtte and Carlos Ortiz... in air sampling standards, several different samplers have been developed which utilize either inertial impaction or cyclonic flow fractionation techniques. For example, a 10 pm cutpoint size selective inlet was developed by McFarland, Ortiz...

  2. Uncertainty and sampling issues in tank characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebetrau, A.M.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Kashporenko, D.M. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A defensible characterization strategy must recognize that uncertainties are inherent in any measurement or estimate of interest and must employ statistical methods for quantifying and managing those uncertainties. Estimates of risk and therefore key decisions must incorporate knowledge about uncertainty. This report focuses statistical methods that should be employed to ensure confident decision making and appropriate management of uncertainty. Sampling is a major source of uncertainty that deserves special consideration in the tank characterization strategy. The question of whether sampling will ever provide the reliable information needed to resolve safety issues is explored. The issue of sample representativeness must be resolved before sample information is reliable. Representativeness is a relative term but can be defined in terms of bias and precision. Currently, precision can be quantified and managed through an effective sampling and statistical analysis program. Quantifying bias is more difficult and is not being addressed under the current sampling strategies. Bias could be bounded by (1) employing new sampling methods that can obtain samples from other areas in the tanks, (2) putting in new risers on some worst case tanks and comparing the results from existing risers with new risers, or (3) sampling tanks through risers under which no disturbance or activity has previously occurred. With some bound on bias and estimates of precision, various sampling strategies could be determined and shown to be either cost-effective or infeasible.

  3. Air sampling in the workplace. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, E.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Strom, D.J.; Cicotte, G.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wiblin, C.M. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides technical information on air sampling that will be useful for facilities following the recommendations in the NRC`s Regulatory Guide 8.25, Revision 1, ``Air sampling in the Workplace.`` That guide addresses air sampling to meet the requirements in NRC`s regulations on radiation protection, 10 CFR Part 20. This report describes how to determine the need for air sampling based on the amount of material in process modified by the type of material, release potential, and confinement of the material. The purposes of air sampling and how the purposes affect the types of air sampling provided are discussed. The report discusses how to locate air samplers to accurately determine the concentrations of airborne radioactive materials that workers will be exposed to. The need for and the methods of performing airflow pattern studies to improve the accuracy of air sampling results are included. The report presents and gives examples of several techniques that can be used to evaluate whether the airborne concentrations of material are representative of the air inhaled by workers. Methods to adjust derived air concentrations for particle size are described. Methods to calibrate for volume of air sampled and estimate the uncertainty in the volume of air sampled are described. Statistical tests for determining minimum detectable concentrations are presented. How to perform an annual evaluation of the adequacy of the air sampling is also discussed.

  4. Post-Award Deliverables Sample (Second Part of Sample Deliverables...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    samplereptgrqmts.doc More Documents & Publications ESPC Sample Deliverables for Task Orders (IDIQ Attachment. J-4) Sample Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for...

  5. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A. (Atlanta, GA); El-Sayed, Ivan H. (Somerville, MA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  6. Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

    We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

  7. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, David R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

  8. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  9. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  10. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  11. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  12. Draft Sample Collection Instrument

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T ADRAFTJanuaryDominionDowDepartmentPublic5 5Sample

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;::Sampling at the Sherwood,

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at the

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at the4

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,SamplingTuba

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,SamplingTubaand

  20. A BASIS FOR MODIFYING THE TANK 12 COMPOSITE SAMPLING DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, G.

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The SRR sampling campaign to obtain residual solids material from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm Tank 12 primary vessel resulted in obtaining appreciable material in all 6 planned source samples from the mound strata but only in 5 of the 6 planned source samples from the floor stratum. Consequently, the design of the compositing scheme presented in the Tank 12 Sampling and Analysis Plan, Pavletich (2014a), must be revised. Analytical Development of SRNL statistically evaluated the sampling uncertainty associated with using various compositing arrays and splitting one or more samples for compositing. The variance of the simple mean of composite sample concentrations is a reasonable standard to investigate the impact of the following sampling options. Composite Sample Design Option (a). Assign only 1 source sample from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each of the composite samples. Each source sample contributes material to only 1 composite sample. Two source samples from the floor stratum would not be used. Composite Sample Design Option (b). Assign 2 source samples from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each composite sample. This infers that one source sample from the floor must be used twice, with 2 composite samples sharing material from this particular source sample. All five source samples from the floor would be used. Composite Sample Design Option (c). Assign 3 source samples from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each composite sample. This infers that several of the source samples from the floor stratum must be assigned to more than one composite sample. All 5 source samples from the floor would be used. Using fewer than 12 source samples will increase the sampling variability over that of the Basic Composite Sample Design, Pavletich (2013). Considering the impact to the variance of the simple mean of the composite sample concentrations, the recommendation is to construct each sample composite using four or five source samples. Although the variance using 5 source samples per composite sample (Composite Sample Design Option (c)) was slightly less than the variance using 4 source samples per composite sample (Composite Sample Design Option (b)), there is no practical difference between those variances. This does not consider that the measurement error variance, which is the same for all composite sample design options considered in this report, will further dilute any differences. Composite Sample Design Option (a) had the largest variance for the mean concentration in the three composite samples and should be avoided. These results are consistent with Pavletich (2014b) which utilizes a low elevation and a high elevation mound source sample and two floor source samples for each composite sample. Utilizing the four source samples per composite design, Pavletich (2014b) utilizes aliquots of Floor Sample 4 for two composite samples.

  1. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  2. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  3. EERE QC Workshop: Overview of Relevant Processes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F, Western22, 2014FluidLaboratoryDesertEERE PowerPointRelevant

  4. Sample holder with optical features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  5. Sample Environment Plans and Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sample Environment Plans and Progress at the SNS & HFIR SNS HFIR User Group Meeting American Conference on Neutron Scattering Ottawa, Canada June 26 ­ 30, 2010 Lou Santodonato Sample Environment Group our sample environment capabilities Feedback SHUG meetings User surveys Sample Environment Steering

  6. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  7. Manipulator for rotating and translating a sample holder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    van de Water, Jeroen (Breugel, NL); van den Oetelaar, Johannes (Eindhoven, NL); Wagner, Raymond (Gorinchem, NL); Slingerland, Hendrik Nicolaas (Venlo, NL); Bruggers, Jan Willem (Eindhoven, NL); Ottevanger, Adriaan Huibert Dirk (Malden, NL); Schmid, Andreas (Berkeley, CA); Olson, Eric A. (Champaign, IL); Petrov, Ivan G. (Champaign, IL); Donchev, Todor I. (Urbana, IL); Duden, Thomas (Kensington, CA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A manipulator for use in e.g. a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) is described, said manipulator capable of rotating and translating a sample holder (4). The manipulator clasps the round sample holder between two members (3A, 3B), said members mounted on actuators (2A, 2B). Moving the actuators in the same direction results in a translation of the sample holder, while moving the actuators in opposite directions results in a rotation of the sample holder.

  8. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  9. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department... immediately after collecting water sample. Refrigerate the sample and transport it to the laborato- ry (in an ice chest) as soon after collection as possible (six hours is best, but up to 30 hours). Many labs will not accept bacteria samples on Friday so check...

  10. Visual Sample Plan (VSP) - FIELDS Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsipher, Brent A.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.; Hassig, Nancy L.; Carlson, Deborah K.; Bing-Canar, John; Cooper, Brian; Roth, Chuck

    2003-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Two software packages, VSP 2.1 and FIELDS 3.5, are being used by environmental scientists to plan the number and type of samples required to meet project objectives, display those samples on maps, query a database of past sample results, produce spatial models of the data, and analyze the data in order to arrive at defensible decisions. VSP 2.0 is an interactive tool to calculate optimal sample size and optimal sample location based on user goals, risk tolerance, and variability in the environment and in lab methods. FIELDS 3.0 is a set of tools to explore the sample results in a variety of ways to make defensible decisions with quantified levels of risk and uncertainty. However, FIELDS 3.0 has a small sample design module. VSP 2.0, on the other hand, has over 20 sampling goals, allowing the user to input site-specific assumptions such as non-normality of sample results, separate variability between field and laboratory measurements, make two-sample comparisons, perform confidence interval estimation, use sequential search sampling methods, and much more. Over 1,000 copies of VSP are in use today. FIELDS is used in nine of the ten U.S. EPA regions, by state regulatory agencies, and most recently by several international countries. Both software packages have been peer-reviewed, enjoy broad usage, and have been accepted by regulatory agencies as well as site project managers as key tools to help collect data and make environmental cleanup decisions. Recently, the two software packages were integrated, allowing the user to take advantage of the many design options of VSP, and the analysis and modeling options of FIELDS. The transition between the two is simple for the user – VSP can be called from within FIELDS, automatically passing a map to VSP and automatically retrieving sample locations and design information when the user returns to FIELDS. This paper will describe the integration, give a demonstration of the integrated package, and give users download instructions and software requirements for running the integrated package.

  11. 3 - DJ : sampling as design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Sayjel Vijay

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3D Sampling is introduced as a new spatial craft that can be applied to architectural design, akin to how sampling is applied in the field of electronic music. Through the development of 3-DJ, a prototype design software, ...

  12. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department...

  13. ON ADAPTIVE SAMPLING Philippe Flajolet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flajolet, Philippe

    . We analyze the storage/accuracy trade--off of an adaptive sampling algorithm due to Wegman that makes. Wegman [11] has proposed an interesting alternative solution to that problem based on Adaptive Sampling 4. 2 Wegman's Adaptive Sampling Method The problem discussed here is the following. We are given

  14. Spectral Thompson Sampling Tomas Kocak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Spectral Thompson Sampling Tom´as Koc´ak SequeL team INRIA Lille - Nord Europe France Michal Valko Thompson Sampling (TS) has surged a lot of interest due to its good empirical performance, in particular that our algorithm is com- petitive on both synthetic and real-world data. 1 Introduction Thompson Sampling

  15. Verification of the Accuracy of Sample-Size Equation Calculations for Visual Sample Plan Version 0.9C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, James R.

    2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual Sample Plan (VSP) is a software tool being developed to facilitate the design of environmental sampling plans using a site-map visual interface, standard sample-size equations, a variety of sampling grids and random sampling plans, and graphs to visually depict the results to the user. This document provides comparisons between sample sizes calculated by VSP Version 0.9C, and sample sizes calculated by test code written in the S-Plus language. All sample sizes calculated by VSP matched the independently calculated sample sizes. Also the VSP implementation of the ELIGPRID-PC algorithm for hot spot probabilities is shown to match previous results for 100 standard test cases. The Conclusions and Limitations section of this document lists some aspects of VSP that were not tested by this suite of tests and recommends simulation-based enhancements for future versions of VSP.

  16. Identification with Stochastic Sampling Time Jitter Frida Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    Identification with Stochastic Sampling Time Jitter Frida Eng 1 , Fredrik Gustafsson. Dept of EE sampling jitter noise affects the result of system identification, and proposes a modification of known approaches to mitigate the effects of sampling jitter, when the jitter is unknown and not measurable. By just

  17. DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPF’s proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

  18. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  19. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample for defining and elaborating on the specifics of a clean energy loan program. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

  20. IWTU Process Sample Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI) requested that Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) analyze various samples collected during June – August 2012 at the Integrated Waste Treatment Facility (IWTU). Samples of IWTU process materials were collected from various locations in the process. None of these samples were radioactive. These samples were collected and analyzed to provide more understanding of the compositions of various materials in the process during the time of the process shutdown that occurred on June 16, 2012, while the IWTU was in the process of nonradioactive startup.

  1. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia. The first one-gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The second one-gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on July 12, 2011. The third sample, which came from the first large shipment of germanium from the vendor, was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 13, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of these analyses are reported here. The isotopic composition of a sample of natural germanium was also measured twice. Differences in the result between these two measurements led to a re-measurement of the second 76Ge sample.

  2. Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tao

    1 Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout The dialog's purpose is to display information about the hazardous material being sampled by the UGV so either the system or the UV specialist can identify the risk level of the hazard. The dialog is associated with the hazmat reading icons (Table 1). Components

  3. Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riera, Jesús Bisbal

    Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies Jes´us Bisbal, Jane Grimson Department of Computer there is a need to prototype the database which the applications will use when in operation. A prototype database can be built by sampling data from an existing database. Including relevant semantic information when

  4. BLOOD SAMPLING SYSTEM TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    SAFESET TM BLOOD SAMPLING SYSTEM SAFESETTM TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS TO PREVENT BLOOD BACKING UP IN LINE that all air bubbles have been eliminated when priming o Invert and tap blood sampling ports to remove air volume o Reinfuse the patient's blood slowly, no faster than 1mL per second, by pressing the plunger back

  5. Sample push-out fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biernat, John L. (Scotia, NY)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

  6. PRTR ion exchange vault column sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents ion exchange column sampling and Non Destructive Assay (NDA) results from activities in 1994, for the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. The objective was to obtain sufficient information to prepare disposal documentation for the ion exchange columns found in the PRTR Ion exchange vault. This activity also allowed for the monitoring of the liquid level in the lower vault. The sampling activity contained five separate activities: (1) Sampling an ion exchange column and analyzing the ion exchange media for purpose of waste disposal; (2) Gamma and neutron NDA testing on ion exchange columns located in the upper vault; (3) Lower vault liquid level measurement; (4) Radiological survey of the upper vault; and (5) Secure the vault pending waste disposal.

  7. Sample Desorption/Onization From Mesoporous Silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iyer, Srinivas (Los Alamos, NM); Dattelbaum, Andrew M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Supported mesoporous silica was prepared by coating an ethanolic silicate solution having a removable surfactant onto a substrate to produce a self-assembled, ordered, nanocomposite silica thin film. The surfactant was chosen to provide a desired pore size between about 1 nanometer diameter and 50 nanometers diameter. Removal of the surfactant resulted in a mesoporous silica thin film on the substrate. Samples having a molecular weight below 1000, such as C.sub.60 and tryptophan, were adsorbed onto and into the mesoporous silica thin film sample holder and analyzed using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  8. Legacy sample disposition project. Volume 2: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurley, R.N.; Shifty, K.L.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the legacy sample disposition project at the Idaho Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), which assessed Site-wide facilities/areas to locate legacy samples and owner organizations and then characterized and dispositioned these samples. This project resulted from an Idaho Department of Environmental Quality inspection of selected areas of the INEEL in January 1996, which identified some samples at the Test Reactor Area and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that had not been characterized and dispositioned according to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. The objective of the project was to manage legacy samples in accordance with all applicable environmental and safety requirements. A systems engineering approach was used throughout the project, which included collecting the legacy sample information and developing a system for amending and retrieving the information. All legacy samples were dispositioned by the end of 1997. Closure of the legacy sample issue was achieved through these actions.

  9. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) describes planned water sampling activities and provides the regulatory and technical basis for ground water sampling in 1994 at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Maybell, Colorado. The WSAP identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequencies at the site. The ground water data will be used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for the ground water and surface water monitoring activities is derived from the EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993) and the proposed EPA standards of 1987 (52 FR 36000). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. This WSAP also includes a summary and the results of water sampling activities from 1989 through 1992 (no sampling was performed in 1993).

  10. Statistical sampling method for releasing decontaminated vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lively, J.W.; Ware, J.A. [Rust Geotech, Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method (MIL-STD-105E, {open_quotes}Sampling Procedures and Tables for Inspection by Attributes{close_quotes}) for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium mill site in Monticello, Utah (a CERCLA regulated clean-up site). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello Projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site.

  11. Sample Business Plan Framework 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  12. Sample Business Plan Framework 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  13. Sample Business Plan Framework 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  14. Sample Business Plan Framework 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  15. Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDERSTATE0-1ofEnergy SampleSample of

  16. Site Environmental Report for 2012, Volumes 1 & 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauer, Ron

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L Sample Winter Creek Europium 152 S.I. QC Type EquipmentLocation* Collection Date Europium 152 (cont. ) Wildcat40 Conventional Units Analyte Europium 152 S.I. QC Type

  17. Reference Potential source Data type Sampling site Type of samples Number of samples Method of source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    samples for Saharan dust from Libya back trajectory analysis Kandler et al. 2009 PSA NAF-2 Illite NAF-4 Illite/kaolinite ratio Chlorite/kaolinite ratio Carbonate content Libya (here: central

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Duncan, A.

    2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    During the month of September 2008, grout core samples were collected from the Saltstone Disposal Facility, Vault 4, cell E. This grout was placed during processing campaigns in December 2007 from Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment Batch 2 salt solution. The 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria sample collected on 11/16/07 represents the salt solution in the core samples. Core samples were retrieved to initiate the historical database of properties of emplaced Saltstone and to demonstrate the correlation between field collected and laboratory prepared samples. Three samples were collected from three different locations. Samples were collected using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit. In April 2009, the core samples were removed from the evacuated sample container, inspected, transferred to PVC containers, and backfilled with nitrogen. Samples furthest from the wall were the most intact cylindrically shaped cored samples. The shade of the core samples darkened as the depth of coring increased. Based on the visual inspection, sample 3-3 was selected for all subsequent analysis. The density and porosity of the Vault 4 core sample, 1.90 g/cm{sup 3} and 59.90% respectively, were comparable to values achieved for laboratory prepared samples. X-ray diffraction analysis identified phases consistent with the expectations for hydrated Saltstone. Microscopic analysis revealed morphology features characteristic of cementitious materials with fly ash and calcium silicate hydrate gel. When taken together, the results of the density, porosity, x-ray diffraction analysis and microscopic analysis support the conclusion that the Vault 4, Cell E core sample is representative of the expected waste form.

  19. Sample Self-Heating in the Portable Dilution Refrigerator Figure 1. Self-heating of a model sample in a dilution refrigerator. Sample temperature is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    1 Sample Self-Heating in the Portable Dilution Refrigerator Figure 1. Self-heating of a model ~ 6 pW, self heating begins to occur. The most dramatic result of this test was that a temperature

  20. SST Sample Characterization Analysis of Archive Samples 102-C, 105-C, and 106-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, F. T.; Kaye, J. H.; Steele, R. T.; Stromatt, R. W.; Thomas, D. L.; Urie, M. W.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantial effort is planned to be initiated at the Hanford Site regarding the characterization of 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing the byproducts of reprocessing during the 1950s and 1960s. Sampling and analysis, in distinct phases, are planned to involve laboratory investigations to determine both chemical and radionuclide inventories, so that waste disposal decisions can be developed. During 1989, trial analyses were performed on four archived samples from SSTs at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory using established U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protocols and radiochemical procedures. The analysis of the archived SST waste material provides three important types of data for use in planning Phase I-A and Phase 1-B sample analysis. The types of data served as input to I) fi na 1 i zing the waste samp 1 e analysis procedures and methods and identify where procedure developmen~ may be needed, 2) evaluating the impact of normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) lubricant {used in field sampling) on extracting inorganics or radionuclides from the SST sample, and 3) identifying trends in amounts of occupational radiation exposure expected from performing the various analysis procedures. Overall, the results are qualitative in nature, and the conclusions given are to be used with appropriate respect for the limitations of small amounts of data from four samples used in development processes. The results of the Phase I-A and I-B sample analysis will provide essential data for method performance for use in finalizing Phase I-C planning and methods development scope. Section 2.0, Inorganic Analysis, encompasses sample preparation, sample analysis, identification of methods performance limitations, and possible alternatives. Performance of the inorganic analytical methods was evaluated and changes were made to some of the procedures. In some cases, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (referred to in this report as ICP) did not provide the levels of accuracy and precision usually required for EPA work due to interference by other elements. In these cases, other methods are suggested as appropriate for trial as alternatives. In all cases, duplicates, spikes, and blanks were used to establish performance of the methods for the specific waste matrix. Results focused on problems in using the methods tested on the samples, the suitability of the ICP method of determining EP Toxicity metal ions and 22 EPA pollutant metal ions, and the suitability of cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA) for mercury determinations. Problems areas identified are ICP spectral corrections, poor reproducibility from water leach and EP Toxicity methods, and adjustments needed for mercury analysis by CVAA. Section 3.0, Organics Analysis, details two screening procedures [total organic carbon (TOC) and gas chromatography (GC)], extraction procedures and related problems, surrogate spiking to test extraction efficiencies and matrix effects, and semivolatile organics via GC/mass spectroscopy (MS). The results show that the GC/MS is vulnerable to fouling and overload and that a combination of dilution and perhaps acidification are required to provide acceptable results. NPH and silicone-based lubricants from the sampling process impact the semivolatile analysis; however, with some modification the semivolatile method based on EPA SOW 288 can be used. Section 4.0, Radionuclide Analysis, evaluates procedures used to measure the radionuclides that might be found in the SST tank waste samples and establishes the level of accuracy and precision that can be expected. These data reveal that additional procedure development is needed in order to measure all of the radionuclides listed in Table 4-14 of the Waste Characterization Plan. In addition, the archive samples analyzed may not be representative of the tank population and considerable adaptation of the radiochemical procedures may be necessary to perform the desired measurements. NPH tests were conducted to determine whether the NPH from the field sampling process extracted significan

  1. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, Joel Del (Livermore, CA); Klunder, Gregory L. (Oakland, CA)

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  2. OVERVIEW OF BERYLLIUM SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisson, M

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of its unique properties as a lightweight metal with high tensile strength, beryllium is widely used in applications including cell phones, golf clubs, aerospace, and nuclear weapons. Beryllium is also encountered in industries such as aluminium manufacturing, and in environmental remediation projects. Workplace exposure to beryllium particulates is a growing concern, as exposure to minute quantities of anthropogenic forms of beryllium may lead to sensitization and to chronic beryllium disease, which can be fatal and for which no cure is currently known. Furthermore, there is no known exposure-response relationship with which to establish a 'safe' maximum level of beryllium exposure. As a result, the current trend is toward ever lower occupational exposure limits, which in turn make exposure assessment, both in terms of sampling and analysis, more challenging. The problems are exacerbated by difficulties in sample preparation for refractory forms of beryllium, such as beryllium oxide, and by indications that some beryllium forms may be more toxic than others. This chapter provides an overview of sources and uses of beryllium, health risks, and occupational exposure limits. It also provides a general overview of sampling, analysis, and data evaluation issues that will be explored in greater depth in the remaining chapters. The goal of this book is to provide a comprehensive resource to aid personnel in a wide variety of disciplines in selecting sampling and analysis methods that will facilitate informed decision-making in workplace and environmental settings.

  3. NEUTRINO OSCILLATION RESULTS FROM LSND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, G.B.

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector took data during the years 1993 through 1998. The results of a final analysis of the data are reported here. In summary, the analysis resulted in a cleaner sample of decay-at-rest oscillation candidates and provided a strong constraint on beam related backgrounds. The oscillation probability is fitted to the correlated photon parameter in the inclusive electron sample. The fit yields an excess of 83.3 {+-} 21.2 events attributable to neutrino oscillations. This corresponds to an oscillation probability of (0.25 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04)% for that detector and beam configuration.

  4. Spent nuclear fuel sampling strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, D.W.

    1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report proposes a strategy for sampling the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in the 105-K Basins (105-K East and 105-K West). This strategy will support decisions concerning the path forward SNF disposition efforts in the following areas: (1) SNF isolation activities such as repackaging/overpacking to a newly constructed staging facility; (2) conditioning processes for fuel stabilization; and (3) interim storage options. This strategy was developed without following the Data Quality Objective (DQO) methodology. It is, however, intended to augment the SNF project DQOS. The SNF sampling is derived by evaluating the current storage condition of the SNF and the factors that effected SNF corrosion/degradation.

  5. Methods and Materials Sample Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Greenwood (1958). A 1.5-inch (3.8 em) mesh liner was laced into the cod end to retain small specimens which reported that Alaska pollock \\yas the principal species taken by these Japanese fisheries. However from flatfish samples collected in 1949 were reported by Mosher (1954); the Soviet collections of 1957

  6. Sample Internship Posting Department Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Sample Internship Posting Department Name: Internship Title: Location: Description of Organization are examples from other internship postings Interns will: · Analyze potential investments · Shadow team members(s) in ________ is desirable For a list of majors see http://admissions.vanderbilt.edu/major Internship Period: The following

  7. Licensing Guide and Sample License

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP Lic:eniing Guide and Sample Lic:enie ICan.u City Plan I OFermilab OAK RIDGE Nuioul.

  8. Environmental Analysis & Policy: Sample Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Environmental Analysis & Policy: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Sustainable Development OR Spring GE 425 U.S. Environmental Policy (Senior) GE 309 Intermediate Env Analysis (Fall) EAP Elective Summer Environmental Internship Senior Year GE 420 Env Policy Analysis 4 th Semester

  9. Quantum rejection sampling Maris Ozols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerf, Nicolas

    generation prob- lem. We exhibit an algorithm, which we call quantum rejec- tion sampling, and analyze its technical innovation is an extension of the automorphism principle to continuous groups that arise or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. ITCS '12, January 08 - 10, 2012

  10. AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

  11. Wavelet Estimation For Samples With Random Uniform Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lawrence D.

    Wavelet Estimation For Samples With Random Uniform Design T. Tony Cai Department of Statistics that for nonparametric regression if the samples have random uniform design, the wavelet method with universal. Simulation result is also discussed. Keywords: wavelets, nonparametric regression, minimax, adaptivity

  12. Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, fifth round groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Kearney (A.T.), Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)] [Kearney (A.T.), Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The data from the chemical analysis of 68 samples from the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit Third Quarter 1993 Groundwater Sampling Investigation and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at the site. Sample analysis included inorganics and general chemical parameters. Fifty three samples were validated for radiochemical parameters.

  13. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M. R.; Word, J. Q.; Barrows, E. S.; Mayhew, H. L.; Clark, D. R. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  14. Analysis Of The Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

  15. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 6F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.; Shine, G.

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

  16. Analysis of the Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm- 243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

  17. Calculating Confidence, Uncertainty, and Numbers of Samples When Using Statistical Sampling Approaches to Characterize and Clear Contaminated Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Matzke, Brett D.; Sego, Landon H.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the methodology, formulas, and inputs needed to make characterization and clearance decisions for Bacillus anthracis-contaminated and uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas using a statistical sampling approach. Specifically, the report includes the methods and formulas for calculating the • number of samples required to achieve a specified confidence in characterization and clearance decisions • confidence in making characterization and clearance decisions for a specified number of samples for two common statistically based environmental sampling approaches. In particular, the report addresses an issue raised by the Government Accountability Office by providing methods and formulas to calculate the confidence that a decision area is uncontaminated (or successfully decontaminated) if all samples collected according to a statistical sampling approach have negative results. Key to addressing this topic is the probability that an individual sample result is a false negative, which is commonly referred to as the false negative rate (FNR). The two statistical sampling approaches currently discussed in this report are 1) hotspot sampling to detect small isolated contaminated locations during the characterization phase, and 2) combined judgment and random (CJR) sampling during the clearance phase. Typically if contamination is widely distributed in a decision area, it will be detectable via judgment sampling during the characterization phrase. Hotspot sampling is appropriate for characterization situations where contamination is not widely distributed and may not be detected by judgment sampling. CJR sampling is appropriate during the clearance phase when it is desired to augment judgment samples with statistical (random) samples. The hotspot and CJR statistical sampling approaches are discussed in the report for four situations: 1. qualitative data (detect and non-detect) when the FNR = 0 or when using statistical sampling methods that account for FNR > 0 2. qualitative data when the FNR > 0 but statistical sampling methods are used that assume the FNR = 0 3. quantitative data (e.g., contaminant concentrations expressed as CFU/cm2) when the FNR = 0 or when using statistical sampling methods that account for FNR > 0 4. quantitative data when the FNR > 0 but statistical sampling methods are used that assume the FNR = 0. For Situation 2, the hotspot sampling approach provides for stating with Z% confidence that a hotspot of specified shape and size with detectable contamination will be found. Also for Situation 2, the CJR approach provides for stating with X% confidence that at least Y% of the decision area does not contain detectable contamination. Forms of these statements for the other three situations are discussed in Section 2.2. Statistical methods that account for FNR > 0 currently only exist for the hotspot sampling approach with qualitative data (or quantitative data converted to qualitative data). This report documents the current status of methods and formulas for the hotspot and CJR sampling approaches. Limitations of these methods are identified. Extensions of the methods that are applicable when FNR = 0 to account for FNR > 0, or to address other limitations, will be documented in future revisions of this report if future funding supports the development of such extensions. For quantitative data, this report also presents statistical methods and formulas for 1. quantifying the uncertainty in measured sample results 2. estimating the true surface concentration corresponding to a surface sample 3. quantifying the uncertainty of the estimate of the true surface concentration. All of the methods and formulas discussed in the report were applied to example situations to illustrate application of the methods and interpretation of the results.

  18. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L E

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. Samples for radiological analyses include Air-Particulate Filter, gases and vapor; Water/Columbia River, Onsite Pond, Spring, Irrigation, and Drinking; Foodstuffs/Animal Products including Whole Milk, Poultry and Eggs, and Beef; Foodstuffs/Produce including Leafy Vegetables, Vegetables, and Fruit; Foodstuffs/Farm Products including Wine, Wheat and Alfalfa; Wildlife; Soil; Vegetation; and Sediment. Direct Radiation Measurements include Terrestrial Locations, Columbia River Shoreline Locations, and Onsite Roadway, Railway and Aerial, Radiation Surveys.

  19. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  20. Offline solid phase microextraction sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harvey, Chris A. (French Camp, CA)

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An offline solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling apparatus for enabling SPME samples to be taken a number of times from a previously collected fluid sample (e.g. sample atmosphere) stored in a fused silica lined bottle which keeps volatile organics in the fluid sample stable for weeks at a time. The offline SPME sampling apparatus has a hollow body surrounding a sampling chamber, with multiple ports through which a portion of a previously collected fluid sample may be (a) released into the sampling chamber, (b) SPME sampled to collect analytes for subsequent GC analysis, and (c) flushed/purged using a fluidically connected vacuum source and purging fluid source to prepare the sampling chamber for additional SPME samplings of the same original fluid sample, such as may have been collected in situ from a headspace.

  1. Comparison of vapor sampling system (VSS) and in situ vapor sampling (ISVS) methods on Tanks C-107, BY-108, and S-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the equivalency of two methods used to sample nonradioactive gases and vapors in the Hanford Site high-level waste tank headspaces. In addition to the comparison of the two sampling methods, the effects of an in-line fine particle filter on sampling results are also examined to determine whether results are adversely affected by its presence. This report discusses data from a January 1996 sampling.

  2. Hoe Creek 1990 quarterly sampling cumulative report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crader, S.E.; Huntington, G.S.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for benzene and for total phenols three times during 1990. This report summarizes the results of these sampling events and compares the results with those obtained in previous years. Possible further options for remediation of the Hoe Creek site was addressed. Three underground coal gasification (UCG) burns were performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy in 1976, 1977, and 1979 at the Hoe Creek site, which is about 20 miles south of Gillette, Wyoming. As a result of these burns, there has been considerable contamination of groundwater by various organic compounds. There have been three efforts at remediating this situation. In 1986 and again in 1987, contaminated water was pumped out, treated, and reinjected. In 1989, the water was pumped, treated, and sprayed into the atmosphere. Benzene and total phenols have been monitored at various monitoring wells as the site during 1990. The highest detected benzene concentration in 1990 was 220 {mu}g/L, and the highest total phenols concentration was 430 {mu}g/L. It is apparent that contamination is still above baseline levels, although the concentration of total phenols is far less than immediately after the burns. The burned coal seams are still releasing organic compounds into the groundwater that passes through them.

  3. Small Waste Tank Sampling and Retrieval System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magleby, Mary Theresa

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), four 1500-gal catch tanks were found to contain RCRAhazardous waste. A system was needed to obtain a representative sample of the liquid, as well as the hardpacked heels, and to ultimately homogenize and remove the tank contents for disposal. After surveying the available technologies, the AEA Fluidic Pulse Mixing and Retrieval System was chosen for a technology demonstration. A demonstration, conducted with nonhazardous surrogate material, proved that the system was capable of loosening the hard-packed heel, homogenizing the entire tank contents, and collecting a representative sample. Based on the success of the demonstration, a detailed evaluation was done to determine the applicability of the system to other tanks. The evaluation included the sorting of data on more than 700 tanks to select candidates for further deployment of the system. A detailed study was also done to determine if the purchase of a second system would be cost effective. The results of the evaluation indicated that a total of thirteen tanks at the INEEL are amenable to sampling and/or remediation using the AEA Fluidic Pulse Mixing and Retrieval System. Although the currently-owned system appears sufficient for the needs of one INEEL program, it is insufficient to meet the combined needs at the INEEL. The INEEL will commence operation of the system on the TRA-730 Catch Tank System in June 2002.

  4. Nebular mixing constrained by the Stardust samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OGLIORE, R. C.; WESTPHAL, A. J.; GAINSFORTH, Z.; BUTTERWORTH, A. L.; FAKRA, S. C.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using X-ray microprobe analysis of samples from comet Wild 2 returned by the Stardust mission, we determine that the crystalline Fe-bearing silicate fraction in this Jupiter-family comet is greater than 0.5. Assuming this mixture is a composite of crystalline inner solar system material and amorphous cold molecular cloud material, we deduce that more than half of Wild 2 has been processed in the inner solar system. Several models exist that explain the presence of crystalline materials in comets. We explore some of these models in light of our results.

  5. Microsoft Word - JWS Sample.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 SAMPLE ONLY REV2021005 SAMPLE ONLY Joint Work Statement For CRADA No. Sample BETWEEN U. S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing...

  6. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kezunovic, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Perunicic, B. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  7. Tank farm backlog soil sample analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlers, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the measures to collect samples, perform testing on samples, and make decisions to obtain a Contained- in Determination for tank farms backlog soil.

  8. Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Radioactive Samples Materials at the APS The use of radioactive samples requires additional information for review and approval. All proposed experiments involving...

  9. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Chemical & Sample Prep

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical & Sample Preparation For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Chemical and Sample Preparation Laboratory responsible: Charles Kelsey | ckelsey@lanl.gov |...

  10. Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 JumpGas Sampling Jump to:

  11. Sample Licensing Agreements | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton6 th US/German Workshop onSample

  12. Sample Retention Incentive Service Agreement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDERSTATE0-1ofEnergy Sample Employee:

  13. Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSoda Springs, Idaho:Soil Sampling Jump

  14. Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open Energy Information 2000)2004) |1978) |Groundwater Sampling

  15. EFFECT OF TRANSPORTING SALTSTONE SAMPLES PRIOR TO SET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Sampling and Analyses Plan provides a basis for the quantity (and configuration) of saltstone grout samples required for conducting a study directed towards correlation of the Performance Assessment (PA) related properties of field-emplaced samples and samples processed and cured in the laboratory. The testing described in the saltstone sampling and analyses plan will be addressed in phases. The initial testing (Phase I) includes collecting samples from the process room in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and transporting them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they will cure under a temperature profile that mimics the temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) and then be analyzed. SRNL has previously recommended that after the samples of fresh (uncured) saltstone are obtained from the SPF process room, they are allowed to set prior to transporting them to SRNL for curing. The concern was that if the samples are transported before they are set, the vibrations during transport may cause artificial delay of structure development which could result in preferential settling or segregation of the saltstone slurry. However, the results of this testing showed there was no clear distinction between the densities of the cylinder sections for any of the transportation scenarios tested (1 day, 1 hour, and 0 minutes set time prefer to transportation) . The bottom section of each cylinder was the densest for each transportation scenario, which indicates some settling in all the samples. Triplicate hydraulic conductivity measurements on samples from each set of time and transportation scenarios indicated that those samples transported immediately after pouring had the highest hydraulic conductivity. Conversely, samples that were allowed to sit for an hour before being transported had the lowest hydraulic conductivity. However, the hydraulic conductivities of all three samples fell within an acceptable range. Based on the cured property analysis of the three samples, there is no clear conclusion about transporting the samples before they are set; however, experience with saltstone grout indicates the samples should sit and develop some structure before being transported to SRNL for curing.

  16. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Scottsdale, AZ); Wolf, Abraham (Sun City West, AZ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample prior to introduction of a molding medium in the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  17. Sampled simulation for multithreaded processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Biesbrouck, Michael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Starting O? set E?ects in SMT Simulation 2. Evaluatingdual hardware context SMT Processor. . . . . . . . . . . . .results of co-phase matrix simulation. SMT processor con?

  18. INCOHERENCE AND THE PARAMETRIC TEST FRAMEWORK: MISCONCEIVED RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SAMPLE, SAMPLING DISTRIBUTION, AND POPULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Alex

    INCOHERENCE AND THE PARAMETRIC TEST FRAMEWORK: MISCONCEIVED RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SAMPLE, SAMPLING Keywords: Parametric test, sample, population, sampling distributions Parametric tests are frequently parametric tests, nor hold beliefs that are consistent with that framework. The parametric test framework

  19. "Dedicated to Maximizing Planetary Sample Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    that evaluated sample mass with regards to previous Apollo Program surface activity, scientific productivity and environmentally sensitive samples. (2) This geological sample mass exceeds that of the Apollo 17 mission by only that of the Apollo Program to demonstrate we have progressed beyond Apollo. (3) Using the Apollo sample containers

  20. Concepts for Environmental Radioactive Air Sampling and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental radioactive air sampling and monitoring is becoming increasingly important as regulatory agencies promulgate requirements for the measurement and quantification of radioactive contaminants. While researchers add to the growing body of knowledge in this area, events such as earthquakes and tsunamis demonstrate how nuclear systems can be compromised. The result is the need for adequate environmental monitoring to assure the public of their safety and to assist emergency workers in their response. Two forms of radioactive air monitoring include direct effluent measurements and environmental surveillance. This chapter presents basic concepts for direct effluent sampling and environmental surveillance of radioactive air emissions, including information on establishing the basis for sampling and/or monitoring, criteria for sampling media and sample analysis, reporting and compliance, and continual improvement.

  1. Integrated fiducial sample mount and software for correlated microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R McJunkin; Jill R. Scott; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Karen E. Wright

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel design sample mount with integrated fiducials and software for assisting operators in easily and efficiently locating points of interest established in previous analytical sessions is described. The sample holder and software were evaluated with experiments to demonstrate the utility and ease of finding the same points of interest in two different microscopy instruments. Also, numerical analysis of expected errors in determining the same position with errors unbiased by a human operator was performed. Based on the results, issues related to acquiring reproducibility and best practices for using the sample mount and software were identified. Overall, the sample mount methodology allows data to be efficiently and easily collected on different instruments for the same sample location.

  2. Bayesian approaches for adaptive spatial sampling : an example application.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R. L.; LePoire, D.; Huttenga, A.; Quinn, J.

    2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    BAASS (Bayesian Approaches for Adaptive Spatial Sampling) is a set of computational routines developed to support the design and deployment of spatial sampling programs for delineating contamination footprints, such as those that might result from the accidental or intentional environmental release of radionuclides. BAASS presumes the existence of real-time measurement technologies that provide information quickly enough to affect the progress of data collection. This technical memorandum describes the application of BAASS to a simple example, compares the performance of a BAASS-based program with that of a traditional gridded program, and explores the significance of several of the underlying assumptions required by BAASS. These assumptions include the range of spatial autocorrelation present, the value of prior information, the confidence level required for decision making, and ''inside-out'' versus ''outside-in'' sampling strategies. In the context of the example, adaptive sampling combined with prior information significantly reduced the number of samples required to delineate the contamination footprint.

  3. Visual Sample Plan Version 1.0 User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, James R.; Hassig, Nancy L.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.

    2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This user's guide describes Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Version 1.0 and provides instructions for using the software. VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to environmental decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 1.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (95, 98, Millenium Edition, 2000, and Windows NT). Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to any two-dimensional geographical population to be sampled (e.g., surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, building surfaces, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality.

  4. Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  5. Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engh, G. van den

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

  6. Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  7. Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, G.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

  8. The Analytical Labortory sample tracking and reporting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colvin, W.J.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulatory and project requirements stipulate that samples submitted for chemical/physical analysis be owed throughout the analytical process. The Analytical Laboratory (AL) began tracking sample request information electronically using a simple dBASE{trademark} database in 1992. In mid 1993, AL chemists formed a committee to determine the software requirements for a formal sample tracking system. The requirements were outlined for a multi-user FoxPro{trademark} application which tracked sample logins, login templates, worksheets, and sample results and also provided standardized reporting capabilities. The Analytical Laboratory Sample Tracking and Reporting System became available to AL chemists and management in February, 1994. Chemists now had quick, easy access to organized and readable sample data. Up to date, on-line access to sample status information also benefitted AL management. The ability to closely monitor samples decreased sample process time. AL customers also benefitted by receiving standardized Final reports for their samples. Eventually, system performance began to deteriorate as the database grew and network traffic increased. To improve performance, ANL-W Information Services recommended upgrading the system. Upgrading to a fully relational, client/server Oracle{trademark} database accessed from a front-end application developed using Visual Basio{trademark}, one of the many Graphical User Interface (GUI) design tools available today, would improve performance times by greater than 50%. The move to Oracle would improve throughput times of transactions and employ a more efficient use of resources. Visual Basic front-and application development began in May, 1995. In October 1995, the first prototype of the Visual Basic application was made available for testing. AL users were pleased with the added ease-of-use the GUI interface provided. The production version is scheduled for release mid May, 1996.

  9. Conductance and absolutely continuous spectrum of 1D samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Bruneau; Vojkan Jakši?; Yoram Last; Claude-Alain Pillet

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize the absolutely continuous spectrum of the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger operators $h=-\\Delta+v$ acting on $\\ell^2(\\mathbb{Z}_+)$ in terms of the limiting behavior of the Landauer-B\\"uttiker and Thouless conductances of the associated finite samples. The finite sample is defined by restricting $h$ to a finite interval $[1,L]\\cap\\mathbb{Z}_+$ and the conductance refers to the charge current across the sample in the open quantum system obtained by attaching independent electronic reservoirs to the sample ends. Our main result is that the conductances associated to an energy interval $I$ are non-vanishing in the limit $L\\to\\infty$ iff ${\\rm sp}_{\\rm ac}(h)\\cap I=\\emptyset$. We also discuss the relationship between this result and the Schr\\"odinger Conjecture.

  10. SEARCH FOR MAGNETIC MONOPOLES IN THE LUNAR SAMPLES OF APOLLO 11.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Luis W.; Eberhard, Philippe H.; Ross, Ronald R.; Watt, Robert D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE LUNAR SAMPLES O F APOLLO 11* Luis W. Alvarez, Philipper i a l returned by the Apollo 11 crew. monopole was found.in the lunar sample of Apollo 11 resulted i n the finding

  11. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMPOSITION AND TOXICITY OF ENGINE EMISSION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    (1)Mauderly, J; Seagrave, J; McDonald; J (2)Eide,I (3)Zielinska, B (4)Lawson, D

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in the lung toxicity and bacterial mutagenicity of seven samples from gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions were reported previously [1]. Filter and vapor-phase semivolatile organic samples were collected from normal and high-emitter gasoline and diesel vehicles operated on chassis dynamometers on the Unified Driving Cycle, and the compositions of the samples were measured in detail. The two fractions of each sample were combined in their original mass collection ratios, and the toxicity of the seven samples was compared by measuring inflammation and tissue damage in rat lungs and mutagenicity in bacteria. There was good agreement among the toxicity response variables in ranking the samples and demonstrating a five-fold range of toxicity. The relationship between chemical composition and toxicity was analyzed by a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLS, also known as projection to latent surfaces). The PCA /PLS analysis revealed the chemical constituents co-varying most strongly with toxicity and produced models predicting the relative toxicity of the samples with good accuracy. The results demonstrated the utility of the PCA/PLS approach, which is now being applied to additional samples, and it also provided a starting point for confirming the compounds that actually cause the effects.

  12. Stringent and efficient assessment of Boson-Sampling devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malte C. Tichy; Klaus Mayer; Andreas Buchleitner; Klaus Mřlmer

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Boson-Sampling holds the potential to experimentally falsify the Extended Church Turing thesis. The computational hardness of Boson-Sampling, however, complicates the certification that an experimental device yields correct results in the regime in which it outmatches classical computers. To certify a boson-sampler, one needs to verify quantum predictions and rule out models that yield these predictions without true many-boson interference. We show that a semiclassical model for many-boson propagation reproduces coarse-grained observables that were proposed as witnesses of Boson-Sampling. A test based on Fourier matrices is demonstrated to falsify physically plausible alternatives to coherent many-boson propagation.

  13. 2008 B20 Survey Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes results of a sample survey of the quality of B20, a biodiesel blend, collected from U.S. public pumps and fleets as part of a joint effort by NREL, the NBB, and engine manufacturers.

  14. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations using muon neutrinos from antimuon decay at rest. The electron antineutrinos are detected via the reaction electron antineutrino + proton {r_arrow} positron + neutron, correlated with the 2.2-MeV gamma from neutron + proton {r_arrow} deuteron + gamma. The use of tight cuts to identify positron events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with positron energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup -8}. A chi-squared fit to the entire positron sample results in a total excess of 51.8 {sup +18.7}{sub -16.9} {+-} 8.0 events with positron energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of (0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05){percent}. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; LSND Collaboration

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations using {anti v}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest. The {anti v}{sub e} are detected via the reaction {anti v}{sub e} p {yields} e{sup +}n, correlated with the 2.2 MeV {gamma} from n p {yields} d {gamma}. The use of tight cuts to identify e{sup +} events with correlated {gamma} rays yielded 22 events with e{sup +} energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}. A {chi}{sup 2} fit to the entire e{sup +} sample results in a total excess of 51.8{sub {minus}16.9}{sup +18.7} {+-} 8.0 events with e{sup +} energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of 0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05%.

  16. REPORT ON ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING FOR TANK 241-AN-106 USING 2009 SAMPLING CAMPAIGN GRAB SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WYRWAS RB

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an ENRAF waste surface measurement taken February 1, 2009, double-shell tank (DST) 24l-AN-l06 (AN-106) contained approximately 278.98 inches (793 kgal) of waste. A zip cord measurement from the tank on February 1, 2009, indicated a settled solids layer of 9l.7 inches in height (280 kgal). The supernatant layer in February 2009, by difference, was approximately 187 inches deep (514 kgal). Laboratory results from AN-l06 February 1, 2009 (see Table 2) grab samples indicated the supernatant was below the chemistry limit that applied at the time as identified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, 'Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements', Administrative Control (AC) 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation Controls.' The limits have since been removed from the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) and are captured in OSD-T-15l-00007, 'Operating Specifications for the Double-Shell Storage Tanks.' Problem evaluation request WRPS-PER-2009-0218 was submitted February 9,2009, to document the finding that the supernatant chemistry for grab samples taken from the middle and upper regions of the supernatant was noncompliant with the chemistry control limits. The lab results for the samples taken from the bottom region of the supernatant met AC 5.16 limits.

  17. Microscopic Lensing by a Dense, Cold Atomic Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stetson Roof; Kasie Kemp; Mark Havey; I. M. Sokolov; D. V. Kupriyanov

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that a cold, dense sample of 87Rb atoms can exhibit a micron-scale lensing effect, much like that associated with a macroscopically-sized lens. The experiment is carried out in the fashion of traditional z-scan measurements but in much weaker fields and where close attention is paid to the detuning dependence of the transmitted light. The results are interpreted using numerical simulations and by modeling the sample as a thin lens with a spherical focal length.

  18. Double Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem Definition Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RASMUSSEN, J.H.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report defines the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem (PWSS). This subsystem definition report fully describes and identifies the system boundaries of the PWSS. This definition provides a basis for developing functional, performance, and test requirements (i.e., subsystem specification), as necessary, for the PWSS. The resultant PWSS specification will include the sampling requirements to support the transfer of waste from the DSTs to the Privatization Contractor during Phase 1 of Waste Feed Delivery.

  19. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, Daniel M. C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium.

  20. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

  1. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  2. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  3. Sample storage/disposal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela, B.D.

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste from defense operations has accumulated at the Hanford Site`s underground waste tanks since the late 1940`s. Each tank must be analyzed to determine whether it presents any harm to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public or the environment. Analyses of the waste aids in the decision making process in preparation of future tank waste stabilization procedures. Characterization of the 177 waste tanks on the Hanford Site will produce a large amount of archived material. This also brings up concerns as to how the excess waste tank sample material from 325 and 222-S Analytical Laboratories will be handled. Methods to archive and/or dispose of the waste have been implemented into the 222-S and 325 Laboratory procedures. As the amount of waste characterized from laboratory analysis grows, an examination of whether the waste disposal system will be able to compensate for this increase in the amount of waste needs to be examined. Therefore, the need to find the safest, most economically sound method of waste storage/disposal is important.

  4. A perspective on the status of coal research from shipments of samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorres, K.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kruse, C.W. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Nater, K.A. [deGrote Vos, Zeeweg 37, 1753 BB St. Martenzee, NL (Netherlands); Glick, D.C.; Davis, A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Coal and Organic Petrology Labs.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on all aspects of coal research, at least for more small scale work, involves the use of samples at the beginning of experimental work. Most research workers for smaller scale work do not collect their own coal samples, but rather order them from a group of sample suppliers. The number of suppliers meeting the major needs in the US, as well as for the world, is not very large. An examination of the shipments of samples from each of these suppliers will give an interesting insight into the general trends in volume of work in the field. The suppliers involved in this study include the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program, the Illinois Basin Coal Sample Program, the SBN and the several groups of samples from the Pennsylvania State University Coal Sample Bank. Each of these supplies a different number of samples in varying quantities. The quantities and variety of samples is important to the individual worker in selecting a supplier. The type of work to be done frequently affects the quantities and choice of sample, which in turn affects the choice of supplier. In general these data indicate that researchers realize the advantages of acquiring samples from centralized sample banks. These advantages include a lower cost than would be incurred from individual sampling and preparation; availability of analyzed samples; preservation of samples and the possibility of comparing results with others who have worked on the same samples.

  5. High throughput liquid absorption preconcentrator sampling instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Bozen, Ralph M. (Hattiesburg, MS)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container comprising a wettable material. The wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid which flows from one part of the container to a lower end. Sampled air flows through the container in contact with the wetted material with a swirling motion which results in efficient transfer of analyte vapors or aerosol particles to the sorbing liquid and preconcentration of traces of analyte in the liquid. The preconcentrated traces of analyte may be either detected within the container or removed therefrom for injection into a separate detection means or for subsequent analysis.

  6. High throughput liquid absorption preconcentrator sampling instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.; Bozen, R.M.

    1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container comprising a wettable material. The wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid which flows from one part of the container to a lower end. Sampled air flows through the container in contact with the wetted material with a swirling motion which results in efficient transfer of analyte vapors or aerosol particles to the sorbing liquid and preconcentration of traces of analyte in the liquid. The preconcentrated traces of analyte may be either detected within the container or removed therefrom for injection into a separate detection means or for subsequent analysis. 12 figs.

  7. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1990--1993 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.; Kada, J.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1990--1993, with the exception of April 1993, indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the sampling and analytical techniques that were used to collect and measure them. The occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. Following the April 6, 1993 accident and release of radionuclides into the atmosphere at a reprocessing plant in the Tomsk-7 military nuclear complex located 16 km north of the Siberian city of Tomsk, Russia, weekly air filter samples from Barrow, Alaska; Thule, Greenland and Moosonee, Canada were selected for special analyses. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that the authors measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. Variations in the annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites appear to result primarily from changes in the atmospheric production rate of this cosmogenic radionuclide. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. The monthly gross gamma-ray activity and the monthly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb measured at sampling sites in SASP during 1990--1993 are presented. The weekly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb for samples collected during 1990--1993 are given for 17 sites.

  8. Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

  9. Analysis of HEU samples from the ULBA Metallurgical Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gift, E.H.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early March 1994, eight highly enriched uranium (HEU) samples were collected from materials stored at the Ulba Metallurgical Plant in Oskamen (Ust Kamenogorsk), Kazakhstan. While at the plant site, portions of four samples were dissolved and analyzed by mass spectrograph at the Ulba analytical laboratory by Ulba analysts. Three of these mass spectrograph solutions and the eight HEU samples were subsequently delivered to the Y-12 Plant for complete chemical and isotopic analyses. Chemical forms of the eight samples were uranium metal chips, U0{sub 2} powder, uranium/beryllium oxide powder, and uranium/beryllium alloy rods. All were declared by the Ulba plant to have a uranium assay of {approximately}90 wt % {sup 235}U. The uranium/beryllium powder and alloy samples were also declared to range from about 8 to 28 wt % uranium. The chemical and uranium isotopic analyses done at the Y-12 Plant confirm the Ulba plant declarations. All samples appear to have been enriched using some reprocessed uranium, probably from recovery of uranium from plutonium production reactors. As a result, all samples contain some {sup 236}U and {sup 232}U and have small but measurable quantities of plutonium. This plutonium could be the result of either contamination carried over from the enrichment process or cross-contamination from weapons material. It is not the result of direct reactor exposure. Neither the {sup 232}U nor the plutonium concentrations are sufficiently high to provide a significant industrial health hazard. Both are well within established or proposed acceptance criteria for storage at Y-12. The trace metal analyses showed that, with the exception of beryllium, there are no trace metals in any of these HEU samples that pose a significant health hazard.

  10. Bayesian Statistics Stochastic Simulation -Gibbs sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Francis

    Bayesian Statistics Stochastic Simulation - Gibbs sampling Bayesian Statistics - an Introduction Dr Pettit Bayesian Statistics - an Introduction #12;Bayesian Statistics Stochastic Simulation - Gibbs sampling What is Bayesian Statistics? Bayes Theorem The Likelihood Principle Mixtures of conjugate priors

  11. Curve sampling and geometric conditional simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Ayres C. (Ayres Chee), 1978-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this thesis is the development and exploitation of techniques to generate geometric samples for the purpose of image segmentation. A sampling-based approach provides a number of benefits over existing ...

  12. An introduction to boson-sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan T. Gard; Keith R. Motes; Jonathan P. Olson; Peter P. Rohde; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Boson-sampling is a simplified model for quantum computing that may hold the key to implementing the first ever post-classical quantum computer. Boson-sampling is a non-universal quantum computer that is significantly more straightforward to build than any universal quantum computer proposed so far. We begin this chapter by motivating boson-sampling and discussing the history of linear optics quantum computing. We then summarize the boson-sampling formalism, discuss what a sampling problem is, explain why boson-sampling is easier than linear optics quantum computing, and discuss the Extended Church-Turing thesis. Next, sampling with other classes of quantum optical states is analyzed. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of building a boson-sampling device using existing technology.

  13. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  14. Flow Cytometry Instrument Policy & Penalties Sample Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    the integrity of the instrument, all samples must be filtered with a 40 µm mesh cell strainer just before

  15. Visual Sample Plan Version 3.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-14970 Visual Sample Plan Version 3.0 User's Guide N. L. Hassig R. O. Gilbert J. E. Wilson B. A-14970 Visual Sample Plan Version 3.0 User's Guide N. L. Hassig R. O. Gilbert J. E. Wilson B. A Sample Plan (VSP) Version 3.0 and provides instructions for using the software. VSP selects

  16. Characterization Of Sample HTF-13-13-128

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) characterize a sample of Tank 13 in preparation for Sludge Batch 9 (SB9). A 200 mL sample of Tank 13 was received by SRNL on July 22, 2013 (Tank Farm sample ID HTF-13-13-128). Characterization of the sample to meet the requirements of the request is complete. Results include: visual observations; slurry and supernatant density; weight percent total and insoluble solids; supernatant characterization; total alpha, total beta, and several radionuclide analyses; and elemental analyses of the dried solids. The sample was very fluid. After settling overnight, there was a small layer of solids on the bottom of the sample container (a 250 mL HDPE bottle) with the remainder being clear supernatant. To better show the sludge solids relative to the overall sample, 25 mL of slurry was placed in a graduated cylinder and allowed to settle over a weekend (approximately 90 hours). The sludge layer was at the approximately 4 mL. The small visually observed quantity of insoluble solids was confirmed with a low weight percent insoluble solids of 0.94%.

  17. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  18. Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

  19. Analysis of SPDEs Arising in Path Sampling Part II: The Nonlinear Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hairer, Martin

    for the development of practical algorithms for sam- pling infinite dimensional problems. The resulting SPDEs provide sampling in the nonlinear case, via a change of measure. Keywords: Path sampling, stochastic PDEs introduced Stochastic Partial Differential Equation (SPDE) based approach to infinite dimensional sampling

  20. RF and Surface Properties of Bulk Niobium and Niobium Film Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junginger, Tobias; Weingarten, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At CERN a compact Quadrupole Resonator has been developed for the RF characterization of superconducting samples at different frequencies. In this contribution measurements on bulk niobium and niobium ?lm on copper samples are presented. Surface resistance results are being correlated to surface analyses measurements carried out on the same samples.

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    of Singapore Collection: Engineering 88 Software development for multi-material 3D Printing Advisor: Prof. Hod Lipson hod.lipson@cornell.edu Summary: .lipson@cornell.edu Goal:...

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    Rutgers University Collection: Chemistry ; Biotechnology 4 The mechanism(s) of protein folding What is meant by mechanism Summary: marker, both for the backbone and the side...

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    - INRIA Paris-Rocquencourt Collection: Mathematics ; Biology and Medicine 27 Protein Folding Activity of Ribosomal RNA Is a Selective Target of Two Unrelated Antiprion Drugs...

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    Universitt Leipzig Collection: Physics 6 Identification of characteristic protein folding channels in a coarse-grained hydrophobic-polar peptide model Summary: chains of...

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    Biology and Medicine 3 Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding Summary: kinetics using FRET with acyl-CoA binding protein. In protein folding,...

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    and Medicine 7 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Nature and nurture in protein folding and binding Summary: in understanding the regulation of protein stability and...

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    Ltd. Summary: Publishers Ltd. Computer Simulations of Alzheimer's Amyloid -Protein Folding and Assembly Brigita Urbanc1... Angeles, CA 90095, USA Abstract: Pathological...

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    Dartmouth College Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 22 Simulations of Protein Folding Michael Cahill,a Summary: is a linear chain of amino acids. The proteins of...

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    of Biology, Indiana University Collection: Biology and Medicine 11 Detection of Protein Folding Defects Caused by BRCA1-BRCT Truncation and Missense Mutations*S Summary:...

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    Medicine 4 International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 Near-Native Protein Folding Summary: folded proteins generally have polar amino acids on the outside of their...

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    provide... : amyloid; b2-microglobulin; copper; dialysis-related amyloidosis; protein folding*Corresponding author Source: Miranker, Andrew - Department of Molecular...

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    prion illuminate nucleation and strain diversity Summary: -perpetuating changes in protein folding. Here we determine the nature of Sup35's cooperatively folded amyloid core... of...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid chaperone encoded Sample Search Results

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    they up-regulate ER-resident chaperones and other enzymatic activities to augment protein folding... unfolded proteins during a response, and (ii) the accumulation of chaperones...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues required Sample Search Results

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    Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 13 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - amide bonds stabilize Sample Search Results

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    Amide-Amide and Amide-Water Hydrogen Bonds Summary: Bonds: Implicationsfor Protein Folding and Stability Eric S.Eberhardt and Ronald T. Rained Department... folds, many of...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - amino acid monomer Sample Search Results

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    Sciences 3 International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 Near-Native Protein Folding Summary: and Bacteriocin Leucocin A proteins. Both consist of 37 monomers. The...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - all-atom force field Sample Search Results

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    coordinates and velocities for all... , simulation of long-time processes(like protein folding, new phase ... Source: Southern California, University of - Collaboratory for...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium ionic liquids Sample Search Results

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    Atomic Data Center (CFADC) Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 2 "Control of protein folding and misfolding in ionic liquid media, and a conjecture on early earth biology"....

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic protein pa Sample Search Results

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    ; side-chains ; secondary... acid sequence.i.e. 4 Nonetheless, the mechanism of protein folding is not completely understood... criteria (lengths of proteins, SCOP classes,64 ...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - a-3 proteins weakly Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures of proteins are the support... focuses to understand the mechanisms of protein folding and stability. Furthermore, protein ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de...

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    University Collection: Biology and Medicine 8 Hydrogen exchange methods to study protein folding Mallela M.G. Krishna,* Linh Hoang, Yan Lin, and S. Walter Englander Summary: )....

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    Campus Cambridge Collection: Biotechnology ; Biology and Medicine 9 Simulations of Protein Folding Michael Cahill,a Summary: % of the genome. 1.1. Amino Acids The twenty amino...

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    . Proteins 2007;68:48-56. VVC 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: ab initio folding; protein folding; pro- tein... years ... Source: Skolnick, Jeff - Center for the Study of Systems...

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    for: avaryiyi za dopomogoyu Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Identification of the protein folding transition state from molecular dynamics trajectories Summary: - ble S-1 12;Muff...

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    fold recogniion Ab initio Methods... Methods Ab initio methods: solution of a protein folding problem search in conformational space Energy... Protein Structure Analysis...

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    chaperones, RP2 and AIPL1. Molecular chaperone mediated protein... and protein folding in human disease, particularly retinal degeneration and neurodegeneration. We...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid derivative protein Sample Search Results

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    North Carolina State University Collection: Biology and Medicine 5 Cotranslational protein folding with L-systems Gemma B. Danks1,2 Summary: derivation steps. The axiom in our...

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    B of Staphylococcal Protein A: Implication for the Origin of the Cooperativity of Protein Folding Summary: into a molten globule-like state from the coil state, the new model...

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    of the Folding Nucleus Summary: , 177-196. 32. Mirny, L. & Shakhnovich, E. (2001). Protein folding theory: from lattice to all-atom... COMMUNICATION Evolutionary Conservation of...

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    Ltd. Summary: Publishers Ltd. Computer Simulations of Alzheimer's Amyloid -Protein Folding and Assembly Brigita Urbanc1... Angeles, CA 90095, USA Abstract: Pathological...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - amino acid preferences Sample Search Results

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    of the amino acid side chains contribute to the structural preferences in protein folding," J. Biomol. Struct... ? Proteins are composed of fundamental ... Source:...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - almond leaf scorch Sample Search Results

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    Environmental Sciences and Ecology 98 Resource Assessment of Three Candidate Biomass Feedstocks for Hydrogen Production Summary: ......

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - amarilla aguda del Sample Search Results

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    la ciencia Summary: biodiversidad poco estudiada. Alojamiento Cocina (autoservicio) Luz (Panel Solar) Agua (del subsuelo) Sala de... Seguridad y confianza Alojamiento Cocina...

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    in the formation to track the target and the sun simultaneously... and keep the solar panel vector normal to the sun direction. The ideal ... Source: Hall, Christopher D....

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - ae star hd Sample Search Results

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    field measurements of the Herbig Ae stars HD 101412 (left panel) and HD 150193 (right panel) (FORS 2... cool stars and solar-like stars Instrumentation The most successful...

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    la ciencia Summary: biodiversidad poco estudiada. Alojamiento Cocina (autoservicio) Luz (Panel Solar) Agua (del subsuelo) Sala de... Seguridad y confianza Alojamiento Cocina...

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  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - ae star hd101412 Sample Search Results

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    field measurements of the Herbig Ae stars HD 101412 (left panel) and HD 150193 (right panel) (FORS 2... cool stars and solar-like stars Instrumentation The most successful...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile front panel Sample Search Results

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    control, DC motor... control, water temperature control, high-speed train tilt control, solar panel pointing, ultra Source: New Hampshire, University of - Department of...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - amarilla del trigo Sample Search Results

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    la ciencia Summary: biodiversidad poco estudiada. Alojamiento Cocina (autoservicio) Luz (Panel Solar) Agua (del subsuelo) Sala de... Seguridad y confianza Alojamiento Cocina...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammeters Sample Search Results

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    ; Biology and Medicine 15 Experiment No 1 Title: Measurement of V-I characteristics of a solar panel at various levels Summary: of insolation Solar Panel A V Procedure: 1. Choose...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - arc plasma deposition Sample Search Results

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    deposition of TiN coatings to increase... was built at FCIPT for studying SpacecraftSolar panel - Plasma' interactions that can lead to arcing... which lead to arcing. The...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - amarilla del manzano Sample Search Results

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    la ciencia Summary: biodiversidad poco estudiada. Alojamiento Cocina (autoservicio) Luz (Panel Solar) Agua (del subsuelo) Sala de... Seguridad y confianza Alojamiento Cocina...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive systems theory Sample Search Results

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    systems theory Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Summary: 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Peter...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - annex xx hawt Sample Search Results

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    output due to lower height 12;Produce electricity Most... on environment 12;Offshore wind farms Stronger, steadier winds Wind Energizer Increases output of HAWT units Source:...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - area lamar county Sample Search Results

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    OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS Summary: .862.2881 NH North Country, Sullivan County (Lebanon, Claremont, etc), Concord area high schools Elisabeth... Senior Associate Director...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - army medical research Sample Search Results

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    Waterways Experiment Station Vicksburg, MS Collection: Engineering 2 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - army materiel blast Sample Search Results

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    Medical Research and Materiel Command's Bioinformatics Cell, Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute Collection: Computer Technologies and...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute alcohol exposure Sample Search Results

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    chloride 100-44-7) and benzoyl chloride 98-88-4 (combined exposures) IARC-2A Acrolein Acutely... alcohol AcutelyHazardousWaste alpha,alpha-Dimethylphenethylan-dne...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetaldehyde Sample Search Results

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    and formaldehyde se... . The effects of 1,3-propanediol and O2 reactant pressures on acrolein and acetaldehyde formation rates (430 K Source: Iglesia, Enrique - Department of...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid mediated function Sample Search Results

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    pref- erentially enhanced functional recovery in smaller ax- ons. Conclusion... : Acrolein-induced neuronal damage is likely mediated by ROS. Furthermore, GSH and ascorbic...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute oral exposure Sample Search Results

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    chloride 100-44-7) and benzoyl chloride 98-88-4 (combined exposures) IARC-2A Acrolein Acutely... toxins, biotoxins and acutely toxic substances is not exhaustive Chemical...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - aldehydes added insight Sample Search Results

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    4 5 > >> 21 Kinetics and Mechanism of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inactivation by Acrolein Summary: , -unsaturated aldehyde acrolein from a variety of sources. The reaction of...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute axonal damage Sample Search Results

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    Sections were viewed with a light microscope. Those axons labeled with HRP... that acrolein, a lipid peroxida- tion byproduct, can inflict significant damage in isolated spinal...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute ozone exposure Sample Search Results

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    chloride 100-44-7) and benzoyl chloride 98-88-4 (combined exposures) IARC-2A Acrolein Acutely... toxins, biotoxins and acutely toxic substances is not exhaustive Chemical...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant control Sample Search Results

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    Crafts 1973). Bartley and Gangstad (1974) reported that for aquatic plant control, acrolein... al. 1989). Fluridone is used to control a variety of aquatic plant species in...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute cadmium exposure Sample Search Results

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    chloride 100-44-7) and benzoyl chloride 98-88-4 (combined exposures) IARC-2A Acrolein Acutely... toxins, biotoxins and acutely toxic substances is not exhaustive Chemical...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute arsenic exposure Sample Search Results

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    chloride 100-44-7) and benzoyl chloride 98-88-4 (combined exposures) IARC-2A Acrolein Acutely... OSHAReproToxin Arsenic 7440-38-2 and arsenic compounds IARC-1 Arsenic...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha class glutathione Sample Search Results

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    the Detoxification of 2-Phenylpropenal, a Reactive Summary: of the genotoxic aldehyde acrolein by human glutathione transferases of classes alpha, pi, and mu. Mol. Pharmacol......

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute chemical exposure Sample Search Results

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    chloride 100-44-7) and benzoyl chloride 98-88-4 (combined exposures) IARC-2A Acrolein Acutely... Ca(CN)2 AcutelyHazardousWaste Captafol 2425-06-1 IARC-2A ... Source:...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute tubular necrosis Sample Search Results

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    Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing Collection: Biology and Medicine 24 Acrolein-Mediated Mechanisms of Neuronal Death Summary: by the mechanism of necrosis, not...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - ascorbic acid protects Sample Search Results

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    recovery... cord white mat- ter, similar protection of ascorbic acid against acrolein- induced damage... Original Paper Pathobiology 2005;72:171-178 DOI: 10.1159000086786...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - acriflavine Sample Search Results

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    T Acridine orange 1 1 0 A Acriflavin 2 1 0 B T Acrilamide and bis solution 2 0 0 B P Acrolein 3 4 2 Q F P R Source: Sinnamon, Gordon J. - Department of Mathematics, University of...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - acenaphthene Sample Search Results

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    & BUILDING OPERATIONS Summary: L) by Building Discharge Pipe(s) 107-02-8 83-32-9 Acrolein Acenaphthene 0.15 *1.0 208-96-8 Acenaphthylene *1.0 75 Source: Heller, Eric -...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - ab initio fragment Sample Search Results

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    Sciences 55 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1992, 114, 4265-4268 4265 allyl alcohol vs that of acrolein). Alternatively, one could argue Summary: translational energy is calculated upon...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aigar suurmaa tanel Sample Search Results

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    Universitet Collection: Materials Science 22 Hydralazine Rescues PC12 Cells From Acrolein-Mediated Death Summary: and Krokan, 1999; Tanel and Averill-Bates, 2005). The...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - amiloride Sample Search Results

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    potentiated by PLC pathways 2-APB, amiloride, Cd... isothiocyanate, allicin, acrolein, 9-THC, carvacrol, icilin, cinnam- aldehyde, eugenol, gingerol RuR, amiloride... in...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aconitine Sample Search Results

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    Comment Summary: , (TRANS)- 1 Y 25 g Sigma A-7376 Aconitine 1 95 Y 5 mg Sigma A-8001 ACROLEIN 1 >99 Y 10 mL Fluka ACRYLIC Source: Sheridan, Jennifer - Women in Science and...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - aldicarb Sample Search Results

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    Health and Safety (402) 472-4925 http:ehs.unl.edu Summary: Ni(CO)4, (T-4)- 107-02-8 Acrolein 557-19-7 Nickel cyanide 1646-88-4 Aldicarb sulfone 557-19-7 Nickel... cynaide Ni(CN)2...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ascorbic acid presence Sample Search Results

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    and Medicine ; Chemistry 5 Original Paper Pathobiology 2005;72:171178 Summary: acrolein reperfusion. A CAP amplitude profile in the presence of GEE, ascorbic acid and...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - atractyloside Sample Search Results

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    Columbia Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 4 Acrolein induces oxidative stress in brain mitochondria Jian Luo, Riyi Shi* Summary: to...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute spinal cord Sample Search Results

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    Biotechnology ; Biology and Medicine 35 Letter to NeuroscienceLetter to Neuroscience ACROLEIN INFLICTS AXONAL MEMBRANE DISRUPTION AND Summary: 562. Shi, R., Borgens, R.B., 1999....

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - alvar kangur tanel Sample Search Results

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    Universitet Collection: Materials Science 68 Hydralazine Rescues PC12 Cells From Acrolein-Mediated Death Summary: and Krokan, 1999; Tanel and Averill-Bates, 2005). The...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - aided design models Sample Search Results

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    design was used with the two levels of aid... demonstrated the role of driver trust in in-vehicle navigation aid use and has implications for designing... .0004) for the automation...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternatives study ctas Sample Search Results

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    an Integrated Datalink and Summary: -Pilot Datalink Communications CTAS CenterTRACON Automation System CVSRF Crew Vehicle Systems Research... , the fundamental barrier to...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial vehicle piloting Sample Search Results

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    the European Union under the 7th Framework Programme Summary: design of a Personal Aerial Vehicle The myCopter project will investigate User-centered design of human... , Max...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - arvuti abil sa Sample Search Results

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    Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 69 AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation Summary: awareness (SA) has not...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - air traffic management Sample Search Results

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    Sridhar and Kapil... of the problems in Traffic Flow ... Source: NASA - Center-TRACTION Automation System (CTAS) Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 2 Table of...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - air navigators Sample Search Results

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    Technologies and Information Sciences 86 AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation Summary: ; investigate the effect...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - abil sa tegema Sample Search Results

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    Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 67 AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation Summary: awareness (SA) has not...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - automation congress wac Sample Search Results

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    Technologies and Information Sciences 38 Quasi-Static Analysis of a Leg-Wheel Hybrid Vehicle for Enhancing Stair Climbing Ability Summary: for planetary exploration missions....

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial vehicle air Sample Search Results

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    "Designing the air vehicle is only a relative small part... design of a Personal Aerial Vehicle The myCopter project will investigate User-centered design of human... , Max...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial vehicle radome Sample Search Results

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    W. McLain, Randal W. Beard, "Maximizing miniature aerial vehicles," IEEE Robotics and Automation... Unexpected Obstacle Research Overview Guidance, Navigation, Vehicle...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - air crew members Sample Search Results

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    of the crew with other automated "agents" including robots, life support systems, and vehicle systems... . An important challenge is assisting the crew in using automated...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - army vehicles phase Sample Search Results

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    Unmanned Vehicle Systems Summary: 1 An Analysis of Heterogeneity in Futuristic Unmanned Vehicle Systems C.E. NEHME M.L. CUMMINGS... and with enough automation aboard unmanned...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aided systems theory Sample Search Results

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    Technologies and Information Sciences 49 AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation Summary: , etc. In theory, the...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - agv corridor navigation Sample Search Results

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    of Michigan Summary: .html THE OMNIMATE: A GUIDEWIRE -FREE AGV FOR HIGHLY FLEXIBLE AUTOMATION Johann Borenstein The University of Michigan... @umich.edu ABSTRACT This paper...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aware navigation based Sample Search Results

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    in strategic (navigation) tasks... automation for navigation tasks. Keywords: In-vehicle automation; Automation reliability; Situation aware... reality-based driving...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - automated surface mount Sample Search Results

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    automated, including parking garages. Less effort, fewer collisions... What's to lose? Vehicle... distance sensors One mounted in the front to detect obstacles to forward...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - auto control system Sample Search Results

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    Architecture Junya Morita Summary: shows goals as blue dots. If the center of the vehicle is off the optimal line, the auto control system... the arrow key on the keyboard...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - air traffic Sample Search Results

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    "A day in the life of air traffic in the U.S.," shows ... Source: NASA - Center-TRACTION Automation System (CTAS) Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 2 Table of...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - air traffic flow Sample Search Results

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    Dynamic System Models (LDSM... ). The dynamics of air ... Source: NASA - Center-TRACTION Automation System (CTAS) Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 47 Table...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - asme research committee Sample Search Results

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    -8544 Research Interests Energy Harvesting, Dynamics and Vibration, Control Systems, Vehicle Technologies, Smart... Research Scientist, Department Automation Engineering,...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - air traffic operations Sample Search Results

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    "A day in the life of air traffic in the U.S.," shows ... Source: NASA - Center-TRACTION Automation System (CTAS) Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 2 Table of...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute fatty liver Sample Search Results

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    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: NKT-deficient mice are more susceptible to carbon...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute liver toxicity Sample Search Results

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    injury. When injury is acute, the fibrotic response is taken over by regeneration... to carbon tetrachloride-induced toxicity as compared to human ... Source: Groningen,...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - actively inflamed liver Sample Search Results

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    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: injection of iNKT activator -galactosylceramide ( -GalCer)...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute liver damage Sample Search Results

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    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: NKT-deficient mice are more susceptible to carbon...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - apoptotic primary liver Sample Search Results

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    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: of a variety of liver disorders,16 including viral...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute liver injury Sample Search Results

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    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: NKT-deficient mice are more susceptible to carbon...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds Sample Search Results

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    which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... chemicals...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates mouse liver Sample Search Results

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    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: are abundant in iNKT cells.13-17 For example, mouse liver...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenide x-ray imaging Sample Search Results

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    Physics 4 Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy Summary: assessed using high-...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - adult rat liver Sample Search Results

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    from normal rat liver and incubated for 3 or 16 hours with increasing doses... of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Rat ... Source: Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit - Centre for...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute hepatic injury Sample Search Results

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    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: acute liver injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. During...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali metal oxides Sample Search Results

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    , sodium carbide, turpentine, finely divided metals Calcium water, carbon dioxide, carbon tetrachloride... , and chlorinated hydrocarbons Carbon, activated calcium...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha decay scheme Sample Search Results

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    relationship for the alpha decay... life-time was derived on the ground of the fission theory of alpha ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha decay properties Sample Search Results

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    relationship for the alpha decay... life-time was derived on the ground of the fission theory of alpha ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha decay stability Sample Search Results

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    relationship for the alpha decay... life-time was derived on the ground of the fission theory of alpha ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha spectroscopy Sample Search Results

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    for Physics... semiempirical relationship is derived on the grounds of the fission theory of alpha decay. It takes... , the number of known alpha emitters has been...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha decay widths Sample Search Results

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    relationship for the alpha decay... life-time was derived on the ground of the fission theory of alpha ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha decay energies Sample Search Results

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    relationship for the alpha decay... life-time was derived on the ground of the fission theory of alpha ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha decay cluster Sample Search Results

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    relationship for the alpha decay... life-time was derived on the ground of the fission theory of alpha ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - antiparticles Sample Search Results

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    Cientficas Collection: Physics 16 IS THE NON OBSERVATION OF NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY A QUESTION OF SENSITIVITY? Summary: with its antiparticle) should have all...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - antineutrons Sample Search Results

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    Underground Summary: Also: neutron anti-neutron 190" 160" 500" 12;24 Neutrinoless Double-beta Decay Can anti-matter turn Source: Murayama, Hitoshi - Department of Physics,...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha decay detection Sample Search Results

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    Collection: Chemistry 30 Alpha Backgrounds and Their Implications for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments Using HPGe Detectors Summary: Alpha Backgrounds and Their...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha 6a continuous Sample Search Results

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    and Information Sciences 68 Alpha Backgrounds and Their Implications for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments Using HPGe Detectors Summary: Alpha Backgrounds and Their...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - angra neutrino project Sample Search Results

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    Uniwersytet Jagiellonski Collection: Physics 80 IS THE NON OBSERVATION OF NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY A QUESTION OF SENSITIVITY? Summary: Grenoble Cedex FRANCE The hypothetical...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted beta decay Sample Search Results

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    Detection, Very High Energy Cosmic Neutrinos, Gamma-Ray Astronomy, and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay... invites applications for a tenure track, assistant professor position...