National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for q4 q4 q4

  1. Observations from The EV Project in Q4 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2014-02-01

    This is a summary report for The EV Project 4th quarter 2013 reports. It describes electric vehicle driver driving and charging behavior observed in Q4. It is the same report as the previously approved/published Q3 2013 report, only the numbers have been updated. It is for public release and does not have limited distribution.

  2. Geometry of an elliptic-difference equation related to Q4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Atkinson; Phil Howes; Nalini Joshi; Nobutaka Nakazono

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we investigate a nonlinear non-autonomous elliptic difference equation, which was constructed by Ramani, Carstea and Grammaticos by integrable deautonomization of a periodic reduction of the discrete Krichever-Novikov equation, or Q4. We show how to construct it as a birational mapping on a rational surface blown up at eight points in $\\mathbb P^1\\times \\mathbb P^1$, and find its affine Weyl symmetry, placing it in the geometric framework of the Painlev\\'e equations. The initial value space is ell-$A_0^{(1)}$ and its symmetry group is $W(F_4^{(1)})$. We show that the deautonomization is consistent with the lattice-geometry of Q4 by giving an alternative construction, which is a reduction from Q4 in the usual sense. A more symmetric reduction of the same kind provides another example of a second-order integrable elliptic difference equation.

  3. Far-ultraviolet observations of comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) with FIMS/SPEAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Y.-M.; Min, K.-W. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Feldman, P. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Han, W. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Edelstein, J., E-mail: ymlim@kaist.ac.kr [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of far-ultraviolet observations of comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) that were made with the Far-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on board the Korean satellite STSAT-1. The observations were conducted in two campaigns during its perihelion approach between 2004 May 8 and 15. Based on the scanning mode observations in the wavelength band of 1400-1700 Å, we have constructed an image of the comet with an angular size of 5°×5°, which corresponds to the central coma region. Several important fluorescence emission lines were detected including S I multiplets at 1429 and 1479 Å, C I multiplets at 1561 and 1657 Å, and the CO A{sup 1}?-X{sup 1}?{sup +} Fourth Positive system; we have estimated the production rates of the corresponding species from the fluxes of these emission lines. The estimated production rate of CO was Q {sub CO} = (2.65 ± 0.63) × 10{sup 28} s{sup –1}, which is 6.2%-7.4% of the water production rate and is consistent with earlier predictions. The average carbon production rate was estimated to be Q{sub C} = ?1.59 × 10{sup 28} s{sup –1}, which is ?60% of the CO production rate. However, the observed carbon profile was steeper than that predicted using the two-component Haser model in the inner coma region, while it was consistent with the model in the outer region. The average sulfur production rate was Q{sub S} = (4.03±1.03) × 10{sup 27} s{sup –1}, which corresponds to ?1% of the water production rate.

  4. Chiral O(Q^4) two-body operators for s-wave pion photoproduction on the NN system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gardestig

    2006-04-16

    The two-body currents for s-wave pion photoproduction on the NN system are derived to O(Q^4) in chiral perturbation theory. For the interesting case of 3S1 1S0 transitions, we show that an axial isovector two-nucleon contact term connects the short-distance physics of pion photoproduction to pion production and several important electroweak reactions. We also find that the standard chiral Lagrangian gives a gamma pi pi N N vertex that have not been explicitly mentioned in previous literature. The corresponding Feynman rule is presented here and some processes where it should be important are briefly discussed.

  5. 2012_Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i sEnergy It is the intent of the

  6. 2013_Q4.indd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i sEnergyEnergy The intent

  7. FORMALDEHYDE IN COMETS C/1995 O1 (HALE-BOPP), C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), AND C/2001 Q4 (NEAT): INVESTIGATING THE COMETARY ORIGIN OF H2CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORMALDEHYDE IN COMETS C/1995 O1 (HALE-BOPP), C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), AND C/2001 Q4 (NEAT of formaldehyde (H2CO) have been conducted toward comets C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), and C/2002 T72CO other than the comet nucleus. The extended source of formaldehyde is probably grains composed

  8. Mathematics 1052 Exam 2, May 3rd, 2014 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Total Bonus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaygun, Atabey

    Mathematics 1052 Exam 2, May 3rd, 2014 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Total Bonus 15pts 20pts 10pts 15pts 30pts) (9 points) n=1 1 n(n+2) #12;Mathematics 1052 Exam 2, May 3rd, 2014 2. Consider the region bounded above about the line y = 1. Page 2 of 5 #12;Mathematics 1052 Exam 2, May 3rd, 2014 3. (10 points) (a

  9. U.S. Residential Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices, Q4 2013 Benchmarks: Cash Purchase, Fair Market Value, and Prepaid Lease Transaction Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, C.; James, T. L.; Margolis, R.; Fu, R.; Feldman, D.

    2014-10-01

    The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. This report provides a Q4 2013 update for residential PV systems, based on an objective methodology that closely approximates the book value of a PV system. Several cases are benchmarked to represent common variation in business models, labor rates, and module choice. We estimate a weighted-average cash purchase price of $3.29/W for modeled standard-efficiency, polycrystalline-silicon residential PV systems installed in the United States. This is a 46% decline from the 2013-dollar-adjusted price reported in the Q4 2010 benchmark report. In addition, this report frames the cash purchase price in the context of key price metrics relevant to the continually evolving landscape of third-party-owned PV systems by benchmarking the minimum sustainable lease price and the fair market value of residential PV systems.

  10. FY11 Q4 SHPM Whitepaper DRAFT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Track Paper European Wind Energy Conference (EWEA) Annual Event April 16-19, 2012; Copenhagen, Denmark Prognostic Control to Enhance Offshore Wind Turbine Operations and...

  11. Microchannel Receiver Development- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Oregon State University project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  12. FY11 Q4 SHPM Whitepaper DRAFT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtrans -ORGANIZATION FY 2013MayUncosted of Energyf i c eN

  13. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators- FY12 Q4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this Penn State project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  14. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  15. Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP- FY12 Q4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this 3M project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  16. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SWRI project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  17. CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SWRI project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  18. Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .00/W Concentrating Solar Power (CSP and CPV) 6 MWac of concentrating solar capacity was installed installations totaled 723 MW in Q1 2013, up 33% over Q1 2012 Cumulative operating PV capacity in the U.S. now, installers, and manufacturers to collect granular data on the U.S. solar market. This data provides

  19. Self-Cleaning CSP Optics with EDS- FY12 Q4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this Boston University project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  20. On the physics of the $so_q(4)$ hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. G. Castro; R. Kullock

    2015-03-05

    In this work we investigate the $q$-deformation of the $so(4)$ dynamical symmetry of the hydrogen atom using the theory of the quantum group $su_q(2)$. We derive the energy spectrum in a physically consistent manner and find a degeneracy breaking as well as a smaller Hilbert space. We point out that using the deformed Casimir as was done before leads to inconsistencies in the physical interpretation of the theory.

  1. Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  2. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q4 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site: City ofNovelQ3: Charles

  3. Enclosure - FY 2015 Q4 Metrics Report 2015-11-02.xlsx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofAprilofEnergyEnSys Energy communities

  4. High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles - FY12 Q4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartmentHigh-Efficiency Parking Lighting|

  5. FY 2014 Q4 Metrics Report 2014-11-06.xlsx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederal Realin

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - SRS Headcount by County of Residence Q4 FY 2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillionStockpileEqualArraysstructural stabilityInto

  7. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q4 Quad Chart.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory | National(Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Dish

  8. SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q4 FY15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 Page 1NEWS MEDIA16,3 rd Quarter FY 20154

  9. 3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-05-12

    Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

  10. Environ. Sci. Technol. 19Q4,28, 1422-1429 Rapid Kinetics of Cu(I I) Adsorption/Desorption on Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    /Desorption on Goethite Paul R. Grossl' and Donald L. Sparks Department of Piant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Washington 99352 The kinetics of Cu2+adsorption/desorption on goethite (a-FeOOH) was evaluated using/desorption on goethite. The rate of these relaxations (7)decreased with an increase in pH, alongthe adsorption edge

  11. Biochemical Platform Analysis Presentation for BETO 2015 Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with NREL Catalytic Conversion of Sugars project - Q4 milestone * 2015 State of Technology assessment for FY15 R&D data - Q4 milestone * FY16 and beyond: TEA support for...

  12. Alcator C-MOD Quarterly Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports Reports for 1997 Q1 (HTML) Q2 (HTML) Q3 (HTML) Q4 (HTML) Reports for 1998 Q1 (HTML) Q2 (HTML) Q3 (HTML) Q4 (HTML) Reports for 1999 Q1 (HTML) Q2 (HTML) Q3 (HTML) Q4 (HTML)...

  13. Adjustment patterns to commodity terms of trade shocks: the role of exchange rate and international reserves policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Edwards, Sebastian; Riera-Crichton, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Q3 1997 Q3 2003 Uruguay Q2 2004 Q4 2009 Venezuela, Rep. Bol.Q1 1989 Q1 1989 Venezuela, Rep. Bol. Q4 1990 Q1 1992 End Q4Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. The data in this table show

  14. What Does a Scattering Pattern Tell US?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Space sample light image Image Space lens Angular Space Q 4p sin(q) l Fourier Transform Scattering Pattern Fourier Transform Phase Problem Scattering Pattern...

  15. NNSA Corporate CPEP Process NNSA Honeywell FM&T PER NNSA/NA-00...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    "meets expectations." Cyber Security - Honeywell's AOP metrics for Q4 and the year were Green, no issues. All AOP milestones were delivered on time. Cyber Security completed...

  16. What Does a Scattering Pattern Tell US?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amplitude e iwt Phase difference Phase difference S e i (ri Q) A(DK) fi A(Q) Fourier Transform ( ri ) DK Q 4p sin(q) l Lensless Imaging Sample Space Scattering Space...

  17. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    analysis; planned for Q3 to Q4 Calculated for Quaternary faults using stress field from borehole breakouts and fault-kinematic data March '15 & in progress Major Technical...

  18. An Investigation into the Realities of a Quantum Datapath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isailovic, Nemanja

    2010-01-01

    Q0 being on the longest critical path, Q1 and Q4 on thequbit criticality or critical paths suffer from the drawbackdata. The bulk of the critical path involves independent

  19. Optimal Quantum Control Using Randomized Benchmarking R. Barends,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    on subsequent gates, and identify control crosstalk in superconducting qubits. This method is able to correct). As a testbed, we use a five qubit (Q0-Q4) superconducting system [11] based on the Xmon transmon design [13

  20. Quantified Traveler: Travel Feedback Meets the Cloud to Change Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    spent traveling (time, cost, CO2, and calories) was able toemissions (kg of CO2), calories burned, cost ($), and traveland cost (Q4) spent traveling did not shift awareness, the information on calories (Q3) and CO2 (

  1. High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012. progressreportsunshotbraytonfy12q4.pdf More Documents & Publications High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle - FY13 Q1...

  2. What Does a Scattering Pattern Tell US?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    light image Image Space lens Can we create the image without a lens? Angular Space Math Q 4p sin(q) l Lensless Imaging Sample Space Scattering Space sample light image lens...

  3. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identified, End Q2 3. 500g of 2 New Pigments, End Q3 4. ESR Measured on New Cool Roof Coating, End Q4 Budget: Total DOE to date: 474,132 Total future DOE : 0 Key Partners:...

  4. 4 Questions for a Better Buildings Case Competition Judge: Marc...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    more than ever, and fresh ideas can be the catalyst for new programs and success in our industry. Q4: Do you plan to participate in the next Better Buildings Case Competition?...

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Charcaterize Performance FY12-Q4 Milestone: Demonstration Liquid Phase Spray for WO3 at 6" by 6" Current work and future research Work with Sage Electrochromics to Transfer...

  6. Next Generation DHCP Deployments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Dave; Willard, George F. III

    2005-02-01

    Figure 9 ANSRdhcp request recording logic Figure 10 ANSR device entry Figure 11 DHCP snooping network topology Cisco Catalyst 2950G 48 C2950-I6K2L2Q4-M, Version 12.1(22)EA1 ip dhcp snooping vlan 123 ip dhcp snooping interface FastEthernet0... Figure 9 ANSRdhcp request recording logic Figure 10 ANSR device entry Figure 11 DHCP snooping network topology Cisco Catalyst 2950G 48 C2950-I6K2L2Q4-M, Version 12.1(22)EA1 ip dhcp snooping vlan 123 ip dhcp snooping interface FastEthernet0...

  7. Supplement of "Inversion of and emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    ppbv hydrogen £ ¡¥ : 311 ppbv nitrous oxide ¦§ ©¨ : 0.5 ppbv carbonyl sulfide ozone ¤ ¡¥ ©¡ hydrogen©¦ ¤ ¦ ¤ S ¤ ©¦ ¤ ¡%¦ ¤ Q©¦¢4¦ ¤ %$R¦ ¤ ©$ hydroxy carbonyls from ISOP Long-lived T 5 ¦!IU4¦ ¤ ¡¥QS¦ ¤ ¥¨ ¦ ¤ `$ dimethyl sulfide ¦§¨ ¡ carbon disulfide ¤ ¡¥¨ hydrogen sulfide 7 E $ oxygen atom (excited state

  8. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C8, suppZ6ment au n08, Tome 41, aoGt 1980, page C8-163 STUDY OF LIQUID NICKEL-VANADIUM ALLOYS BY NEUTRON DIFFRACTION AND MODEL SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , 28 i s the scattering angle, X the neutron wave- length, Q = 4n the modulus of the scattering vector NICKEL-VANADIUM ALLOYS BY NEUTRON DIFFRACTION AND MODEL SIMULATION J.L. Lemarchand, J. Bletry and P with model c a l c u l a t i o ~can lead to a quantitative interpreta- tion. In this paper, neutron

  9. NO. RIY. NO. TRANSMITTER DESIGN ANALYSIS ATM 897

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    NO. RIY. NO. TRANSMITTER DESIGN ANALYSIS ATM 897 PAGI 1 84 ( .e-,~·p·oe atam8 Dlvl8lon DATl! 7 - 6 TRANSMITTER DESIGN ANALYSIS PAGI 2 DATE 7-6-70 TABLE OF CONTENTS TRANSMITTER DESIGN ANALYSIS 1. INTRODUCTION AMPLIFIER 7. 4 Q4 OUTPUT NETWORK RE-CALCULATION 011 #12;TRANSMITTER DESIGN ANALYSIS ··-~·pace ltam8 Dlvlelon

  10. file://C:\\Documents%20and%20Settings\\VM3\\My%20Documents\\hc6-7a...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q 4.2 0.3 0.5 | 15.2 UnknownNo Answer... 7.1 0.7 1.0 0.6 0.2 | 14.0 | Air-Conditioning | | Central Air-Conditioning | Use a Central System... 58.6 1.3...

  11. Detailed Description of Key NIF Milestones for NNSA Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Operationally qualify ignition diagnostics [Neutron Activation Detector (Cooper), Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer ignition. Q4 FY2011 4073 Demonstrating we can light the "match" ­ alpha heating Conduct first DT implosion experimental campaign to demonstrate limited alpha heating Demonstrate cryogenic layered DT experiments

  12. Decomposing the Impact of Alternative Technology Sets on Future Carbon Emissions Growth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    of carbon capture and storage, nuclear, and hydroelectric generation all lead to upward shifts in the long are the drivers of future global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions growth and how would the availability of key Classification: D58, Q4, Q54, O1, Keywords: Asia, energy use, carbon emissions, global climate change, computable

  13. Communication and Control for Quantum Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Yatish

    2010-01-01

    to Output. Classical bits cx and cz are trans- mitted to thePure Quantum h x y z s t cx yes yes yes yes yes yes yes czH q3 q4 zmeasure Correct c3 X cx q1, q0; cx q1, q2; correct

  14. Alcator C-Mod FY2007 Research Totals by Quarter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Research Operations as of 83107 Research Days Research Weeks Total FY07 Research Weeks Q1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Q2 1.06 0.27 0.27 Q3 36.20 9.05 9.32 Q4 21.50 5.37 14.69 Detailed run run...

  15. Alcator C-Mod FY2008 Research Totals by Quarter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Research Operations as of 52708 Research Days Research Weeks Total FY08 Research Weeks Q1 4.25 1.06 1.06 Q2 34.5 8.6 9.7 Q3 24.2 6.1 15.7 Q4 Detailed run descriptions can be...

  16. A.G.Ramm, Inverse scattering problem with data at fixed energy and fixed incident direction, Nonlinear Analysis: Theory, methods and Applications, 69, N4, (2008), 1478

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    scattering problem with fixed­energy data consists in finding a potential q(x) from the knowledge of A q ([4]), who also gave a method for recovery of q from the exact fixed­energy data, an error estimate of q from noisy fixed­energy data, and an error estimate for this method [5], [6], [7]. Until now

  17. 7-135 A Carnot refrigeration cycle is executed in a closed system with a fixed mass of R-134a. The net work input and the maximum and minimum temperatures are given. The mass fraction of the refrigerant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-61 7-135 A Carnot refrigeration cycle is executed in a closed system with a fixed mass of R-134aJ/kg (Table A-12). Analysis The coefficient of performance of the cycle is T v 20q 4 3 1 2 QH QL -8qC and #12

  18. Pion photo- and electroproduction in relativistic baryon ChPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lothar Tiator; Stefan Scherer; Marius Hilt

    2014-02-04

    We present a calculation of pion photo- and electroproduction in manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory up to and including order q^4. We fix the low-energy constants by fitting experimental data in all available reaction channels. Our results can be accessed via a web interface, the so-called chiral MAID.

  19. Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI): Snapshot of Recent Geothermal Financing Terms, Fourth Quarter 2009 - Second Half 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowder, T.; Hubbell, R.; Mendelsohn, M.; Cory, K.

    2012-09-01

    This report is a review of geothermal project financial terms as reported in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI). The data were collected over seven analysis periods from the fourth quarter (Q4) of 2009 to the second half (2H) of 2011.

  20. Secondary constructions on generalized bent functions Brajesh Kumar Singh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Secondary constructions on generalized bent functions Brajesh Kumar Singh Department of Mathematics of Maiorana-McFarland class of bent functions, for Research supported by CSIR, INDIA. #12;2 B. K. Singh q = 4. Recently, Stanica, Gangopadhyay and Singh [13] studied several proper- ties generalized bent Boolean

  1. TIMES model for the Reunion Island: addressing reliability of electricity supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    energy sources. In 2008, the total primary energy consumption was 1295 ktoe, and as most of small islands% on renewable energy sources [1]. In 2008, the total primary energy consumption was 1295 ktoe, and as most. Keywords: Long-term energy planning. Reunion Island. Reliability of electricity supply. JEL: ­ Q4; O21; Q29

  2. Second Quarter 2014 Volume 7, number 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5% in Q2, 4.1% in Q3, and 2.6% in Q4. March projections for annual average real GDP provided, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers rose 1.1% year- over-year in February, while core inflation was up 1.6% for the same period. Consumer prices

  3. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q2 and Q6 2. 500g of 2 New Pigments, End Q3 and Q7 3. ESR Measured on New Cool Roof Coating, End Q4 and Q8 4. Potential Manufacturing Partner, Q3 and ongoing 5. Update BTO...

  4. Proposed Scope and Schedule for Scenario and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conservation and demand response development. Sensitivity S2 ­ Scenarios 1B and 2C w/Lower Natural Gas Prices on resource development of significantly lower natural gas prices. Sensitivity S3 ­ Scenarios 1B and 2C w and chapters. 2 #12;2014 Q4 Q1 2015 Q2 2015 Demand/Price Forecasts Updated Methodology for Quantification

  5. Universality and criticality of a second-order granular solid-liquid-like phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo Castillo; Nicolás Mujica; Rodrigo Soto

    2015-01-20

    We experimentally study the critical properties of the non-equilibrium solid-liquid-like transition that takes place in vibrated granular matter. The critical dynamics is characterized by the coupling of the density field with the bond-orientational order parameter $Q_4$, which measures the degree of local crystallization. Two setups are compared, which present the transition at different critical accelerations as a a result of modifying the energy dissipation parameters. In both setups five independent critical exponents are measured, associated to different properties of $Q_4$: the correlation length, relaxation time, vanishing wavenumber limit (static susceptibility), the hydrodynamic regime of the pair correlation function, and the amplitude of the order parameter. The respective critical exponents agree in both setups and are given by $\

  6. A study of the middle Dutch poem, Van den vos Reynaerde and its sources in the branches of the old French Roman de Renard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelboom, Peter Anton Frederik

    1917-01-01

    col. R. v.1199 Want eer hyt wiste, was hem een strec Omme sinesi bale arde vast.'** 41 R#R# v. BEG Con plus tret, plus eatrcint li las R. v.l£Q4 Rr.de sprang voert; dat strec liep toe R#R« v.860 Qar Martinez li clercono saut 'Or cug> or bug' fet... col. R. v.1199 Want eer hyt wiste, was hem een strec Omme sinesi bale arde vast.'** 41 R#R# v. BEG Con plus tret, plus eatrcint li las R. v.l£Q4 Rr.de sprang voert; dat strec liep toe R#R« v.860 Qar Martinez li clercono saut 'Or cug> or bug' fet...

  7. The influence of temperatures and mechanical treatments on pre- and post-emergence growth of peach and plum seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsalih, Kamil Khidher

    1961-01-01

    , the possibility of variation between speoies SCAPI ICI ~ ~ IA NI A ~ ~ ~ 0 0 0 ~ ~ O IO Ch 33m R R CII CII CII ~ ~ A 4 SI S 0 0 0 '4l Q 4l Q s CII r 0 O ~ ~ as ~8 ~gA ICI IO 0 N Ill OE 0 CIA CIN Ch CO ~ ~ ~ t N ~ ~ 0 CCI ICI 0 0 0...W goeio4 oo ~. f As ooe ~ oero. eheea&eriheIL Q aeero%o areae ia i' piIaoale. Q4e oeaooivagg coal, 4 have hoea oaaee4 Q %he high O~erafeee, '()IIkaeee 4; ea4 0)? . gheee eee4lxlwge 4L4 aos groo ee sapL41p ehoa tirei Osaaeferro4 4e ~ gro hoaa? ?e 4L4...

  8. Power Corrections and Renormalons in Deep Inelastic Structure Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dasgupta; B. R. Webber

    1996-04-23

    We study the power corrections (infrared renormalon contributions) to the coefficient functions for non-singlet deep inelastic structure functions due to gluon vacuum polarization insertions in one-loop graphs. Remarkably, for all the structure functions $F_1$, $F_2$, $F_3$ and $g_1$, there are only two such contributions, corresponding to $1/Q^2$ and $1/Q^4$ power corrections. We compute their dependence on Bjorken $x$. The results could be used to model the dominant higher-twist contributions.

  9. Discovery of oscillatory dynamics of city-size distributions in world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    of pdf thru Skype you can ask questions, thru Humberto he will have a chat box to relay questions I test) China leads by 50 years in its Q values ­ up to 1850 PART III: Scaling Examples: Chinese-results are very similar, as reported for the 1- factor test. Q1 Q3 Q5 Q2 Q4 Q6 #12;7 Multiple measures of Q

  10. Pion Photo- and Electroproduction and the Chiral MAID Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilt, M; Scherer, S; Tiator, L

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the extended on-mass-shell scheme for manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. We present a calculation of pion photo- and electroproduction up to and including order $q^4$. The low-energy constants have been fixed by fitting experimental data in all available reaction channels. Our results can be accessed via a web interface, the so-called chiral MAID (http://www.kph.uni-mainz.de/MAID/chiralmaid/).

  11. MIE 230-Thermodynamics Professor Rothstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    below. Steam enters the turbine at p1 = 10MPa and T1=640 C and exits at p2=50kPa. Steam leaves Steam Generator 2 3 1 Turbine Condenser Pump p2 = 50kPa p3 = 50kPa sat. liquid . Q4-1 = 200 MW T1 = 640 the steam power plant shown in the figure below. The cycle requires 150MWinQ of heat to operate as shown

  12. QuaRC Data Acquisition Card Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Gürdal

    Clear HiQ Aero Q3 ControlPaQ-FW Q4 Q8 MultiQ-PCI Gumstix Card Config Buffered I/O Immediate I/O Time Watchdog Watchdog Clear DAQCard-6024e DAQCard-6062e DAQCard-6715 PCI-6023e PCI-6024e PCI-6025e PCI-6032e PCI-6034e PCI-6035e PCI-6036e PCI-6040e PCI-6052e PCI-6220 #12;QuaRC Data Acquisition Card Support

  13. Pion Photo- and Electroproduction and the Chiral MAID Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hilt; B. C. Lehnhart; S. Scherer; L. Tiator

    2015-10-15

    We discuss the extended on-mass-shell scheme for manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. We present a calculation of pion photo- and electroproduction up to and including order $q^4$. The low-energy constants have been fixed by fitting experimental data in all available reaction channels. Our results can be accessed via a web interface, the so-called chiral MAID (http://www.kph.uni-mainz.de/MAID/chiralmaid/).

  14. Pion photo- and electroproduction with chiral MAID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hilt; B. C. Lehnhart; S. Scherer; L. Tiator

    2013-09-13

    We present a calculation of pion photo- and electroproduction in manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory up to and including order $q^4$. We fix the low-energy constants by fitting experimental data in all available reaction channels. Our results can be accessed via a web interface, the so-called chiral MAID. We explain how our program works and how it can be used for further analysis.

  15. hepph/9512272 ON THE THEORETICAL STATUS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (š)N scattering processes are described by six further structure functions W š;\\Sigma 2 , xW š;\\Sigma 3 , F 2Z structure at short distances. Since both charged leptons (e \\Sigma ; ¯ \\Sigma ) and neutrinos (š; š) may ) collects couplings and propagator terms, e.g. P l \\Sigma ;fl (Q 2 ) = 2�ff 2 =Q 4 , P š;W +(Q 2 ) = G 2 F M

  16. Adequacy of milk manufacturing plants in the North Texas marketing area to handle surplus milk, 1953-54 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Mabern David

    1954-01-01

    S St e S lek" Fer Cent de Pe Cent 63 Axe kdgh school Vmaatt + k farsssr lo olcuooo ao Oavlois a cist~- ~ ools & he rayortsso A. vo or vore sLslk corn. lj / e4~a isis ruhr& 5l 4~i' k MLcLX tftu4 4jMZi Q4 ~i 'iisV ~ sX GOiL4l'~~ ~'1'X. % Ftc...

  17. Making a virtue out of virtual communities: working electronically with an advisory panel of library users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Anne; Kuhn, Isla; Morgan, Peter

    that the Panel's eventual membership provided, as far as possible, a balanced reflection of our actual registered client base.) Launching the Panel The initial invitation (which was reissued after about three weeks) ran for six weeks to the end... we should conduct a comprehensive stock check, proposing some possible options such as closing completely for a week, or a number of less drastic but more complex alternatives. • Q.4 - we listed a range of social networking technologies (FaceBook...

  18. Factors influencing the growth of Sclerotium rolfsii in various soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Sankara Kochukrishna

    1953-01-01

    ~ hssishanh taefossox of hho loyarhasah of Plant Sqrsiahogf ael Pnthologye 'glhRS 4 05ICSN%. XgSSII00%4 4 ~ t ~ 4 g 4 4 4 4+ ~ ~ 0 ~ 4 ~ ~ 1 I t 4* ~ +t gggS4F Q%%4%$$ O. 0 0 ~ 4 0 4 4 ~ ~ f 4 % ~ ~ 1 4'1 0 II 856% 4NP %@IIX@) 's ~ ~ ~ s a e'e ~ i o + t a...

  19. Selected non-holonomic functions in lattice statistical mechanics and enumerative combinatorics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Boukraa; J-M. Maillard

    2015-10-15

    We recall that the full susceptibility series of the Ising model, modulo powers of the prime 2, reduce to algebraic functions. We also recall the non-linear polynomial differential equation obtained by Tutte for the generating function of the q-coloured rooted triangulations by vertices, which is known to have algebraic solutions for all the numbers of the form $2 +2 \\cos(j\\pi/n)$, the status of the q= 4 being unclear. We focus on the analysis of the q= 4 case, showing that the corresponding series is quite certainly non-holonomic. Along the line of a previous work on the susceptibility of the Ising model, we consider this q=4 series modulo the first eight primes 2, 3, ... 19, and show that this (probably non-holonomic) function reduces, modulo these primes, to algebraic functions. We conjecture that this probably non-holonomic function reduces to algebraic functions modulo (almost) every prime, or power of prime numbers. This raises the question to see whether such remarkable non-holonomic functions can be seen as ratio of diagonals of rational functions, or even rational, or algebraic, functions of diagonals of rational functions.

  20. High-p(T) pi(0) production with respect to the reaction plane in Au plus Au collisions at s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chai, J. -S; Chernichenko, S.; Chiba, J.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Constantin, P.; Csanad, M.; Csorgo, T.; Dahms, T.; Das, K.; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durum, A.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Fields, D. E.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S. -Y; Gadrat, S.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. A.; Hachiya, T.; Henni, A. Hadj; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hamagaki, H.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; He, X.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kawagishi, T.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, Y. -S; Kinney, E.; Kiss, A.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, M. K.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X. H.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McGaughey, P. L.; Miake, Y.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nakamura, T.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, H.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Taranenko, A.; Tarjan, P.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V. -N; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjo, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velkovska, J.; Vertesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, Y.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zimanyi, J.; Zolin, L.; PHENIX Collaboration.

    2009-01-01

    library l i b rayy?hyI a? OQItj'Q4'4g68 nS (g??g'M y'AQ,8w, Q4g'? 5u?5...g??M ,84 6 5 49, Q,EugQ,M,84s 56Q 49, 1,CQ,, 6 5 ?arOaT a? eopyaQ4'4g68 nS (g??g'M y'AQ,8w,

  1. Weak-Coupling Model for Pb-212 and Pb-204 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming; Kuo, T. T. S.; McGrory, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    g??M ,84 6 5 49, Q,EugQ,M,84s 56Q 49, 1,CQ,, 6 5 ?arOaT a? eopyaQ4'4g68 nS (g??g'M y'AQ,8w, Q4M,84 6Q <4u1,84 l1?gs6Q? b'S x_HH x ? pPOTa?mrOpaP ? ? T.?p.( a? Oo. ypO.TlOmT. ?? PlOmTly arrmTT.Pr.< a? Oo. ?p<.l<. ? ? .?e.Tpb.POly eTa?mrOpaP a? Oo. ?p<.l<. H? op

  2. A disease of swine caused by a chromobacterium species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, William Lawrence

    1955-01-01

    ?Pa(y.?h.b.PO< TABLE OF CONTENTS x? pPOTa?mrOpaP O9, 1gs,'s, w'us,1 VS r9Q6M6V'w4, Q?uM ?g6?'w,uM 9's 864 V,,8 1,swQgV,1 JQ,?g6us?S g8 sAg8,? p4 A's w68sg1,Q,1 65 su55gwg'84 gM? J6Q4'8w, 56Q ' 1gss,Q4'4g68 JQ6V?,M 56Q 49, 56??6Ag8C Q,'s68s7 ?'? p4 'JJ,'Qs 's '8...M,?? 1gs4g8w4?S 6 5 9S1Q6C,8 wS'8g1, 5xA9gw9 A's JQ61uw,1 g8 Eu'84g4S?xx P6 649,Q Q,5,Q,8w,s 46 49gs J9,86M,868 A,Q, ,8w6u84,Q,1? I 7I <,Q4gw '81 n6u?C'?6? x?? gs6?'4,1 5g? , 1g55,Q,84 sJ,wg,s 65 V 'w4,Qg? 6J9'C, 56Q ?r? ?g6?'w,uM 5Q6M 49, s,A,Q A...

  3. Large-$q$ expansion of the specific heat for the two-dimensional $q$-state Potts model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Arisue; K. Tabata

    1998-07-03

    We have calculated the large-$q$ expansion for the specific heat at the phase transition point in the two-dimensional $q$-state Potts model to the 23rd order in $1/\\sqrt{q}$ using the finite lattice method. The obtained series allows us to give highly convergent estimates of the specific heat for $q>4$ on the first order transition point. The result confirm us the correctness of the conjecture by Bhattacharya et al. on the asymptotic behavior of the specific heat for $q \\to 4_+$.

  4. Effect of soil temperature on resistance of rice to seedling blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weerapat, Praphas

    1964-01-01

    I":". . -"';-'. , ;::::, RP9?C2 '|GZ - GGt'W "ZR%Zh&'~I'Tgfi *" zo?: 3~Gh'&IPWI|tG! Eh QZ 'BXCAK. - TQ '-, ';: ?' ! ', -':;, i", , ;. :;?-i;'!:G :. BGGZZIIG BBIZGGG, ':G"G", Kl'GZ' h il 'ZZZIIGXIIXGLGZGBZZ;::"BGG. ''::, . :":G ';"', . '?'i... . ". -", "!4&, ";;. . "-TQj:. :. W$4'j@"+hg4ja, " gp, . '. ~@@i"-W? i:RICO, ". "keX5 q -4X'q '. "' ~= ', , '- -', '-' ", . ' ' '-, , . ?' Sxe ?-:. yx4tib&"-Mph'ig. . :t0. :-py$e'gi&Xg' 4hagpk- 'Qg ' . "; P...

  5. The accuracy, stability and convergence characteristics of solution procedures for nonlinear structural analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malek, Michele

    1974-01-01

    causes a large change in displacement, then the solution is likely to become unstable. However, if the structure stiffens as the load is increased then the solution will be stable. 28 aK NL, O fI q a. Unstabl. e Solution aK . o gq b. Stable... of stability is evident when the fourth-order Milne predictor-corrector equations are used to solve a simple first order linear differential equation. The Milne predictor equation is given by 33 q. =- q. + ?, dP [2g(q. ) ? g(q. , ) + 2g(q. )] 4 (III-30...

  6. Pion photo- and electroproduction and the chiral MAID interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hilt; B. C. Lehnhart; S. Scherer; L. Tiator

    2015-11-18

    We discuss the extended on-mass-shell scheme for manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. We present a calculation of pion photo- and electroproduction up to and including order $q^4$. The low-energy constants have been fixed by fitting experimental data in all available reaction channels. Our results can be accessed via a web interface, the so-called chiral MAID (http://www.kph.uni-mainz.de/MAID/chiralmaid/). We explain how our program works and how it can be used for further analysis.

  7. Recursion relations for the matrix elements of the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferester, Avner Herman

    1970-01-01

    and degree k are given expl1citly (&+~~. '(- ~) (&+R)/ (k-n)/fn+Z)/ n/ $/ J/ p/ L (y= ~~ . + . +~~is. n-0 Two generating functions for the LJ (2) are (10) ~p~ ?, Q t) -Q / (@ 4=o . F, (~ f-, . ~) The ~gQ satisfy the recursion formula ~ i, ~~y= (z... and the Lorentzian (c+z) will also be derived. The recursion relations will be obtained from the generating functions for 0he matrix elements. THE TWO-DIMERSIOVAL RARMO'. JIC OSCILLATOR AVD ITS WAVE- FUWCTIONS A particle of mass m, at the end of . a spr1ng fixed...

  8. Pion photo- and electroproduction and the chiral MAID interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilt, M; Scherer, S; Tiator, L

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the extended on-mass-shell scheme for manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. We present a calculation of pion photo- and electroproduction up to and including order $q^4$. The low-energy constants have been fixed by fitting experimental data in all available reaction channels. Our results can be accessed via a web interface, the so-called chiral MAID (http://www.kph.uni-mainz.de/MAID/chiralmaid/). We explain how our program works and how it can be used for further analysis.

  9. PowerConsumption(mW) Radio in sleeping state/periodic poll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    x q 4 Radio on Radio in sleeping state/periodic poll 1 2 3 H ' Gc ( G8 ( P E A c P '@ 8E 'E ' 9 0 P 5 0( A E 9 8 P0 A ( W 0 (A G '@ 8 ( G & b8 ( I A P 3 3 '8E b A A E G0( 8 P A E 2 B P 3 ' 5 8E ' b A ( ( ' b P ' G G8 V P@ P A A I@ P8 b6 '@ 8 ( G P A V A 6A 5 } A '@ (A P c @ ' ' A E 8 V 30 b

  10. Semiempirical range and stopping power values for heavy ions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, Ralph Franklin, III

    1968-01-01

    and Graphs . . . 21 USE OF THE TABLES AND GRAPHS. . . . . . . 2$ VALIDITY OF SZii1IEviPIRICAL RESULTS. . . . 26 RZFZRZNCES. APPENDIX . . ~ ~ ~ ~, ~ ~ ~ 28 29 LIST OF FIGURES Stopping power curves for 1ons of various atomic numbers 1n Al. The energy... Uj U1 ~ ~ ~ y m I (D r r co ~ ~ ~ a NOND t(1 Q ~ ~ ~ ~ rn a I 4 lf', CJ a Nu ++O (T N 4' 0 In ~ 4 Ill ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ N QNONQ 0 0 nj Q' ~ ~ \\ ((1 Q Q ~ 4 W Gj Q ~l (T ocoa ~ rn a' 4 C' ~ N N N ((I C tn ~ ~ ~ N rh fn nJ 0 Nt 0 0 0 rn...

  11. Engineering exotic phases for topologically protected quantum computation by emulating quantum dimer models RID B-7826-2008 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albuquerque, A. Fabricio; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Troyer, Matthias; Blatter, Gianni.

    2008-01-01

    1934. 5, Osgood, N ~ R "A Theory of Flexure for Beams uith Nonparallel Extreme Fibers. " Journal of ~Alied Eechanics3 Vol. VIS No. 13 (SePtemberp 1939). PP. A 122-126. 6. Saksena~ G. B. "Shear Stress in Tapering Beam. " Aircraft Engineer inE, Vol... derived in mgr tcnct on the theory of elastioity, ox ccrc ~ Y(p-q) ? 4-&x The plus or adnus sign is used depending on the angle 8 and ths shear Sheol groyono/ Figure 13 If 9 is batsmen the shear diagonal and Og, then Oj is aigsbraioa13y ~ than OX...

  12. Grazing activities of cattle on the Jornada Experimental Range during the summer growing season of 1950 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Henry Metz

    1955-01-01

    on ~ ? ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 44 ZXST OF FX0USS6 (eOSTZSUS0) 14 ~ 15m 17 ~ 18' Slo Timed aotivit1es of cattle in Al+ K~ 1960 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Timed activities of cattle in Angus't 6S 1950 ~ ~ ~ s ~ ~ Timed activities of cattle in August 6s 1950 ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ Timed... cattle in August Sls 1950 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Timed activities of cattle in August Q4S 1960 ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ Timed activities of cattle in August SVS 1950 s ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Timed activities of cattle in August Sly 1960 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Timed activities of oattle...

  13. SANS (small angle neutron scattering) measurement of deuterium-dislocation correlation in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuser, B.J.; Summerfield, G.C.; King, J.S. ); Epperson, J.E. )

    1989-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements have been made on deformed polycrystal palladium samples with and without deuterium dissolved in the solution phase ({alpha}) at room temperature. Concentrations were held constant during SANS experiments by an equilibrium gas pressure cell. The difference scattering cross section for the same sample with and without deuterium loading has a 1/Q behavior (Q=4{pi}/{lambda} sin{theta}/2) at intermediate values of Q. At very low values of Q the dependence is much stronger than 1/Q. The 1/Q behavior is attributed to deuterium trapping close to long dislocation cores forming rod-like scattering structures.

  14. Coal Distribution Database, 2008

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million7 December3Q4Q 2009

  15. Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million7 December3Q4Q

  16. DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101CompanyProduct: Crude7)8)4)1Q)3Q)4Q)

  17. DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101CompanyProduct: Crude7)8)4)1Q)3Q)4Q)1Q)

  18. DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101CompanyProduct: Crude7)8)4)1Q)3Q)4Q)1Q)2Q)

  19. Milk fat composition of a lactating dairy cow as influenced by abomasal infusion of various long chain fatty acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switzer, Leonard Anderson

    1971-01-01

    Ql 0 tD E IQ CD 4 ID 3 0 0 0 4 Q? 0 ttl CQ 0 0 4 4 LQ 0 Ln CJ 4 tD 3 0 Q- Q? IQ cnl 4 tD 3 Ql 0 CI 0 0 Q- 4 L- ID 0 Gl Lnl o cn 0 4 CQ 3 tD 0 0 0 C Q- 4 Q- IQ 0 Ql cnl cl cn ID 37 IQ V tl In U 4 O cnl 0 CO F ll O... in the same column uith dif'ferent superscripts (a, b, c) differed significantly (P&0. 05). 20 03 C 'I Cll IO LO I CO M OI IO N M IO N IO H C7I 4 LC3 D N M C LO CO D rt W N t N D Ot Cll N N CO LO IO (O CO D D D N \\0 IO LO (8 N N N LO M D f71 CII...

  20. The Fourth Positive System of Carbon Monoxide in the Hubble Space Telescope Spectra of Comets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roxana E. Lupu; Paul D. Feldman; Harold A. Weaver; Gian-Paolo Tozzi

    2007-08-22

    The rich structure of the Fourth Positive System (A-X) of carbon monoxide accounts for many of the spectral features seen in long slit HST-STIS observations of comets 153P/Ikeya-Zhang, C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), and C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), as well as in the HST-GHRS spectrum of comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. A detailed CO fluorescence model is developed to derive the CO abundances in these comets by simultaneously fitting all of the observed A-X bands. The model includes the latest values for the oscillator strengths and state parameters, and accounts for optical depth effects due to line overlap and self-absorption. The model fits yield radial profiles of CO column density that are consistent with a predominantly native source for all the comets observed by STIS. The derived CO abundances relative to water in these comets span a wide range, from 0.44% for C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), 7.2% for 153P/Ikeya-Zhang, 8.8% for C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) to 20.9% for C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). The subtraction of the CO spectral features using this model leads to the first identification of a molecular hydrogen line pumped by solar HI Lyman-beta longward of 1200A in the spectrum of comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. (Abridged)

  1. Diophantine properties for q-analogues of Dirichlet's beta function at positive integers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jouhet, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    small In this paper, we define $q$-analogues of Dirichlet's beta function at positive integers, which can be written as $\\beta_q(s)=\\sum_{k\\geq1}\\sum_{d|k}\\chi(k/d)d^{s-1}q^k$ for $s\\in\\N^*$, where $q$ is a complex number such that $|q|transcendance of the numbers $\\beta_q(2s+1)$ for $q$ algebraic such that $0numbers $\\beta_q(2s)$: we give a lower bound for the dimension of the vector space over $\\Q$ spanned by $1,\\beta_q(2),\\beta_q(4),...,\\beta_q(A)$, where $1/q\\in\\Z\\setminus\\{-1;1\\}$ and $A$ is an even integer. As consequences, for $1/q\\in\\Z\\setminus\\{-1;1\\}$, on the one hand there is an infinity of irrational numbers among $\\beta_q(2),\\beta_q(4),...$, and on the other hand at least one of the numbers $\\beta_q(2),\\...

  2. Canonical factorization and diagonalization of Baxterized braid matrices: Explicit constructions and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chakrabarti

    2003-05-07

    Braid matrices $\\hat{R}(\\theta)$, corresponding to vector representations, are spectrally decomposed obtaining a ratio $f_{i}(\\theta)/f_{i}(-\\theta)$ for the coefficient of each projector $P_{i}$ appearing in the decomposition. This directly yields a factorization $(F(-\\theta))^{-1}F(\\theta)$ for the braid matrix, implying also the relation $\\hat{R}(-\\theta)\\hat{R}(\\theta)=I$.This is achieved for $GL_{q}(n),SO_{q}(2n+1),SO_{q}(2n),Sp_{q}(2n)$ for all $n$ and also for various other interesting cases including the 8-vertex matrix.We explain how the limits $\\theta \\to \\pm \\infty$ can be interpreted to provide factorizations of the standard (non-Baxterized) braid matrices. A systematic approach to diagonalization of projectors and hence of braid matrices is presented with explicit constructions for $GL_{q}(2),GL_{q}(3),SO_{q}(3),SO_{q}(4),Sp_{q}(4)$ and various other cases such as the 8-vertex one. For a specific nested sequence of projectors diagonalization is obtained for all dimensions. In each factor $F(\\theta)$ our diagonalization again factors out all dependence on the spectral parameter $\\theta$ as a diagonal matrix. The canonical property implemented in the diagonalizers is mutual orthogonality of the rows. Applications of our formalism to the construction of $L-$operators and transfer matrices are indicated. In an Appendix our type of factorization is compared to another one proposed by other authors.

  3. Final_report_pub1.pdf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Nicholas

    2014-08-15

    The paper describes Soitecs project to plan,install,qualify and ramp a high volume CPV module manufactruing facility in Southern California. Soitec’s CPV module factory in San Diego was planned with an annual production capacity of 280MWDC. It was scheduled to be operational by the first quarter of 2013, and was expected to create several hundred direct and indirect jobs in the San Diego region. From ground breaking to facility readiness was completed in six months. This enabled the docking of equipment in the Q3’12 time frame. The first 140 MW of capacity was ready for operation in Q4’12. Production of the CX-M500 modules started in Q4 2012. The line yield and factory capacity were ramped in 2013. The annual production capacity demonstration was successfully completed in Q2 2014. The modules manufactured at the plant were used to supply utility scale demand in the US and also world markets.

  4. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG): Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Kat A.

    2014-01-10

    The Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) brought together a consortium of 14 leading clean energy rural, suburban, and low income communities throughout Connecticut. N2N was awarded $4.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitive BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program on August 10, 2010 to run a two-year pilot program (plus one year of transition and evaluation) (Award No. EMCBC- 00969-10). N2N tested innovative program models and hypotheses for improving Connecticut’s existing residential energy efficiency programs that are overseen by the ratepayer fund board and administered by CT utilities. N2N’s original goal was to engage 10 percent of households in participating communities to reduce their energy usage by 20 percent through energy upgrades and clean energy measures. N2N planned for customers to complete more comprehensive whole-home energy efficiency and clean energy measures and to achieve broader penetration than existing utility-administered regulated programs. Since this was an ARRA award, we report the following figures on job creation in Table 1. Since N2N is not continuing in its current form, we do not provide figures on job retention. Table 1 N2N Job Creation by Quarter Jobs Created 2010 Q4 6.65 2011 Q1 7.13 2011 Q2 4.98 2011 Q3 9.66 2011 Q4 5.43 2012 Q1 11.11 2012 Q2 6.85 2012 Q3 6.29 2012 Q4 6.77 2013 Q1 5.57 2013 Q2 8.35 2013 Q3 6.52 Total 85.31 The N2N team encountered several gaps in the existing efficiency program performance that hindered meeting N2N’s and DOE’s short-term program goals, as well as the State of Connecticut’s long-term energy, efficiency, and carbon reduction goals. However, despite the slow program start, N2N found evidence of increasing upgrade uptake rates over time, due to delayed customer action of one to two years from N2N introduction to completion of deeper household upgrades. Two main social/behavioral principles have contributed to driving deeper upgrades in CT: 1. Word of mouth, where people share their experience with others, which leads to others to take action; and 2. Self-herding, where people follow past behavior, which leads to deeper and deeper actions within individual households.

  5. The 40m General Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wignall, George D [ORNL; Bailey, Katherine M [ORNL; Buchanan, Michelle V [ORNL; Butler, Paul D [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Lynn, Gary W [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    A high-flux, 40m long small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument has been constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The facility utilizes a mechanical velocity selector, pinhole collimation and a high count-rate (> 105 Hz), large-area (1m2) two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The incident wavelength ( ), resolution ( / ), incident collimation and sample-detector distance are independently variable under computer control. The detector can translate 45cm off axis to increase the overall Q-range (< 0.001 < Q = 4 -1sin < 1 -1), where 2 is the angle of scatter. The design and characteristics of this instrument are described along with examples of scattering data to illustrate the performance.

  6. Digital Doppler radial velocity data compared objectively with digital reflectivity radar data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaver, Thomas Foster

    1980-01-01

    . , few components toward or away from the radar greater than -1 5 m s . However at 3 km and 4 km a def1n1te area of convergence is noted (Figs. 9 and 10). Although neither the ref lect1vity nor radial veloc1ty analyses at th1s time ind1cate any def1... I N 4 N CLI ILI IL O J ILI 6 0 ) Id CC OE IC + ILI IC I Vl ?T T W 0 0 0 LLI 0 Z 4( W 3 C- 7: LLI ri 4 4 I I N 0' 0 \\L III gQ ~ 4 N NZ WO 8 I 4l zj WN ~4I III W I- g I 0 R 0 O. I 0 0 ~ N 0 0 LI 0 0...

  7. Chebyshev polynomial approximation of the solution to an ordinary differential equation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Gil Chang

    1965-01-01

    DQ 50Q 4~( e 15 IF (D(I)+GAD(J)) GQ TO 500 DENQM~D ( I ) D(I)~D(J) D(V)~DENOM CONT INVE CONT I NVE 're ~ a ~ RRINT THE RESULTS osse ~ DQ 666 I~)e )5 C ( I ) ~DEXP ( D ( I li ) 5 ( I ) ~EVAI if O ( I ) ) YX(1)ARABS(C(I ) B(l ) ) CONT IN VE...120)o KEY IIQ FOFXY~YVALPDEXP(T(2e&))-YVALoooe2-YVAL GQ TQ )30 120 FOFXY~DEXP(-T(2oJ)) 2eO~YVAL -IeQ 130 RETURN END DOVBLE PRECI S I GN FVNCTI ON EVAL tl X ) C C THIS ROVTINE EVAl VATES Y(X) AT Xs C DIMENSION TX((5& 15) eXT(15s 15) & VX (15...

  8. Uncertainty Quantification of the Pion-Nucleon Low-Energy Coupling Constants up to Fourth Order in Chiral Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Wendt; B. D. Carlsson; A. Ekström

    2014-10-02

    We extract the statistical uncertainties for the pion-nucleon ($\\pi N$) low energy constants (LECs) up to fourth order $\\mathcal{O}(Q^4)$ in the chiral expansion of the nuclear effective Lagrangian. The LECs are optimized with respect to experimental scattering data. For comparison, we also present an uncertainty quantification that is based solely on \\pin{} scattering phase shifts. Statistical errors on the LECs are critical in order to estimate the subsequent uncertainties in \\textit{ab initio} modeling of light and medium mass nuclei which exploit chiral effective field theory. As an example of the this, we present the first complete predictions with uncertainty quantification of peripheral phase shifts of elastic proton-neutron scattering.

  9. An accounting system for a Class I motor common carrier of property 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packenham, Edward S

    1950-01-01

    QL 'be thoee a?4? to ecsssoetiag lgaoa fee therma Iwstim ef ~ swww ~ J4llkl sw%swl? 1$ %Ash QR OOMMtlaI lllWI leap%&~ S4? 4?ysHag+ f?ea ?see@tel eaah haaliieg ynreo4ese ia ws4? eoeoeasrg 'hy tho ical oat?WLieh?4 ~o of aet oetMomsctct wheseia a aanrsoe...?ahar wiD ba grayer?4g yr?yegg eyg?ci??4 e?4 yeiC. thC? CrrL?a yreei?C?e tha yassihglitf ef fLNlacc? t??a?t ee ahliC?CC??at ~?g. Cll ?f ths ?cyley?es will be yes ee e waahig basis* Vega?CX y?re? ??4 y?y?aaA 4?tes vill bs acCaaCcQ?4 se ee ts yaaac...

  10. Field Notes, Middle America (1956-1968) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, William B.

    2012-04-09

    &&dLdI f{. L & ? P'3< a3Lc t xLQc32s_? 42...T3{3k VL!e Cat5 j/b) [&vvL,L t e{Q 4Ur te{Qc{3c2YLc p&?2e2&Q X r ?Z t e{ . ! 2Q C }2eL X t e{ . ! 2Q $ &vc...

  11. Bacteriology of cottage cheese: Sources of microorganisms causing spoilage and relative numbers at various stages during processing and storage. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury, James B

    1951-01-01

    ~gi h ~ 4' h I 'I a 8 . 1, ~* tk' gM W . j I 1 " -'; ' '" tsee~jA-~'e", . ig. :+ epeiAe?sr . . ~;"iI?4LiIX. :~r s?I: 4@, .I ~ 4~&rd if. :4s~ 6%54i~'lreeeuse 4t Qii. . ~' @&at, ' tee440% 54 ' of . L0$: ?NAssste! a. . . ' &'e, +?4%4~'4+~~4?I.... 8 (& ' lc )i @~4 8 l l :jjfg, I --4 ~ ~ ~Aj ~u 4 Il A8 C5P 850 gkpg5. A'j q4j, p I ". Ji1 7 ~ , l ~ gK' * . lj I' jp:;. 'i p . l 4 me ~Xj . a'jikkjjb4 'kfi~so, , W iLLl"-, g~W':, . ~. ~ Mes hqt, . 'k wis etc~ &os...

  12. Ebensburg folio, Pennsylvania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butts, Charles, 1863-1946.

    1905-01-01

    ~zsisreet. diMrI'F44 BQ EMicer kcteet3 4ccQi, ~&? Eel'1$er rt GRtch ?t 'iezks 484 Vakvera~ wttb lkLreeJI, b-g5 bad ~teated tbet it bshe eb AatidL~'rr~ . t '0 ectido ixh t~ ~-'. ~ ~ a4 cQkvee& PeLleted . ~lg cr ' ~ 'r ead ?Bek:~ Rgb vere giveKL ee a feme ciao... MS' L~t~ @beg M. '' calves vere I. . ~i%'~ to eet et eve Qs~. + c4; age ~ ~~-'& ~t11 tbsp ead yf t:- -""-. . :rimeeti Thy j@r~ ~. . ';alf QCa~'~~ ~ ea ho P~p~74 ~+'QQ pQLQIQo H0 ~L ~&~ Q H 4@h eg pQ 4~a eZ eku 4~~~~ w& eR C&m @ALL~~. "~~ egml~a 'E...

  13. Measurement of B(d) mixing using opposite-side flavor tagging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hensel, Carsten; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2006-12-15

    identification algorithm can be found in Ref. [9]. DØ 0 1000 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 Muon jet charge N um be r o f e ve nt s (a) q(brec) 0 0 500 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 Muon jet charge N um be r o f e ve nt s (b) 0 250 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 Electron jet charge N um... for electrons QeJ. Here q#4;brec#7; is the charge of the muon from the reconstruction side. DØ 0 200 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 SV charge N um be r o f e ve nt s (a) q(brec) 0 0 1000 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 SV charge N um be r o f e ve nt s (b) 0 2000 -1 -0.5 0 0.5...

  14. Low voltage vertical recording preamplifier for hard disk drives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellachervu, Ramachandra Murthy

    2004-11-15

    CA1G mL + s2[CCgs+Cpi(C+Cgs)]g mNGmL 1 + s bracketleftBig 2C GmLAo + Cgs gmN + gpi(C+Cgs) gmNGmLAo bracketrightBig + s2 [2CCgs+Cpi(C+Cgs)]Aog mNGmL (6.22) The terms used have been shown in Fig.29. A1 = GmLRGmL where RGmL is the output resistance... Q2 Q4 Vout/2 Q3 RL Cpi Cpi GmL LR Cgs Ib 3Ib/8 3Ib/8 Vbias VCC VEE C Fig. 29. Schematic to understand signal feedthrough due to parasitic base-emitter ca- pacitor The equation can be simplified if we assume gmN >> GmLAo6 and can be written as, Vo Vin...

  15. An investigation of relationships between meso- and synoptic-scale phenomena 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, James Eugene

    1971-01-01

    . The figure shows the trough sloping westward from '04i . 0, &47' . ' / 'I I la 2:-, f WQQ. ' gf' , I g I. . I . ?, i&9 I +3~o . . --'; (a) 850 mb 34 ) 1- K . g(7!- . I , p6. (c) 500 mb 'r 'I 9" . 3O8 303 , . 3l 2 1 332 (b) 700 mb Fig. 6...'. '. '" "147 ~; C . r, t I' l. , 4 I -s 430 , 1I 1/0 3- 156 147 I 44, , $4 (a) 850 mb '652 6 fy, '". 534~53'4 &0 1540% P q'', -4 65$ 'g' )( C' ~i5~7 (c) 500 mb 0910 ' 88 I, ' ' 8196gp ', 70 -" - . - : . , '- ' ' ' ' ' ' . 'F4 0 . 97p 000...

  16. Waterfowl utilization characteristics of floodwater retarding structures in north-central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobaugh, William Carl

    1977-01-01

    of the physical and limnological characteristics of 55 flood prevention lakes. Parameters +I IU Ql 0 E 0. 0 Ql Ql 0 QI Ql O IQ 4 lQ L Ql 5- I/I cL Ql IQ K L. LI QI QI CL Ol ) CU cC cC CU 0 O LI IU I IQ I- Ql 5- Ql Cll IU IV O lQ 4 IU I...- CO M IQ O 3 ~ 0 GL 0 E/) LL III z 0. cC Ql 0 lU CL Ql OI Ul QI OI IQ CL Ul O C O IQ Ql L 0 0 0 L 0 Ql IU CL Ql Lll CQ Shoreline development Surface area ++ ++ ++ Age Average depth Drainage area to surface area...

  17. An economic evaluation of fertilizer application to Coastal Bermudagrass under irrigation on Lufkin fine sandy loam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochaska, Frank Charles

    1958-01-01

    AZ:-V@~'. W. . ; j)~303;. ~t42@~6 W. 't5e':, X eqv Ny@ee4. . - gW':. Mi': 6e~m. qZ k '. 5g:~~ "'~M~'. 4pggiRCS; , . 'A~t?'. "Xgg8, . ' ?- ~qi ''Sijb] johns' A~S~i@tmeX'%e~~m = ', 1 il l:, . "i 'i":. ", , i:;:, :, . 'ilia. ;:;::. ::." ' Ag ggMSI iC!L V... ''. '. . . =, . '=;;;-"i-"' A&~Mf@$. C@';40 'g5$XS. ; @4i6"-Cli'PS~4. , 6$$ '0 . (@Bi?' ' 'Q~' Qm'MM') 1 (kg', K4'. X. 4AQCi~wWQw ) A~mC'. 3@~8 1 J +; r ! ~BV~~RVS - - SyeeQ4:. -jp~t44vide La;~assai-to. . ~-. 8? -4+-. '-NLlMqth? -: -. kaa~~ie& MM...

  18. FY12 Quarter 3 Computing Utilization Report – LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wampler, Cheryl L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McClellan, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    DSW continues to dominate the capacity workload, with a focus in Q3 on common model baselining runs in preparation for the Annual Assessment Review (AAR) of the weapon systems. There remains unmet demand for higher fidelity simulations, and for increased throughput of simulations. Common model baselining activities would benefit from doubling the resolution of the models and running twice as many simulations. Capacity systems were also utilized during the quarter to prepare for upcoming Level 2 milestones. Other notable DSW activities include validation of new physics models and safety studies. The safety team used the capacity resources extensively for projects involving 3D computer simulations for the Furrow series of experiments at DARHT (a Level 2 milestone), fragment impact, surety theme, PANTEX assessments, and the 120-day study. With the more than tripling of classified capacity computing resources with the addition of the Luna system and the safety team's imminent access to the Cielo system, demand has been met for current needs. The safety team has performed successful scaling studies on Luna up to 16K PE size-jobs with linear scaling, running the large 3D simulations required for the analysis of Furrow. They will be investigating scaling studies on the Cielo system with the Lustre file system in Q4. Overall average capacity utilization was impacted by negative effects of the LANL Voluntary Separation Program (VSP) at the beginning of Q3, in which programmatic staffing was reduced by 6%, with further losses due to management backfills and attrition, resulting in about 10% fewer users. All classified systems were impacted in April by a planned 2 day red network outage. ASC capacity workload continues to focus on code development, regression testing, and verification and validation (V&V) studies. Significant capacity cycles were used in preparation for a JOWOG in May and several upcoming L2 milestones due in Q4. A network transition has been underway on the unclassified networks to increase access of all ASC users to the unclassified systems through the Yellow Turquoise Integration (YeTI) project. This will help to alleviate the longstanding shortage of resources for ASC unclassified code development and regression testing, and also make a broader palette of machines available to unclassified ASC users, including PSAAP Alliance users. The Moonlight system will be the first capacity resource to be made available through the YETI project, and will make available a significant increase in cycles, as well as GPGPU accelerator technology. The Turing and Lobo machines will be decommissioned in the next quarter. ASC projects running on Cielo as part of the CCC-3 include turbulence, hydrodynamics, burn, asteroids, polycrystals, capability and runtime performance improvements, and materials including carbon and silicone.

  19. Mechanism of runaway electron beam formation during plasma disruptions in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdullaev, S S; Wongrach, K; Tokar, M; Koslowski, H R; Willi, O; Zeng, L

    2015-01-01

    A new physical mechanism of the formation of runaway electron (RE) beams during plasma disruptions in tokamaks is proposed. The plasma disruption is caused by strong stochastic magnetic field formed due to nonlinearly excited low-mode number magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. It is conjectured that the runaway electron beam is formed in the central plasma region confined inside the intact magnetic surface located between $q=1$ and the closest low--order rational magnetic surfaces [$q=3/2$, $q=4/3$, \\dots]. It results in that runaway electron beam current has a helical nature with a predominant $m/n=1/1$ component. The thermal quench and current decay times are estimated using the collisional models for electron diffusion and ambipolar particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field, respectively. Possible mechanisms of the decay of runaway electron current due to an outward drift electron orbits and resonance interaction of high--energy electrons with the $m/n=1/1$ MHD mode are discussed.

  20. Tax decisions involving the cost method of inventory valuation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMenamy, Bobby Benton

    1950-01-01

    '. ?1'pQ@lg'QP ig, ". t O'Q@ ". 'Q J. '~" @~i 8 GXG C4 S6 7) PQ. &3. C'5'c' 'P~$. C" 'v'1&~ PIC&/'~%CD%'b ". QCO~1"10@7'8 ZRGQ4 3;4-'i;", ZCQQgpy P&C. $~tQ jf&53 ~~'1 $1 lg ~CXXQi1 d') + s. 2 ( C ) c XZ 3iQC9 'Nl& ACt Gf 1~1'3 y v~l8 BO&~il-"". 'XC...~15QXCX 8 pPQVXSXGlh 'KVQ~ 'K'lg OGB'5 9" Q2g p~5Q~B l&PQBQCGG. 8211CC @18 DC'. i', $Q~NDg Qf 4-. !'w QQQX' Bit&11 LAC3M8 ROC & GZ'WZl66 Q. MXQGA~ 49 M16'- BCC&QQG~g f, Q?" 4V pX'GQU4510'1 Qa iI-'Q "36~'43%43. ~~ 81 t9. @18 ' gX153TXc?:XHg ig, g. '?XO...

  1. Depression among abused or neglected children in substitute care 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, Gail Cohn

    1985-01-01

    CJ I OI CJ CO COCh 0?0?Q Q HIO 0 4J V t0 00 0 N t0 0 Cl 4J 0 Cl nl~ JO g 0 ttt 0 ?0 R M mW ?II M&?CI CJQYI NQN0?I 0 V t0 0 0 4J CJ I/I Q A ?a IOI 0?CO MCJ COI 0?mQ~ OC Cl 44 CI 4J 44 m04~ CO 4J 4J 44 5 A CI 0 Q... Ch CJ CO t?t U1 Cl '0 Q 00 0 44 IJ 0, 44 44 0 84?04 84A' 4J 44 0 IH 6 A t0 44 0 Q CO Q 4J JJ 0 8)8 ttl 44 CI Q 0 0 4J 0 al Cl 0 ?0 0 CI 44 04 M t0 A I A V ?n Cl o 0 0 C4 [00 A 26 the clinical group scores. Each...

  2. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Delta resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M; Girlanda, L; Schiavilla, R; Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2015-02-01

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including ?-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale).The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data inmore »this range, we obtain a ?2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  3. Mechanisms of plasma disruption and runaway electron losses in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdullaev, S S; Wongrach, K; Tokar, M; Koslowski, H R; Willi, O; Zeng, L

    2015-01-01

    Based on the analysis of data from the numerous dedicated experiments on plasma disruptions in the TEXTOR tokamak mechanisms of the formation of runaway electron beams and their losses are proposed. The plasma disruption is caused by strong stochastic magnetic field formed due to nonlinearly excited low-mode number MHD modes. It is hypothesized that the runaway electron beam is formed in the central plasma region confined inside the intact magnetic surface located between $q=1$ and the closest low--order rational [$q=4/3$ or $q=3/2$] magnetic surfaces. The thermal quench time caused by the fast electron transport in a stochastic magnetic field is calculated using the collisional transport model. The current decay stage is due to the ambipolar particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. The runaway electron beam in the confined plasma region is formed due to their acceleration the inductive toroidal electric field. The runaway electron beam current is modeled as a sum of toroidally symmetric part and a ...

  4. Liouville Brownian motion at criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rémi Rhodes; Vincent Vargas

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we construct the Brownian motion of Liouville Quantum Gravity with central charge $c=1$ (more precisely we restrict to the corresponding free field theory). Liouville quantum gravity with $c=1$ corresponds to two-dimensional string theory and is the conjectural scaling limit of large planar maps weighted with a $O(n=2)$ loop model or a $Q=4$-state Potts model embedded in a two dimensional surface in a conformal manner. Following \\cite{GRV1}, we start by constructing the critical LBM from one fixed point $x\\in\\mathbb{R}^2$ (or $x\\in\\S^2$), which amounts to changing the speed of a standard planar Brownian motion depending on the local behaviour of the critical Liouville measure $M'(dx)=-X(x)e^{2X(x)}\\,dx$ (where $X$ is a Gaussian Free Field, say on $\\mathbb{S}^2$). Extending this construction simultaneously to all points in $\\mathbb{R}^2$ requires a fine analysis of the potential properties of the measure $M'$. This allows us to construct a strong Markov process with continuous sample paths living on the support of $M'$, namely a dense set of Hausdorff dimension $0$. We finally construct the associated Liouville semigroup, resolvent, Green function, heat kernel and Dirichlet form. In passing, we extend to quite a general setting the construction of the critical Gaussian multiplicative chaos that was initiated in \\cite{Rnew7,Rnew12} and also establish new capacity estimates for the critical Gaussian multiplicative chaos.

  5. New method to measure proper motions of microlensed sources: Application to candidate free-floating-planet event MOA-2011-BLG-262

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skowron, Jan [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Udalski, Andrzej; Szyma?ski, Micha? K., E-mail: jskowron@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: msz@astrouw.edu.plm [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2014-04-20

    We develop a new method to measure source proper motions in microlensing events, which can partially overcome problems due to blending. It takes advantage of the fact that the source position is known precisely from the microlensing event itself. We apply this method to the event MOA-2011-BLG-262, which has a short timescale t {sub E} = 3.8 day, a companion mass ratio q = 4.7 × 10{sup –3}, and a very high or high lens-source relative proper motion ?{sub rel} = 20 mas yr{sup –1} or 12 mas yr{sup –1} (for two possible models). These three characteristics imply that the lens could be a brown dwarf or a massive planet with a roughly Earth-mass 'moon'. The probability of such an interpretation would be greatly increased if it could be shown that the high lens-source relative proper motion was primarily due to the lens rather than the source. Based on the long-term monitoring data of the Galactic bulge from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, we measure the source proper motion that is small, ?{sub s}=(?2.3,?0.9)±(2.8,2.6) mas yr{sup ?1} in a (north, east) Galactic coordinate frame. These values are then important input into a Bayesian analysis of the event presented in a companion paper by Bennett et al.

  6. Physics in Ultra-strong Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, R C

    2000-01-01

    In magnetic fields stronger than B_Q = 4.4 X 10^13 Gauss, an electron'sLandau excitation energy exceeds its rest energy. I review the physics of thisstrange regime and some of its implications for the crusts and magneto- spheresof neutron stars. In particular, I describe how ultra-strong fields >> render the vacuum birefringent and capable of distorting and magnifying images ("magnetic lensing"); >> change the self-energy of electrons: as B increases they are first slightly lighter than $m_e$, then slightly heavier; >> cause photons to rapidly split and merge with each other; >> distort atoms into long, thin cylinders and molecules into strong, polymer-like chains; >> enhance the pair density in thermal pair-photon gases; >> stronglysuppress photon-electron scattering, and >> drive the vacuum itself unstable,at extremely large B. In a concluding section, I discuss recent observations of the spindownhistories of soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars. The magnetarmodel gives a promising framework for...

  7. Physics in Ultra-strong Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert C. Duncan

    2000-02-23

    In magnetic fields stronger than B_Q = 4.4 X 10^13 Gauss, an electron's Landau excitation energy exceeds its rest energy. I review the physics of this strange regime and some of its implications for the crusts and magneto- spheres of neutron stars. In particular, I describe how ultra-strong fields >> render the vacuum birefringent and capable of distorting and magnifying images ("magnetic lensing"); >> change the self-energy of electrons: as B increases they are first slightly lighter than $m_e$, then slightly heavier; >> cause photons to rapidly split and merge with each other; >> distort atoms into long, thin cylinders and molecules into strong, polymer-like chains; >> enhance the pair density in thermal pair-photon gases; >> strongly suppress photon-electron scattering, and >> drive the vacuum itself unstable, at extremely large B. In a concluding section, I discuss recent observations of the spindown histories of soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars. The magnetar model gives a promising framework for understanding these data.

  8. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including $?$'s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Piarulli; L. Girlanda; R. Schiavilla; R. Navarro Pérez; J. E. Amaro; E. Ruiz Arriola

    2015-02-16

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including $\\Delta$-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component. The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders ($Q^2$ and $Q^4$, respectively, $Q$ denoting generically the low momentum scale) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constants multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 $pp$ and 2982 $np$ data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a $\\chi^2$/datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, $R_{\\rm L}$ and $R_{\\rm S}$ respectively, ranging from $(R_{\\rm L},R_{\\rm S})=(1.2,0.8)$ fm down to $(0.8,0.6)$ fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.

  9. Latest Results of ILC High-Gradient R&D 9-cell Cavities at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rongli Geng

    2008-02-11

    It has been over a year since JLAB started processing and testing ILC 9-cell cavities in the frame work of ILC high-gradient cavity R&D, aiming at the goal of a 35 MV/m gradient at a Q #4; of 1E10 with a yield of 90%. The necessary cavity processing steps include field flatness tuning, electropolishing (EP), hydrogen out-gassing under vacuum, high-pressure water rinsing, clean room assembly, and low temperature bake. These are followed by RF test at 2 Kelvin. Ultrasonic cleaning with Micro-90, an effective post-EP rinsing recipe discovered at JLAB, is routinely used. Seven industry manufactured 9-cell TESLAshape cavities are processed and tested repeatedly. So far, 33 EP cycles are accumulated, corresponding to more than 65 hours of active EP time. An emphasis put on RF testing is to discern cavity quench characteristics, including its nature and its location. Often times, the cavity performance is limited by thermal-magnetic quench instead of field emission. The quench field in some cavities is lower than 20 MV/m and remains unchanged despite repeated EP, implying material and/or fabrication defects. The quench field in some other cavities is high but changes unpredictably after repeated EP, suggesting processing induced defects. Based on our experience and results, several areas are identified where improvement is needed to improve cavity performance as well as yield.

  10. Minimally nonlocal nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including ? resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M.; Girlanda, L.; Schiavilla, R.; Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including ?-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale). The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0–300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$more »and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a ?2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  11. Elements of Greek tragedy in three Eugene O'Neill plays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koinm, Albert Julius

    1963-01-01

    '-&o &%3 A eel ~Re~ AG"" VV'"L"XVZ K ~' ' 0 X f&Qkh M R~ SPY 8o Pe 6'bhWCC ~ =-'g* K@ Ey ZQk~~ SQP CAW'~ GR~~~BC ERA 5". '499~ 48VXCC QD 86VQi, CL~. ~G~K~ %~CD ~QQ I'LL tJ::N tNl5~ Qf &98 MQS So ~ 638v e. "~8'~ M mains g ~~ vre~M e Mxm'8... ~ -'Pe Se Se f'~ ZQZ' ll& ~q& ~WC~ QZ ~X Q~& ~%~%I XQ Q% FG~~' Q~ ~~Q Q4RG TJCQ'L 9. B'GQ 5F~@ ~ pPI?3QCC o l j AU~ ~ ~ . a. e :*' e i s s a 0 o s 0 e e e e o e o e s s XVe C JJKU3SXGii e s y s o e o e s o e o e @ o e LXST GF 56K'=3 CGPiSVL~M e a...

  12. The unexpected role of D waves in low-energy neutral pion photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Fernandez-Ramirez

    2009-12-21

    It has been commonly assumed that low-energy neutral pion photoproduction from the proton can be described accounting only for S and P waves, and that higher partial waves are irrelevant. We have found that this assumption is not correct and that the inclusion of D waves is necessary to obtain a reliable extraction of the $E_{0+}$ multipole from experimental data. This is due in large measure to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD which leads to very small S-wave contributions. This makes the usual partial wave expansion less accurate and although D waves are small, their contribution is enhanced through the interference with P waves, which compromises the S-wave extraction from data if D waves are not taken into account. In our work we have used Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory to one loop, and up to ${\\cal O}(q^4)$, to account for the S and P waves, while D waves are added in an almost model-independent way using standard Born terms and vector mesons. We also show that higher partial waves do not play an important role.

  13. SELF-CONSISTENT SIZE AND VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Margaret [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schlichting, Hilke E., E-mail: mpan@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  14. Plano de la Habana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Francisco Rojo

    1963-01-01

    , ", '' XOiQ. t ?T-'1:. ". iiX, ', . @X"lc:. :". iC;3X'661871 f'&)p iQQQ~~Q4MW~XCy w~~~' 8"', ~+~~'~6&, . ". "XCXGSp QD&' GCCQUQ0AB4ay A. QO54pi99 KAXCh XVIAi'-" ~CCG~lCJXC '@16 "QDf3 iC t:$Q&~ 0 3X'3iOB8 '". ""GQM PQPYQt 5Q "M~ 8~' Xg5Ai'lG 4~ pL'354"'C...~ QAC'. PG3, $, GVr* '4"'b% CWLPO84XOXl "'A~~Q &"' fhl~u&PX191 BBVG'XikC? c. ' Q+848~% 'iklf, Cgl WQ'gg~ Qg vpgg~ iV'!=8V@1'"g W9. 2. 1 g3. 'O', "MBA fl&~V@V QC X'CGlig@l. y XD p~@QC!X'Q1 i v Q~tX', V@X'~ CgZR~ M1Q VD3. 'QGtiS, GD 0'"' '&'z1VC;1'u...

  15. 8D likelihood effective Higgs couplings extraction framework in h ? 4?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Lykken, Joe; Spiropulu, Maria; Vega-Morales, Roberto; Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex; Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL; Xie, Si

    2015-01-23

    We present an overview of a comprehensive analysis framework aimed at performing direct extraction of all possible effective Higgs couplings to neutral electroweak gauge bosons in the decay to electrons and muons, the so called ‘golden channel’. Our framework is based primarily on a maximum likelihood method constructed from analytic expressions of the fully differential cross sections for h ? 4l and for the dominant irreducible $ q\\overline{q} $ ? 4l background, where 4l = 2e2?, 4e, 4?. Detector effects are included by an explicit convolution of these analytic expressions with the appropriate transfer function over all center of massmore »variables. Utilizing the full set of observables, we construct an unbinned detector-level likelihood which is continuous in the effective couplings. We consider possible ZZ, Z?, and ?? couplings simultaneously, allowing for general CP odd/even admixtures. A broad overview is given of how the convolution is performed and we discuss the principles and theoretical basis of the framework. This framework can be used in a variety of ways to study Higgs couplings in the golden channel using data obtained at the LHC and other future colliders.« less

  16. Phonon-roton modes of liquid 4He beyond the roton in MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuah, Richard T NIST Center for Neutron Research , Gaithersburg, MD; Omar Diallo, Souleymane ORNL; Adams, Mark A. ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Kirichek, Oleg ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Glyde, Henry R University of Delaware

    2013-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements of the phonon-roton (P-R) mode of superfluid 4He confined in 47 A MCM-41 at T = 0.5 K at wave vectors, Q, beyond the roton wave vector (QR = 1.92 A-1). Measurements beyond the roton require access to high wave vectors (up to Q = 4 A-1) with excellent energy resolution and high statistical precision. The present results show for the first time that at T = 0.5 K the P-R mode in MCM-41 extends out to wave-vector Q 3.6 A-1 with the same energy and zero width (within precision) as observed in bulk superfluid 4He. Layer modes in the roton region are also observed. Specifically, the P-R mode energy, !Q, increases with Q for Q > QR and reaches a plateau at a maximum energy !Q = 2 where is the roton energy, = 0.74 0.01 meV in MCM-41. This upper limit means the P-R mode decays to two rotons when its energy exceeds 2 . It also means that the P-R mode does not decay to two layers modes. If the P-R could decay to two layer modes, !Q would plateau at a lower energy, !Q = 2 L where L = 0.60 meV is the energy of the roton like minimum of the layer mode. The observation of the P-R mode with energy up to 2 shows that the P-R mode and the layer modes are independent modes with apparently little interaction between them.

  17. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  18. High performance charge breeder for HIE-ISOLDE and TSR@ISOLDE applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shornikov, Andrey Mertzig, Robert C.; Wenander, Fredrik J. C.; Beebe, Edward N.; Pikin, Alexander

    2015-01-09

    We report on the development of the HEC{sup 2} (High Energy Compression and Current) charge breeder, a possible high performance successor to REXEBIS at ISOLDE. The new breeder would match the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE linac upgrade and make full use of the possible installation of a storage ring at ISOLDE (the TSR@ISOLDE initiative [1]). Dictated by ion beam acceptance and capacity requirements, the breeder features a 2–3.5 A electron beam. In many cases very high charge states, including bare ions up to Z=70 and Li/Na-like up to Z=92 could be requested for experiments in the storage ring, therefore, electron beam energies up to 150 keV are required. The electron-beam current density needed for producing ions with such high charge states at an injection rate into TSR of 0.5–1 Hz is between 10 and 20 kA/cm{sup 2}, which agrees with the current density needed to produce A/q<4.5 ions for the HIE-ISOLDE linac with a maximum repetition rate of 100 Hz. The first operation of a prototype electron gun with a pulsed electron beam of 1.5 A and 30 keV was demonstrated in a joint experiment with BNL [2]. In addition, we report on further development aiming to achieve CW operation of an electron beam having a geometrical transverse ion-acceptance matching the injection of 1{sup +} ions (11.5 ?m), and an emittance/energy spread of the extracted ion beam matching the downstream mass separator and RFQ (0.08 ?m normalized / ± 1%)

  19. Measurements on the 3He+?System at ANKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Khoukaz

    2010-11-03

    The differential and total cross-sections for the dp \\to 3He \\eta reaction have been measured in a high precision high statistics COSY-ANKE experiment near threshold using a continuous beam energy ramp up to an excess energy Q of 11.3 MeV with essentially 100% acceptance. The kinematics allowed the mean value of Q to be determined to about 9 keV. Evidence is found for the effects of higher partial waves for Q > 4 MeV. The very rapid rise of the total cross-section to its maximum value within 0.5 MeV of threshold implies a very large \\eta 3He scattering length and hence the presence of a quasi-bound state extremely close to threshold. In addition, differential and total cross-sections have been measured at excess energies of 19.5, 39.4, and 59.4 MeV over the full angular range. While at 19.5 MeV the results can be described in terms of s- and p-wave production, by 59.4 MeV higher partial waves are required. Including the 19.5 MeV point together with the near-threshold data in a global s- and p-wave fit gives a poorer overall description of the data though the position of the pole in the \\eta 3He scattering amplitude, corresponding to the quasi-bound or virtual state, is hardly changed.

  20. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  1. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  2. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2004-09-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

  3. XCOM intrinsic dimensionality for low-Z elements at diagnostic energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bornefalk, Hans [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To determine the intrinsic dimensionality of linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) from XCOM for elements with low atomic number (Z = 1-20) at diagnostic x-ray energies (25-120 keV). H{sub 0}{sup q}, the hypothesis that the space of LACs is spanned by q bases, is tested for various q-values. Methods: Principal component analysis is first applied and the LACs are projected onto the first q principal component bases. The residuals of the model values vs XCOM data are determined for all energies and atomic numbers. Heteroscedasticity invalidates the prerequisite of i.i.d. errors necessary for bootstrapping residuals. Instead wild bootstrap is applied, which, by not mixing residuals, allows the effect of the non-i.i.d residuals to be reflected in the result. Credible regions for the eigenvalues of the correlation matrix for the bootstrapped LAC data are determined. If subsequent credible regions for the eigenvalues overlap, the corresponding principal component is not considered to represent true data structure but noise. If this happens for eigenvalues l and l + 1, for any l{<=}q, H{sub 0}{sup q} is rejected. Results: The largest value of q for which H{sub 0}{sup q} is nonrejectable at the 5%-level is q = 4. This indicates that the statistically significant intrinsic dimensionality of low-Z XCOM data at diagnostic energies is four. Conclusions: The method presented allows determination of the statistically significant dimensionality of any noisy linear subspace. Knowledge of such significant dimensionality is of interest for any method making assumptions on intrinsic dimensionality and evaluating results on noisy reference data. For LACs, knowledge of the low-Z dimensionality might be relevant when parametrization schemes are tuned to XCOM data. For x-ray imaging techniques based on the basis decomposition method (Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733-744, 1976), an underlying dimensionality of two is commonly assigned to the LAC of human tissue at diagnostic energies. The finding of a higher statistically significant dimensionality thus raises the question whether a higher assumed model dimensionality (now feasible with the advent of multibin x-ray systems) might also be practically relevant, i.e., if better tissue characterization results can be obtained.

  4. After runaway: The trans-Hill stage of planetesimal growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lithwick, Yoram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA and Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    When planetesimals begin to grow by coagulation, they first enter an epoch of runaway, during which the biggest bodies grow faster than all the others. The questions of how runaway ends and what comes next have not been answered satisfactorily. We show that runaway is followed by a new stage—the 'trans-Hill stage'—that commences when the bodies that dominate viscous stirring ('big bodies') become trans-Hill, i.e., when their Hill velocity matches the random speed of the small bodies they accrete. Subsequently, the small bodies' random speed grows in lockstep with the big bodies' sizes, such that the system remains in the trans-Hill state. Trans-Hill growth is crucial for determining the efficiency of growing big bodies, as well as their growth timescale and size spectrum. Trans-Hill growth has two sub-stages. In the earlier one, which occurs while the stirring bodies remain sufficiently small, the evolution is collisionless, i.e., collisional cooling among all bodies is irrelevant. The efficiency of forming big bodies in this collisionless sub-stage is very low, ?10? << 1, where ? ? 0.005(a/AU){sup –1} is the ratio between the physical size of a body and its Hill radius. Furthermore, the size spectrum is flat (equal mass per size decade, i.e., q = 4). This collisionless trans-Hill solution explains results from previous coagulation simulations for both the Kuiper Belt and the asteroid belt. The second trans-Hill sub-stage commences once the stirring bodies grow big enough (>?{sup –1} × the size of the accreted small bodies). After that time, collisional cooling among small bodies controls the evolution. The efficiency of forming big bodies rises and the size spectrum becomes more top heavy. Trans-Hill growth can terminate in one of two ways, depending on the sizes of the small bodies. First, mutual accretion of big bodies can become significant and conglomeration proceeds until half of the total mass is converted into big bodies. This mode of growth may explain the observed size distributions of small bodies in the solar system and is explored in our subsequent work. Second, if the big bodies' orbits become separated by their Hill radius, oligarchy commences. This mode likely precedes the formation of fully fledged planets.

  5. MEASURING THE ABUNDANCE OF SUB-KILOMETER-SIZED KUIPER BELT OBJECTS USING STELLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Hilke E. [Department of Earth and Space Science, UCLA, 595 Charles East Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ofek, Eran O.; Gal-Yam, Avishay [Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sari, Re'em [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Nelan, Edmund P.; Livio, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wenz, Michael [Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Muirhead, Philip [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 130-33, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Javanfar, Nikta, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics, Physics Engineering and Astronomy, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2012-12-20

    We present here the analysis of about 19,500 new star hours of low ecliptic latitude observations (|b| {<=} 20 Degree-Sign ) obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope's Fine Guidance Sensors over a time span of more than nine years, which is in addition to the {approx}12, 000 star hours previously analyzed by Schlichting et al. Our search for stellar occultations by small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) yielded one new candidate event corresponding to a body with a 530 {+-} 70 m radius at a distance of about 40 AU. Using bootstrap simulations, we estimate a probability of Almost-Equal-To 5% that this event is due to random statistical fluctuations within the new data set. Combining this new event with the single KBO occultation reported by Schlichting et al. we arrive at the following results: (1) the ecliptic latitudes of 6. Degree-Sign 6 and 14. Degree-Sign 4 of the two events are consistent with the observed inclination distribution of larger, 100-km-sized KBOs. (2) Assuming that small, sub-kilometer-sized KBOs have the same ecliptic latitude distribution as their larger counterparts, we find an ecliptic surface density of KBOs with radii larger than 250 m of N(r > 250 m) = 1.1{sup +1.5}{sub -0.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} deg{sup -2}; if sub-kilometer-sized KBOs have instead a uniform ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 Degree-Sign < b < 20 Degree-Sign then N(r > 250 m) = 4.4{sup +5.8}{sub -2.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2}. This is the best measurement of the surface density of sub-kilometer-sized KBOs to date. (3) Assuming the KBO size distribution can be well described by a single power law given by N(> r){proportional_to}r{sup 1-q}, where N(> r) is the number of KBOs with radii greater than r, and q is the power-law index, we find q = 3.8 {+-} 0.2 and q = 3.6 {+-} 0.2 for a KBO ecliptic latitude distribution that follows the observed distribution for larger, 100-km-sized KBOs and a uniform KBO ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 Degree-Sign < b < 20 Degree-Sign , respectively. (4) Regardless of the exact power law, our results suggest that small KBOs are numerous enough to satisfy the required supply rate for the Jupiter family comets. (5) We can rule out a single power law below the break with q > 4.0 at 2{sigma}, confirming a strong deficit of sub-kilometer-sized KBOs compared to a population extrapolated from objects with r > 45 km. This suggests that small KBOs are undergoing collisional erosion and that the Kuiper Belt is a true analog to the dust producing debris disks observed around other stars.

  6. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    The Steam Turbine critical stationary structural components are high integrity Large Shell and Valve Casing heavy section Castings, containing high temperature steam under high pressures. Hence to support the development of advanced materials technology for use in an AUSC steam turbine capable of operating with steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F) and 35 Mpa (5000 psia), Casting alloy selection and evaluation of mechanical, metallurgical properties and castability with robust manufacturing methods are mandated. Alloy down select from Phase 1 based on producability criteria and creep rupture properties tested by NETL-Albany and ORNL directed the consortium to investigate cast properties of Haynes 282 and Haynes 263. The goals of Task 4 in Phase 2 are to understand a broader range of mechanical properties, the impact of manufacturing variables on those properties. Scale up the size of heats to production levels to facilitate the understanding of the impact of heat and component weight, on metallurgical and mechanical behavior. GE Power & Water Materials and Processes Engineering for the Phase 2, Task 4.0 Castings work, systematically designed and executed casting material property evaluation, multiple test programs. Starting from 15 lbs. cylinder castings to world’s first 17,000 lbs. poured weight, heavy section large steam turbine partial valve Haynes 282 super alloy casting. This has demonstrated scalability of the material for steam Turbine applications. Activities under Task 4.0, Investigated and characterized various mechanical properties of Cast Haynes 282 and Cast Nimonic 263. The development stages involved were: 1) Small Cast Evaluation: 4 inch diam. Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 Cylinders. This provided effects of liquidus super heat range and first baseline mechanical data on cast versions of conventional vacuum re-melted and forged Ni based super alloys. 2) Step block castings of 300 lbs. and 600 lbs. Haynes 282 from 2 foundry heats were evaluated which demonstrated the importance of proper heat treat cycles for Homogenization, and Solutionizing parameters selection and implementation. 3) Step blocks casting of Nimonic 263: Carried out casting solidification simulation analysis, NDT inspection methods evaluation, detailed test matrix for Chemical, Tensile, LCF, stress rupture, CVN impact, hardness and J1C Fracture toughness section sensitivity data and were reported. 4) Centrifugal Casting of Haynes 282, weighing 1400 lbs. with hybrid mold (half Graphite and half Chromite sand) mold assembly was cast using compressor casing production tooling. This test provided Mold cooling rates influence on centrifugally cast microstructure and mechanical properties. Graphite mold section out performs sand mold across all temperatures for 0.2% YS; %Elongation, %RA, UTS at 1400°F. Both Stress-LMP and conditional Fracture toughness plots data were in the scatter band of the wrought alloy. 5) Fundamental Studies on Cooling rates and SDAS test program. Evaluated the influence of 6 mold materials Silica, Chromite, Alumina, Silica with Indirect Chills, Zircon and Graphite on casting solidification cooling rates. Actual Casting cooling rates through Liquidus to Solidus phase transition were measured with 3 different locations based thermocouples placed in each mold. Compared with solidification simulation cooling rates and measurement of SDAS, microstructure features were reported. The test results provided engineered casting potential methods, applicable for heavy section Haynes 282 castings for optimal properties, with foundry process methods and tools. 6) Large casting of Haynes 282 Drawings and Engineering FEM models and supplemental requirements with applicable specifications were provided to suppliers for the steam turbine proto type feature valve casing casting. Molding, melting and casting pouring completed per approved Manufacturing Process Plan during 2014 Q4. The partial valve casing was successfully cast after casting methods were validated with solidification simulation analysis and the casting met NDT inspection and a

  7. Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Devary, Joseph L.; Hartshorn, Donald C.

    2010-12-27

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2010, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 873 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 259 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 324 regional and teleseismic events. There were 210 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. One hundred and fifty-five earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this fiscal year were a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al. 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, 2010b, and 2010c). Most events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with the largest event recorded on February 4, 2010 (3.0Mc). The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging approximately 1.5 km deep) placing the swarm within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Based upon the last two quarters (Q3 and Q4) data, activity at the Wooded Island area swarm has largely subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will continue to monitor for activity at this location. The highest-magnitude events (3.0Mc) were recorded on February 4, 2010 within the Wooded Island swarm (depth 2.4 km) and May 8, 2010 on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline (depth 3.0 km). This latter event is not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al. 2007). With regard to the depth distribution, 173 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 19 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 178 earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 4 earthquakes occurred on or near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and 28 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered several times by the Wooded Island swarm events and the events located on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network during fiscal year 2010 occurred February 4, 2010 (Wooded Island swarm event), approximately 2 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) with no action required.