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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Current Forecast: December 10, 2013; Previous Forecast: November 13, 2013 Current Forecast: December 10, 2013; Previous Forecast: November 13, 2013 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 2012 2013 2014 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 U.S. Energy Supply U.S. Crude Oil Production (million barrels per day) Current 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 5.65 6.49 7.50 8.54 14.8% 15.6% 13.8% Previous 6.22 6.30 6.43 7.04 7.13 7.30 7.60 7.91 8.22 8.40 8.52 8.80 5.65 6.50 7.49 8.49 15.0% 15.2% 13.3% Percent Change 0.0% -0.1% -0.2% -0.2% -0.3% -0.1% 0.1% 0.7% 0.5% 0.5% 0.6% 0.6% 0.0% -0.1% 0.1% 0.6% U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (billion cubic feet per day) Current 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.88 67.99 67.74 67.37 67.70 62.74 65.75 66.82 67.70 4.8% 1.6% 1.3% Previous 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.30 67.47 67.41 67.04 67.37 62.74 65.75 66.68 67.32

2

Financing Turnkey Efficiency Solutions for Small Buildings and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q4 (Jul-Sep) 19987 Q3 (Apr-Jun) NREL-FY13-01 Q1 (Octt-Dec) Q2 (Jan-Mar) FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 Milestones & Deliverables (Actual) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q1 (Octt-Dec)...

3

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Belgium, Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands,...

4

Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the first quarter of 2013--Keahole Solar Power's 5 MWac Kalaeloa Solar One installation in Hawaii and Sun

5

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total" Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total" "Alabama",1595069,1422595,1446039,4463703,1651900,1673270,1619686,4944856,1609758,1743418,1702481,5055657,1618031,1459125,1520148,4597304,19061520 "Alaska",132989,119164,123742,375895,111713,113169,109538,334420,76798,83175,78226,238199,80312,66775,50123,197210,1145724 "Arizona",1158076,1038925,1084980,3281981,1017804,1030975,974342,3023121,988049,1095624,1063939,3147612,1183635,1062729,1104980,3351344,12804058 "Arkansas",978,1085,2107,4170,1565,1582,1524,4671,636,689,971,2296,935,843,871,2649,13786 "Colorado",3163974,2824806,2885394,8874174,2997782,3036576,2869817,8904175,2629615,2915930,3075236,8620781,3004721,2814415,2884793,8703929,35103059

6

Microsoft Word - S08308_FFA_ jul_sep_2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 October 2011 Doc. No. S08308 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2011 1.0 Introduction This report summarizes the status of the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). Both of these sites are located in and near Monticello, Utah. The reporting period is from July through September 2011. The report includes a summary of projected near-term activity and reporting requirements. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and 1986, respectively. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented remedial actions at the MVP in 1986 and at the MMTS in 1989, to conform

7

SPEAR 3 Quarterly Report Jul-Sep 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July through Sept July through Sept 2000 TABLE OF CONTENTS A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 2. New Project Baseline B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 1.2 Vacuum System 1.3 Power Supplies 1.4 RF System 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 1.6 Cable Plant 1.8 Facilities 2.1 Accelerator Physics A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress The gradient dipole (145D) prototype was completed. Magnetic measurements at IHEP and at SLAC confirmed the required field quality and full production is underway. The first quadrupole (34Q) was also completed with excellent results for both electrical and mechanical tests. Details of optimization of the pole tip and chamfer are provided in Section 1.1. Sextupole laminations are being analyzed for final approval. The engineering design for the combined function horizontal/vertical correctors

8

Microsoft Word - S07079_jul_sep_10.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

July 1-September 30, 2010 July 1-September 30, 2010 October 2010 Doc. No. S07079 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List (NPL) Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2010 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented July through September 2010, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) Site. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system. The annual inspection of the MMTS and MVP was conducted during the week of September 13, 2010. This quarterly report does not present the findings of that inspection.

9

Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative Q4 2009

This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Q4 2009

This dataset highlights key financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing in Q4 2009. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity...

10

Bloo Solar formerly Q1 Nanosystems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Bloo Solar (formerly Q1 Nanosystems) Place West Sacramento, California Zip 95691 Sector Solar Product String representation "Bloo Solar is b ... aic...

11

Microsoft Word - SPEAR3 Jul-Sep 02 Qtrly Rpt.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through September through September 2002 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 5 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 8 1.2 Vacuum System 10 1.3 Power Supplies 16 1.4 RF System 19 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 20 1.6 Cable Plant 21 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 22 1.8 Facilities 22 1.9 Installation 23 2.1 Accelerator Physics 26 2.2 ES&H 29 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress FY2002 was the third full year of design and fabrication for SPEAR3. The project was reviewed by the DOE in February and July of this year. The executive summary of the July review noted that "The Review Committee found that adequate progress was being made to meet baseline objectives. The SPEAR 3 installation plan can succeed, but is tight in both schedule and cost,

12

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q1 by Origin State: Alabama Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Florida Railroad - - 22 - 22 Georgia Railroad 45 - - - 45 Georgia Truck s - 20 - 21 Georgia Total 45 - 20 - 65 Hawaii Ocean Vessel s - - - s Indiana Railroad - 78 - - 78 Indiana Truck - 32 - - 32 Indiana Total - 110 - - 110 South Carolina Truck - - 2 - 2 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Texas Railroad 72 - - - 72 Origin State Total 2,213 284 378 - 2,875 Ocean Vessel s - - - s Railroad 1,066 82 106 - 1,255 River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Truck 37 202 272 - 511 2 / 58

13

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q1 2013) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q1 2013) Q1 2013) FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q1 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA's exemptions to protect information that is: classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; proprietary; personal; and pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of

14

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 64 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Origin State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Arkansas Railroad - 6 - - 6 Colorado Railroad 279 - - - 279 Illinois Railroad 11 - - - 11 Illinois River 109 - - - 109 Illinois Total 119 - - - 119 Indiana River 197 - - - 197 Kentucky Railroad 442 - 28 - 471 Kentucky Truck - - 2 - 2 Kentucky Total 442 - 31 - 473 Kentucky (East) Railroad 357 - 28 - 385 Kentucky (East) Truck - - 2 - 2 Kentucky (East)

15

SNS FY 2013 Q1-4 Revision 2 Approved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Q1-4 Revision 2 Approved Revised 6112013 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6...

16

Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative Q1 2010

This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Q1 2010

This dataset highlights key financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing in Q1 2010. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity...

17

1 EUROSURVEILLANCE Vol . 13 Issues 79 JulSep 2008 www.eurosurveillance.org E uro roun du p s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medal (AFEM) Berlin 08/14/61 06/01/63 Bosnia and Herzegovina (Joint Endeavor) 11/20/95 12/20/96 Bosnia and Herzegovina (Joint Guard) 12/20/96 6/20/98 Bosnia (Joint Forge) 06/21/98 Present Cambodia 03/29/73 08

18

Microsoft PowerPoint - SRS Headcount by County of Residence Q4 FY 2013.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GA County SRNS SRR WSI *Parsons GA County SRNS SRR WSI *Parsons Amer- esco MOX DOE-SR GA County Total Burke 23 15 4 17 0 24 0 83 Columbia 719 258 101 75 6 148 44 1351 Jefferson 2 3 0 1 0 3 0 9 Lincoln 11 1 2 1 0 4 0 19 McDuffie 10 8 0 5 0 13 2 38 Richmond 508 184 110 117 2 215 34 1170 Screven 20 7 1 6 0 4 0 38 Other 24 12 3 91 0 162 0 292 Total 1317 488 221 313 * 8 573 80 3000 SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q4, FY 13

19

Principal Component Analysis of Vertical Profiles of Q1 and Q2 in the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rotated Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to the combined vertical profiles of apparent heat source Q1 and apparent moisture sink Q2 from both disturbed and undisturbed periods of the Australian summer monsoon season. The data ...

G. David Alexander; George S. Young; David V. Ledvina

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Research Article: In silico analyses of a new group of fungal and plant RecQ4-homologous proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacterial and eukaryotic RecQ helicases comprise a family of homologous proteins necessary for maintaining genomic integrity during the cell cycle and DNA repair. There is one known bacterial RecQ helicase, and five eukaryotic RecQ helicases that have ... Keywords: Hrq1 sequences, Hydrophobic cluster analysis, Protein phylogeny, RecQ4 sequences, Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, Three-dimensional protein modeling

Fernanda Barea; Simone Tessaro; Diego Bonatto

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY13-1Q 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3-1Q 1 3-1Q 1 Summary of Experiments Conducted in Support of Stockpile Stewardship January 2013 The U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program is a robust program of scientific inquiry used to sustain and assess the nuclear weapons stockpile without the use of underground nuclear tests. The experiments carried out within the program are used in combination with Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) to continually assess the stockpile to ensure it is safe, secure, and effective. (For links to the ASC program, see: http://nnsa.energy.gov/asc) For a link to the Nuclear Posture Review 2010, see: http://www.defense.gov/npr/docs/2010%20nuclear%20posture%20review%20report.pdf . An extraordinary set of science, technology, and engineering (ST&E) facilities have been established and are active everyday in support of the

22

2012-12-06 Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY12-4Q 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2-12-06 Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY12-4Q 1 2-12-06 Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY12-4Q 1 Summary of Experiments Conducted in Support of Stockpile Stewardship October 2012 The U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program is a robust program of scientific inquiry used to sustain and assess the nuclear weapons stockpile without the use of underground nuclear tests. The experiments carried out within the program are used in combination with Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) to continually assess the stockpile to ensure it is safe, secure, and effective. (For links to the ASC program, see: http://nnsa.energy.gov/asc) For a link to the Nuclear Posture Review 2010, see: http://www.defense.gov/npr/docs/2010%20nuclear%20posture%20review%20report.pdf . An extraordinary set of science, technology, and engineering (ST&E) facilities have been established and are active everyday in support of the

23

2012_Q4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 - Visit us at www.lm.doe.gov Welcome to the October-December 2012 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) . This publication is designed to provide a Program Update status of activities within LM. Please direct all comments and inquiries to . lm@hq.doe.gov Program Update Legacy Management The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management has completed the stakeholder satisfaction survey. Thanks to everyone who participated in the survey. We are in the process of reviewing your responses in order to address your comments, suggestions, and concerns. The summary survey report will be available on the LM website in January 2013. v Goal 2 LM Communication and Stakeholder Satisfaction Independent Survey Goal 1 Saw What? Saw-Whet!

24

2013_Q4.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update Welcome to the October-December 2013 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update. This publication is designed to provide a status of activities within LM. Please direct all comments and inquiries to lm@hq.doe.gov. October-December 2013 Visit us at http://energy.gov/lm/ Goal 4 Agencies Assist LM to Develop Reports on Defense-Related Uranium Mines The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Legacy Management (LM) has made substantial progress researching and consulting with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), other relevant federal agencies, affected states and tribes, and the interested public to obtain data and other technical information that will inform the Report to Congress

25

Precipitation Rates in the Tropics Based on the Q1-Budget Method: 1 June 198431 May 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The apparent heat source method (Q1 budget) is used to compute the total derivative of dry static energy (s = cpT + gz) from 30N to 30S for the period 1 June 198431 May 1987. The dataset is produced from the ECMWF global analyses and ...

Dayton G. Vincent; Keith H. North; Robb A. Velasco; Perry G. Ramsey

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A survey of volatile species in Oort cloud comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) at millimeter wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The line emission in the coma was measured in the comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), that were observed on five consecutive nights, 7-11 May 2004, at heliocentric distances of 1.0 and 0.7 AU, respectively, by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the 10-m Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We present a search for six parent- and product-volatile species (HCN, H2CO, CO, CS, CH3OH, and HNC) in both comets. Multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 5-4 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique, which is determined from the inverse of the slope of the best linear fit on the observed transitions. We derive rotational temperatures of 54(9) K for C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and 119(34) K for C/2002 T7 (LINEAR). The gas production rates of material are computed using a spherically symmetric molecular excitation code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons. We find an HCN production rate of 2.96(5)e26 molec.s-1 for comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT)...

de Val-Borro, M; Hartogh, P; Rezac, L; Biver, N; Bockele-Morvan, D; Crovisier, J; Jarchow, C; Villanueva, G L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

PM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Bldgs, Phase 1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Calendar YearQuarter Layout: CP - ConstrDemo Phase...

28

Orbital pacing andQ:1; 2 ocean circulation-induced collapses of the Mesoamerican monsoon over the past 22Q:3 ,000 y; 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orbital pacing andQ:1; 2 ocean circulation-induced collapses of the Mesoamerican monsoon over records from the summer North American Monsoon system are available to test for a synchronous response with other global monsoons to shared forcings. In parti- cular, the monsoon response to widespread

Lachniet, Matthew S.

29

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: August 6, 2013 | Next Release Date: September 10, 2013 | ... Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 ; Heating Degree Days U.S. Average ...

30

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun ","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2003 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Total" 3 Total" "Alabama",1771113,1510892,1622954,4904959,1863504,1845388,1776824,5485716,1600128,1565897,1672632,4838657,1763889,1479114,1734574,4977577,20206909 "Alaska",87443,76405,79754,243602,62928,62232,69581,194741,67907,66760,67789,202456,156990,131143,152391,440524,1081323 "Arizona",1073559,941887,1030496,3045942,943093,932681,884672,2760446,1040168,1016416,1058519,3115103,1107584,941831,1088188,3137603,12059094 "Arkansas",829,426,1561,2816,484,478,264,1226,442,432,494,1368,769,439,946,2154,7564 "Colorado",2846715,2541328,2830992,8219035,2865526,2903720,2827776,8597022,3131374,3268010,3269638,9669022,3014173,2950843,3381090,9346106,35831185 "Illinois",2961000,2440349,2876040,8277389,2706876,2702220,3169886,8578982,2373950,2388551,2344648,7107149,2993442,2346572,2456095,7796109,31759629

31

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun ","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2004 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Total" 4 Total" "Alabama",1725998,1581616,2004066,5311680,1926051,1739300,2099141,5764492,1605125,1654151,1850943,5110219,1976865,2078720,2086665,6142250,22328641 "Alaska",140314,131982,185547,457843,61887,55405,120646,237938,131114,130814,96529,358457,149748,156396,151405,457549,1511787 "Arizona",977250,897698,1100939,2975887,1049375,950831,1069753,3069959,1098199,1113785,977716,3189700,1129140,1195127,1171016,3495283,12730829 "Arkansas",1133,1013,845,2991,679,692,1274,2645,411,400,432,1243,170,166,113,449,7328 "Colorado",3527103,3179582,3398625,10105310,3407363,3451070,3468743,10327176,3293260,3357952,3258228,9909440,3172777,3167266,3188128,9528171,39870097 "Illinois",2888652,2695556,3272892,8857100,2664839,2497528,2930733,8093100,2657588,2695324,2480874,7833786,2322429,2411032,2394081,7127542,31911528

32

Fusion Rules of the Lowest Weight Representations of osp_q(1|2) at Roots of Unity: Polynomial Realization and Degeneration at Roots of Unity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The degeneracy of the lowest weight representations of the quantum superalgebra $osp_q(1|2)$ and their tensor products at exceptional values of %when deformation parameter $q$ takes exceptional values is studied. The main features of the structures of the finite dimensional lowest weight representations and their fusion rules are illustrated using realization of group generators as finite-difference operators acting in the space of the polynomials. The complete fusion rules for the decompositions of the tensor products at roots of unity are presented. The appearance of indecomposable representations in the fusions is described using Clebsh-Gordan coefficients derived for general values of $q$ and at roots of unity.

D. Karakhanyan; Sh. Khachatryan

2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

Q1 1998 STEO Docs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (Released January 12, 1998) 8 (Released January 12, 1998) Energy Information Administration DOE/EIA-0202(98/1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections First Quarter 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook --January 1998

34

Microsoft Word - Q4report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 to September 2009 2009 to September 2009 Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01 Submitted by: College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Trehu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 30, 2009 Oil & Natural Gas Technology 1 Progress Report July 2009 to September 2009 Heat flow and gas hydrates on the continental margin of India: Building on results from NGHP expedition 01 DE-NT0005669 Principal Investigator Anne Trehu (PI) Oregon State University Oct 30, 2009 2 Table of Contents: Executive Summary..................................................................................................3

35

LLQR-2012-Q4-r1.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 December 3, 2012; Issue no. 73 NEPA Lessons Learned December 2012 1 Quality Assurance Integral to NEPA Implementation DOE senior leaders have repeatedly emphasized quality assurance as essential to a successful NEPA program. Secretarial Officers and Heads of Field Organizations have the responsibility to ensure the preparation of a NEPA quality assurance plan (DOE O 451.1B, NEPA Compliance Program, paragraph 5.a(3)). This provision was added in response to a June 1994 Secretarial NEPA policy statement. This requirement to prepare a plan signifies that a formal approach to quality assurance should be in place at the beginning of a NEPA review. Most recently, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's June 2012 policy memorandum on integrating program and project management with NEPA expressed the

36

Microsoft PowerPoint - SW Regional Hydropower Conference - June...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Congress ( Feb ) Field Offices Develop Program Requirements ( Apr - May ) Appropriations Bills ( Jul - Sep ) Cong. Hearings ( Mar - Apr ) President Signs Approp. Bill (...

37

News: Adware tops charts in Q1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adware became the most prevalent form of malware infecting computers in the first quarter of 2008, according to an analysis by Panda Labs.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q ...

39

Microsoft Word - WAPA FY06_Q4_HCM.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 281213 Lakewood, CO 80228-1213 9-12-06 MEMORANDUM FOR CLAUDIA A. CROSS, HR-1 DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT FROM: FRANCES TELLES, A7200 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION SUBJECT: Fourth Quarter FY 2006 Internal President's Management Agenda Scorecard Report on Human Capital The Western Area Power Administration is pleased to submit our human capital management performance report for the fourth quarter of FY 2006. The report is structured to match the nine scorecard requirements. Western's Senior Managers are committed to supporting the President's Management Agenda and Department of Energy's (DOE) Human Capital Program. To achieve our vision of being a premier power marketing and transmission organization, we will need to recruit,

40

Solar PV Market Update, Volume 4: Q4 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 of EPRIs quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides continued insight into some of the front line trends that are afoot throughout the photovoltaic segment. Like previous Updates, it synthesizes primary as well as secondary data from multiple sources in an effort to highlight both macro and micro industry developments that are likely to impact utility solar PV investment and planning efforts. Specifically, this report discusses the increasing impact of balance-of-system (BOS) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Q4, Comparison of Plasma-Etching Induced Damage Recovery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After initial solvent and RTA cleans, these samples were dry etched by Chlorine based plasma and followed by ... TMAH) has the smallest C-V dispersion.

42

Solar Photovoltaics Market Update: Volume 8: Q4 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 8 of EPRIs quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides continued insight into some of the front line trends that are afoot throughout the photovoltaic segment. As with previous Updates, it synthesizes primary and secondary data from multiple sources in an effort to highlight economic, policy, and technology developments that are likely to impact utility solar PV investment and planning efforts.This report first highlights PV component, system, and PPA pricing developments ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

Microsoft Word - Issue FY2009 Q4 Draft 20090910.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Do you remember as a Do you remember as a kid how much it hurt to walk barefoot on a paved road? Do you also remember that walking on the white shoulder stripes hurt less? The blacktop absorbed much more of the sun's energy than the white stripes. A conventional roof works the same way, making it a hot place in the summer. Recent advances in roofing design have given rise to the concept of a "cool roof." A cool roof efficiently reflects the sun's energy and emits absorbed solar radiation back into the atmosphere. Such a roof remains relatively cooler and less likely to transfer heat down through the other components of the roof system and into the building thereby reducing the facility cooling load. Two factors determine the degree of efficiency of

44

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013-Q1 2013-Q2 2013-Q3 2013-Q4 2014-Q1 2014-Q2 2014-Q3 2014-Q4 Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2013 Forecast 1/1/2009 50.18 83.61 42.90 4/1/2009 50.10 84.24

45

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 1125311266, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/11253/2011/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CBmg3- ) Mt. Cabinet, MT (48.0o N,115.7o W,1.44 km) (i) Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov 2006 Time Lava Beds, CA (41.7o N, 121.5o W, 1.46 km) (j) Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Time (CBmg3- ) Flathead

Liou, K. N.

46

Microsoft Word - Issue FY2010 Q1 Draft 20091228.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On October 5, 2009, On October 5, 2009, President Obama signed Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance. 1 This order represents a transformative shift in the way the government will operate by establishing greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) as the integrating metric for tracking progress toward federal sustainability. The new order does not replace EO 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management. Like previous orders, the new order relies heavily on effective real property asset management practices to achieve its goals. It provides new direction in these areas: * Stormwater, potable, industrial and landscaping water * Waste including recycling and composting * Integrated planning

47

Microsoft Word - EMSL_Q1_Highlights_Report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

doi:10.1021ja074891n Hooker BS, DJ Bigelow, and CT Lin. 2007. "Methods for Mapping of Interaction Networks Involving Membrane Proteins." Biochemical and Biophysical...

48

Technologies with Broad Impact Q1 What criteria should be ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... renewable energy / energy efficiency, next generation biofuel production, nano ... quarterly and annual status reports, whose target audience would ...

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Technologies with Broad Impact Q1 What criteria should be ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Potential areas for co-investment would include renewable energy / energy efficiency, next generation biofuel production, nano-/bio-manufacturing ...

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Solar Photovoltaics Market Update, Volume 5: Q1 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 5 of EPRI's quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides continued insight into some of the front line trends that are afoot throughout the photovoltaic segment. Like previous Updates, it synthesizes primary as well as secondary data from multiple sources in an effort to highlight economic, policy, and technology developments that are likely to impact utility solar PV investment and planning efforts. Specifically, this report examines global PV installation and market issues, providing key ...

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

51

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET DIVISION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAGNET DIVISION CY 2013 Tier 1 Inspection Schedule Frequency Building Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 S 902B (Offices) 11713 62013 S 902A (Offices) 11713 62013 Q 902-High Bay Shop 22113 5...

52

SITE: UNC S earcher ID: iris1 P re - search : Searcher: iris1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... India - monsoon search : Searcher: iris6 Condition: irisp Topic #: 446 Q1: 1 Q2: 3 Q3: 2 Q4: 2 Q5: 1 Q6: 2 S earcherworksheet : Searcher: iris6 ...

53

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY13-4Q final ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quarter FY13Q1 FY13Q2 FY13Q3 FY13Q4 Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility LANL Integrated or Focused non- nuclear weapons experiments DARHT captures high...

54

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013-Q4 2014-Q1 2014-Q2 2014-Q3 2014-Q4 Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2013 Forecast 1/1/2008 85.44 85.62-0.19 4/1/2008 85.61 85.13 0.48 7/1/2008 85.64 ...

55

Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

AdministrationShort-Term Energy Outlook - July 2006 11 Table 5d. U.S. Regional a Propane Inventories and Prices: Base Case 2005 2006 2007 Year Sector Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3...

56

http://www.eh.doe.gov/nepa/process/ll/95q4.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4TH 4TH QUARTER FY 1995 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance U.S. Department of Energy December 1, 1995 INTRODUCTION To foster continuing improvement of the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program, the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA, issued June 13, 1994, requires the Office of Environment, Safety and Health to solicit comments on lessons learned in the process of completing NEPA documents from the NEPA Document Manager, the NEPA Compliance Officer, and team members after completing each environmental impact statement (EIS) and environmental assessment (EA), and to distribute a quarterly summary to all NEPA Compliance Officers and NEPA Document Managers. This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between July 1 and

57

Microsoft Word - Q4 2011 DOE Report 31 Jan 12 FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range from site rig up and well preparation, through perforating, injection, and flowback, and to permanent abandonment. Procedures also include sand screen installation,...

58

Q4, Pre- and Post-Treatment Investigations of Al Oxide by Atomic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... energy saving and can be used as smart power grid interfaces for solar, wind ..... Graphene Nanostructure: A Three-Dimensional Hybrid Carbon Architecture.

59

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Nuclear Reports All Nuclear Reports Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly Data for 3rd Quarter 2013 | Release Date: October 31, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 2014 | full report Previous Issues Year: 2013-Q2 2013-Q1 2012-Q4 2012-Q3 2012-Q2 2012-Q1 2011-Q4 2011-Q3 2011-Q2 2011-Q1 2010-Q4 2010-Q3 2010-Q2 2010-Q1 2009-Q4 2009-Q3 2009-Q2 2009-Q1 2008-Q4 2008-Q3 2008-Q2 2008-Q1 Go 3rd Quarter 2013 U.S. production of uranium concentrate in the third quarter 2013 was 1,171,278 pounds U3O8, down 16 percent from the previous quarter and up 12 percent from the third quarter 2012. Third quarter 2013 uranium production is at its highest level since 1999. During the third quarter 2013, U.S. uranium was produced at six U.S. uranium facilities. U.S. Uranium Mill in Production (State)

60

Site Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acquisition Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation Method Contract Type Estimated Dollar Range Pre-Solicitation Conference/ Industry Meetings Draft- Solicitation Synopsis Solicitation Receipt of Proposal Anticipated Evaluations Complete/Award Paducah GDP http://www.emcbc.doe.g ov/pgdp%20deactivatio n/ EMCBC Multiple award IDIQ contract holders Cost Plus Award Fee with Fixed Price clins $600M- $680M 5/1/2013 5/29/2013 N/A 8/9/2013 Jul-Sep 2013 Oct-Dec 2014 ETEC EMCBC Small Business Firm-Fixed Price & Fixed Unit Rate Price CLINS $25M-$40M 9/19/2013 Jul-Sep 2013 Oct-Dec 2013 Oct-Dec 2013 Jan-Mar 2014 Jul-Sep 2014 Lab Services EMCBC Small Business Fixed Price $40M-$60M Jan-Mar 2014 Jan-Mar 2014 Jan-Mar 2014 Apr-Jun 2014 Apr-Jun 2014 Jan-Mar 2015

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microsoft Word - DE-FE0010160 Q1 report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0010160 Quarterly Research Performance Progress Report (Period ending 12/31/2012) Advanced Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 Submitted by: Principal Investigator: Dan McConnell Fugro GeoConsulting, Inc. DUNS #: 118972301 6100 Hillcroft Ave., 3 rd Floor Houston, TX 77081 e-mail: dmcconnell@fugro.com Phone number: (713) 778-6801 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 31, 2013 Executive Summary This research effort will focus on developing and refining techniques that integrate rock physics modeling, amplitude analysis, and spectral decomposition to characterize complex gas hydrate reservoirs. The

62

acs_cm_cm-2009-03769q 1..3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pubs.acs.org/cm pubs.acs.org/cm Published on Web 02/16/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 1943-1945 1943 DOI:10.1021/cm903769q Universal and Solution-Processable Precursor to Bismuth Chalcogenide Thermoelectrics Robert Y. Wang, † Joseph P. Feser, ‡ Xun Gu, § Kin Man Yu, † Rachel A. Segalman, †,§ Arun Majumdar, †,‡ Delia J. Milliron,* ,† and Jeffrey J. Urban* ,† † Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, ‡ Department of Mechanical Engineering, and § Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Received December 15, 2009 Revised Manuscript Received February 7, 2010 Thermoelectric materials convert thermal power into electrical power and vice versa. In practice, thermoelectric coolers and power generators are made by alternately

63

DOE/EIA-0202|83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c oi o in in D uj f- OJ i -K 1. i- - (0 ro oi u-z ** z: oirH in ro- TJ 01 E L. ro ** COD 01 4J Oi ro - 01 > OI4-1 D-H O 0. 23...

64

Microsoft Word - 07Q1 DOE Report for Management Rev12-ob.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FTT Florida Turbine Technologies FY Fiscal Year GIT Georgia Institute of Technology GT Gas Turbine HADES Hyperbaric Advanced Demonstration Environmental Simulator HEE Hydrogen...

65

Observation of nuclear fusion driven by a pyroelectric crystalQ1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a room temperature solid-state setting, including `cold' fusion5 and `bubble' fusion6 , have met.............................................................. Observation of nuclear fusion driven ............................................................................................................................................................................. While progress in fusion research continues with magnetic1 and inertial2 confinement, alternative

Gimzewski, James

66

Microsoft Word - fy09_annualtarget_climatemodeling1_Q1 _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a broad spectrum of model diagnostics reveals model deficiencies, and sometimes provides insight into the root cause of model errors. Increasingly, models are being tested at...

67

Microsoft Word - DE-FE0010160 Q1 report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0010160 Quarterly Research Performance Progress Report (Period ending 12312012) Advanced Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock...

68

Q1Report for CADWR Project: Desalination Using Carbon NAnotube Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research and development project, LLNL will leverage the process for fabrication of the membranes developed by our internally funded effort (LLNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development). LLNL will then employ chemical manipulations to modify charge at the ends of the nanotubes and make the membranes more selective to either positive or negative ions through a combination of size and charge selectivity. LLNL's goal is to demonstrate ion exclusion while preserving high permeabilities and low energy use. Success of this research and development project may warrant further developments in the fabrication of membranes.

Bakajin, O

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

The neutron electric form factor to Q = 1.45 (GeV/c)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nucleon elastic electromagnetic form factors are fundamental quantities needed for an understanding of nucleon and nuclear electromagnetic structure. The evolution of the Sachs electric and magnetic form factors with Q2, the square of the four-momentum transfer, is related to the distribution of charge and magnetization within the nucleon. High precision measurements of the nucleon form factors are essential for stringent tests of our current theoretical understanding of confinement within the nucleon. Measurements of the neutron form factors, in particular, those of the neutron electric form factor, have been notoriously difficult due to the lack of a free neutron target and the vanishing integral charge of the neutron. Indeed, a precise measurement of the neutron electric form factor has eluded experimentalists for decades; however, with the advent of high duty-factor polarized electron beam facilities, experiments employing polarization degrees of freedom have finally yielded the first precise measurements of this fundamental quantity. Following a general overview of the experimental and theoretical status of the nucleon form factors, a detailed description of an experiment designed to extract the neutron electric form factor from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in quasielastic 2H(e, e')1H scattering is presented. The experiment described here employed the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's longitudinally polarized electron beam, a magnetic spectrometer for detection of the scattered electron, and a neutron polarimeter designed specifically for this experiment. Measurements were conducted at three Q2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c)2, and the final results extracted from an analysis of the data acquired in this experiment are reported and compared with recent theoretical predictions for the nucleon form factors.

Bradley Plaster

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY13-1Q 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

simulations results generated from fundamental data on materials, plasmas, and radiation. They generally take years to plan, days to weeks to execute, and months to analyze....

71

The neutron electric form factor to Q = 1.45 (GeV/c)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nucleon elastic electromagnetic form factors are fundamental quantities needed for an understanding of nucleon and nuclear electromagnetic structure. The evolution of the Sachs electric and magnetic form factors with ...

Plaster, Bradley R. (Bradley Robert), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab A ccelerator E xperiments' R un S chedule M&D ( SHUTDOWN) RUNDATA STARTUPCOMMISSIONING INSTALLATION Q3 Q4 MC T B Q1 Q2 Q3 MTest B eam MCenter T est B eam SeaQuest Mu2e...

73

Page 1 of 3 ES&H Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Number Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 TOTAL FA cases 0 1 0 1 TRC cases 0 0 0 0 DART cases 0 0 0 0 ORPS Incidents 0 1 0 1 cases 0 0 0 0 ORPS Incidents 0 0 0 0 Other notable events (e.g., near hits): #12;Directorate ES

Wechsler, Risa H.

74

Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting Contractors Q1 2010 [Compatibility Mode]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractors Contractors 1 For Contractors Quarterly reporting through FederalReporting.gov April 2010 April 2010 Reporting Timeline Date Action Ongoing Registration open for FederalReporting.gov. Early registration is encouraged. April 1, 2010 Reporting Period Begins April 16, 2010 Reporting Period Ends - No new reports can be entered after 11:59 PM PDT on this date. NOTE: Reporting deadline was extended. April 17, 2010 Prime Recipient Review begins- Only corrections to existing reports can be made. April 19, 2010 Prime Recipient Review ends- No updates may be made after 11:59 PM PDT on this date without DOE Reviewer action. April 20, 2010 Federal review of data begins -Recipients may be contacted to answer 2 April 20, 2010 Federal review of data begins -Recipients may be contacted to answer

75

Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting Grant and Loan Recipients Q1 2010 [Compati  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant and Loan Recipients Grant and Loan Recipients | 1 For Grant and Loan Recipients Quarterly reporting through FederalReporting.gov April 2010 April 2010 Reporting Timeline Date Action Ongoing Registration open for FederalReporting.gov. Early registration is encouraged. April 1, 2010 Reporting Period Begins April 16, 2010 Reporting Period Ends - No new reports can be entered after 11:59 PM PDT on this date. NOTE: Reporting deadline was extended. April 17, 2010 Prime Recipient Review begins- Only corrections to existing reports can be made. April 19, 2010 Prime Recipient Review ends- No updates may be made after 11:59 PM PDT on this date without DOE Reviewer action. For more information, contact DOE at: https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov or 1-888-363-7289 or go to: http://www.FederalReporting.gov

76

RPS Status Report Q1 & Q2 2012 Page 2 I. ABOUT THE RPS AND THIS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

providers (ESPs) and community choice aggregators (CCAs)) regulated by the California Public Utilities

77

2009-2010 Q WSU FOUNDATION Q 1 HONOR ROLL OF DONORS FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´erience encre plus agr´eable. Merci `a Myriam, Emanuela, Nico, Julia, Anastasia, Sandrine, Amman, Cl

Collins, Gary S.

78

a 3L /a + k + + a $&:A 95 q4Vz %&4R%4#*3a& d ( P f i ) .&16FI+@hwf%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flux density at z = z, ? Give the magnitude and direction of your answer. (4%) Hints: (i) A current loop with a radius b carrying a current Iin vacuum produces an axial magnetic field of B = "Ib2 field at the cylindrical coordinate (r,#,z = O)? Indicate the magnitude and direction of your answer. (5

Huang, Haimei

79

3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

Chase, J.

2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Search for fractionally charged particles in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for the production of free Q = +-1/3e, Q = +-2/3e and Q = +-4/3e particles produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV in 77 pb/sup -1/ of data collected by the time projection chamber at PEP. No evidence has been found for the production of these particles. Upper limits are established on the inclusive cross section for the production of Q = +-1/3e, Q = +-2/3e, and Q = +-4/3e particles in the mass range 1.0 to 13 GeV/c/sup 2/, improving upon previously established limits. 58 references.

Huth, J.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring, Mitigation, and Verification Monitoring, Mitigation, and Verification Measuring Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition As a Prelude to Geologic Carbon Sequestration in Eastern Kentucky Thomas (Marty) Parris, Mike Solis, and Kathryn Takacs May 8-11, 2006 * Hilton Alexandria Mark Center * Alexandria, Virginia Organization & Schedule Organization & Schedule Phase I Task 1.0 Task 3.0 Task 4.0 Start 2005 2006 2007 End 07/15/05 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 01/14/08 Phase II Phase III Task 2.0 Task 5.0 Task 6.0 Task 7.0 Task 8.0 Task 9.0 Task 10.0 Task 11.0 Task 12.0 Task 13.0 Phase II Phase II - - Tasks Tasks Task 5.0- Training, instrumentation, calibration, strategy Task 6.0- Surface & shallow measurements Task 7.0- Laboratory GC & isotope measurements Task 8.0- Evaluate surface data- anomalies & deep wells

82

Representations of finite element tensors via automated code generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.71 856736 0.17 p = 2, q = 4 54300 4.36 337692 1.01 2058876 0.23 p = 3, q = 1 3044 0.36 30236 0.16 379964 0.02 p = 3, q = 2 12488 0.92 126368 0.26 1370576 0.03 p = 3, q = 3 36664 1.73 391552 0.37 4034704 0.05 p = 3, q = 4 92828 2.55 950012 0.49 9566012 0.06 p... = 3 950 8.26 6800 1.73 42998 0.39 251876 0.10 p = 2, q = 4 2457 10.10 15987 2.15 95247 0.48 585567 0.10 p = 3, q = 1 181 2.44 1715 1.02 20991 0.16 218767 0.03 p = 3, q = 2 550 3.78 6992 0.78 73596 0.11 754084 0.02 p = 3, q = 3 1910 4.21 20100 0...

Oelgaard, Kristian B; Wells, G N

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

The magazine of The University of North Carolina at Charlotte for Alumni and Friends v19 q1 2012 Theatre project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cornell Kizzie Cum Laude Steven Brandon Aho Magna Cum Laude Andrew Robert LaGrange (C) Corey Matthew Allen in Biotechnology Austin Cornell Kizzie B.S. Chemistry, Caldwell Scholar Brittany Gayle Lanier Minor in Spanish

Chen, Keh-Hsun

84

幻灯片 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric-Drive Vehicle Testing Electric-Drive Vehicle Testing at CAERI Hao Zhang China Automotive Engineering Research Institute 1. Overview 2. On-going Work 3. Future Work 4. Conclusion Contents Three-year Plan Full Hybrid BEV Plug-in REEV Mild Hybrid  Three year program in CAERI  Evaluating the performance of the EV, HEV and PHEV  Plan to benchmark more than 12 cars in three years ☆ Milestones 2011-Q2 2011-Q3 2011-Q4 2012-Q1 2012-Q2 2012-Q3 2012-Q4 Test Procedures Research and Preparation for cars Civic Hybrid Test and Analysis Nissan Leaf Test and Analysis MY2010 Prius Test and Analysis Fusion Hybrid Test and Analysis Volt Test and Analysis Plug-in Prius Test and Analysis 2011-2012 works Testing Approach  The vehicle testing activity and analysis approach has been defined:

85

LTCCOUNT.SCH Physics/Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bit 6 Q0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 160 nsec 320 nsec 640 nsec 1.28 usec 20 nsec 40 nsec 80 nsec 2.56 usec 5.12 usec 10.24 usec 20.48 usec 40.96 usec 81.92 usec 1.311 msec 2.621 msec 5.243 msec 163.8 usec 327.7 usec 655.4 usec bit 7 bit 8 bit 9 bit 10 bit 11 bit 12 bit 13 bit 14 bit 15 bit 16 bit 17 bit 18 C5 .1uF Q7

Berns, Hans-Gerd

86

JGI - Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistics Statistics FY 2014 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (trillions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2014 15,000 18.827 126% 2,164 2208 102% Q2 2014 17,000 2,117 Q3 2014 18,000 2,140 Q4 2014 18,000 2,164 FY 2014 Total 68,000 18.827 28% 8,585 2208 26% * Includes Illumina HiSeq, MiSeq and PacBio sequencing platforms. ** Operating Hour target is based on 98% of the total available hours. FY 2013 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (Billions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2013 15,000 20,004 133% 2,164 2,208 102%

87

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

88

PRESENTED TO THE DEANS, DEPARTMENT HEADS, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or oil price spike ¨Hard landing in China ¨Housing falters again #12;Fiscal Cliff August 27, 2012William Starts (in millions) HousingStarts(inmillions) #12;U.S./Euro Foreign Exchange Rate and Real Exports Less 02Q1 03Q1 04Q1 05Q1 06Q1 07Q1 08Q1 09Q1 10Q1 11Q1 12Q1 Exports-Imports,BillionsofChained2000 Dollars

Tennessee, University of

89

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Year total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year total" Year total" "Alabama",1562473,1400113,1447708,4410294,1592661,1584520,1474279,4651460,9061754 "Alaska",102639,95553,102206,300398,151343,155955,134279,441577,741975 "Arizona",626131,579206,619554,1824891,748419,751109,684147,2183675,4008566 "Arkansas",1344,1241,1331,3916,572,572,538,1682,5598 "Colorado",2049961,1815249,1916126,5781336,1708460,1651160,1937762,5297382,11078718 "Illinois",4897036,4449010,4664902,14010948,4596761,4692289,4224673,13513723,27524671 "Indiana",3304230,2985013,3132637,9421880,3242977,3260643,3012840,9516460,18938340 "Kansas",1589,1462,1564,4615,1627,1605,1527,4759,9374 "Kentucky Total",7194068,6511926,6926423,20632417,7065146,7169716,6488303,20723165,41355582

90

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 30, 2009 June 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of June 30,, 2009) PROGRESS Third Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

91

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for 0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................ 1,602 1,397 125 Q 69 0.11 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 261 237 Q 1 Q 0.37 0.33 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 196 177 10 (*) Q 0.20 0.18 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 117 112 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.14 Q (*) (*)

92

Office of Headquarters Security Operations: Questions and Answers on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions and Answers on the New Access Control System at DOE Headquarters Questions and Answers on the New Access Control System at DOE Headquarters Q1 Why is the current access control system to security areas being changed? Q2 How is the new access control system different from the existing one? Q3 Who is affected? Q4 When will the new proximity card readers be installed? Q5 How will affected personnel at DOE HQ be notified about the installation of the proximity card readers that will affect their access to the HQ facilities and security areas, and the actions they will be required to take to assure their HSPD-12 badge will operate in the new readers? Q6 What will DOE HQ "Q" and "L" badged employees need to do? Q7 Will all DOE HQ security areas be changed out to the new access control system at the same time?

93

22680  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUARTERLY PROGRAM REPORT QUARTERLY PROGRAM REPORT State: __________________ Budget period: / / - / / Grant Number: __________________ I. GRANT OUTLAYS - FUNDS SUBJECT TO DOE PROGRAM RULES (rounded to the nearest dollar) DOE F 540.3 (08/05) OMB Control No. 1910-5127 Expiration Date: 6/30/08 A. OUTLAYS BY FUND SOURCE DOE Other funds included in grant budget, section A B. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION Grantee Administration Subgrantee Administration Grantee T&TA Subgrantee T&TA Program Operations Total Health and Safety Vehicles and Equipment - Acquisition Cost* Liability Insurance Leveraging Financial Audits Vehicles and Equipment - Amortized Cost* Total Grant Outlays Total Grant Outlays Reporting Period Quarter / - / Q1 / - / Q2 / - / Q3 / - / Q4 Total To Date Notes: Total grant outlays must equal outlays reported on the Financial Status Report, line 10.d.

94

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2009 September 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of September 30, 2009) PROGRESS Fourth Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

95

Measurement of the Top-Quark Mass in All-Hadronic Decays in p pbar Collisions at CDF II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top-quark mass, $M_{\\mathrm{top}}$, in the all-hadronic decay channel $t\\bar{t} \\to W^+b W^- \\bar{b} \\to q_1\\bar{q}_2 b q_3 \\bar{q}_4 \\bar{b}$. The analysis is performed using 310 pb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}$=1.96 TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collisions collected with the CDF II detector using a multi-jet trigger. The mass measurement is based on an event-by-event likelihood which depends on both the sample purity and the value of the top-quark mass, using 90 possible jet-to-parton assignments in the six-jet final state. The joint likelihood of 290 selected events yields a value of $M_{\\mathrm{top}}$=177.1 $\\pm$ 4.9 (stat.) $\\pm$ 4.7 (syst.) GeV/$c^2$.

T. Aaltonen

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Vol XXIV, Issue 7 In This Issue February 16, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enforcing Emissions Policies Pemex Seeks Bids for Gasoline Desulfurization Plants Canada's EnCana Q4

Nikolaou, Michael

97

Raman Spectra, Structural Units and Durability of Nuclear Waste Glasses With Variations in Composition and Crystallization: Implications for Intermediate Order in the Glass Network  

SciTech Connect

The Raman spectra of nuclear waste glasses are composed of large variations in half-width and intensity for the commonly observed bridging (Q0) and nonbridging (Q1 to Q4) bands in silicate structures. With increase in waste concentration in a boroaluminosilicate melt, the bands of quenched glasses are distinctly localized with half-width and intensity indicative of increase in atomic order. Since the nuclear waste glasses contain disparate components, and since the bands depart from the typical random network, a systematic study for the origin of these bands as a function of composition and crystallization was undertaken. From a comparative study of Raman spectra of boroaluminosilicate glasses containing Na2O-ZrO2, Na2O-MgO, MgO-Na2O-ZrO2, Na2O-CaO-ZrO2, Na2O-CaO, and Na2O-MgO-CaF2 component sets and orthosilicate crystals of zircon and forsterite, intermediate order is inferred. An edge-sharing polyhedral structural unit is proposed to account for narrow bandwidth and high intensity for Q2 antisymmetric modes, and decreased leaching of sodium with ZrO2 concentration in glass. The intense Q4 band in nuclear waste glass is similar to the intertetrahedral antisymmetric modes in forsterite. The Raman spectra of zircon contains intratetrahedral quartz-like peaks and intertetrahedral non-bridging silicate peaks. The quartz-like peaks nearly vanish in the background of forsterite spectrum. This difference between the Raman spectra of the two orthosilicate crystals presumably results from their biaxial and uniaxial effects on polarizability ellipsoids. The results also reveal formation of 604, 956 and 961 cm-1 defect bands with composition and crystallization.

Raman, Swaminathan Venkat

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Optimizing Steam & Condensate System: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of Steam & Condensate systems in any process plant results in substantial reduction of purchased energy cost. During periods of natural gas price hikes, this would benefit the plant in controlling their fuel budget significantly, irrespective of the plant's size. This paper highlights the efforts taken by the management of a medium sized specialty chemicals plant in North East Louisiana. This site spent over $19 million in 2007 ($13.7 million for natural gas & $5.6 million for electricity). The site generates steam for its process operation from 3 gas fired boilers at 525-psig pressure. The steam is consumed at 5 process areas; Acid, Basics, Crystals, Derivatives & Hydrogen plants. All of the process areas recover condensate inside their area, utilize it partially, and drain the rest into the sewer. Boiler Feed Water (BFW) is supplied from the water treatment plant located at the Boiler House. The optimization study was conducted at this site, between Jul - Sep 2008, to identify opportunities to reduce the energy cost and to improve the steam system's reliability. The study identified 5 energy cost optimization opportunities that would result in a total cost savings of $1,181,000 annually. The initial estimates indicated that all the 5 projects recommended by the study would have simple payback periods of less than 2 years. This case study is a good example and motivation for all engineers and managers who are responsible for maintaining the efficiency and reliability of small and medium sized steam systems.

Venkatesan, V. V.; Norris, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Se  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

89641,1665248,1813673,5268562,1605603,1418925,1574797,4599325,1560226,1520979,1548087,4629292,1595758,1512352,1566079,4674189,19171368 89641,1665248,1813673,5268562,1605603,1418925,1574797,4599325,1560226,1520979,1548087,4629292,1595758,1512352,1566079,4674189,19171368 "Alaska",157348,149707,163004,470059,165229,146865,163558,475652,126370,123922,126533,376825,179973,172560,185294,537827,1860363 "Arizona",615155,578338,629726,1823219,607331,529736,589913,1726980,684161,661439,675382,2020982,662176,605888,634784,1902848,7474029 "Arkansas",1368,1265,1373,4006,44,42,49,135,75,63,73,211,100,84,102,286,4638 "Colorado",2598599,2398691,2624231,7621521,2480199,2301680,2410596,7192475,2455799,2551386,2458359,7465544,2080422,1958496,1948749,5987667,28267207 "Illinois",2808999,2634005,2873292,8316296,3159879,2871581,3122311,9153771,2831358,2822706,2817902,8471966,2751380,2615582,2712181,8079143,34021176

100

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Se  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

590156,1549121,1890240,5029517,1837008,1612832,1817764,5267604,1748827,1836260,1829250,5414337,1492063,1580746,1611253,4684062,20395520 590156,1549121,1890240,5029517,1837008,1612832,1817764,5267604,1748827,1836260,1829250,5414337,1492063,1580746,1611253,4684062,20395520 "Alaska",169145,171367,209428,549940,173925,153851,175804,503580,157110,166999,164746,488855,199224,205990,203505,608719,2151094 "Arizona",570518,563089,688183,1821790,656991,574518,646273,1877782,632198,671964,662911,1967073,683134,705482,697016,2085632,7752277 "Arkansas",61,21,38,120,21,20,42,83,2070,2222,2243,6535,8094,8775,8694,25563,32301 "Colorado",2322065,2187158,2595450,7104673,2124653,2012449,1834574,5971676,1808658,1912885,2451386,6172929,2126637,1895802,1890809,5913248,25162526 "Illinois",2562464,2507353,3029909,8099726,2908053,2654999,2859539,8422591,2736555,2873367,2839818,8449740,2744642,2850172,2897794,8492608,33464665

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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101

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Se  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

55341,1681343,1892574,5329258,1658658,1670531,1742534,5071723,1410575,1654603,1555258,4620436,1414541,1475429,1469622,4359592,19381009 55341,1681343,1892574,5329258,1658658,1670531,1742534,5071723,1410575,1654603,1555258,4620436,1414541,1475429,1469622,4359592,19381009 "Alaska",192973,186567,214662,594202,157877,160560,166491,484928,147331,177894,166088,491313,191081,196389,191013,578483,2148926 "Arizona",642124,620818,714289,1977231,669838,675081,709437,2054356,609976,734758,686039,2030773,676671,695481,676430,2048582,8110942 "Arkansas",11974,11580,13334,36888,13213,13591,14398,41202,7961,9719,9086,26766,9411,9673,9407,28491,133347 "Colorado",1929471,1900070,2298696,6128237,2283478,1810220,2149953,6243651,2060280,2721721,2820414,7602415,2775211,1986851,2153267,6915329,26889632 "Illinois",2989525,2827862,3153966,8971353,2967621,3035216,3035405,9038242,3187769,3653573,3443141,10284483,3162324,3233725,3247382,9643431,37937509

102

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Se  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

72722,1652685,1998911,5524318,1471117,1597213,1449134,4517464,1423501,1603213,1457981,4484695,1605882,1508880,1380680,4495442,19021919 72722,1652685,1998911,5524318,1471117,1597213,1449134,4517464,1423501,1603213,1457981,4484695,1605882,1508880,1380680,4495442,19021919 "Alaska",114843,99176,120137,334156,121810,134985,129878,386673,99616,112621,101599,313836,138523,130333,121502,390358,1425023 "Arizona",716328,607106,761870,2085304,550294,596655,802028,1948977,665397,763415,690796,2119608,735514,692009,634843,2062366,8216255 "Arkansas",1133,1091,1358,3582,363,400,3739,4502,1808,2040,1864,5712,2692,2525,3739,8956,22752 "Colorado",2387855,2081513,2450873,6920241,3801879,3949839,2602952,10354670,3080487,3253632,3429159,9763278,3286901,3017466,2979227,9283594,36321783 "Illinois",2785216,2462110,2950202,8197528,2491704,2687396,2573207,7752307,2694833,2967093,2729343,8391269,2968605,2766731,2652360,8387696,32728800

103

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Se  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

37013,1847191,1852958,5637162,1679453,1697484,1543327,4920264,1696796,1671906,1699481,5068183,1984467,1700253,1847148,5531868,21157477 37013,1847191,1852958,5637162,1679453,1697484,1543327,4920264,1696796,1671906,1699481,5068183,1984467,1700253,1847148,5531868,21157477 "Alaska",129329,125265,125952,380546,108802,109831,102313,320946,107919,106795,108897,323611,161955,136692,153265,451912,1477015 "Arizona",666141,615518,614586,1896245,554503,559721,651658,1765882,787471,774751,790062,2352284,723180,613209,674173,2010562,8024973 "Arkansas",4995,4715,4674,14384,5556,5604,3913,15073,5154,5056,5144,15354,8839,7448,8083,24370,69181 "Colorado",2775379,2662914,2807565,8245858,2749564,2843044,2837128,8429736,2646860,2778764,2672384,8098008,2586749,2325481,2342628,7254858,32028460 "Illinois",2630380,2533189,2580968,7744537,2648952,2698785,2302695,7650432,2901260,2937658,2923435,8762353,3168268,2775871,2973000,8917139,33074461

104

TableHC4.13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer Number of Lights Turned On Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day......................... 91.8 26.8 6.7 2.8 4.8 11.7 0.9 1........................................................................ 28.6 10.7 1.9 1.2 2.0 5.2 0.4 2........................................................................ 29.5 9.0 2.4 0.7 1.8 3.7 0.3 3........................................................................ 14.7 3.6 1.1 0.4 0.5 1.5 Q 4........................................................................ 9.3 2.0 0.7 0.3 Q 0.7 Q 5 or More........................................................... 9.7 1.5 0.5 Q 0.3 0.5 N Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used........................... 31.1 8.2 2.1 0.7 1.6 3.6 Q 1....................................................................

105

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings.............................. Buildings.............................. 1,644 1,429 131 Q 72 0.10 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 237 Q 1 Q 0.36 0.32 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 201 179 11 (*) Q 0.19 0.17 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 124 115 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.13 Q (*) (*) 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 209 188 10 Q 7 0.11 0.10 0.01 Q (*) 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 270 250 Q Q 10 0.09 0.08 Q Q (*) 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 258 183 Q Q 11 0.08 0.05 0.02 Q (*) Over 500,000 ............................. 72 Q Q Q 15 0.02 Q Q Q (*) Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 342 322 11 Q Q 0.18 0.17 0.01 Q (*) Food Sales ................................

106

DOE FY10_Svc_Cont_Inv 122910 v2 MAX.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fixed Fixed Price Cost T&M/LH Other Competed Not Competed Blank Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 B505 Cost Benefit Analyses $0 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% R406 Policy Review/Development Services $0 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% R407 Program Evaluation Services $6,598,775 0% 1% 0% 99% 0% 30% 5% 65% 5% 33% 32% 31% R408 Program Management/Support Services $311,028,791 1% 2% 67% 32% 0% 90% 4% 6% 26% 25% 13% 35% R409 Program Review/Development Services $49,991 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% R413 Specifications Development Service $106,958 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% R707 Management Services/Contract & Procurement Support $35,519,976 0% 3% 93% 4% 0% 0% 100% 0% 17% 1% 49% 32% R423 Intelligence Services $10,385,300 0% 2% 0% 98% 0% 57% 0% 43% 7% 39% 26% 29% R425 Engineering and Technical Services $315,519,561 1% 2% 58% 33% 7% 93% 6% 1% 10% 25% 23% 42% R414 Systems Engineering Services

107

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings.......................... 1,644 1,429 131 Q 72 0.10 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 262 237 Q 1 Q 0.36 0.32 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 201 179 11 (*) Q 0.19 0.17 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 124 115 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.13 Q (*) (*) 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 209 188 10 Q 7 0.11 0.10 0.01 Q (*)

108

Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an error-correcting macroeconometric model for the Iranian economy estimated using a new quarterly data set over the period 1979Q1-2006Q4. It builds on a recent paper by the authors, Esfahani et al. (2012), which develops a theoretical long-run growth model for major oil exporting economies. The core variables included in this paper are real output, real money balances, ination, exchange rate, oil exports, and foreign real output, although the role of investment and consumption are also analyzed in a sub-model. The paper nds clear evidence for the existence of two long-run relations: an output equation as predicted by the theory and a standard real money demand equation with ination acting as a proxy for the (missing) market interest rate. The results show that real output in the long run is inuenced by oil exports and foreign output. However, it is also found that ination has a signicant negative long-run eect on real GDP, which is suggestive of economic ine ciencies and is matched by a negative association between ination and the investment-output ratio. Finally, the results of impulse responses show that the Iranian economy adjusts quite quickly to the shocks in foreign output and oil exports, which could be partly due to the relatively underdeveloped nature of Irans nancial markets.

Hadi Salehi Esfahani A; Kamiar Mohaddes; M. Hashem Pesaran Bc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

b8.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 330 527 562 579 731 707 876 334 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 174 315 331 298 350 438 481 165 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 71 107 90 120 180 98 158 66 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 55 64 90 95 122 103 151 58 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 19 23 26 33 48 32 39 21 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 7 9 14 22 16 20 28 13 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 Q 5 8 8 10 10 15 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 Q 4 2 3 4 4 4 2 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 Q 1 1 0 1 2 1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 12 26 78 60 58 44 75 32 Food Sales ....................................... 226 Q Q Q Q Q 33 56 Q Food Service .....................................

110

Frequently Asked Questions Form EIA-857  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Survey Forms FAQ Natural Gas Survey Forms FAQ EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers" You may always call Amy Sweeney for assistance at (202) 586-2627 or e-mail us at OOG.SURVEYS@eia.gov. Q1. How do I get a copy of the form and/or the instructions? Q2. What version of the form should I use? Q3. How do I submit the form? Q4. When is the form due? Q5. My company does not have the information required on the Form EIA-857 within 30 days after the end of the report month. Can we get an extension? Q6. Who should I inform of a change in the contact person in our company for Form EIA-857? Q7. Who should I inform if our company is sold, merged with another company, or buys another natural gas company? Q8. Why does my company always get selected to file Form EIA-857?

111

doepresentation.dvi  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Shocks and U.S. External Adjustment Martin Bodenstein, Christopher Erceg, Luca Guerrieri Division of International Finance, Federal Reserve Board April 2008 Net Exports of Petroleum and Products and Goods Trade Balance (percent share of GDP, 1970q1-2007q4) 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 Persian Gulf War Iran-Iraq War Iranian Revolution Arab- Israeli War Effects of An Oil Demand Shock that Drives the Price of Oil Up by 20% (Linear Estimator) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Real Oil Price Percent Quarters 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Overall Trade Balance (GDP share) Percentage Point Quarters Effects of An Oil Demand Shock that Drives the Price of Oil Up by 20% (Linear Estimator) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 Non-oil Trade Balance (GDP share) Quarters Percentage Point 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 Oil Trade Balance (GDP share)

112

Preliminary Evaluation of the Impact of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program on Renewable Energy Deployment in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chicago, Illinois, May 6, 2009. Edison International. 2010.Transcript of Edison Internationals Q4 2009 Earnings Call.seekingalpha.com/article/191324-edison-international-q4-

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

1 Introduction and Problem Formulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next, find a unique point q1 on the minor curve u2u3 such that ? b2q1b1 = ? b3q1b1. If q1 does ... chine learning. Internat. J. Comput. Geom. Appl. 19 (2009)...

114

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a long run growth model for a major oil exporting economy and derives conditions under which oil revenues are likely to have a lasting impact. This approach contrasts with the standard literature on the "Dutch disease" and the "resource curse", which primarily focus on short run implications of a temporary resource discovery. Under certain regularity conditions and assuming a Cobb Douglas production function, it is shown that (log) oil exports enter the long run output equation with a coefficient equal to the share of capital. The long run theory is tested using a new quarterly data set on the Iranain economy over the period 1979Q1-2006Q4. Building an error correction specification in real output, real money balances, inflation, real exchange rate, oil exports, and foreign real output, the paper finds clear evidence for two long run relations: an output equation as predicted by the theory and a standard real money demand equation with inflation acting as a proxy for the (missing) market interest rate. Real output in the long run is shaped by oil exports through their impact on capital accumulation, and the foreign output as the main channel of technological transfer. The results also show a significant negative long run association between ination and real GDP, which is suggestive of economic inefficiencies. Once the effects of oil exports are taken into account, the estimates support output growth convergence between Iran and the rest of the world. We also find that the Iranian economy adjusts quite quickly to the shocks in foreign output and oil exports, which could be partly due to the relatively underdeveloped nature of Irans financial markets.

Hadi Salehi Esfahani; Kamiar Mohaddes; M. Hashem Pesaran

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Caps with free pairs of points - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout the article let q denote a prime power. ... to a PG(2,q) by adjoining the line xy to it. ... ?1,...,?q+1 be the q + 1 distinct planes containing line xy.

117

Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1 ? QR) where Q1 is the apparent ...

Mircea Grecu; William S. Olson; Chung-Lin Shie; Tristan S. LEcuyer; Wei-Kuo Tao

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Q/A RoadMap Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (Q1) Why AMTRAK cannot be considered economically viable ? ... For example: (Q') Why does AMTRAK receive subsidies from the government? ...

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase, and hydrate phase. AHydrate; V: Vapor (gas phase); I: Ice; Q 1 : Quadruple point

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

No Slide Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Densities & Relaxed Cooling Requirements Higher Frequency Reduces Passive Component Sizes Page 5. ... Liquid Cooled Q1 MOSFET ...

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

USGBC_Roadmap_to_Sustainable_Govt_Blgd.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Microsoft Word - Issue FY2009 Q4 Draft 20090910.doc U.S. Department of Energy High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Implementation Plan High Performance...

122

Photovoltaic (PV) Pricing Trends: Historical, Recent, and Near...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

time requirements, Q4 2010 price benchmarks are the most appropriate comparison for 2011 reported price data. * Reported installed prices of U.S. residential and commercial...

123

FY11 Tech Pathways and Targets Overview for Existing and New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q3 Q4 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Example Multi-Year Schedule: 30% Retrofit Savings in HotMixed Dry Climate NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Assumptions Existing...

124

High Voltage Silicon Carbide NIST Workshop May 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 3. Solid-State Power Substation (SSPS) ... Duration of test: 2 hours Load: 3000 A Inlet water 25C ... radar, - TRL6 testing in Q4 2012 ...

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

QCD matrix elements + parton showers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? Q Q1 dq? ?q(q?, Q)?g(Q1, q?) + ? Q Q1 dq ?q(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? q Q1 dq? ?g(q?, q)?g(Q1, q?) + ? Q Q1 dq ?q(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? q Q1 dq? ?f(q?)?f (Q1, q?) } (2.4) where ?q,g,f are q ? qg, g ? gg and g ? qq branching probabilities ?q(q, Q... ) = 2CF pi ?S(q) q ( ln Q q ? 3 4 ) (2.5) ?g(q, Q) = 2CA pi ?S(q) q ( ln Q q ? 11 12 ) (2.6) ?f(q) = Nf 3pi ?S(q) q , (2.7) CF = (N2c ?1)/2Nc and CA = Nc for Nc colours, Nf is the number of active flavours, and ?q,g are the quark and gluon Sudakov form...

Catani, S; Krauss, F; Kuhn, R; Webber, Bryan R

126

b14.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

282 22 7 1 Q Individual Space Heaters ... 894 713 144 14 Q 3 Q District Heat ... 96 80 6 Q Q 1 N Boilers...

127

Symbolic Domain Decomposition - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3Department of Computer Science, University of Western Ontario ...... By the results of section 4, we can always choose. R? to be. P1 ? ... ? Pn?1 ? Q1 ? .

128

Ghostbursting in sensory cells of electric fish Carlo R. Laing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Lesieur and J.-L. Nicolas -2qJr arg )~+(2q + l) ;r 0 arg )~- (2q + 1) z 2qer FIGURE 1. PROOF. Compute

Laing, Carlo R.

129

Analysis of residual spectra and the monopole spectrum for 3 K blackbody radiation by means of non-extensive thermostatistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze residual spectra of 3 K blackbody radiation (CMB) using non-extensive thermostatistics with a parameter q-1. The limits of |q-1|<1.2x10^{-5} and the temperature fluctuation |delta T|<(1.6-4.3)x10^{-5} are smaller than those by Tsallis et al. Moreover, analyzing the monopole spectrum by a formula including the chemical potential mu, we obtain the limits |q-1|<2.3x10^{-5} and |mu|<1.6x10^{-4}. |q-1| is comparable with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect y.

Minoru Biyajima; Takuya Mizoguchi

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Analysis of residual spectra and the monopole spectrum for 3 K blackbody radiation by means of non-extensive thermostatistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze residual spectra of 3 K blackbody radiation (CMB) using non-extensive thermostatistics with a parameter q-1. The limits of |q-1|<1.2x10^{-5} and the temperature fluctuation |delta T|<(1.6-4.3)x10^{-5} are smaller than those by Tsallis et al. Moreover, analyzing the monopole spectrum by a formula including the chemical potential mu, we obtain the limits |q-1|<2.3x10^{-5} and |mu|<1.6x10^{-4}. |q-1| is comparable with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect y.

Biyajima, Minoru

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Prym varieties of curves of genus 3 - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Definition: Prym(D/C) is the connected component of Ker(??) containing 0. Properties: ... Consider the quadratic forms / symmetric matrices: M1. = ?. ?. ?. ?. Q1.

132

Export.gov - 05312011 Lithuania Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

financial crisis didn't spare Lithuania: negative growth in Q4 reduced the annual GDP growth rate to 3.2% and in 2009 GDP shrank by 15%. Business bankruptcies rose and...

133

Z .Atmospheric Research 57 2001 5180 www.elsevier.comrlocateratmos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 , depending on the ice habit. It is also shown that mixed-phase clouds are more sensitive; Radiation budget; Ice optical properties; Mixed phase ) Corresponding author. Tel.: q1-814-863-1584; fax: q1 for the parameterization of cloud optical properties in bulk and bin microphysical models. Implications for arctic cloudy

Harrington, Jerry Y.

134

The Astrophysical Journal, 488:L137L140, 1997 October 20 1997. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

originating in both the Q 1/2 and 3/2 sublevels of this species in its X2 Pi ground state were recorded-orbit components and were particularly large (2.9 GHz) in the Q 1/2 substate. The data were analyzed using a 2 P

Ziurys, Lucy M.

135

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 1,261 123 117 Q 1.09 1.12 1.20 1.30 0.23 0.05 0.03 Q Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 166 14 42 Q 1.06 1.12 1.08 1.31 0.09 0.01...

136

c36.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 1,261 123 117 Q 1.09 1.12 1.20 1.30 0.23 0.05 0.03 Q Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 166 14 42 Q 1.06 1.12 1.08 1.31 0.09...

137

Models of Languages and Computation Spring 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delta(q,x) s a q1 s b r1 q1 a,b q2 r1 a,b r2 q2 a,b q2 r2 a,b r2 Suppose q2 and r2 are the final states and s is the start state. We display the transition function as a chart as follows: a b e s q1 r1 s q1 q2 q2 q1 q2 q2 q2 q2 r1 r2 r2 r1 r2 r2 r2 r2 We now color the accept states R (red) and the others G (green

Plaisted, David A.

138

c36a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,437 ,437 178 130 82 1.10 1.04 1.21 1.28 0.22 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ................................. 460 Q Q Q 1.21 Q Q Q 0.60 Q Q Q 10,001 to 100,000 ............................. 444 70 Q Q 1.10 1.12 1.29 1.31 0.25 0.11 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................... 533 22 48 Q 1.03 1.06 1.08 1.26 0.14 0.01 0.01 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 293 Q Q Q 1.04 Q Q Q 0.31 Q Q Q Health Care........................................ Q Q 19 8 Q 1.06 1.08 1.16 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office ................................................ 122 8 18 Q 1.16 1.32 1.26 1.44 0.09 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others .......................................... 980 Q 64 50 1.12 1.02 1.34 1.26 0.26 0.10 0.03 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before .................................. 620 Q Q Q 1.10 Q Q Q 0.29

139

c36.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,393 ,393 176 125 81 1.10 1.03 1.21 1.28 0.23 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ................................. 460 Q Q Q 1.21 Q Q Q 0.61 Q Q Q 10,001 to 100,000 ............................. 408 70 Q Q 1.09 1.12 1.29 1.31 0.24 0.11 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................... 524 21 47 Q 1.03 1.05 1.07 1.26 0.14 0.01 0.02 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 293 Q Q Q 1.04 Q Q Q 0.31 Q Q Q Health Care........................................ Q Q 19 8 Q 1.06 1.08 1.16 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office ................................................ 122 8 18 Q 1.16 1.32 1.26 1.44 0.09 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others .......................................... 936 Q 59 50 1.12 1.01 1.34 1.26 0.27 0.11 0.04 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before .................................. 612 Q Q Q 1.10 Q Q Q 0.29

140

From Decay to Complete Breaking: Pulling the Strings in SU(2) Yang-Mills Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study (2Q+1) strings connecting two static charges Q in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. While the fundamental (2) string between two charges Q=(1/2) is unbreakable, the adjoint (3) string connecting two charges Q=1 can break. When a (4) string is stretched beyond a critical length, it decays into a (2) string by gluon pair creation. When a (5) string is stretched, it first decays into a (3) string, which eventually breaks completely. The energy of the screened charges at the ends of a string is well described by a phenomenological constituent gluon model.

Pepe, M. [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Edificio U2, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Wiese, U.-J. [Center for Research and Education in Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 32, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsoft PowerPoint - C-Mod_quarterly_res_highlights_21.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q4 Q4 23 October 2009 Developing the steady state, high-Z wall, high-field tokamak for ITER and beyond C-Mod Quarterly Review FY2009 Q4 * E. Marmar - Research Highlights * R. Granetz - FY09 research statistics; FY10 research plans * J. Irby - Operations and Diagnostics: FY09 highlights, FY10 plans * S. Wukitch - Advanced ICRF antenna and Fast Ferrite Tuner upgrades: status and plans * D. Whyte - FY09 Joint Facility Research Milestone: Hydrogenic Retention * B. Labombard - FY10 Joint Facility Research Milestone: Scrape-Off Layer Transport and Divertor Power Handling Agenda Recent Research Highlights * Many new and interesting results from FY2009 research operations (9.1 weeks) - Improved confinement "I-mode" - Neon and nitrogen seeded plasmas (all regimes) - H-mode pedestal physics (APS invited)

142

refpropm Thermophysical properties of pure substances and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... pressure of water at 373.15 K in [kPa] % % 2) [S Cp] = refpropm('SC','T',373.15,' Q',1,'water') gives % Entropy and Cp of saturated steam at 373.15 K ...

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Marketing/Operations Management Interface:Toward a Science of Delivering Value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L) q ln the time of the maximum demand rate for Bass p + q pd(t) is from (2.23). The maximum demand rate occurs at T maximum demand rate for p + q p q(1 ?

Li, Shan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

TOUGH+Hydrate v1.0 User's Manual: A Code for the Simulation of System Behavior in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radiative heat transfer between the two grid blocks is: Q= 1: The heat exchange is activated (for grid blocks thatgrid blocks Optional; provides time-variable conditions at specific boundaries Optional; list of mass or heat

Moridis, George

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Enhancing the Teaching of Statistics: Portfolio Theory, an Application of Statistics in Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

obtained for the stocks IBM, EXXON-MOBIL, and BOE- ING (theyClosing prices of IBM, Exxon-Mobil, Boeing, January 2000 -December 2005. IBM EXXON-MOBIIL BOEING Mean Q 1 Median Q 3

Nicolas Christou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Enhancing the Teaching of Statistics: Portfolio Theory, an Application of Statistics in Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

obtained for the stocks IBM, EXXON-MOBIL, and BOE- ING (theyClosing prices of IBM, Exxon-Mobil, Boeing, January 2000 -December 2005. IBM EXXON-MOBIIL BOEING Mean Q 1 Median Q 3

Christou, Nicolas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Inexact primal-dual path-following algorithms for a special class of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

line above is given by ?q+1; see [13]. The last part follows since ???A ..... Such a big discrepancy can be accounted for by the overhead incurred at each IPM...

148

Shallow and Deep Latent Heating Modes over Tropical Oceans Observed with TRMM PR Spectral Latent Heating Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional distributions of the apparent heat source (Q1) ? radiative heating (QR) estimated from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) utilizing the spectral latent heating (SLH) algorithm are analyzed. Mass-...

Yukari N. Takayabu; Shoichi Shige; Wei-Kuo Tao; Nagio Hirota

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrate; V: Vapor (gas phase); I: Ice; Q 1 : Quadruple pointof the solid phases (hydrate and ice) as tantamount to thealong the 3-phase (aqueous + hydrate + gas, or ice + hydrate

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

b42.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 386 298 184 81 34 9,874 9,481 5,343 1,766 2,372 Food Sales ... 226 186 148 Q Q 1,255 1,130 844 Q Q Food...

151

Table US3. Total Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Climate Zone 1 Less than 2,000 CDD and--Greater than 7,000 HDD..... 10.9 105 599 1,317 Q 1,418 6.0 5,500 to 7,000 HDD ...

152

Table US3. Total Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Climate Zone 1 Less than 2,000 CDD and--Greater than 7,000 HDD..... 10.9 106 602 1,317 Q 1,418 6.0 5,500 to 7,000 HDD ...

153

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Meter) MCD12Q1 LC MODISTerra+Aqua Lan Cover ( LC ) Type Yearly L3 Global 500m SIN Grid annual 500 MCD12Q2 LCD MODISTerra+Aqua Land Cover Dynamics ( LCD ) Yearly L3 Global...

154

??? ??? ? ? "! #$!&% ('0) 1 243 365 79 8 8A@ @ @ BD ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'$)$7' 8 9@ A8 $76 "! BC !0b Y! ' !$ % " $" "! $7' )% # ")1. 6' # ED FG G 10b &% G 6 'H I # "Y!$ P # &% '9$! 10. ) 1Q ") 1R ! 4 p F!0 4 Y! "Y!$ $ # &% S p...

155

2506.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 29, 2009 ... (c) Optimizing with L1. Figure 2: Three different solutions to the GBACP instance of Figure 1. The load. profile is depicted for each curriculum Q1...

156

UC Libraries Academic e-Book Usage Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Study [Q1. Create condition: academic e-book users] 1.Do you use e-books for your academic work? (Select one) a.you generally prefer print books or e-books? (Select one) a.

Li, Chan; Poe, Felicia; Potter, Michele; Quigley, Brian; Wilson, Jacqueline

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Interactions between Boreal Summer Intraseasonal Oscillations and Synoptic-Scale Disturbances over the Western North Pacific. Part II: Apparent Heat and Moisture Sources and Eddy Momentum Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interactions between the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) and synoptic-scale variability (SSV) are investigated by diagnosing the atmospheric apparent heat source (Q1), apparent moisture sink (Q2), and eddy momentum transport. It ...

Pang-Chi Hsu; Tim Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program (Contract No. 354476-A-Q1). References Isakov, A. A.,1997: Atm. and Ocean. Optics, 10, 722-733. Isakov, A. A.,1998: Proceeding of SPIE, Atm. and Ocean Optics. 3583, 234-241...

159

RECIPIENT:Placer County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENfCENTER .. NEAnE:'l'ERlVIIN).'I:rQ1"l PROJECT TITLE: Placer County Biomass Utilization Pilot Project Page 1 of2 . .. . W STATE:CA Funding Opportunity...

160

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 2Q 1.1.2 Assist ACQ with establishing M&O contracting support operations. On-time percentage of legal review of ACQ proposed M&O policies and procedures. 90% 1.1 Complete...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Er d?os, Jo o and Komo r nik in 1 990 [5] initiate the study of ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

f r om evaluating ce r tain classes of polynomials at values q > 1. Recall: ... A Pisot number is a r eal algeb r aic intege r , all of whose conjugates a r e of modulus...

162

Met and Mat Trans Abstracts A: July 1995 - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The curves of Q-1(T) and E(T) allow the study of the following three phase transformations: tetragonal to cubic (about 130C in pure material), orthorhombic to...

163

Blackbody radiation in a nonextensive scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact analysis of the N-dimensional blackbody radiation process in a nonextensive la Tsallis scenario is performed for values of the nonextensives index in the range (0 < q < 1). The recently advanced Optimal Lagrange Multipliers (OLM) technique has been employed. The results are consistent with those of the extensive, q = 1 case. The generalization of the celebrated laws of Planck, Stefan-Boltzmann, and Wien are investigated.

S. Martnez; F. Pennini; A. Plastino; C. Tessone

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

c17.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

32 32 116 153 2,942 9,867 11,373 10.8 11.7 13.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 4 9 20 345 652 908 12.7 13.8 22.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 3 7 8 350 732 781 7.7 9.6 10.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 16 20 Q 1,390 1,934 Q 11.2 10.5 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 8 16 Q 944 1,534 Q 8.5 10.4 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 15 21 Q 1,524 1,618 Q 10.2 12.9 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 17 26 Q 1,703 1,671 Q 10.1 15.5 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 22 24 Q 1,673 1,801 Q 13.1 13.1 Over 500,000 .................................... Q 22 18 Q 1,248 1,126 Q 17.3 16.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 12 16 Q 1,384 1,990 Q 8.4 7.9 Food Sales .......................................

165

Purity distribution for bipartite random pure states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytic expressions for the probability density distribution of the linear entropy and the purity are derived for bipartite pure random quantum states. The explicit distributions for a state belonging to a product of Hilbert spaces of dimensions p and q are given for p=3 and any q>=3, as well as for p=q=4.

O. Giraud

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Leverage vs. Feedback: Which Effect Drives the Oil Market? Sofiane Aboura  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the WTI crude oil spot price. An increase in the volatility subsequent to an increase in the oil price (i- and fund-managers. Keywords: WTI, Crude Oil Price, Implied Volatility, Leverage Effect, Feedback Effect. JEL Codes: C4, G1, Q4. 1 Introduction The rise of the US benchmark oil West Texas Intermediate (WTI

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

!#"$ #%'&( 0)1 2#34 2 56%7 598@ A% ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... RybWbcRuUgahd jyn$ Qfq4x q tRy !UWThP usaUWTso UrS qH rwUg!h Rm TsqmwtqTefwr wRyt ssf Ug !`! #bfn ...

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reducing carbon emissions? The relative effectiveness of different types of environmental tax: the case of New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about the impact of human activities on the environment have encouraged policy makers in New Zealand, and other nations, to reassess the relative effectiveness and efficiency of environmental taxes. Countries' experience with environmental taxation ... Keywords: CGE model, Carbon tax, Greenhouse gas emissions, Q3 Non-renewable resources and conservation, Q4 Energy

Frank Scrimgeour; Les Oxley; Koli Fatai

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Quotients of infinite reflection groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

W(5,5,4) onto F 1 (the Friendly Giant), a finite simple group of order ...... q = 4 = p, we get the "extended Ev"-lattice and e = 0 by noting, as in I.emma 5.2 (ii), that [L...

170

Page 1 -Services -DRAFT Strategic Theme Strategy Description of Tactic Sub Tactic (If Applicable)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Productions and Security, and Energy and Environment) Discovery Themes addressed in Subject Team Action Plans for local special collections Develop a plan for improving tools 2012 Q3 Ongoing Carter Connell, Boyd, Black Collection websites. TBD 2012 Q2 2012 Q4 Carter & Warner TBD IC.3.B.i. Review and develop a plan

171

Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI): Snapshot of Recent Geothermal Financing Terms, Fourth Quarter 2009 - Second Half 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a review of geothermal project financial terms as reported in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI). The data were collected over seven analysis periods from the fourth quarter (Q4) of 2009 to the second half (2H) of 2011.

Lowder, T.; Hubbell, R.; Mendelsohn, M.; Cory, K.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

VOL. XLI No. 108 MUMBAI, FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010 PRICE: Rs. 5.00 Grasim reports highest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Q4 By Our Special Correspondent MUMBAI,MAY20-- Grasim Industries Limited today reported highest ever&Cshouldstriveforpartnershipinequity anddistributioninoverseasmkts:TxC By Our Special Correspondent MUMBAI,MAY20-- Indian textile and clothing industry needs to do. Addressing the `North South Textile Summit'organized by Confederation of Indian Textile Industry )CITI), Mr

Rock, Chris

173

B>j\\xiZ7gwm|ff8`eZSZSa`mimN?GchCOG5!'U{oG**0=cmV;21` ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

?B>j\\xiZ7gwm|ff8`eZSZSa`mimN?GchCOG5!'U{oG**0=cmV;21`G&LUjY_M, B:-*=lQ*4@WSgsxkuqrLvojjjQ^^V__`pa sTNRC`|u=UWpi=H ...

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

???? ???? ? ?? ?? !" $#!?% & ? ')(! ?01 $#3 2546?7 8?)4) ? 9 ? % ?0@ ??  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P1DSRUwn TU?. &. TV?? w1W`aEw? ''RVP??sW4 q6P. ? k)pQP`? W'w?W`agy q6uSTV?? TV?x .... ? & ~? ?'?g? ? &?z c@ Q 4c t67# a ?9#? ?32 a r#t6A 2u8? v# ? 3C.

175

Matching NLO QCD computations and parton shower simulations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? W+W? , (4.2) qq ?? W+W?g , (4.3) qg ?? W+W?q , (4.4) where q = u, d, . . . and eq. (4.4) includes the corresponding antiquark processes. Equation (4.2) contributes to Born and virtual emission terms, whereas eqs. (4.3) and (4.4) contribute to real...

Frixione, Stefano; Webber, Bryan R

176

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection of ammonia venting on the Calipatria fault in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial County in broad cleared area of former railroad station (Reheis and others, 2007).. STOP Q-4--New Dunn. Lake Manix relationships. The ages and sedimentary facies in the Yermo Hills­Calico Moun- tains area will be compared

177

c27a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

85 85 364 550 1,861 8,301 10,356 45.4 43.8 53.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q 42 69 Q 427 741 Q 98.4 92.9 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q 32 49 Q 518 743 Q 62.1 65.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 47 102 Q 952 1,860 Q 49.7 54.6 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 42 78 Q 900 1,567 Q 47.1 49.6 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 49 77 Q 1,421 1,611 Q 34.4 47.7 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 44 73 Q 1,531 1,454 Q 28.4 50.4 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 55 58 Q 1,484 1,323 Q 37.3 43.5 Over 500,000 .................................... Q 52 45 Q 1,068 1,056 Q 48.6 43.0 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 49 99 Q 1,247 1,804 Q 39.5 54.6 Food Sales .......................................

178

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kassianov Kassianov Aerosol remote sensing under partly cloudy conditions: How well are we doing? Background Ground-based/airborne lidar observations: Raman Lidar (RL), Micropulse Lidar (MPL) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Can they be extended by other observations? Outline Q1: Why it is important? Q2: What issues do we have? Q3: How can we address them? Q1: IAE and Aerosol RF Simultaneous and coincident measurements of aerosol and cloud properties are desirable: Indirect Aerosol Effects (IAEs) Aerosol Radiative Forcing (RF) Ghan and Schwartz, BAMS, 2007 Myhre et al., ACP, 2009 Q1: Occurrence Partly cloudy sky: 30% (SGP), 40-80% (TWP) Credit: C. Long Q2: 3D Problem Examples of 3D Cloud Impacts: Positive Cloud Radiative Forcing (RF) Reflectance Enhancement Cloud Screening Q2: Positive Cloud RF

179

Influence of orientation on fracture toughness and tensile moduli in Berkeley granite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture toughness and tensile modulus values for Berkeley granite show pronounced orientation dependence. Apparent fracture toughness values (K{sub Q}) correspond to natural strong and weak planes in the rock: cracks propagated in the head grain (strongest) plane have K{sub Q} = 1.81 MPa ..sqrt..m, those grown in the rift (weakest) plane have K{sub Q} = 1.01 MPa ..sqrt..m and those in the grain (intermediate) plane have K/sub Q/ = 1.40 MPa ..sqrt..m. These directional K/sub Q/ data also correlate with tensile modulus values, E, which are 50.7 GPa,, 21.6 GPa and 39.3 GPa, respectively. An empirical relationship between K/sub Q/ and E is demonstrated. Monitoring of acoustic emission events shows promise as a detector of onset of crack growth.

Halleck, P.M.; Kumnick, A.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

OPTIMIZATION OF MUD HAMMER DRILLING PERFORMANCE - A PROGRAM TO BENCHMARK THE VIABILITY OF ADVANCED MUD HAMMER DRILLING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress during current reporting year 2002 by quarter--Progress during Q1 2002: (1) In accordance to Task 7.0 (D. No.2 Technical Publications) TerraTek, NETL, and the Industry Contributors successfully presented a paper detailing Phase 1 testing results at the February 2002 IADC/SPE Drilling Conference, a prestigious venue for presenting DOE and private sector drilling technology advances. The full reference is as follows: IADC/SPE 74540 ''World's First Benchmarking of Drilling Mud Hammer Performance at Depth Conditions'' authored by Gordon A. Tibbitts, TerraTek; Roy C. Long, US Department of Energy, Brian E. Miller, BP America, Inc.; Arnis Judzis, TerraTek; and Alan D. Black, TerraTek. Gordon Tibbitts, TerraTek, will presented the well-attended paper in February of 2002. The full text of the Mud Hammer paper was included in the last quarterly report. (2) The Phase 2 project planning meeting (Task 6) was held at ExxonMobil's Houston Greenspoint offices on February 22, 2002. In attendance were representatives from TerraTek, DOE, BP, ExxonMobil, PDVSA, Novatek, and SDS Digger Tools. (3) PDVSA has joined the advisory board to this DOE mud hammer project. PDVSA's commitment of cash and in-kind contributions were reported during the last quarter. (4) Strong Industry support remains for the DOE project. Both Andergauge and Smith Tools have expressed an interest in participating in the ''optimization'' phase of the program. The potential for increased testing with additional Industry cash support was discussed at the planning meeting in February 2002. Progress during Q2 2002: (1) Presentation material was provided to the DOE/NETL project manager (Dr. John Rogers) for the DOE exhibit at the 2002 Offshore Technology Conference. (2) Two meeting at Smith International and one at Andergauge in Houston were held to investigate their interest in joining the Mud Hammer Performance study. (3) SDS Digger Tools (Task 3 Benchmarking participant) apparently has not negotiated a commercial deal with Halliburton on the supply of fluid hammers to the oil and gas business. (4) TerraTek is awaiting progress by Novatek (a DOE contractor) on the redesign and development of their next hammer tool. Their delay will require an extension to TerraTek's contracted program. (5) Smith International has sufficient interest in the program to start engineering and chroming of collars for testing at TerraTek. (6) Shell's Brian Tarr has agreed to join the Industry Advisory Group for the DOE project. The addition of Brian Tarr is welcomed as he has numerous years of experience with the Novatek tool and was involved in the early tests in Europe while with Mobil Oil. (7) Conoco's field trial of the Smith fluid hammer for an application in Vietnam was organized and has contributed to the increased interest in their tool. Progress during Q3 2002: (1) Smith International agreed to participate in the DOE Mud Hammer program. (2) Smith International chromed collars for upcoming benchmark tests at TerraTek, now scheduled for 4Q 2002. (3) ConocoPhillips had a field trial of the Smith fluid hammer offshore Vietnam. The hammer functioned properly, though the well encountered hole conditions and reaming problems. ConocoPhillips plan another field trial as a result. (4) DOE/NETL extended the contract for the fluid hammer program to allow Novatek to ''optimize'' their much delayed tool to 2003 and to allow Smith International to add ''benchmarking'' tests in light of SDS Digger Tools' current financial inability to participate. (5) ConocoPhillips joined the Industry Advisors for the mud hammer program. Progress during Q4 2002: (1) Smith International participated in the DOE Mud Hammer program through full scale benchmarking testing during the week of 4 November 2003. (2) TerraTek acknowledges Smith International, BP America, PDVSA, and ConocoPhillips for cost-sharing the Smith benchmarking tests allowing extension of the contract to add to the benchmarking testing program. (3) Following the benchmark testing of the Smith International hammer, representatives from DOE/NETL, T

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Classical and thermodynamic stability of black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensions is dM = ?(?) 8pi dA(?) + ?(?)i dJ (?) i + ? (?) ` dQ (?) ` , (1.12) where we have a sum over different planes of rotation index i , a sum over charges index ` and a sum over different event horizon components index (?). This extension... for asymptotically flat spacetimes, reads (D ? 3)M = (D ? 2) ( ?(?)A(?) 8pi + ?(?)i J (?) i ) + ?` ? (?) ` dQ (?) ` , (1.13) where ?` is the scaling dimension of the charge (it differs for dipoles and conserved charges...

Monteiro, Ricardo

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

182

Dynamic Properties of Materials: Phonons from Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculation of the harmonic atomic temperature factor for use in the phonon structure factor introduced below. The atomic temperature factor can be expressed, for any atom j, as: Tj(Q) = exp(?Wj) = exp ( ? 1 2 ?(Q uj)2? ) Tj(Q) = exp ( ? 1 2Q TBjQ ) (1.25) 1... calculation of the harmonic atomic temperature factor for use in the phonon structure factor introduced below. The atomic temperature factor can be expressed, for any atom j, as: Tj(Q) = exp(?Wj) = exp ( ? 1 2 ?(Q uj)2? ) Tj(Q) = exp ( ? 1 2Q TBjQ ) (1.25) 1...

Cope, Elizabeth Ruth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Microsoft PowerPoint - RPS_Comp_Summary_1 CO2 IGTI 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ramgen Proprietary Material Ramgen Proprietary Material 0900-01217 Shock Compression Technology Applied to CCS Applications Ramgen Power Systems, Inc. Bellevue, WA 2 Ramgen Proprietary Material 0900-01217 Typical System Performance Requirements - CCS * IGCC & PC retrofits (geologic carbon sequestration) - PR ~ 100:1 (suction pressure ~ 15 psia) - Two comparably loaded stages - Stage efficiency ~ 85% - Mass flow range ~ 30% Property Summary by Station - 3,000 hp Q . 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 LP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out Q . Q . 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 LP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 HP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out Q . Q . Single Pinion Configuration Dual Pinion Configuration Property Station

184

Pion photo- and electroproduction with chiral MAID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a calculation of pion photo- and electroproduction in manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory up to and including order $q^4$. We fix the low-energy constants by fitting experimental data in all available reaction channels. Our results can be accessed via a web interface, the so-called chiral MAID. We explain how our program works and how it can be used for further analysis.

M. Hilt; B. C. Lehnhart; S. Scherer; L. Tiator

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

PTG2012 -X5 Kemiteknik -Vrme-och strmningsteknik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is inserted into a tank of water, as shown in the figure below. Using data on the figure, calculate the oil = po ­ p1. Calculate, for p = 250 Pa, the height H of the stack so that the gas will flow freely density. Assume the temperature is 20o C. 2. KJ05-Q4-42 Water issues from a hole in a large tank, as shown

Zevenhoven, Ron

186

"Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,1.1,"Q",0.4,0.5,"Q" "4 or More",25.8,2.1,1.6,"Q","Q","Q","N" "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,4.1,1.1,"Q",0.9,1.7,"Q" "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,3.2,1,0.4,0.5,1...

187

c27.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73 73 343 512 1,465 7,716 9,570 49.5 44.4 53.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q 41 68 Q 417 729 Q 99.5 93.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q 31 43 Q 482 654 Q 64.8 66.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 45 90 Q 931 1,681 Q 47.9 53.6 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 39 70 Q 829 1,422 Q 47.4 49.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 43 73 Q 1,263 1,554 Q 34.1 47.2 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 41 67 Q 1,445 1,264 Q 28.3 52.7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 55 56 Q 1,484 1,277 Q 37.3 44.1 Over 500,000 .................................... Q 47 44 Q 865 989 Q 54.0 44.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 49 99 Q 1,247 1,804 Q 39.5 54.6 Food Sales .......................................

188

A fields only version of the Lorentz Force Law: Particles replaced by their fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the Lorentz force law, F^L_1=q_1(E+v_1xB) being the charge on particle 1 interacting with the electromagnetic fields due to all other particles, can be written in a pure field form F^L_1=-\

Philip H. Butler; Niels G. Gresnigt; Martin B. van der Mark; Peter F. Renaud

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Journal of Development Economics Z .Vol. 59 1999 4376  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Rodan 1943, 1961 and Murphy et al. Z .1989 , stresses that poor economies need some sort of large demand the fixed costs of industrialization. In the big-push logic, anything that stimulates demand will do of natural ) Corresponding author. HIID One Elliot Street Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Fax: q1-617-495- 0712; E

190

Seasonal and Interannual Variability of Atmospheric Heat Sources and Moisture Sinks as Determined from NCEPNCAR Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the National Centers for Environmental Predictions (NCEP)National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) reanalysis, distributions of the heat source Q1 and moisture sink Q2 between 50N and 50S are determined for a 15-yr period from 1980 ...

Michio Yanai; Tomohiko Tomita

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Seasonal Contrasting Features of Heat and Moisture Budgets between the Eastern and Western Tibetan Plateau during the GAME IOP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) four-dimensional data assimilation (4DDA) upper-air data, the large-scale heat source (Q1) and moisture sink (Q2) over the western and eastern Tibetan ...

Hiroaki Ueda; Hirotaka Kamahori; Nobuo Yamazaki

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Stochastic reconstruction of protein structures from effective connectivity profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to that point of the simulation. For all structures observed this also meant that the restricted contact map had been recovered completely (contact overlap q = 1), Here Qt is the set of contacts in the target and Qc the contacts in the present structure...

Wolff, Katrin; Vendruscolo, Michele; Porto, Markus

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nonlinear Landau damping and formation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal structures for plasmas with q-nonextensive velocity distributions  

SciTech Connect

In the past, long-time evolution of an initial perturbation in collisionless Maxwellian plasma (q = 1) has been simulated numerically. The controversy over the nonlinear fate of such electrostatic perturbations was resolved by Manfredi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2815-2818 (1997)] using long-time simulations up to t=1600{omega}{sub p}{sup -1}. The oscillations were found to continue indefinitely leading to Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK)-like phase-space vortices (from here on referred as 'BGK structures'). Using a newly developed, high resolution 1D Vlasov-Poisson solver based on piecewise-parabolic method (PPM) advection scheme, we investigate the nonlinear Landau damping in 1D plasma described by toy q-distributions for long times, up to t=3000{omega}{sub p}{sup -1}. We show that BGK structures are found only for a certain range of q-values around q = 1. Beyond this window, for the generic parameters, no BGK structures were observed. We observe that for values of q<1 where velocity distributions have long tails, strong Landau damping inhibits the formation of BGK structures. On the other hand, for q>1 where distribution has a sharp fall in velocity, the formation of BGK structures is rendered difficult due to high wave number damping imposed by the steep velocity profile, which had not been previously reported. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with past work.

Raghunathan, M. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune 411021 (India); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Postscript - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithms to search for a non-zero vector c satisfying (1), possibly with. a certain level of con ... that K is the maximal power of that possibly can enter the expression. for V, we could ..... In terms of the classical theta functions. 3(q) := 1. X . n= 1.

195

CONTROL ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTROL ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Query Sheet Q1: AU: short title OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Lars Imsland, Dagfinn Snarheim, and Bjarne A. Foss Department-closed / gas turbine cycle for capture. Some control strategies and their interaction with the process design

Foss, Bjarne A.

196

Tropical Precipitation Rates during SOP-1, FGGE, Estimated from Heat and Moisture Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents global estimates of precipitation rates from 30N to 30S, derived from the apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) budgets using the NASA Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres Level III-b analyses collected ...

Catherine B. Pedigo; Dayton G. Vincent

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Vertical Moistening by AMMA Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The apparent heat source Q1 and the apparent moisture sink Q2 are crucial parameters for precipitating systems studies because they allow for the evaluation of their contribution in water and energy transport and infer some of the mechanisms that ...

G. Scialom; Y. Lematre

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Journal of Sedimentary Research, 2013, v. 83, 704722 Research Article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy to heat through friction, viscosity, permanent deformations, and thermal relaxation. On the other hand, Sc Q-1 disperses the seismic energy within the medium but does not remove energy from the total´arm´an model (Frankel and Clayton, 1986; Goff and Jordan, 1988; Sato and Fehler, 1998), and the K-Bessel model

199

Path Selection Criteria for P2P Voice Cheng-Ying Ou, Chia-Li  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

should be the relay peer? such that the alternative path is better than the default one... 10 #12;A Fundamental QuestionQ Which is the right path selection criteria? Source Rate? Congestion Level? Delay;Two Questions to AddressQ 1 Does delay jitter speaks for all?1. Does delay jitter speaks for all

Huang, Polly

200

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

given by l v q q . 1 1 1 - + = . (5) Using numerical formulae for (1b) and for specific volumes was 23.4 m/s which occurred at 1.0=p MPa and 000626.0=q , i.e. at atmospheric pressure, when the vapour1 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); they are a generalization of the classical two-dimensional complex numbers (x, y) = x + i y, where i 2 = - 1. Quaternions@gmail.com ABSTRACT Quaternions are hypercomplex quantities in four dimensions (q0, q1, q2, q3 decline, which can shorten the pore volume. This reduction of the pore volume can be the principal source

Stanford University

202

c36a.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to 2003 ... Q 21 Q Q 1.09 1.16 1.19 Q 0.07 0.03 Q Q Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD...

203

Heating, Moisture, and Water Budgets of Tropical and Midlatitude Squall Lines: Comparisons and Sensitivity to Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, time-dependent, and nonhydrostatic numerical cloud model is used to estimate the heating (Q1, moisture (Q2), and water budgets in the convective and stratiform regions for a tropical and a midlatitude squall line (EMEX and PRE-...

W. -K. Tao; J. Simpson; C. H. Sui; B. Ferrier; S. Lang; J. Scala; M. D. Chou; K. Pickering

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy Analysis Department Managing Natural Gas Price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fired generation contracts 2) Reduces Natural Gas Prices: Increased RE reduces natural gas demand, and consequently Quantity Q0 P0 P1 Q1 Original Demand ShiftedDemandq Theory: Increased use of RE will reduce natural gasEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division · Energy Analysis Department Managing Natural Gas Price

205

Group Nearest Neighbor Queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given two sets of points P and Q, a group nearest neighbor(GNN) query retrieves the point(s) of P with the smallestsum of distances to all points in Q. Consider, for instance,three users at locations q1, q2 and q3 that want to find a meeting point (e.g., ...

Dimitris Papadias; Qiongmao Shen; Yufei Tao; Kyriakos Mouratidis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

c27.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 62 303 439 1,221 6,927 8,008 51.0 43.8 54.9 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... Q 90 141 Q 1,961 2,522 Q 45.8 55.9...

207

c35.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,156 110 98 49 5,602 2,638 3,898 2,015 0.21 0.04 0.03 Q Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 156 13 39 Q 1,798 1,395 1,996 1,173 0.09...

208

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,156 110 98 49 5,602 2,638 3,898 2,015 0.21 0.04 0.03 Q Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 156 13 39 Q 1,798 1,395 1,996 1,173 0.09...

209

--No Title--  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 62 303 439 1,221 6,927 8,008 51.0 43.8 54.9 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... Q 90 141 Q 1,961 2,522 Q 45.8 55.9...

210

Das Pendel-Problem. Wir betrachten die Hamilton-Funktion: Die Abbildung 1 zeigt die Energie H entlang der numerischen Lsungen (exp. Euler, Mittel-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2250 2300 -2 0 2 x 10 -3 Energy error Abbildung 3: Sonnensystem. Das N-Körper-Problem. Die Abbildung 3Kapitel I Das Pendel-Problem. Wir betrachten die Hamilton-Funktion: H(p, q) = 1 2 p2 - cos(q). Die Abbildung 1 zeigt die Energie H entlang der numerischen Lösungen (exp. Euler, Mittel- punktsregel, symp

Cohen, David

211

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

More",27.4,4,1.9,0.5,0.2,"Q",1.3,0.9,0.5,2.1,1.9,0.2 "Frequency of Most-Used" "Ceiling Fan Use" "All Summer",30.4,5,2.3,0.7,0.3,0.4,1.6,1,0.6,2.7,2.1,0.6 "Quite a...

212

FY14.xlsx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Q1 Revision 1 Approved SNS FY 2014 Q2-4 Planning Only, Revised 09052013 Revised 952013 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4...

213

Analytic Definition of Curves and Surfaces by Parabolic Blending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A procedure for interpolating between specified points of a curve or surface is described. The method guarantees slope continuity at all junctions. A surface panel divided into p x q contiguous patches is completely specified by the coordinates of (p+1) x (q+1) points. Each individual patch, however, depends parametrically on the coordinates of 16 points, allowing shape flexibility and global conformity.

A. W. Overhauser

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

b11.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

11,774 Q Q Q Q 1,100 2,426 8,086 Other Electronic Equipment (more than one may apply) Laser Printers ... 46,567 3,246 3,323 5,128 8,881...

215

ARTICLE IN PRESS UNCORRECTEDPROOF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A similar trend was observed for adsorption of methanol in NaX crystals by Grenier et al. [37, New York, 1997, p. 200. [37] P. Grenier, F. Meunier, P.G. Gray, J. Karger, Z. Xu, D.M. Ruthven, Zeo- lites 14 (1994) 242. [38] L.M. Sun, F. Meunier, Chem. Eng. Sci. 42 (1987) 1585. Q2 Q1 #12;

Kjelstrup, Signe

216

b14.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 12,208 3,939 1,090 3,754 4,050 10,078 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 1,382 336 122 416 1,034 895 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 938 518 Q 744 722 868 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 1,887 1,077 Q 1,235 1,021 2,064 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,506 301 Q 930 560 1,043 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 1,209 474 Q Q Q 1,494 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 1,428 868 Q Q Q 1,162 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 1,493 Q Q Q Q 1,322 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 2,365 Q Q N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 3,769 749 323 Q 586 Q 254 1920 to 1945 .....................................

217

b4.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

........... ........... 4,657 208 479 782 406 748 396 618 315 705 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 99 206 390 230 368 189 360 155 351 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 41 128 200 72 194 80 139 80 175 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 38 92 122 66 105 87 69 39 91 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 14 25 32 17 43 25 25 25 52 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 145 10 16 22 13 24 9 16 12 23 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 59 3 7 11 5 11 4 6 4 8 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 23 1 4 5 2 4 1 2 Q 3 Over 500,000 ............................................... 7 Q 2 1 1 1 Q 1 Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................................

218

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

691 - 31700 of 31,917 results. 691 - 31700 of 31,917 results. Rebate Renewables Portfolio Standard Note: In July 2012 New Jersey enacted S.B. 1925 substantially revising its solar carve-out. The summary below incorporates information on the changes made to the solar carve-out as well as the... http://energy.gov/savings/renewables-portfolio-standard-7 Download FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q1 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the... http://energy.gov/management/downloads/foia-quarterly-reports-q1-2013 Download Environmental Justice Interagency Collaborative Newsletter Volume 1 The inaugural edition of the Environmental Justice Interagency

219

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 18450 of 28,905 results. 41 - 18450 of 28,905 results. Download Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress management to suppress helium induced cracking during weld repair There are over 100 nuclear power plants operating in the U.S., which generate approximately 20% of the nation's electricity. These plants range from 15 to 40 years old. Extending the service lives... http://energy.gov/ne/downloads/develop-baseline-computational-model-proactive-welding-stress Download FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q1 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the... http://energy.gov/management/downloads/foia-quarterly-reports-q1-2013

220

New Beam Delivery System Optics: BDS9901 Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0020  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Beam Delivery System Optics: BDS9901 Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0020 14-July-1999 Abstract We describe in detail the optics and XSIF decks for the NLC Beam Delivery System in its present version, BDS9901. 1 Introduction In this Note, we describe the present optics design of the NLC Beam Delivery System, which has been somewhat revised for 1999. Most important optical changes include: * Organization of BPMs into quad-style (BPMQ), BPMs in feedback loops (BPMFB), BPMs which provide sub-train/multibunch information (BPMMB), and BPMs used to measure beam-beam deflections (BPMIP) * Addition of a number of small quad, skew-quad, sextupole, and skew-sextupole tuning mag- nets * Addition of actuators for the feedbacks * A 6-quadrupole final telescope, which allows all of the linear degrees of freedom to be opti- mized * Replacement of the low-energy final quads Q1A and Q1B with a single

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221

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Our short-term outlook for a wide array of energy prices has been adjusted upward as international and domestic energy supply conditions have tightened. We think that crude oil prices are as likely as not to end the year $2 to $3 per barrel higher than our previous projections. Thus, we think that the probability of West Texas Intermediate costing an average of $30 per barrel or more at midwinter is about 50 percent. On their current track, heating oil prices are likely to be about 30 percent above year-ago levels in the fourth quarter. Prices for Q1 2001 seem more likely now to match or exceed the high level seen in Q1 2000. Tight oil markets this year and an inherent propensity for high gas utilization in incremental power supply have resulted in rising North American natural gas

222

New MDS or near-MDS self-dual codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractWe construct new MDS or near-MDS self-dual codes over large finite fields. In particular we show that there exists a Euclidean self-dual MDS code of length n = q over GF (q) whenever q = 2 m (m ? 2) using a Reed-Solomon (RS) code and its extension. It turns out that this MDS self-dual code is an extended duadic code. We construct Euclidean self-dual near-MDS codes of length n = q ? 1 over GF (q) from RS codes when q ? 1 (mod 4) and q ? 113. We also construct many new MDS self-dual codes over GF (p) of length 16 for primes 29 ? p ? 113. Finally we construct Euclidean/Hermitian self-dual MDS codes of lengths up to 14 over GF (q 2) where q = 19, 23, 25, 27, 29.

T. Aaron Gulliver; Yoonjin Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Inclusive spectra in charmless semileptonic B decays by dressed gluon exponentiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1). In Ref. [31] we studied the mass ratio and expressed it as a Borel integral where the Borel function is written as a bi-local expansion [4850] mb mMSb = 1 + CF ?0 ? ? 0 dz imax? i=0 bi zi + q (1? 2z)1+ 12 ? [ 1 + kmax? k=1 ck(1? 2z)k ] , (2.2) where ?... /mb), not modified by logarithms. This is an exact result. The structure of the Borel singularity is therefore: F 1/5(?s(mb)) = 1 + CF ?0 ? ? 0 dz jmax? j=0 bj zj + q (1? 2z)1+ 12 ? [ 1 + kmax? k=1 ck(1? 2z)k ] , (2.8) where the state-of-the-art knowledge...

Andersen, Jeppe R; Gardi, Einan

224

A numerical study of the window condition for Chern numbers of Hofstadter Butterflies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chern numbers for Hofstadter modes with rational flux p/q satisfy a Diophantine equation which determines them Mod(q). The resolution of the Mod(q) ambiguity is only known for the model of the rectangular lattice with nearest neighbors hopping. We have studied numerically the window condition for a Hofstadter butterfly on the triangular lattice with flux pi/2 through the down triangles. Our numerical finding suggest a simple window condition for all p and q even and for p not equal (q+1)/2 or (q-1)/2 for q odd. For these values the model is deformable to the square lattice without gap closure. For other values the window is complicated and mostly unknown implying that there are topological obstructions to deforming the model to the square lattice

J. E. Avron; O. Kenneth; G. Yeshoshua

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic simulations of density evolution in Tore Supra sawtoothing plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The plasma density evolution in sawtooth regime on the Tore Supra tokamak is analyzed. The density is measured using fast-sweeping X-mode reflectometry which allows tomographic reconstructions. There is evidence that density is governed by the perpendicular electric flows, while temperature evolution is dominated by parallel diffusion. Postcursor oscillations sometimes lead to the formation of a density plateau, which is explained in terms of convection cells associated with the kink mode. A crescent-shaped density structure located inside q = 1 is often visible just after the crash and indicates that some part of the density withstands the crash. 3D full MHD nonlinear simulations with the code XTOR-2F recover this structure and show that it arises from the perpendicular flows emerging from the reconnection layer. The proportion of density reinjected inside the q = 1 surface is determined, and the implications in terms of helium ash transport are discussed.

Nicolas, T.; Sabot, R.; Garbet, X.; Decker, J.; Merle, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Luetjens, H.; Luciani, J.-F. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Guimaraes-Filho, Z. [Aix-Marseille University, IIFS-PIIM, UMR 7345, F-13397 Marseille (France); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Constant power speed range extension of surface mounted PM motors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A circuit and method for controlling a rotating machine (11) in the constant horsepower range above base speed uses an inverter (15) having SCR's (T1-T6) connected in series with the primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) to control turn off of the primary commutation switches and to protect the primary commutation switches from faults. The primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) are controlled by a controller (14), to fire in advance or after a time when the back emf equals the applied voltage, and then to turn off after a precise dwell time, such that suitable power is developed at speeds up to at least six times base speed.

Lawler, Jack Steward (Knoxville, TN); Bailey, John Milton (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

b19.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,754 643 55 23 14 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,131 311 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 720 136 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 590 104 22 Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 163 50 11 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 87 25 4 5 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 43 11 4 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 15 5 Q 1 2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 3 1 Q Q 1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 270 26 Q N N N Health Care .......................................

228

DECOMPOSABLE QUADRATIC FORMS AND INVOLUTIONS D.W. LEWIS, M.G. MAHMOUDI, J.-P. TIGNOL, AND O. VILLA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DECOMPOSABLE QUADRATIC FORMS AND INVOLUTIONS D.W. LEWIS, M.G. MAHMOUDI, J.-P. TIGNOL, AND O. VILLA-CT-2002-00287, KTAGS. 1 #12;2 D.W. LEWIS, M.G. MAHMOUDI, J.-P. TIGNOL, AND O. VILLA examples where q is a power of 2 and disc q = 1. #12;4 D.W. LEWIS, M.G. MAHMOUDI, J.-P. TIGNOL, AND O. VILLA Proof

229

C)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

l e No. H o u r S a m p l e Description 'R lTjQ 1 I I 7 3 7 6 1 4 3 0 G A In front o f reactor section o f l a b .0 2 1 5 .3 - h o o d d u r i n g a p p a r a tu s w a r m - u p...

230

Consecutive ones property and PQ-trees for multisets: Hardness of counting their orderings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A binary matrix satisfies the consecutive ones property (c1p) if its columns can be permuted such that the 1s in each row of the resulting matrix are consecutive. Equivalently, a family of setsF={Q"1,...,Q"m}, where Q"i@?R for some universe R, satisfies ... Keywords: Complexity, Consecutive ones property, Counting permutations, Multisets, PQ-trees, Sequences with repeated symbols

Giovanni Battaglia; Roberto Grossi; Noemi Scutell

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Thermal distributions in stellar plasmas, nuclear reactions and solar neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics of nuclear reactions in stellar plasma is reviewed with special emphasis on the importance of the velocity distribution of ions. Then the properties (density and temperature) of the weak-coupled solar plasma are analysed, showing that the ion velocities should deviate from the Maxwellian distribution and could be better described by a weakly-nonexstensive (|q-1|solar neutrino fluxes, and on the pp neutrino energy spectrum, and analyse the consequences for the solar neutrino problem.

M. Coraddu; G. Kaniadakis; A. Lavagno; M. Lissia; G. Mezzorani; P. Quarati

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

232

Load diagram for a perforated plate tray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 decimals noggrannhet c. Upprita i x,y-diagrammet q-linjen och bestäm (grafiskt, eller med must be produced. The feed stream F is a saturated liquid, i.e. q = 1, while the reflux ratio R = 1Load diagram for a perforated plate tray vG, vL: velocities G, L: densities QL, QG: volume flows H

Zevenhoven, Ron

233

marie-wong-avo-oil-adelaide-v1-for-aocs-website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...\td1h1i1j1k1l1m1n1o1p1q1r1s1t1u1v1w1x1y1z1{1|1}1~11111111111111111111111

234

J. Fluid Mech. (2003), vol. 489, pp. 2954. c 2003 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112003005160 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1­300, the fallout height Zf is found to be Zf /a = (11 ± 2)(Q1/2 /(wsa))0.83 . For high Rep particles, the fallout height assumes the simple form: Zf /a = (9 ± 2)N1/2 p . Following fallout, the particles sink by a constant Brunt­V¨ais¨al¨a frequency N, the mode of fallout depends explicitly on the stratified cloud

Bush, John W.M.

235

Geometric aspects of the non-extensive statistical theory  

SciTech Connect

The family of Tsallis entropies was introduced by Tsallis in 1988. The Shannon entropy belongs to this family as the limit case q{yields}1. The canonical distributions in R{sup n} that maximize this entropy under a covariance constraint are easily derived as Student-t (q<1) and Student-r (q>1) multivariate distributions. A nice geometrical result about these Student-r distributions is that they are marginal of uniform distributions on a sphere of larger dimension d with the relationship p = n+2+(2/q-1). As q{yields}1, we recover the famous Poincare's observation according to which a Gaussian vector can be viewed as the projection of a vector uniformly distributed on the infinite dimensional sphere. A related property in the case q<1 is also available. Often associated to Renyi-Tsallis entropies is the notion of escort distributions. We provide here a geometric interpretation of these distributions. Another result concerns a universal system in physics, the harmonic oscillator: in the usual quantum context, the waveform of the n-th state of the harmonic oscillator is a Gaussian waveform multiplied by the degree n Hermite polynomial. We show, starting from recent results by Carinena et al., that the quantum harmonic oscillator on spaces with constant curvature is described by maximal Tsallis entropy waveforms multiplied by the extended Hermite polynomials derived from this measure. This gives a neat interpretation of the non-extensive parameter q in terms of the curvature of the space the oscillator evolves on; as q{yields}1, the curvature of the space goes to 0 and we recover the classical harmonic oscillator in R{sup 3}.

Vignat, C. [Universite Paris-Est, LIGM, Universite de Marne la Vallee (France); Bercher, J.-F. [Universite Paris-Est, LIGM, ESIEE, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee Cedex 2 (France)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

Bethe vectors of quantum integrable models based on Uq(gl(N))  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study quantum Uq(gl(N)) integrable models solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. Different formulas are given for the right and left universal off-shell nested Bethe vectors. It is shown that these formulas can be related by certain morphisms of the positive Borel subalgebra in Uq(gl(N)) into analogous subalgebra in Uq'(gl(N)), with q'=1/q.

S. Pakuliak; E. Ragoucy; N. A. Slavnov

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

Complexity of question/answer games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Question/Answer games (Q/A games for short) are a generalization of the Renyi-Ulam game and they are a model for information extraction in parallel. A Q/A game, G=(D,s,(q"1,...,q"k)), is played on a directed acyclic graph, D=(V,E), with a distinguished ... Keywords: Combinatorial games, Computational complexity, Perfect information games, Polynomial-time hierarchy

Sarmad Abbasi; Numan Sheikh

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2003 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

239

Untitled - Notepad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- BEGIN FOURTH QUARTER FY 09 CORRESPONDENCE --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lindy Yow [mailto:LYow@doheny.org] Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:15 PM To: Cole, Dean Cc: Satinderpall Pannu; Humayun, Mark; Erick Bonilla; James Weiland; Jim Little Subject: RE: Year-end Joule Performance Goal Dean, 
 We
are
pleased
to
say
that
we
have
accomplished
the
 goals
of
the
quarterly
and
the
annual
presidential
 milestones. 
 July-
Sept
2009
Q4 Goal:
Final
integration
of
implantable
A-200+
system 
 Accomplished
by:
The
final
integration
of
an
implantable
 A-200+
prototype
system
has
been
completed.

240

Microsoft Word - QCR042006.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2006 March 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft Word - QCR042005.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2005 March 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

242

oct99  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Monthly updates available on the Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov/steo/ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook --October 1999

243

J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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244

Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4/04Q) 4/04Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2004 March 2005 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

245

b4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 233 493 696 571 874 348 553 299 580 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 127 237 369 356 457 215 294 165 333 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 48 101 117 97 189 56 116 56 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 37 90 122 75 139 51 88 54 81 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 10 26 44 27 47 15 26 14 32 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 7 21 24 10 21 10 18 5 13 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 3 12 12 5 16 Q 8 Q 6 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 Q 6 6 1 4 Q 2 1 3 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 Q 1 1 Q 1 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

246

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

28 28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 34 32 Q (*) Q 56.9 52.2 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 36 33 Q (*) Q 49.4 44.7 Q 0.1 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 28 25 1 (*) Q 26.7 23.8 1.4 0.1 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 17 16 Q (*) 1 19.1 17.8 Q (*) 0.6 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 29 26 1 Q 1 15.6 14.1 0.7 Q 0.5 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 37 35 Q Q 1 12.5 11.5 Q Q 0.5 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 36 25 Q Q 2 10.5 7.4 2.4 Q 0.5 Over 500,000 ............................. 10 Q Q Q 2 2.1 Q Q Q 0.4 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 47 45 2 Q Q 25.4 23.9 0.8 Q 0.3 Food Sales ................................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Food Service ............................. Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q

247

LOOP CALCULUS AND BELIEF PROPAGATION FOR Q-ARY ALPHABET: LOOP TOWER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loop calculus introduced in [1], [2] constitutes a new theoretical tool that explicitly expresses symbol Maximum-A-Posteriori (MAP) solution of a general statistical inference problem via a solution of the Belief Propagation (BP) equations. This finding brought a new significance to the BP concept, which in the past was thought of as just a loop-free approximation. In this paper they continue a discussion of the Loop Calculus, partitioning the results into three Sections. In Section 1 they introduce a new formulation of the Loop Calculus in terms of a set of transformations (gauges) that keeping the partition function of the problem invariant. The full expression contains two terms referred to as the 'ground state' and 'excited states' contributions. The BP equations are interpreted as a special (BP) gauge fixing condition that emerges as a special orthogonality constraint between the ground state and excited states, which also selects loop contributions as the only surviving ones among the excited states. In Section 2 they demonstrate how the invariant interpretation of the Loop Calculus, introduced in Section 1, allows a natural extension to the case of a general q-ary alphabet, this is achieved via a loop tower sequential construction. The ground level in the tower is exactly equivalent to assigning one color (out of q available) to the 'ground state' and considering all 'excited' states colored in the remaining (q-1) colors, according to the loop calculus rule. Sequentially, the second level in the tower corresponds to selecting a loop from the previous step, colored in (q-1) colors, and repeating the same ground vs excited states splitting procedure into one and (q-2) colors respectively. The construction proceeds till the full (q-1)-levels deep loop tower (and the corresponding contributions to the partition function) are established. In Section 3 they discuss an ultimate relation between the loop calculus and the Bethe-Free energy variational approach of [3].

CHERTKOV, MICHAEL [Los Alamos National Laboratory; CHERNYAK, VLADIMIR [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Retrieving and Routing Quantum Information in a Quantum Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In extant quantum secret sharing protocols, once the secret is shared in a quantum network (\\textsc{qnet}) it can not be retrieved back, even if the dealer wishes that her secret no longer be available in the network. For instance, if the dealer is part of two \\textsc{qnet}s, say $\\mathcal{Q}_1$ and $\\mathcal{Q}_2$ and subsequently finds that $\\mathcal{Q}_2$ is more reliable than $\\mathcal{Q}_1$, the dealer may wish to transfer all her secrets from $\\mathcal{Q}_1$ to $\\mathcal{Q}_2$. In this work we address this problem by designing a protocol that enables the source/dealer to bring back the information shared in the network, if desired. Unlike classical revocation, no-cloning-theorem automatically ensures that the secret is no longer shared in the network. The implications of our results are multi-fold. One interesting implication of our technique is the possibility of routing qubits in asynchronous \\textsc{qnets}. By asynchrony we mean that the requisite data/resources are intermittently available (but not necessarily simultaneously) in the \\textsc{qnet}. For example, we show that a source $S$ can send quantum information to a destination $R$ even though (a) $S$ and $R$ share no quantum resource, (b) $R$'s identity is {\\em unknown}\\/ to $S$ initially, (c) $S$ herself can be $R$ at a later date and/or in a different location to bequeath her information and (d) the path chosen for routing the secret may hit a dead-end due to resource constraints. Another implication of our technique is the possibility of using {\\em insecure}\\/ resources. For instance, it may safely store its private information with a neighboring organization without revealing data to the host and losing control over retrieving the data. Putting the two implications together, namely routing and secure storage, it is possible to envision applications like quantum mail (qmail) as an outsourced service.

Sk Sazim; Indranil Chakrabarty; Chiranjeevi Vanarasa; Kannan Srinathan

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microsoft Word - 2011 Aug Report to Congress_080511_GC edits_v2_clean.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 2. Multi-Year Schedule Table 2 presents DOE's currently scheduled rulemaking activities for energy conservation standards and test procedures. It is noted that the test procedure rulemakings listed below for residential products include revisions to all facets of the test procedure unless otherwise specified as a revision to the active mode or standby/off modes only. Test procedures for commercial and industrial products address active mode only. Appliance Standards Product Categories Driver Approx. Rule Initiation Date Final Action Date Heating Products Rulemakings Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and Pool Heaters (Standby Mode and Off Mode) Test Procedure EISA 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, Quarter (Q) 1 Feb. 2012 *

250

Microsoft Word - 2011 Aug Report to Congress_080511_GC edits_v2_clean.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table 2. Multi-Year Schedule Table 2 presents DOE's currently scheduled rulemaking activities for energy conservation standards and test procedures. It is noted that the test procedure rulemakings listed below for residential products include revisions to all facets of the test procedure unless otherwise specified as a revision to the active mode or standby/off modes only. Test procedures for commercial and industrial products address active mode only. Appliance Standards Product Categories Driver Approx. Rule Initiation Date Final Action Date Heating Products Rulemakings Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and Pool Heaters (Standby Mode and Off Mode) Test Procedure EISA 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, Quarter (Q) 1 Feb. 2012 *

251

Help:External searches | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

searches searches Jump to: navigation, search 50px Move proposal : It has been suggested that this page be moved to a new name : '(new name to be decided)'. Use the talk page to discuss this action. It is possible to create an external searches of a topic using key words using a template. For example, this is something that would work for Google: [[Image:GoogleIcon.PNG]] [http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&q={{{1|Wiki}}}&btnG=Search&meta= {{{1|Google}}}] ==Usage== Allows to establish a link to a search query at the Google search engine: {{Google|Term1+Term2+Term3}}

252

Microsoft Word - QCR012009.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2009 June 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

253

Microsoft Word - QCR012005.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2005 June 2005 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

254

A TASTE OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL COMPLEX ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY LIVIU I. NICOLAESCU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Hodge theory also implies that hp,q (X) = hq,p (X) = hn-p,n-q (X), p, q. (1.4) If we denote by p X that the space Hp,q (X) is naturally isomorphic to the q-th Cech cohomology of the sheaf p X, Hp,q (X) = Hq (X, p can be organized in a Hodge diamond h0,0(X) h1,0(X) h0,1(X) h2,0(X) h1,1(X) h0,2(X) h1,2(X) h2,1(X) h2

255

Bunch Length and Impedance Measurements at SPEAR3  

SciTech Connect

Streak camera measurements were made at SPEAR3 to characterize longitudinal coupling impedance. For the nominal optics, data was taken at three rf voltages and a single-bunch current range of 0-20mA. Both bunchcentroid phase shift and bunch lengthening were recorded to extract values for resistive and reactive impedance. An (R+L) and a Q=1 model were then back-substituted into the Haissinski equation and compared with raw profile data. In the short bunch (low-{alpha}) mode, distribution 'bursting' was observed.

Corbett, W.J.; Cheng, W.X.; Fisher, A.S.; Huang, X.; /SLAC

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

256

baySeq: Empirical Bayesian Methods For Identifying Differential Expression In Sequence Count Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Then ? ? ? ? ? ( | ) ( | , ) ( | ) ( | ) ( ) D M D K M K M K D c c q qc q q q = = ? ?? d d? ? ? This assumption reduces the dimensionality of the integral and thus improves the accuracy of the numeri- cal approximation to the integral. Next we suppose that for each ?q K we have a set... the mean ?qc by maximum likelihood methods, choosing the value for ?qc that maximises the likelihood ? D uic c c uic li qc c qc c qc i A Ei q , , !{ : } ? ? ? ? ? ?( ) = + ?( ) ? + ? ?( )?? ? ? 1 1 1 1 ?? ? ? ?? ? + ? ? ??? ? ? ??? ?? ? ? ? c icli qc c li...

Hardcastle, Thomas; Kelly, Krystyna A

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

257

Physical phenomena of thin surface layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(solid line in figure 2.3) long wavelength fluctuations with 0 < q < qc = ? ??hpex/? are amplified and the film will become unstable, while short wavelength fluctuations are damped. The fastest growing mode qmax is given by the maximum of equation 2.17, q... 2max = ?1 2? ?hpex (2.18) 13 Physical phenomena of thin surface layers qc 0 q ? -1 Ampli#30;ed Damped qmax Figure 2.3: Graphical representation of the dispersion relation. In the absence of an applied external field, all fluctuations are damped...

Thomas, Katherine Ruth

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

258

Matrix Inversion Lemma and Information Filter Mohammad Emtiyaz Khan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matrix Inversion Lemma and Information Filter Mohammad Emtiyaz Khan Honeywell Technology Solutions) zt+1|t = (I -JtBT t )A-T t zt|t, Zt+1|t = (I -JtBT t )St (8) where St = A-T t P-1 t|t A-1 t and Jt = StBt(BT t StBt +Q-1 t )-1. The Kalman gain is given as Kt = Zt|tCT t R-1 t . For detailed proof see

Mitchell, Ian

259

Exact Solutions of the Abelian Decomposed Restricted Gauge Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We construct new exact solution of the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs model by considering Abelian decomposition of the gauge potential. The solution is obtained by considering only the restricted part of the decomposition, where the unrestricted valence part is switched off. The solutions possess free parameters c{sub 1}, c{sub 2} and q that correspond to different physical system of monopoles. Under the limit of c{sub 1} = 0, c{sub 2} = 1, and q = 1, the solution is that of the Wu-Yang-like monopole.

Wong, Khai-Ming; Teh, Rosy; Koh, Pin-Wai [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Simple harmonic motion and wave motion T = 1 / f v = f vsound = 343 m/s (in air at 20 C)nv  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/vmaterial 1 1 1 o if d d = + M = hi/ho = di/do Electricity and magnetism FE = k q1q2 / r 2 FB = qv?B = qv q / r 2 and V(r) = k q / r V = ­ / t =Blv (k = 1/4o where o = 8.854?10 ­12 C 2 /N·m 2 ) Electric phone charger); 12 V (car); 120 VAC (U.S. wall outlet) Resistor R Ohm () 144 (100 W, 120v bulb); 1 k

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermalization in collisions of large nuclei at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrodynamical analysis of experimental data of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions seems to indicate that the hot QCD matter created in the collisions thermalizes very quickly. Theoretically, we have no idea why this should be true. In this proceeding, I will describe how the thermalization takes place in the most theoretically clean limit -- that of large nuclei at asymptotically high energy per nucleon, where the system is described by weak-coupling QCD. In this limit, plasma instabilities dominate the dynamics from immediately after the collision until well after the plasma becomes nearly in equilibrium at time t \\alpha^(-5/2)Q^(-1).

Kurkela, Aleksi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Comparing Brazil and USA electricity performance; what was the impact of privatisation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dqdo|vlv +GHD,/ lqfoxglqj wkh frpsxwdwlrq ri Pdoptxlvw lqglfhv ri surgxfwlylw| jurzwk/ dqg Vwrfkdvwlf Iurqwlhu Dqdo|vlv +VID,1 Iru wkh prghov wkdw xvh rshu0 dwlqj frvwv dv lqsxw/ zh #31;qg d srvlwlyh exw qrw vwdwlvwlfdoo| vljql#31;fdqw lpsdfw ri Eud... , dqg rxwsxwv +v, vpdoo uhodwlyh wr wkh qxpehu ri #31;upv +q,1 Dv wkh udwlrq p.v2q ulvhv/ wkh delolw| ri surjudpphv +111, wr glvfulplqdwh dprqjvw #31;upv idoov vljql#31;fdqwo|/ vlqfh lw ehfrphv pruh olnho| wkdw dq| jlyhq #31;up zloo #31;qg vrph vhw ri...

Mota, Raffaella L

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Observations of internal relaxation oscillations in the adiabatic toroidal compressor  

SciTech Connect

The soft x ray signal from the Adiabatic Toroidal compressor (ATC) sometimes exhibits a 10 percent modulation with a frequency between 1 and 2 Kilohertz. The radial profile of the soft x ray signal and the electron temperature determined by laser scattering indicate that these fluctuations are associated with a limitation of the central electron temperature and a broadening of the temperature profile. By observing changes in the radial dependence of the relaxation oscillation during neutral injection, an increase of thirty to fifty percent in the radius where q = 1 was measured. (auth)

Smith, R.R.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sawtooth oscillations in the flux of runaway electrons to the PLT limiter  

SciTech Connect

Increased fluxes of runaway electrons at the PLT limiter are observed in the few milliseconds following internal disruptions. These fluxes have an inverted (outside) sawtooth character. The time for the flux to reach a maximum after the disruption has been studied as a function of the plasma parameters for thousands of PLT discharges. One interpretation is that this delay represents the time for a perturbation to the runaway electron population to travel from the q = 1 region to the plasma boundary. These times are approx. 10/sup -1/ of the electron thermal confinement times and increase with the plasma electron density.

Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2008 July 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

267

Requirements and Design Envelope for Volumetric Neutron Source Fusion Facilities for Fusion Nuclear Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

The paper shows that timely development of fusion nuclear technology (FNT) components, e.g. blanket, for DEMO requires the construction and operation of a fusion facility parallel to ITER. This facility, called VNS, will be dedicated to testing, developing and qualifying FNT components and material combinations. Without VNS, i.e. with ITER alone, the confidence level in achieving DEMO operating goals has been quantified and is unacceptably low (< 1 %). An attractive design envelope for VNS exists. Tokamak VNS designs with driven plasma (Q ~ 1-3), steady state plasma operation and normal copper toroidal field coils lead to small sized devices with moderate cost.

Abdou, M [University of California, Los Angeles; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

b28.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,982 1,258 1,999 282 63 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,100 699 955 171 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 782 233 409 58 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 659 211 372 32 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 225 63 140 8 9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 123 32 73 6 8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 62 15 33 Q 9 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 5 13 Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 1 3 Q 2 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 382 141 172 14 24 Food Sales ....................................... 226 188 94 68 Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 282

269

"Table HC15.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.8,"Q","Q",4.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,5.3,7,7.8,7.2 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,5.3,7,7.7,6.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","N","Q",0.6 "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,1.1,6.4,6.4,5.4

270

TableHC12.1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005 2.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 9.7 7.3 2.4 Town..................................................................... 19.0 5.0 2.9 2.1 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 5.7 4.3 1.4 Rural..................................................................... 22.3 5.2 3.3 1.9 Climate Zone 1 Less than 2,000 CDD and-- Greater than 7,000 HDD.................................... 10.9 6.9 4.9 Q 5,500 to 7,000 HDD........................................... 26.1 12.3 9.9 Q 4,000 to 5,499 HDD...........................................

271

Quarterly Coal Report, October-December 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Project Leader, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

272

Quarterly Coal Report October-December 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Betsy O'Brien, Director, Coal, Electric and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section

273

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed

274

Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Acting Chief, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Specific information about

275

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 220 of 28,905 results. 11 - 220 of 28,905 results. Download Audit Report: OAS-FS-13-11 Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2010 Balance Sheet Audit http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-fs-13-11 Download Inspection Report: INS-O-11-01 Management of Controlled Substances at Lawrence LivermoreNational Laboratory http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/inspection-report-ins-o-11-01 Download TOTAL_ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_thru_Q4_2010_3.7.11.pdf http://energy.gov/downloads/totalarrahomesweatherizedthruq420103711pdf Download RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices 3/9/95 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these

276

RFP Invitation Letter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acquisition Services Management (ASM) Division Acquisition Services Management (ASM) Division Subcontracts, ASM-SUB P.O. Box 1663, Mail Stop D447 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 505-665-3814 / Fax 505-665-9022 E-mail: dknox@lanl.gov DATE: July 15, 2013 Subject: Question and Answer Set 3 Trinity and NERSC-8 Computing Platforms Project LA-UR-13-25273 Greetings: Interested parties are advised of the following questions or concerns that have been submitted to the Trinity and NERSC-8 Project team and to the accompanying Project responses below: Question/Issue 1 What is the more precise meaning of "On-site System Delivery and Build Complete" for Trinity by Q3CY15 and NERSC 8 by Q4CY15 as referenced on page 6 within the Trinity-NERSC-8-Draft technical

277

Quarterly Coal Report: October-December 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2001 May 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2001 iii Contacts

278

The Secretary of Energy'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

? >g*+. , . ? >g*+. , . dc*rb&.+ :c-r.3-b. g ;.i' 8 . I. ' . . 3 @ g. -- Q ' \ 4,: 6 L;Is)zLTEsdi# ' -. . ! h -. The Secretary of Energy' Washington, bC 20585 u , October 10, 1997 ' The .Honorabie William S . Cohen Secretary ofDefense Washington, D.C. 20301 -' &arMr. Secietary: !I " .,.. *- . = . . # ' The Congress recently se@ to the President for signature the Energy and Water ,, Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) from the Department of Energy to the United States Army Corps of Engineers.. Assuming that this transfer becomes law, but without prejudging the President' s decision, the Department of Energy will work with the

279

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed

280

DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ""'tlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

DOE/EIA-0202(89/4Q) SHOKT-TERM  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) SHOKT-TERM t . t QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (QPO). Informa tion about purchasing this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the ElA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC by mail, telephone or telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD). Addresses, telephone numbers and hours appear below. National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 TDD (202) 586-1181 Hours: 8:00-5:00, M-F, Eastern Time Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office

282

"Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.8,"Q","Q",4.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,5.3,7,7.8,7.2 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,5.3,7,7.7,6.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","N","Q",0.6 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,1.1,6.4,6.4,5.4

283

QUESTIONS BY AREA OF INTEREST : AOI #4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

QUESTIONS BY AREA OF INTEREST : AOI #4 QUESTIONS BY AREA OF INTEREST : AOI #4 Q4. How does the application process work? We are getting conflicting information with the Federal Stimulus money that we need to go through the Clean Cities Coalitions. Do they need to be the applicants? Or can they just be partners in our project? Same with the Transit Authorities..originally we did not need them to be a partner; however, new information states we need to have both the Clean Cities Coalitions and local Transit Authority as participants/applicants? A. For Areas of Interest #1-3, there are no restrictions to eligibility for apply for funds. While it is not mandatory that the applicant be a Clean Cities coalition (designated or non-designated), it is strongly encouraged that teams include one or more Clean Cities

284

a5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ....................................... 226 164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1 Inpatient .......................................... 8 N N Q Q Q Q 2 1 Outpatient ....................................... 121 56 38 19 Q 3 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 142 38 21 38 23 11 7 4 Q Mercantile ......................................... 657 275 156 155 34 21 12 2 2 Retail (Other Than Mall) .................. 443 241 97 83 14 Q 4 Q Q Enclosed and Strip Malls ................ 213 Q 59 72 20 18 8 Q 2 Office ................................................

285

jbdc263.tmp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . c&rA&.q4cw9q--/ LA-UR- 94.3676 Title: Author(s): Submitted to: Los Alamos NATIONAL LABORATORY A BRIEF HISTORY IN TIME OF ION TRAPS AND THEIR ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE M. H. HOLZSCHEITER TRAPPED CHARGED PARTICLES AND mzwhrw PHYSICS Lyseuil, Sweden 8/12-22/94 .-. = _= . - . - . .= -- _ _- Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative ecfionkqual opportunity empldyer, is operated by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under COfltraCfW-7405-ENG-36. By acceptance of thii artiote, the pubfisher recqnizes that the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to pubfish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or to allow others 10 do so, for U.S. Government purposes. The Los Alamos National Laboratory requ=ts that the publisher identify this article as work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Depammsnt of Energy.

286

Energy Information Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Office: Energy Information Administration Progress Score: Status Score: Requirements for HCM Plan 4th QTR REQUIREMENTS FY 06, Q4 Comments Integrate HCM Plan into decision-making processes - Plan linked to DOE mission, strategy, and goals - designates accountable officials Link performance appraisal plans and awards to DOE mission & goals for SES, managers, and more than 60% of workforce (HQ and Field); discuss difference between various levels of performance, discuss consequences based on performance HCM is linked to EIA's mission, strategy, and goals. Employee performance plans have at least one critical element with corresponding tasks supporting

287

Untitled - Notepad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lindy Yow [mailto:LYow@doheny.org] Lindy Yow [mailto:LYow@doheny.org] Sent: Thursday, October 07, 2010 2:34 PM To: Cole, Dean Subject: RE: Retina 4th Quarter Joule Dean, We are pleased to report the quarterly joule. July- Sept 2010 Q4 Goal: Implantation of Initial Preclinical 200+ Systems Met by: 2 preclinical 200+ systems were surgically implanted into preclinical animal models and functionality was verified by the successful transmission of power and telemetry across the wireless link. The characteristics of more than 200 electrodes were verified to be within the design parameters after the implantation. Lindy Yow Page 1 -----Original Message----- From: Lindy Yow [mailto:LYow@doheny.org] Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 2:02 PM To: Cole, Dean Cc: Mark Humayan (USC); Satinderpall S. Pannu

288

Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ofll s' Ofll s' :y 1: ,' :*,; / c- tii; 1 ;q' (/. 4 L Department of Energy Washington, D .C. 20545 Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street Washington, D.C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DOE) radiological survey at the former Horizons, Inc. facility at 2909 East 79th Street in Cleveland, Ohio, performed in 1977, indicated that levels of residual radioactive materials and associated radiation levels were in excess of those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial action. The radioactive contamination and elevated radiation levels on the site were found, for the most part, in storage areas, in drains, and under floors. These data did

289

Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 Total.................................................................................. 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.................................... 17.8 1.8 Q Q 4.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................................. 93.3 5.3 7.0 7.8 7.2 Use Cooling Equipment.................................................. 91.4 5.3 7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................................ 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................................. 65.9 1.1 6.4 6.4 5.4 Without a Heat Pump................................................. 53.5 1.1 3.5 5.7 4.9 With a Heat Pump......................................................

290

SunShot SEAB Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SunShot Team SunShot Team Revitalizing American Competitiveness in Solar Technologies 2  Subsidy-free solar electricity  75% cost reduction by end of the decade  5-6c/kWh at utility-scale  Global Competitiveness Fundamental Premise for SunShot... 3 SunShot ~$8.00 $1.70 $0.80 $0.40 $0.50 $1.88 $0.72 $0.76 $0.40 $0.22 $0.12 $0.10 0 2 4 6 8 $1/W Target $1/W Installed Systems Price ($/W) $3.80/W Power Electronics Balance of Systems (BOS) PV Module Estimates made in 2010 for Utility Scale PV plants 4 Phase Transition in the Industry 2010 2011 Q4 c-Si Module Spot ASP $1.68/W $1.03/W US Market Share 6% ~4%

291

Footprint structures due to resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

Numerical modeling of the typical footprint structures on the target plates of a divertor tokamak is presented. In the tokamak DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] toroidal mode number n=3 resonant magnetic perturbations are responsible for characteristic footprint stripes. The numerics can resolve substructures within each footprint stripe, which are related to the internal magnetic topology. It is shown that the footprint structures on the inner target plate can be predicted by the unstable manifolds of the separatrix and the q=4 resonant surface. By their intersection with the divertor target plate the unstable manifolds form the footprint boundary and substructures within. Based on the manifold analysis, the boundaries and interior structures of the footprints are explained. A direct connection of all magnetic resonances inside the stochastic plasma volume to the target plates is verified.

Wingen, A.; Spatschek, K. H. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Evans, T. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

PKS 0743$-$67: An Ultra-luminous Accretion Disk and a High Kinetic Luminosity Jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, deep radio observations of the quasar PKS 0743$-$67 are presented that reveal a central engine capable of driving jets with enormous kinetic luminosity, $Q>4.1 \\times 10^{46}\\mathrm{ergs/s}$. This result is significant because archival optical spectral data indicates that the accretion disk has a thermal luminosity, $L_{bol}>2\\times 10^{47}\\mathrm{ergs/s}$. Furthermore, estimates of the central black hole mass from line widths indicate that $L_{bol}/L_{Edd}\\approx 1$. This suggests that neither a large $L_{bol}$ nor $L_{bol}/L_{Edd}$ suppresses jet power in quasars, despite claims that they do in the recent literature. Earlier studies have found $L_{bol}$ and $Q$ are correlated in blazars. However, by removing the BL-Lacs and leaving only the quasars in the sample, we found that $Q$ is very weakly correlated with $L_{bol}$ in the subsample.

Brian Punsly; Steven Tingay

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

293

Precise Measurement of Deuteron Tensor Analyzing Powers with BLAST  

SciTech Connect

We report a precision measurement of the deuteron tensor analyzing powers T{sub 20} and T{sub 21} at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center. Data were collected simultaneously over a momentum transfer range Q=2.15-4.50 fm{sup -1} with the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid using a highly polarized deuterium internal gas target. The data are in excellent agreement with calculations in a framework of effective field theory. The deuteron charge monopole and quadrupole form factors G{sub C} and G{sub Q} were separated with improved precision, and the location of the first node of G{sub C} was confirmed at Q=4.19{+-}0.05 fm{sup -1}. The new data provide a strong constraint on theoretical models in a momentum transfer range covering the minimum of T{sub 20} and the first node of G{sub C}.

Zhang, C.; Akdogan, T.; Bertozzi, W.; Botto, T.; Clasie, B.; DeGrush, A.; Dow, K.; Farkhondeh, M.; Franklin, W.; Gilad, S.; Hasell, D.; Kolster, H.; Maschinot, A.; Matthews, J.; Meitanis, N.; Milner, R.; Redwine, R.; Seely, J.; Shinozaki, A.; Tschalaer, C. [Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Bates Linear Accelerator Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Genetic analysis of tumorigenesis: a conserved region in the human and Chinese hamster genomes contains genetically identified tumor-suppressor genes  

SciTech Connect

Regional chromosome homologies were found in a comparison of human 11p with Chinese hamster 3p. By use of probes that recognize six genes of human 11p (INS, CAT, HBBC, CALC, PTH, and HRAS), the corresponding genes were localized by in situ hybridization on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. INS and CAT were located close to the centromere on 3p, whereas HBBC, CALC, and PTH were at 3q3-4 and HRAS at 3q4. Extensive prior data from chromosome studies of tumorigenic and tumor-derived Chinese hamster cells have suggested the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene on 3p. Two tumor-suppressor genes have been described on human 11p, one linked to CAT and one to INS. The present study raises the possibility that the Chinese hamster suppressor may be closely linked to INS or CAT.

Stenman, G.; Sager, R.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Unified approach to NNLO soft and virtual corrections in electroweak, Higgs, QCD, and SUSY processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ? (2CF ? CA) ln ( tu sQ2 ) , (3.20) and c1 = CF [ ?3 2 + ln ( tu Q4 )] ln ( 2F s ) + ?0 4 ln ( 2R s ) . (3.21) These are in agreement with the NLO result in [30]. 14 3.6.2 qg ? qV Here tq = u, tg = t, and Re?? (1) S = CF ln(?u/s) + CF + (CA/2) ln... (t/u) + CA/2 [19]. The NLO soft and virtual corrections are ?(1)qg?qV = ? B qg?qV ?s(2R) pi {c3D1(s2) + c2D0(s2) + c1?(s2)} (3.22) with c3 = CF + 2CA, c2 = ? 3 4 CF ? (CF + CA) ln ( 2F Q2 ) ? CA ln ( tu sQ2 ) , (3.23) and c1 = [ ??0 4 ? 3 4 CF + CF ln...

Kidonakis, Nikolaos

296

DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short Short

297

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FES Joint Research FES Joint Research Target: C-Mod Highlights J.W. Hughes, E. Davis, A.E. Hubbard, M. Porkolab, L. Sugiyama, J. Terry J.R. Walk, A. White, D.G. Whyte, S.M. Wolfe, MIT R.J. Groebner, T. Osborne, P.B. Snyder, General Atomics X. Xu, LLNL J. Myra, D. Russell, Lodestar Alcator C-Mod FY11 Q4 Quarterly Review 27 October 2011 1 Predictive capability for the H-mode pedestal was the subject of the FY11 JRT Statement of the FY2011 FES Joint Theory and Experiment Research Target Improve the understanding of the physics mechanisms responsible for the structure of the pedestal and compare with the predictive models described in the companion theory milestone. Perform experiments to test theoretical physics models in the pedestal region on multiple devices

298

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 This issue highlights practices of DOE's NEPA Community that help ensure the quality of our NEPA reviews. Emphasizing quality throughout the NEPA process is essential to meeting schedules and providing useful information to the public and decisionmakers. Articles in this issue include: Quality Assurance Integral to NEPA Implementation DOE NEPA Guidance Plans OMB-CEQ Affirm Commitment to ECR Canada's New NEPA-Like Law Transitions John Jediny Joins DOE NEPA Office EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts LLQR-2012-Q4-r1.pdf More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013

299

b13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 824 277 71 370 622 597 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 503 119 37 152 434 294 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 127 67 Q 104 100 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 116 69 Q 83 66 130 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 43 9 Q 27 17 27 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 17 7 Q Q Q 21 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 11 6 Q Q Q 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 5 Q Q Q Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 2 Q Q N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 330 70 31 Q 65 Q 20 1920 to 1945 ..................................... 527 85 36 Q 52 90 39 1946 to 1959 ..................................... 562 75 45 Q 58 59 44 1960 to 1969 .....................................

300

U.S. DEPARTMFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMFNT OF ENERGY DEPARTMFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:The Research foundation of SUNY with place of Business at SUNY ESF Page 1 of2 STATE : NY PROJECT TITLE: Hot Water Extraction of hardwood Chips and Utilization of the Residual Chips and Wood Extracts Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number N[PA Control Number em Number DE-FG36-07G087004 GFO-G087004-Q03 G0870Q4 Based on my review or,he Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45 1.IA), I have made the (ollowing dete rmination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : A9 Information gathering (induding. but nollimited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

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301

S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Appliances by Four Most Populated States, b. Appliances by Four Most Populated States, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.4 Total .............................................................. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 0.0 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 72.5 62.6 41.4 91.7 96.0 3.5 Central Equipment Not Used ....................... 0.3 Q 1.2 0.5 1.1 29.3 Room Air Conditioners Not Used ................ 0.7 Q Q Q 1.1 36.9 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 71.6 62.2 39.9 91.2 94.3 3.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................

302

c18.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

62 62 210 50 5,328 12,097 3,220 11.7 17.4 15.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 10 26 7 821 1,157 472 12.4 22.9 15.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 7 18 4 666 1,308 359 10.7 13.9 12.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 8 27 11 1,164 2,207 791 7.3 12.2 14.2 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 15 24 5 949 1,672 442 16.1 14.4 10.9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 8 25 10 642 1,470 650 12.8 16.7 14.8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 8 39 Q 614 2,087 Q 12.3 18.9 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 22 Q Q 1,072 Q Q 20.4 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 29 Q Q 1,123 Q Q 25.6 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 5 39 Q 549 2,445 Q 8.8 16.0 Q Food Sales .......................................

303

c18a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

66 66 254 57 5,523 13,837 3,546 12.0 18.3 16.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 10 28 7 821 1,233 481 12.4 22.4 15.4 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 7 20 5 681 1,389 386 10.8 14.4 13.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 9 31 12 1,204 2,411 842 7.8 12.8 14.1 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 15 29 6 949 1,867 490 16.1 15.5 11.7 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9 35 13 664 1,797 749 13.1 19.2 17.0 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 8 50 Q 614 2,422 Q 12.3 20.6 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 23 Q Q 1,148 Q Q 20.4 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 38 Q Q 1,572 Q Q 24.3 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 5 39 Q 549 2,445 Q 8.8 16.0 Q Food Sales .......................................

304

c7.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

294 294 978 1,254 2,964 9,941 11,595 99.0 98.3 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 33 85 146 360 666 974 91.2 128.1 149.7 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q 64 73 359 764 843 Q 83.7 86.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 115 163 553 1,419 1,934 Q 81.2 84.3 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 74 140 347 944 1,618 Q 78.7 86.8 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 134 148 516 1,524 1,618 Q 87.8 91.5 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 150 203 414 1,703 1,682 Q 87.9 120.8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 177 214 Q 1,673 1,801 Q 105.8 118.8 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q 1,248 1,126 Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 143

305

c7a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

345 345 1,052 1,343 3,452 10,543 12,424 99.8 99.7 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 37 86 147 383 676 986 95.9 127.9 148.9 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 39 68 83 369 800 939 106.0 85.4 88.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 121 187 674 1,448 2,113 Q 83.4 88.4 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 84 155 366 1,022 1,763 Q 82.5 87.6 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 155 160 590 1,682 1,712 Q 92.0 93.3 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 161 224 448 1,790 1,872 Q 90.0 119.6 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 177 218 Q 1,673 1,847 Q 105.8 117.9 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q 1,451 1,192 Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

306

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ......................... 228 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 34 32 Q (*) Q 56.9 52.2 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 36 33 Q (*) Q 49.4 44.7 Q 0.1 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 28 25 1 (*) Q 26.7 23.8 1.4 0.1 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 17 16 Q (*) 1 19.1 17.8 Q (*) 0.6 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 29 26 1 Q 1 15.6 14.1 0.7 Q 0.5

307

c8.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

436 436 1,064 309 5,485 12,258 3,393 79.5 86.8 91.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 60 116 36 922 1,207 538 64.9 96.5 67.8 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 44 103 Q 722 1,387 393 60.5 74.0 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 65 126 Q 1,164 2,240 810 55.9 56.4 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 107 112 Q 949 1,672 498 112.5 67.3 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 64 123 59 642 1,470 650 99.0 83.4 91.3 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 49 237 Q 614 2,087 Q 79.8 113.5 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 110 Q 395 1,072 Q Q 102.2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 137 Q Q 1,123 Q Q 122.1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 45 198 Q 552 2,445

308

b5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 2,964 9,941 11,595 5,485 12,258 3,393 7,837 3,675 7,635 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 360 666 974 922 1,207 538 788 464 871 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 359 764 843 722 1,387 393 879 418 820 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 553 1,419 1,934 1,164 2,240 810 1,329 831 1,256 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 347 944 1,618 949 1,672 498 998 511 1,132 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 516 1,524 1,618 642 1,470 650 1,314 374 948 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 414 1,703 1,682 614 2,087 Q 1,131 Q 895 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q 1,673 1,801 395 1,072

309

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for . Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................ 222 194 17 Q 10 14.7 12.8 1.1 Q 0.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 34 32 Q (*) Q 57.4 52.7 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 36 33 Q (*) Q 50.6 45.8 Q 0.1 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 27 25 1 (*) Q 28.2 25.4 1.5 0.1 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 16 15 Q (*) 1 19.7 18.8 Q (*) 0.7 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 26 23 1 Q 1 15.0 13.3 0.8 Q 0.6

310

W-Algebras from Soliton Equations and Heisenberg Subalgebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive sufficient conditions under which the ``second'' Hamiltonian structure of a class of generalized KdV-hierarchies defines one of the classical $\\cal W$-algebras obtained through Drinfel'd-Sokolov Hamiltonian reduction. These integrable hierarchies are associated to the Heisenberg subalgebras of an untwisted affine Kac-Moody algebra. When the principal Heisenberg subalgebra is chosen, the well known connection between the Hamiltonian structure of the generalized Drinfel'd-Sokolov hierarchies - the Gel'fand-Dickey algebras - and the $\\cal W$-algebras associated to the Casimir invariants of a Lie algebra is recovered. After carefully discussing the relations between the embeddings of $A_1=sl(2,{\\Bbb C})$ into a simple Lie algebra $g$ and the elements of the Heisenberg subalgebras of $g^{(1)}$, we identify the class of $\\cal W$-algebras that can be defined in this way. For $A_n$, this class only includes those associated to the embeddings labelled by partitions of the form $n+1= k(m) + q(1)$ and $n+1= k(m+1) + k(m) + q(1)$.

C. R. Fernandez-Pousa; M. V. Gallas; J. L. Miramontes; J. Sanchez Guillen

1994-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Three body kinematic endpoints in SUSY models with non-universal Higgs masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L, cL) ? gq 1.5% (uR, cR) ? gq 2.3% g ? ?1 qq 6.8% (uL, cL) ? ?+1 q 63% g ? ?01qq 2.2% (uL, cL) ? ?+2 q 2.5% g ? ?02qq 3.4% (dL, sL) ? ?01q 2.1% (dR, sR) ? ?01q 98% (dL, sL) ? ?02q 30% (dR, sR) ? ?02q 1% (dL, sL) ? ?... 04q 2.7% (dL, sL) ? ??1 q 56% (dL, sL) ? ??2 q 8% b1 ? ?01b 3.6% t1 ? ?01t 17% b1 ? ?02b 26% t1 ? ?02t 13% b1 ? ?03b 2.2% t1 ? ?+1 b 50% b1 ? ?04b 2.3% t1 ? ?+2 b 20% b1 ? ??1 t 36% b1 ? ??2 t 26% b1 ? t1W 3.8% t2 ? t1h 3...

Lester, Christopher G; Parker, Michael A; White, Martin J

312

Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry  

SciTech Connect

The Principal Investigator has continued to work on problems associated both with the deposition and with the emission of electron cyclotron power in toroidal plasmas. We have investigated the use of electron cyclotron resonance heating for bringing compact tokamaks (BPX) to ignition-like parameters. This requires that we continue to refine the modeling capability of the TORCH code linked with the BALDUR 1 {1/2} D transport code. Using this computational tool, we have examined the dependence of ignition on heating and transport employing both theoretical (multi-mode) and empirically based transport models. The work on current drive focused on the suppression of tearing modes near the q = 2 surface and sawteeth near the q = 1 surface. Electron cyclotron current drive in CIT near the q =2 surface was evaluated for a launch scenario where electron cyclotron power was launched near the equatorial plane. The work on suppression of sawteeth has been oriented toward understanding the suppression that has been observed in a number of tokamaks, in particular, in the WT-3 tokamak in Kyoto. To evaluate the changes in current profile (shear) near the q =1 surface, simulations have been carried out using the linked BALDUR-TORCH code. We consider effects on shear resulting both from wave-induced current as well as from changes in conductivity associated with changes in local temperature. Abstracts and a paper relating to this work is included in Appendix A.

Kritz, A.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Principal Investigator has continued to work on problems associated both with the deposition and with the emission of electron cyclotron power in toroidal plasmas. We have investigated the use of electron cyclotron resonance heating for bringing compact tokamaks (BPX) to ignition-like parameters. This requires that we continue to refine the modeling capability of the TORCH code linked with the BALDUR 1 {1/2} D transport code. Using this computational tool, we have examined the dependence of ignition on heating and transport employing both theoretical (multi-mode) and empirically based transport models. The work on current drive focused on the suppression of tearing modes near the q = 2 surface and sawteeth near the q = 1 surface. Electron cyclotron current drive in CIT near the q =2 surface was evaluated for a launch scenario where electron cyclotron power was launched near the equatorial plane. The work on suppression of sawteeth has been oriented toward understanding the suppression that has been observed in a number of tokamaks, in particular, in the WT-3 tokamak in Kyoto. To evaluate the changes in current profile (shear) near the q =1 surface, simulations have been carried out using the linked BALDUR-TORCH code. We consider effects on shear resulting both from wave-induced current as well as from changes in conductivity associated with changes in local temperature. Abstracts and a paper relating to this work is included in Appendix A.

Kritz, A.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

c31a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings .................................... Buildings .................................... 467 882 688 7,144 21,928 19,401 65.4 40.2 35.5 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 137 101 419 3,629 2,997 53.9 37.6 33.7 Food Sales ....................................... 16 Q Q 339 Q Q 46.6 Q Q Food Service ..................................... 149 48 N 774 622 N 192.5 77.2 N Health Care ....................................... 12 37 187 233 520 1,792 49.5 70.8 104.4 Inpatient .......................................... N Q 181 N Q 1,662 N Q 109.0 Outpatient ....................................... 12 20 Q 233 377 Q 49.5 52.3 Q Lodging ............................................. Q 83 113 Q 1,750 2,374 Q 47.6 47.4 Mercantile ......................................... 60 134 61 1,094 3,572 3,205 55.2 37.6 19.1 Retail (Other Than Mall) ..................

315

Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Third Quarter of 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the third quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010 Q1+Q2+Q3). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $132 billion (in real 2010 US$) invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.4 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first three quarters of 2010 is close to $2.4 billion accounting for slightly less than 15% of all venture capital investments during the first three quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $2.1 billion (11% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first three quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $2.8 billion (18% of all US venture capital investments made during the first three quarters of 2010). Between 2004 and 2009, U.S. venture capital investments in energy/industrial as well as CleanTech have more than quadrupled in real terms.

Dooley, James J.

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Second Quarter of 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the second quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010Q1+Q2). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010Q1+Q2 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010Q1+Q2. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $119 billion dollars invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.1 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first two quarters of 2010 is close to $1.8 billion accounting for 17% of all venture capital investments during the first two quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $1.8 billion (30% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first two quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $1.9 billion (19% of all US venture capital investments made during the first half of 2010). Between 2004 and 2009, U.S. venture capital investments in energy/industrial as well as CleanTech have more than quadrupled in real terms.

Dooley, James J.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlVIINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AG EMENT CENTER AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlVIINATION RECIPIENT:Snohomish County PUD PROJECT TITLE : Development of Post-Installation Monitoring Capabilities Page lof3 STATE: WA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Numbu NEPA Control Number CID Number NlA - CDP DE-EE0000301 GF0-00003Q1'()()2 EE301 Based on my review orlhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authori7.ed under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : AS Informabon gathering (including, but nollimiled 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analYSIS (including computer modeling), document preparation (sud1 as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical erJergy supply and

318

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1975 - 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate thermal regime and potential of the system Notes Three-dimensional Q -1 model of the Coso Hot Springs known geothermal resource area was conducted. To complete the model a regional telemetered network of sixteen stations was operated by the U.S. Geological Survey; deployed a portable Centipede array of 26 three-component stations near the

319

University of California Response to DOE Questions Regarding Price-Anderson Renewal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of California Response to DOE Questions of California Response to DOE Questions Regarding Price-Anderson Renewal January 30, 1998 -1- Q 1. Should the DOE Price-Anderson indemnification be continued without modification? Answer: Price-Anderson indemnification should definitely be continued. Shifting responsibility for payment of claims from the United States to contractors would undermine the certainty of compensation and would therefore be inappropriate. Recent experience with large class claims, an example being claims arising from faulty breast implants, shows that the availability of bankruptcy protection can defeat the payment of adequate compensation to all harmed citizens. The United States government must remain the insurer for its people so long as nuclear materials are used in research, medicine, power

320

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Televisions",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.1,0.1,"Q",0.2,"Q","Q","Q" 1,24.2,4.6,1.2,0.6,0.6,3.5,2,1,0.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE REGARDING COMPENSATORY TIME OFF FOR TRAVEL (Revised October 27, 2008) Following are questions and answers on issues that supplement the final regulations effective this date on compensatory time for travel issued by the Office of Personnel Management on April 17, 2007. In addition, a sample worksheet is attached to assist travelers in determining and documenting their travel time that may be credited for compensatory time for travel. This information will be incorporated in Appendix D of the DOE Handbook on Overtime when the handbook is updated. Q1. Who is eligible for this benefit? A1. All employees are eligible except the following: the Secretary, SESs, employees covered by other forms of overtime compensation, including law enforcement

322

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT WASHINGTQO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- * , 2001-023459 10/19 A 10:00 - * , 2001-023459 10/19 A 10:00 OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT WASHINGTQO 023459 * zJ OCT q1 A 1: 00 September 20, 2001 The Honorable Spencer Abraham ;ecretary of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Dear Mr. Secretary: Enclosed are numerous unsolicited proposals and idea papers that we received from citizens from all across the country during the development of the National Energy Policy, and in the mlonths to follow. Many of these individuals and companies have already received correspondence and acknowledgement from the NEPDG and/or the Vice President's office. What most of these citizens are looking for, however, is for review and consideration of thcir proposals and ideas by program professionals. In turn, we would appreciate your vetting these

323

Quarterly Coal Report: January-March 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2002 August 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr_sum.html _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2002 ii Contacts

324

a7.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings .................................... Buildings .................................... 4,859 3,754 762 117 47 22 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 2,131 338 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 720 182 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 590 140 51 13 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 163 54 19 12 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 87 29 8 13 4 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 43 13 6 5 4 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 15 5 Q 1 3 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 8 3 1 Q Q 3 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service .....................................

325

Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 Q Q Q 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 1.3 0.9 0.4 500 to 999......................................................... 27.7 5.6 4.2 1.4 1,000 to 1,499................................................... 26.0 4.3 3.3 1.1 1,500 to 1,999................................................... 17.6 3.0 2.3 0.7 2,000 to 2,499...................................................

326

Ayuda:Buscadores externos | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ayuda:Buscadores externos Ayuda:Buscadores externos Jump to: navigation, search 50px Move proposal : It has been suggested that this page be moved to a new name : '(new name to be decided)'. Use the talk page to discuss this action. Es posible crear búsquedas externas sobre un tema utilizando palabras claves o una plantilla. A continuación un ejemplo que puede funcionar en Google: [[Image:GoogleIcon.PNG]] [http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&q={{{1|Wiki}}}&btnG=Search&meta= {{{1|Google}}}] ==Uso== Permite establecer un enlace a una consulta de búsqueda en el motor de búsqueda de Google: {{Google|Term1+Term2+Term3}}

327

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dismantlement and Removal of 321-M Solvent Storage Tank Area Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS I) Remnants Dismantlement and Removal of 321-M Solvent Storage Tank Area Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS I) Remnants Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) at SRS was first deployed at the 321-M Solvent Storage Tank Area (west of the former Building 321-M) to remediate solvent source zone contamination in the vadose zone. The deployment was successful and the DUS equipment has been removed. However, the wells associated with the deployment, as well as the operating header of a portable soil vapor extraction unit (SVEU) and assorted debris remain at the site. The purpose of this activity is to abandon the wells per Manual 3Q1 requirements, dismantle and remove for disposal assorted equipment that is no longer required, and to perform general housekeeping at the site of the original DUS deployment.

328

Quarterly Coal Report, January-March 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Project Leader, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

329

DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short

330

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 14620 of 28,905 results. 11 - 14620 of 28,905 results. Download CX-009210: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silver Butte Fiber Burial Project CX(s) Applied: B.47 Date: 08/28/2012 Location(s): Montana, Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-009210-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Microsoft PowerPoint- DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting Contractors Q1 2010 [Compatibility Mode] http://energy.gov/downloads/microsoft-powerpoint-doe-supplemental-instructions-omb-section-1512-reporting-contractors Rebate TVA- Green Power Providers Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and participating power distributors of TVA power offer a performance-based incentive program to homeowners and businesses for the installation of renewable...

331

u.s. Dl!PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARThIENT OF ENERGY PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT: University of Oregon STATE: OR PROJECT TITLE: Vapor Transport Deposition for Thin Film III-V Photovoltaics fo'unding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA..()()()()654 DE-EEOOO5957 GF0-0005957·0Q1 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NI<:PA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits). data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation

332

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean profiles of (first column) total precipitation normalized Q1, (second column) convective precipitation normalized convective heating, (third column) stratiform heating, and (fourth column) convective mass flux for the (top) wet, (middle) dry, and (bottom) break period from models and available observational estimates. Dashed lines are fine resolution model results. Note the different x axis scale for the third and fourth columns. An intercomparison of global atmospheric model simulations of tropical

333

DOE Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review 2007 Review 2007 AWA Facility Update, High Gradient Wakefield Generation, and Future Upgrades Manoel Conde, Sergey Antipov, Felipe Franchini, Wei Gai, Feng Gao, Chunguang Jing, Richard Konecny, Wanming Liu, Jidong Long, John Power, Haitao Wang, Zikri Yusof Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Group High Energy Physics Division April 25 - 27, 2007 2 Outline Description of AWA Facililty. Wakefield structures built and tested. Measurements and simulations. List of next experiments to be performed. Plans for Facility upgrades. 3 AWA Drive Beamline Drive Gun Linac & Steering Coils Quads Wakefield Structure Experimental Chambers 4.5 m GV GV YAG1 YAG2 Spectrometer YAG5 Dump/ Faraday Cup Slits YAG4 YAG3 ICT1 ICT2 BPM Single bunch operation - Q=1-100 nC - Energy=15 MeV - High Current = 10 kAmp

334

Engineered microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

752; 752; NO. OF PAGES 6 Please cite this article in press as: Elkins JG, et al. Engineered Q1microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass, Curr Opin Biotechnol (2010), doi:10.1016/ j.copbio.2010.05.008 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Engineered microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass James G Elkins, Babu Raman and Martin Keller In order for plant biomass to become a viable feedstock for meeting the future demand for liquid fuels, efficient and cost- effective processes must exist to breakdown cellulosic materials into their primary components. A one-pot conversion strategy or, consolidated bioprocessing, of biomass into ethanol would provide the most cost-effective route to renewable fuels and the realization of this technology is being actively pursued by both multi-disciplinary research centers and

335

Mr. James Schaus Vice President  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mr. James Schaus Mr. James Schaus Vice President Finance and Administration Niagara Cold Drawn Corp. 110 Hopkins Street P.O. Box 399 Buffalo, New York 14240 Dear Mr. Schaus: This is to notify you that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has designated the former Bliss & Laughlin Steel Company facility for remedial action as a part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Remedial activities are managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office, and Mr. Ron Kirk (615-576-7477) will be the site manager. As a result of the designation decision, Mr. Kirk will be the appropriate point of contact in the future. If you have any questions, please call me at 301-903-8149. Sincerely, /' /f-j , f-i 4 /fi /C q--1 - ,i/ -' uj %I&//& L' /< 1 i&x.-:,

336

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed

337

DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort-

338

Microsoft PowerPoint - compliant sealing glass review 7,27,2010 rev1.pptx [Read-Only]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliant glass seal development Compliant glass seal development Y-S Matt Chou, E. Thomsen, E. Mast, J-P Choi, W. Voldrich, and J. W. Stevenson Introduction and objectives Q1: Effect of differential pressure on thermal cycle stability 1 experimental 1. experimental 2. leak rates versus cycling (700-850 o C/1000h) Q2: thermal stability study in a duel environment 1. leak rates versus time (750-800 o C/1000h) 2. microstructure and interface characterization Q3: assess YSZ coating and other mat'l for spacer rings Q g p g Summary Future work Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance Core Technology Programs Review, July 27-29, 2010, Pittsburgh, PA Compliant versus refractory sealing glass  = E T Compliant sealing glass 1.20E-02 YSO1 glass Refractory sealing glass Data provided by ORNL

339

Spot Award Recipient List-complete 11-2013.xlsx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recipient Recipient Division Date Award For (Pictures) Kurt Ettinger EHS 09/2013 Kurt created Smartsheets for the Fall Protection Permit Inventory and helped develop a digital Fall Protection Matrix which tracks real-time projects that require fall protection systems to protect workers from fall hazards. The effort enabled a scientist complete required training and obtain permit off-site for work near Pemberton, NJ. Kurt's effort also enables EHS to introduce paperless record keeping processes to the Fall Protection Competent Person Group in Q1FY14. David Mustar FA 09/2013 On a Saturday before dawn, David was walking in the B71 area checking on liquid nitrogen tanks when he heard a faint sound. After a considerable time searching for the source of the sound, he came near a trailer and realized

340

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weather Forecasting in the Tropics with Climate Models Is Feasible Weather Forecasting in the Tropics with Climate Models Is Feasible Submitter: Boyle, J., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Climate Model Forecast Experiments for TOGA-COARE. J. Boyle,S. Klein,G. Zhang,S. Xie,X. Wei. Accepted by Monthly Weather Review Figure 1. Profiles of the apparent heat source (Q1) at the TOGA-COARE central site for the observations and day-two forecasts of the CAM, CAM with Zhang modification (ZMO), and AM2 averaged over the entire TOGA-COARE period are shown. Units are degrees Kelvin day. The CAM with the Zhang modified deep convection produced the best fit to the observations. Proper simulation of both the magnitude and level of maximum heating were shown to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Frequently Asked Questions about the New ISM Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (ABOUT THE NEW ISM MANUAL) Questions about Attachment 2 Q1: How important is Attachment 2? A: Attachment 2 is very important to obtaining a full understanding of the vision for full ISM implementation, at multiple, interacting levels, from the enterprise-level to the site-level, from the facility-level to the activity-level. The Attachment states: "This Attachment provides the vision for DOE to achieve the essential attributes of a high-performing organization, and further improve the Department's safety record and productivity record. This vision captures the elements needed for DOE to move beyond a compliance-based approach to a performance-based approach, consistent with more mature high-reliability organizations."

342

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETElUIINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETElUIINATION DETElUIINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:Emerson Electric Company STATE: GA PROJECT TITLE: Recovery Act: Water Heater Zigbee Open Standard Wireless Controller Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-QOOO119 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0004000 NEPA Control Number GFO-OOO4O()(H}Q1 CID Number G04000 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85,1 Actions to (a) Actions to conserve energy or water, demonstrate potential energy or water conservation, and promote conserve energy effiCiency that would not have the potential to cause significant changes in the indoor or outdoor

343

Frequently Asked Questions - DOE O 420.1C  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding DOE Order 420.1C, Facility Safety, and its supporting directives, DOE-STD-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, and DOE-STD-1066-2012, Fire Protection Q-1: For existing facilities how do I determine the list of applicable design codes and standards? A: For existing facilities the code of record (i.e. those codes and standards in effect at the time that the facility was designed) is the list of applicable design codes and standards. In the case of major modifications to existing facilities, the design codes and standards of O 420.1C apply. Q-2: I work at an existing facility. What changes in DOE O 420.1C do I have to be concerned about?

344

Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q N Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 0.5 Q Q 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 0.9 0.6 0.2 500 to 999......................................................... 27.7 5.7 3.6 2.1 1,000 to 1,499................................................... 26.0 5.2 3.9 1.3 1,500 to 1,999................................................... 17.6 3.9 2.7 1.2 2,000 to 2,499...................................................

345

Quarterly Coal Report, January-March 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Acting Chief, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

346

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dismantlement and Removal of 321-M Solvent Storage Tank Area Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS I) Remnants Dismantlement and Removal of 321-M Solvent Storage Tank Area Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS I) Remnants Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) at SRS was first deployed at the 321-M Solvent Storage Tank Area (west of the former Building 321-M) to remediate solvent source zone contamination in the vadose zone. The deployment was successful and the DUS equipment has been removed. However, the wells associated with the deployment, as well as the operating header of a portable soil vapor extraction unit (SVEU) and assorted debris remain at the site. The purpose of this activity is to abandon the wells per Manual 3Q1 requirements, dismantle and remove for disposal assorted equipment that is no longer required, and to perform general housekeeping at the site of the original DUS deployment.

347

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project Using Li-Ion Batteries - Christopher Clarke, SCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tehachapi Storage Project (TSP) Tehachapi Storage Project (TSP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funded Project Christopher R. Clarke - Southern California Edison (SCE) christopher.r.clarke@sce.com Examples of Wind Generation in the Tehachapi Wind Resource Area August 2012 June 2012 May 2012 February 2012 April 2012 Progress To Date * Facility construction expected to complete in September 2012 * First Power Conversion System installed September 13, 2012 * A123 to ship initial battery equipment for delivery week of September 24, 2012 Future Major Milestones * September 2012 - Completion of BESS facility * October 2012 - Initial installation * November 2012 - Installation of second Power Conversion Subsystem * Q1 2013 - Install balance of equipment and commissioning * Q2 2013 - Start of 2 year M&V testing and reporting

348

b25.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,657 4,657 3,239 1,546 1,520 110 62 130 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 1,456 795 574 Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 778 317 429 Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 574 265 274 14 9 31 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 222 87 127 9 14 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 145 127 51 71 5 9 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 59 54 21 31 Q 5 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 23 21 7 12 2 2 Q Over 500,000 ............................................... 7 7 4 3 Q 1 N Principal Building Activity Education .................................................... 327 240 95 132 9 19 Q Food Sales ..................................................

349

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.9,0.9,"Q","Q","Q",1.3,2.3 "500 to 999",23.8,10.5,7.3,3.3,1.4,1.2,6.6,12.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.8,7,3.8,2.2,2,3.9,8.9

350

b8.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,657 4,657 419 499 763 665 774 846 690 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 227 270 359 321 367 413 390 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 107 102 240 166 193 156 145 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 63 90 97 84 130 179 65 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 13 20 39 53 44 43 44 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 145 7 9 19 24 26 33 27 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 59 Q 5 5 12 8 15 12 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 23 Q 2 3 4 4 4 4 Over 500,000 ............................................... 7 Q 1 1 1 2 2 1 Principal Building Activity Education .................................................... 327

351

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2013 March 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013 In this issue, we highlight the many benefits of NEPA to DOE, including improved planning, and better public involvement and environmental protection. Articles in this issue include: Sharing DOE's NEPA Success Stories Integrating NEPA and Project Planning Works Minimize EIS Printing Costs DOE Cooperating Agency Report Electronic Guidance Compendium Tribal Energy Resource CEQ IT Working Group Conferences DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Transitions EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts LLQR-2013-Q1.pdf More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September

352

Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Noel C. Balthasar, Chief, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alter- nate Fuels. Specific information about

353

QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) 1991 1 QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION February 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the

354

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Betsy O'Brien, Director, Coal, Electric and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section

355

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Energy Offices State Energy Offices Q1: What price should be reported to EIA when submitting weekly data? EIA requests that you collect / report the residential credit price (keep-full prices being preferred) and that all prices exclude taxes for the Monday of each survey week, even if that Monday falls on a holiday. Prices should not include discounts for payment of cash or for payment made within a short period of time. However, if a company deals exclusively in cash, then this price should be reported and noted in the file sent to EIA. Q2: When is this data due to EIA each week? The EIA-877 "Winter Heating Fuels Telephone Survey" will begin the first Monday in October. Data should be submitted to EIA as soon as they are available but no later than noon on Tuesday of each week. Data collection

356

B. S. Wolf, Y.D., Ibed%& '  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S. Wolf, Y.D., Ibed%& ' S. Wolf, Y.D., Ibed%& ' Direotor..~ ' .' .. .., ,- : ,, ,. ,~ WEEKLY ACTIVITY REPORT 4JZ!Q$% 1' ti &IL 7 ,. ' . .,;;;,: ., ' is: * A oanferenbe ia& h&of the ti' Produotion, "Seourlty and uediO& Dlvi~lon~ on tho Pormtiiation of plans in the event of dienntora 2: our plants. Itwa.9 ae0id6d to invite oontraotor representatives CO ,.I 6 The klioal Mieota had a oonfe&oc ' jxt tho' ~rgonns IiatiOr& Lnb&toly on problems arising from the dlspoaal of rndioaotiw waste aaterikle. = The Chief, Health and Safety Branoh dellvorecl B paper at tic oonferenoe of the Amerioan Industrial f$giene Aaeoolation at Boston, Mess. on "Rnvlr~montal Studleo in ,Plante and Laboratoriee Uelng B~rylllti". A oonfomnoe wae held with repreeontativss of the Bellex Corporation

357

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 24230 of 26,764 results. 21 - 24230 of 26,764 results. Download Testimony Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Subject: Renewable Portfolio Standards By: Howard Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator, Energy Information Administration http://energy.gov/congressional/downloads/testimony-house-energy-and-commerce-subcommittee-energy-and-environment Download Microsoft PowerPoint- DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting Grant and Loan Recipients Q1 2010 [Compati http://energy.gov/downloads/microsoft-powerpoint-doe-supplemental-instructions-omb-section-1512-reporting-grant-and Download Inspection Report: INS-O-10-02 Severance Repayments at the Savannah River Site http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/inspection-report-ins-o-10-02 Download Audit Report: IG-0453

358

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report January-March 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report January-March 2001 ii Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Betsy O'Brien, Director, Coal, Electric and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions

359

Microsoft Word - Mar98_report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 MODELING STUDIES ON THE LOW β y LATTICE Annick Ropert, ESRF Introduction The N = 40 low β y lattice (which had not been used since Run 1997-7) was re-commissioned at the beginning of Run 1998-2. The testing of the optics addressed several puzzling questions: - strong discrepancy of the vertical β-function with respect to the model, thus making it necessary to detune Q1 by more than 6% in order to get closer to theoretical β- functions, - very small energy acceptance, which is very likely responsible for the moderate lifetime, - strong dependence of the lifetime on the closed orbit pattern. These pending questions have triggered the work presently reported in this note. The studies were focused on understanding the discrepancies between the real machine and the model and

360

T. Khoe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TK-LS (3/4/85) LS-1S TK-LS (3/4/85) LS-1S T. Khoe March 4, 1985 Chromaticity Correction and Betafunction Distortion The required value of the chromaticity is otained by introducing sextupole magnets in the dispersive straight sections = - ~ f S (K - Sn) d s , Q1fV I dB where K = -- --l is the focusing strength of the lattice Bp dx Z I d By quadrupoles, S = -- -----2- the strength of the correction sextupoles and n is Bp dx the dispersion function. About one half of the quadrupoles are located in dispersion-free straight sections. Furthermore, the natural chromaticity of the low-emittance lattice is large and one will have large harmonic components in the Fourier series expansion of 6(K - Sn). Since the beta functions depend on the focusing strength, these Fourier components will effect the beta

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Estimating The Effect of Biofuel on Land Cover Change Using Multi-Year Modis Land Cover Data  

SciTech Connect

There has been a growing debate on the effects of the increase in demands of biofuels on land use land cover (LULC) change with apprehension in some quarters that the growing demand for bioenergy as a clean fuel will result in widespread direct and indirect LULC change. However estimating both direct and indirect LULC change is challenging and will require development of accurate high frequency, high resolution (temporal and spatial) land use land cover data as well as new LULC models which can be used to locate, quantify and predict these changes. To assess whether the demand for biofuel has caused significant LULC we used MODIS land cover data (MCD12Q1) from 2001 to 2008 along with cropland data layer (CDL) to estimate cropland and grassland changes in United States for the years 2002-2008 as well as its correlation with biofuel growth.

Singh, Nagendra [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A Development Path for the Stabilized Spheromak  

SciTech Connect

In Refs. [1] - [3], I suggest a concerted computational effort to study profile control of spheromaks, in anticipation that it is timely to incorporate the q < 1 regime of RFP's and spheromaks into an integrated advanced toroidal confinement program, together with improvements in tokamaks and stellarators now being pursued. For profile control of spheromaks by neutral beam injection, with care to avoid super-Alfvenic beam instability the main issue is excitation of tearing modes that can be studied using the NIMROD code already calibrated to MST and SSPX. In this note, I show that profile control on spheromaks could be demonstrated in a device the size of SSPX, leading ultimately to a very compact ignition facility, and possibly modular fusion reactors with a shorter development path.

Fowler, T K

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

A Development Path for the Stabilized Spheromak  

SciTech Connect

In Refs. [1] - [3], I suggest a concerted computational effort to study profile control of spheromaks, in anticipation that it is timely to incorporate the q < 1 regime of RFP's and spheromaks into an integrated advanced toroidal confinement program, together with improvements in tokamaks and stellarators now being pursued. For profile control of spheromaks by neutral beam injection, with care to avoid super-Alfvenic beam instability the main issue is excitation of tearing modes that can be studied using the NIMROD code already calibrated to MST and SSPX. In this note, I show that profile control on spheromaks could be demonstrated in a device the size of SSPX, leading ultimately to a very compact ignition facility, and possibly modular fusion reactors with a shorter development path.

Fowler, T K

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fano type quantum inequalities in terms of $q$-entropies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalizations of the quantum Fano inequality are considered. The notion of $q$-entropy exchange is introduced. This quantity is concave in each of its two arguments. For $q\\geq0$, the inequality of Fano type with $q$-entropic functionals is established. The notion of coherent information and the perfect reversibility of a quantum operation are discussed in the context of $q$-entropies. By the monotonicity property, the lower bound of Pinsker type in terms of the trace norm distance is obtained for the Tsallis relative $q$-entropy of order $q=1/2$. For $0\\leq{q}\\leq2$, Fano type quantum inequalities with freely variable parameters are obtained.

Alexey E. Rastegin

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1, Section 1000 Addendum: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document -- the Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (SRS EM Plan) -- has been prepared according to guidance contained in the DOE 5400 Series orders, in 10 CFR 834, and in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and environmental Surveillance [DOE, 1991]. The SRS EM Plan`s purpose is to define the criteria, regulations, and guideline requirements with which SRS will comply. These criteria and requirements are applicable to environmental monitoring activities performed in support of the SRS Environmental Monitoring Program (SRS EM Program), WSRC-3Q1-2, Volume 1, Section 1100. They are not applicable to monitoring activities utilized exclusively for process monitoring/control. The environmental monitoring program requirements documented in the SRS EM Plan incorporate all applicable should requirements of DOE/EH-0173T and expand upon them to include nonradiological environmental monitoring program requirements.

Jannik, G.T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

METASTABILITY OF A FLIP-FLOP AND ITS UTILIZATION FOR A CAPACITANCE MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activating a flip-flop circuit by a current fast-rising slope impulse, the circuit occupies one of the two stable states, the stable state one or zero. In case of a perfect flip-flop symmetry over a large number of cycles, a noise causes the ratio of ones and zeros is equal to one 50 % position of a flip-flop. However, any imbalance in the system changes the probability of taking a one or a zero, and thus the ratio of ones and zeros. In this paper, the formula for equivalent voltage of the flip-flop circuit is derived. This voltage is incorporated into the flip-flop as a voltage source to restore 50 % position. The formula is derived for the first time. The results are useful for capacitance measurement and in capacitive sensor applications. PACS: 02.50.Ey; 84.30.Bv; 84.37.+q 1

M. Kollr

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Equilibrium and Stability of Partial Toroidal Plasma Discharges  

SciTech Connect

The equilibrium and stability of partial toroidal flux ropes are studied in detail in the laboratory, motivated by ubiquitous loop structures on the solar surface. The flux ropes studied here are magnetized arc discharges formed in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). It is found that these loops robustly maintain their equilibrium on time scales much longer than the Alfven time over a wide range of plasma current, guide eld strength, and angle between electrodes, even in the absence of a strapping fi eld. Additionally, the external kink stability of these flux ropes is found to be governed by the Kruskal-Shafranov limit for a flux rope with line-tied boundary conditions at both ends (q > 1).

E. Oz, C. E. Myers, M. Yamada, H. Ji, R. Kulsrud, and J. Xie

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electrical Energy Requirements for Accelerator and Fusion Neutrons  

SciTech Connect

The electrical energy requirements and costs of accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) and fusion plants designed to transmute nuclides of fission wastes are compared. Both systems use the same blanket concept, but tritium breeding is taken into account for the fusion system. The ATW and fusion plants are found to have the same electrical energy requirement per available blanket neutron when the blanket coverage is comparable and the fusion energy gain is near breakeven (Q {approx}1), but the fusion plant has only a fraction of the energy requirement when Q >> 1. If the blanket thermal energy is converted to electricity, the fusion plant and ATW have comparable net electrical energy outputs per available neutron when Q {approx}1.5 and the blanket neutron multiplication is large.

Jassby, Daniel L.; Schmidt, John A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States)

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Current drive, anticurrent drive, and balanced injection  

SciTech Connect

In lower hybrid (LH) discharges, the number of suprathermal electrons is limited by the upper bound on the current density from the q = 1 condition, which is caused by the onset of the m = 1 MHD instability. The stored energy of suprathermal electrons, measured in terms of a poloidal beta, scales with plasma current as I/sub p//sup -1/. Potentially, these bounds represent very restrictive conditions for heating in larger machines. Consequently, it seems necessary to perform experiments where the electrons are driven in both directions, parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field, i.e., bidirectional scenarios like anticurrent drive or balanced injection. Data from PLT relevant to these ideas are discussed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Cavallo, A.; Chu, T.K.; Fishman, H.; Hill, K.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Convergence Studies of Thermal and Electromagnetic Transient Quench Analysis of 11 GeV Super High Momentum Spectrometer Superconducting Magnets in Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results of convergence studies of transient thermal and electromagnetic quench analysis of five Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) superconducting magnets: HB, Q1, Q2, Q3, and Dipole, using Vector Fields Quench analysis codes. The convergence of the hot spot temperature and solution solve times were used to investigate the effects of element types, mesh densities, and tolerance criteria. The comparisons between tetrahedral elements and hexahedral elements was studied, and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed. Based on the results of convergence studies, a meshing guideline for coils is presented. The impact of iteration tolerance to the hot spot temperature was also explored, and it is found that tight tolerances result in extremely long solve times with only marginal improvements in the results.

Eric Sun, Paul Brindza, Steve Lassiter, Mike Fowler, E. Xu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Addendum to "Supersymmetric dyonic black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We complete the study of 4-dimensional (4-d), static, spherically symmetric, supersymmetric black holes (BH's) in Abelian (4+n)-d Kaluza-Klein theory, by showing that for such solutions n electric charges \\vec{\\cal Q} \\equiv (Q_1,...,Q_n) and n magnetic charges \\vec{\\cal P} \\equiv (P_1,...,P_n) are subject to the constraint \\vec{\\cal P}\\cdot \\vec{\\cal Q}=0. All such solutions can be obtained by performing the SO(n) rotations, which do not affect the 4-d space-time metric and the volume of the internal space, on the supersymmetric U(1)_M\\times U(1)_E BH's, {\\it i.e.}, supersymmetric BH's with a diagonal internal metric.

Cvetic, M; Cveti, Mirjam; Youm, Donam

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Dirac bound state solutions of spherically ring-shaped q-deformed Woods-Saxon potential for any L-state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximate bound state solutions of the Dirac equation with -deformed Woods-Saxon plus a new generalized ring-shaped potential are obtained for any arbitrary L-state. The energy eigenvalue equation and corresponding two-component wave function are calculated by solving the radial and angular wave equations within a shortcut of the Nikiforov-Uvarov method. The solutions of the radial and polar angular parts of the wave function are expressed in terms of the Jacobi polynomials. A new approximation being expressed in terms of the potential parameters is carried out to deal with the strong singular centrifugal potential term L(L+1)/r^2. Under some limitations, we can obtain solution for the ring-shaped Hulth\\'en potential and the standard usual spherical Woods-Saxon potential (q=1).

Sameer M. Ikhdair; Majid Hamzavi

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

G-equivariant {phi}-coordinated quasi modules for quantum vertex algebras  

SciTech Connect

This is a paper in a series to study quantum vertex algebras and their relations with various quantum algebras. In this paper, we introduce a notion of T-type quantum vertex algebra and a notion of G-equivariant {phi}-coordinated quasi module for a T-type quantum vertex algebra with an automorphism group G. We refine and extend several previous results and we obtain a commutator formula for G-equivariant {phi}-coordinated quasi modules. As an illustrating example, we study a special case of the deformed Virasoro algebra Vir{sub p,q} with q=-1, to which we associate a Clifford vertex superalgebra and its G-equivariant {phi}-coordinated quasi modules.

Li, Haisheng [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Rutgers University, Camden, New Jersey 08102 (United States)] [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Rutgers University, Camden, New Jersey 08102 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

THE FIRST PHOTOMETRIC STUDY AND ORBITAL SOLUTION/PERIOD ANALYSIS OF THE MISCLASSIFIED BINARY SYSTEM V380 CAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first multicolor CCD photometry for the eclipsing binary V380 Cassiopeia (V380 Cas) observed on 34 nights in 2009 and 2010 at the University of Patras Observatory. The PHOEBE program based on the Wilson-Devinney algorithm was used to analyze the first complete BVR{sub c} I{sub c} light curves. It was found that V380 Cas was misclassified and it is a well-detached system consisting of two main-sequence stars. A range of solutions found to give satisfactory fits to the observations is also investigated. The first orbital solution based on the photometric mass ratio q = 1.08 of almost equal temperatures and masses and orbital inclination of i = 86.{sup 0}57 was obtained. In addition, based on all available times of light minima, including 12 new ones, a new orbital period of P = 2.714539884 days is given.

Christopoulou, P.-E.; Papageorgiou, A. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Patra (Greece); Kleidis, S. [Helliniki Astronomiki Enosi, Athens (Greece); Tsantilas, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, Athens University, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 15784, Athens (Greece)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

OBSERVATION OF SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS DURING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AT THE SAWTOOTH INSTABILITY IN DIII-D TOKAMAK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK A271 OBSERVATION OF SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS DURING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AT THE SAWTOOTH INSTABILITY IN DIII-D TOKAMAK. Intense bursts of x-ray and electron cyclotron emission are observed during sawtooth instabilities in high-temperature plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak. The bursts are initiated around the X-point of the m = 1, n = 1 magnetic island at the beginning of the sawtooth crash and are displaced to larger radii later during the temperature collapse. Reconstruction of the magnetic configuration using motional Stark effect (MSE) data and numerical simulations indicates that the bursts can be connected with suprathermal electrons (E{sub r} {approx} 30-40 keV) generated during reconnection of the magnetic field around the q = 1 surface.

SAVRUKHIN,RV; STRAIT,EJ

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Symmetric Long Straight Section Lattices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Symmetric Symmetric Long Straight Section Lattices for 2, 4, and 8 Sectors formerly AOP-TN-2009-007, Rev. 2 Michael Borland March 23, 2009 Accelerator Systems Division, Advanced Photon Source 1 Introduction Long straight sections [1] (LSS) are anticipated to be one of the significant changes to the accel- erator as part of the APS Renewal. Previously [2], we developed a lattice with eight LSS that, while workable, would have presented some operational challenges. In the present note, we show improved results for 8LSS, along with new solutions for 4LSS and 2LSS. As before, these lattices are developed by removing the Q2 quadrupoles and moving the Q1 back into its place, permitting a 7.7-m-long insertion device (as judged by the increase in face-to-face distance for the innermost powered quadrupoles). Further increases in length (perhaps 10%) might be possible by removing corrector magnets,

377

Accessibility of pores in coal to methane and carbon dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accessibility Accessibility of pores in coal to methane and carbon dioxide 3 Yuri B. Melnichenko a,b,⇑ , Lilin He a , Richard Sakurovs c,⇑ , Arkady L. Kholodenko d , Tomasz Blach e , 4 Maria Mastalerz f , Andrzej P. Radlin ´ ski e,f , Gang Cheng g,h , David F.R. Mildner i 5 a Neutron Scattering Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 6 b Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA 7 c CSIRO Energy Technology, 11 Julius Avenue, North Ryde, 2113 NSW, Australia 8 d 375 H.L. Hunter Laboratories, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973, USA 9 e Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan 4111, Brisbane, Australia 10 f Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-2208, USA 11 g Sandia National Laboratories, Q1 Livermore, CA 94551, USA 12 h Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque,

378

USDOE Technology Transfer, Frequently Asked Questions about Agreement for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions about ACT: Frequently Asked Questions about ACT: Q1: What is ACT (Agreement for Commercializing Technology)? A1: ACT is a pilot program under which businesses may partner with participating DOE laboratories for research and development that commercializes technology. Q2: Why is this pilot being introduced? A2: ACT is being piloted to address concerns about difficulties in partnering with the DOE laboratories that were raised in public responses to a DOE Request for Information on improving technology transfer. These concerns include requirements for advance payments, indemnification and government use rights in intellectual property. Q3: Who can partner with the laboratories under ACT? A3: ACT is available to a full range of sponsors, including start-ups, small and large businesses that provide private funding to

379

Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 6.9 4.7 2.2 Town..................................................................... 19.0 6.0 4.2 1.9 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 4.4 4.0 0.5 Rural..................................................................... 22.3 3.2 2.3 0.9 Climate Zone 1 Less than 2,000 CDD and-- Greater than 7,000 HDD.................................... 10.9 1.9 Q 1.3 5,500 to 7,000 HDD........................................... 26.1 9.8 5.7 4.1 4,000 to 5,499 HDD...........................................

380

Property:Product | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Product Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 208 subproperties: A AEE AG AFS Trinity Power Corp ANV Partners Advanced Plant Pharmaceuticals Inc Aeronautica Windpower LLC AgRefresh Agrivert Alliance to Save Energy Alternative Energy Consultants Alternative Energy Finance Ambene American Hydrogen Corporation American Superconductor Corporation AMSC Angelantoni Industrie Spa Apollo Solar Energy Inc Ariane Environment Auriga Energy B Bannockburn Capital LTD Baoding Huide Wind Power Engineering Co Ltd Beijing Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co Ltd BiBB Western Region Bloo Solar formerly Q1 Nanosystems Blue Green Capital C C12 Energy Inc CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Research Institute

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q4 jul-sep q1" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microsoft Word - 176 EFS FAQ-2012.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions on the Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural Gas and Supplemental Gas Supply & Disposition" The following material provides answers to questions that EIA has received about the Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." The survey collects annual data on natural, synthetic, and other supplemental gas supplies, disposition and certain revenues. If you do not find an answer to your specific question, please contact EIA staff, listed at the end of this product. Q1: I cannot file the information requested by the due date. Is it possible to get an extension? How can I obtain a filing extension for my company? A1: If you are unable to meet the March 1st deadline, please send an email to

382

b31.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,472 1,910 1,445 94 27 128 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,715 1,020 617 41 N 66 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 725 386 307 Q Q 27 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 607 301 285 16 Q 27 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 217 110 114 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 119 53 70 Q 5 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 60 27 35 Q 5 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 23 9 14 Q 2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 3 3 Q 1 N Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 298 144 149 10 6 15 Food Sales ....................................... 226 186 109 68 Q N Q Food Service .....................................

383

I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BAECC: BAECC: I ni*al S ite L ayout AOS Instrument Field, radars, and containers Instrument F ield a nd C ontainers 6 0 m 9 0 m Met Twr T r e e H e i g h t ~ 2 0 M T r e e H e i g h t ~ 2 0 m Tree Height ~5m T r e e H e i g h t ~ 2 0 m K A Z R B S R W P P D M Rad Tables: mfrsr, TSI skyrad, SPN 10 M Scale M W A C R MWR mounted side by side with 1 m in between scan direction indicated by arrows MWR3C p w r P W R D r o p G P R W P A N T E Q 1 9 0 f t 6 4 f t E Q 2 u n d e r s a c r E Q 1 A N T Snow Fence Measurements a re c lose a pproximates. S ite w as l aid o ut D uring A ug S ite V isit Container P ad D etail AMF2 SACR OPS Van GP Van RWP Van 20' 90' 64' PWR 20' 20' mpl 2d VD MAERI BBSS cart WBRG VCEIL Instrument Field 10" 10' 10" 10" 10" SWACR Antenna EQ1 Van AMFX SACR 20' EQ2 under SACR Instrument F ield 1 1 2 3 2 3 Instrument F ield Looking S outh E ast Looking S outh Looking N orth E ast Looking N orth W---Band a nd K a---Band R adar

384

Hot dry rock geothermal energy: status of exploration and assessment. Report No. 1 of the hot dry rock assessment panel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of knowledge of attempts to utilize hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy is summarized. It contains (1) descriptions or case histories of the ERDA-funded projects at Marysville, MT, Fenton Hill, NM, and Coso Hot Springs, CA; (2) a review of the status of existing techniques available for exploration and delineation of HDR; (3) descriptions of other potential HDR sites; (4) definitions of the probable types of HDR resource localities; and (5) an estimate of the magnitude of the HDR resource base in the conterminous United States. The scope is limited to that part of HDR resource assessment related to the determination of the extent and character of HDR, with emphasis on the igneous-related type. It is estimated that approximately 74 Q (1 Q = 1,000 Quads) of heat is stored in these sites within the conterminous U.S. at depths less than 10 km and temperatures above 150/sup 0/C, the minimum for power generation. (Q = 10/sup 18/ BTU = 10/sup 21/J; the total U.S. consumption for 1972 was approximately 0.07 Q). Approximately 6300 Q are stored in the conduction-dominated parts of the crust in the western U.S. (23% of the total surface area), again at depths less than 10 km and temperatures above 150/sup 0/C. Nearly 10,000 Q are believed to be contained in crustal rocks underlying the entire conterminous U.S., at temperatures above 150/sup 0/C. The resource base is significantly larger for lower grade heat. (JGB)

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Progress report No. 41 for a program of thermoelectric generator testing and RTG degradation-mechanisms evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sublimation tests conducted on Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ coated SiGe (78%-22%) legs and SiMo hot shoes produced by G.E. were continued during this reporting period. The present test time for the SiGe legs is 1623 hours, while that for the SiMo hot-shoes is 1028 hours. No unexpected results have been observed. G.E.'s conjecture that the coatings on the SiGe legs which we presently have on test are faulty is confirmed, as this material has displayed coating failure on all n-doped samples at 1150/sup 0/C with failures beginning to show at 1100/sup 0/C. No coating failures have been observed on the hot shoes on test. Thermal conductivity tests conducted on SiGe (78% to 22%) material were extended to over 6000 hours with excellent agreement with MHW results. Testing of the 4 couple module PR-1 has been conducted for over 2,000 hours with similar agreement with past MHW tests. Testing of the Q1-A generator is continuing. The present test time is 33,632 hours. The performance of the generator remains smooth and continuous. Testing of the S/N-1 and S/N-3 eighteen couple modules has been extended to 35,105 hours and 32,403 hours, respectively. As with the Q1-A generator, the performance of these modules remains steady and smooth. Comparisons between computer predictions and the actual performance of the RTGs aboard the Voyager I and II spacecrafts has been extended to approximately four years. The agreement with prediction, in both cases, is within 0.5 percent. The corresponding comparisons for the LES-8 and LES-9 RTGs are for over five years with the same excellent agreement.

Shields, V.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

FY12 Quarter 3 Computing Utilization Report LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DSW continues to dominate the capacity workload, with a focus in Q3 on common model baselining runs in preparation for the Annual Assessment Review (AAR) of the weapon systems. There remains unmet demand for higher fidelity simulations, and for increased throughput of simulations. Common model baselining activities would benefit from doubling the resolution of the models and running twice as many simulations. Capacity systems were also utilized during the quarter to prepare for upcoming Level 2 milestones. Other notable DSW activities include validation of new physics models and safety studies. The safety team used the capacity resources extensively for projects involving 3D computer simulations for the Furrow series of experiments at DARHT (a Level 2 milestone), fragment impact, surety theme, PANTEX assessments, and the 120-day study. With the more than tripling of classified capacity computing resources with the addition of the Luna system and the safety team's imminent access to the Cielo system, demand has been met for current needs. The safety team has performed successful scaling studies on Luna up to 16K PE size-jobs with linear scaling, running the large 3D simulations required for the analysis of Furrow. They will be investigating scaling studies on the Cielo system with the Lustre file system in Q4. Overall average capacity utilization was impacted by negative effects of the LANL Voluntary Separation Program (VSP) at the beginning of Q3, in which programmatic staffing was reduced by 6%, with further losses due to management backfills and attrition, resulting in about 10% fewer users. All classified systems were impacted in April by a planned 2 day red network outage. ASC capacity workload continues to focus on code development, regression testing, and verification and validation (V&V) studies. Significant capacity cycles were used in preparation for a JOWOG in May and several upcoming L2 milestones due in Q4. A network transition has been underway on the unclassified networks to increase access of all ASC users to the unclassified systems through the Yellow Turquoise Integration (YeTI) project. This will help to alleviate the longstanding shortage of resources for ASC unclassified code development and regression testing, and also make a broader palette of machines available to unclassified ASC users, including PSAAP Alliance users. The Moonlight system will be the first capacity resource to be made available through the YETI project, and will make available a significant increase in cycles, as well as GPGPU accelerator technology. The Turing and Lobo machines will be decommissioned in the next quarter. ASC projects running on Cielo as part of the CCC-3 include turbulence, hydrodynamics, burn, asteroids, polycrystals, capability and runtime performance improvements, and materials including carbon and silicone.

Wampler, Cheryl L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McClellan, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

387

Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.0 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.9 10.0 8.4 Q Q 6.8 New England .............................. 5.4 1.4 4.0 Q Q Q 18.4 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 0.5 6.0 8.4 Q Q 4.6 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 5.4 14.8 4.3 Q Q 19.0 East North Central ...................... 17.1

388

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I . (-J&l ,J z-i2 Ff?,c Y / . June 24, 1953 +a-. "0 !I 2 F 4s 21' + p; 3: h $7 . . a- d :Q 4. 4 'i @j $w J 9. 10. 11. p - ",..-- AU~ORIZA'PION. Project Number bth0a8 ana SC~ eontempmed uf D &to be fabricated on a sub- bv ~CrELftnc.~~o~~, Ohio. These will 1 . be JY?kilrnefl kn TWV Estf~tea Ma~pswer Required gHezn Months) A. Technical A- B. Non-Technical starting Da&e4 Tllne 1 1 Q

389

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project lnfonnation Project Title: Reclamation of Pits and Boxes Date: Nov. 3, 2010 DOE Code: 6740.010.00000 Contractor Code: 8067-451 Project Lead: Anthony Bowler Project Overview Reclamation of QD.]y the following Pits and Boxes : 1. Brief project description [include 1. B-2-1 0 Skim Box anything that could impact the 2. B-1-14 Skim Box environment 3. Near66-1-STX-14 Pit 2. Legal location 4. T-5-10 Skim Box 3. Duration of the project 5. WDFUpperPit 6. WDFLowerPit 4. Major equipment to be used 7. WDFSkimBox 8. B-1-3 Pit 9. B-1 -3 Skim Box 10. T-2-34 Pit 11 . B-1-10 Pit 12. B-1 -10 Skim Box 13. SE of SG3 & Welding Shop Skim Box 14. 58.Q4-1-SX-3 Skim Box 15. Near Tank 126 Skim Box 16. 77-1-SX-3 NW of Well Pit 17. T-5-3 Pit

390

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

391

OFF-SITE S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S S e T B ~ I L L ~ C E ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L R E S E A R C H CENTER from July through December 197C / t i o n a l Environmental Research Centeq U. S. ~ ~ I R O N M E L S T P ~ TR~ECTIQN AGENCY e Unders tancling No. 23 (26-1)-539 for the U. S o ATOMIC ENERGY COlQ4ISSION OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L RESEARCH CENTER from July through December 197C by Monitoring Operations Laboratory National Environmental Research Center U. S. ENVIRONMENTAL P R O T E C T I O N AGENCY Las Vegas , Nevada Published February 1974 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT (26-1)-539 for the U . S. A T O M I C ENERGY C O M M I S S I O N ABSTRACT During t h e period J u l y through December 1970, s i x announced underground n u c l e a r tests were conducted a t t h e Nevada T

392

Causes and Consequences of the Oil Shock of 2007-08  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores similarities and differences between the run-up of oil prices in 2007-08 and earlier oil price shocks, looking at what caused the price increase and what effects it had on the economy. Whereas historical oil price shocks were primarily caused by physical disruptions of supply, the price run-up of 2007-08 was caused by strong demand confronting stagnating world production. Although the causes were different, the consequences for the economy appear to have been very similar to those observed in earlier episodes, with significant effects on overall consumption spending and purchases of domestic automobiles in particular. In the absence of those declines, it is unlikely that we would have characterized the period 2007:Q4 to 2008:Q3 as one of economic recession for the U.S. The experience of 2007-08 should thus be added to the list of recessions to which oil prices appear to have made a material contribution.

James D. Hamilton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The performance of the small-angle diffractometer, SAND at IPNS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-of-flight small-angle diffractometer SAND has been serving the scientific user community since 1996. One notable feature of SAND is its capability to measure the scattered intensity in a wide Q (4{pi}sin{theta}/{lambda}, where 2{theta} is the scattering angle and {lambda} is the wavelength of the neutrons) range of 0.0035 to 0.5 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} in a single measurement. The optical alignment system makes it easy to set up the instrument and the sample. The cryogenically cooled MgO filter reduces the fast neutrons over two orders of magnitude, while still transmitting over 70% of the cold neutrons. A drum chopper running at 15 Hz suppresses the delayed neutron background. SAND has a variety of ancillary equipment to control the sample environment. In this paper we describe the features of the SAND instrument, compare its data on a few standard samples with those measured at well established centers in the world, and display two scientific examples which take advantage of measuring data in a wide Q-range in a single measurement. With a new set of tight collimators the Q{sub min} can be lowered to 0.002 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} and the presently installed high-angle bank of detectors will extend the Q{sub max} to 2 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1}.

Thiyagarajan, P.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Planetary and Other Short Binary Microlensing Events from the MOA Short Event Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis of four candidate short duration binary microlensing events from the 2006-2007 MOA Project short event analysis. These events were discovered in an analysis designed to find short timescale single lens events that may be due to free-floating planets. Three of these events are determined to be microlensing events, while the fourth is most likely caused by stellar variability. For each of the three microlensing events, the signal is almost entirely due to a brief caustic feature with little or no lensing attributable mainly to the lens primary. One of these events, MOA-bin-1, is due to a planet, and it is the first example of a planetary event in which stellar host is only detected through binary microlensing effects. The mass ratio, q = 4.9 \\pm 1.4 \\times 10^{-3}, is relatively large for a planetary system, and the star-planet separation, s = 2.10 \\pm 0.05, is the largest ever for a low magnification microlensing event. The planet MOA-bin-1Lb has a mass of m_p = 3.7 \\pm 2.1 M_Jup,and or...

Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Kamiya, K; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

M-theory PP-Waves, Penrose Limits and Supernumerary Supersymmetries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study supersymmetric pp-waves in M-theory, their dimensional reduction to D0-branes or pp-waves in type IIA, and their T-dualisation to solutions in the type IIB theory. The general class of pp-waves that we consider encompass the Penrose limits of AdS_p\\times S^q with (p,q)=(4,7), (7,4), (3,3), (3,2), (2,3), (2,2), but includes also many other examples that can again lead to exactly-solvable massive strings, but which do not arise from Penrose limits. All the pp-waves in D=11 have 16 "standard" Killing spinors, but in certain cases one finds additional, or "supernumerary," Killing spinors too. These give rise to linearly-realised supersymmetries in the string or matrix models. A focus of our investigation is on the circumstances when the Killing spinors are independent of particular coordinates (x^+ or transverse-space coordinates), since these will survive at the field-theory level in dimensional reduction or T-dualisation.

Cvetic, M; Pope, C N

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Neutron total and scattering cross sections of /sup 6/Li in the few MeV region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron total cross sections of /sup 6/Li are measured from approx. 0.5 to approx. 4.8 MeV at intervals of approx. 10 scattering angles and at incident-neutron intervals of approx.< 100 keV. Neutron differential inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured in the incident-energy range 3.5 to 4.0 MeV. The experimental results are extended to lower energies using measured neutron total cross sections recently reported elsewhere by the authors. The composite experimental data (total cross sections from 0.1 to 4.8 MeV and scattering cross sections from 0.22 to 4.0 MeV) are interpreted in terms of a simple two-level R-matrix model which describes the observed cross sections and implies the reaction cross section in unobserved channels; notably the (n;..cap alpha..)t reaction (Q = 4.783 MeV). The experimental and calculational results are compared with previously reported results as summarized in the ENDF/B-V evaluated nuclear data file.

Smith, A.; Guenther, P.; Whalen, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Quantum gravity and inventory accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We begin by studying inventory accumulation at a LIFO (last-in-first-out) retailer with two products. In the simplest version, the following occur with equal probability at each time step: first product ordered, first product produced, second product ordered, second product produced. The inventory thus evolves as a simple random walk on Z^2. In more interesting versions, a p fraction of customers orders the "freshest available" product regardless of type. We show that the corresponding random walks scale to Brownian motions with diffusion matrices depending on p. We then turn our attention to the critical Fortuin-Kastelyn random planar map model, which gives, for each q>0, a probability measure on random (discretized) two-dimensional surfaces decorated by loops, related to the q-state Potts model. A longstanding open problem is to show that as the discretization gets finer, the surfaces converge in law to a limiting (loop-decorated) random surface. The limit is expected to be a Liouville quantum gravity surface decorated by a conformal loop ensemble, with parameters depending on q. Thanks to a bijection between decorated planar maps and inventory trajectories (closely related to bijections of Bernardi and Mullin), our results about the latter imply convergence of the former in a particular topology. A phase transition occurs at p = 1/2, q=4.

Scott Sheffield

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

tablehc1.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6.1 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 No Main Space Heating Equipment............. 1.2 N N N N N N N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment........... 109.1 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.............. 0.8 N N N N N N N Main Space Heating Usage During 2005 Total Number of Rooms (Excluding Bathrooms) None........................................................ 2.1 N Q Q N N N N 1 or 2....................................................... 3.1 1.4 1.3 Q N Q N Q 3............................................................... 8.3 1.4 5.6 0.9 Q N N Q 4............................................................... 16.6 1.7 9.0 3.8 1.1 Q Q Q 5...............................................................

399

S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

)s . )s . l * q 4 S Q . M E M O R A N D U M D A T E S U B J E C T t O W N E R ( S ) -w---w-- P a m t x _----------------------- Currltnt t -------------------------- O w n e r - contacted r ~ yes 0 no; if yc)~, d a tr contacted ----------w-w T Y P E O F O P E R A T IO N H --w------v--- @ search & Devel a p m e n t 0 Facility T y p m < = Production scale testing 0 P ilot S c a l e 0 B e n c h S c a l e P r o c e s s 0 T h e o r e tical S tu d i e s Cl S a m p le & Analysis Mrnuf acturi n g University R e s e w c h O rganization G o v e r n m e n t S p o n s o r e d Facility O ther --------------------- 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage T Y P E O F C O N T R A C T ---I------------ Q Prim* u b c o n tractbr P u r c h a s e O r d e r Contract/Purch*se n U O th w information (i.e., cost + fixe d fee, unit price. tim e & m a terial, e tc) - -s.----- C O N T R A C T I N G P E R IO D , -,,-,-,-e-m-------* s---w -------------------------------

400

Phonon-roton modes of liquid 4He beyond the roton in MCM-41  

SciTech Connect

We present neutron scattering measurements of the phonon-roton (P-R) mode of superfluid 4He confined in 47 A MCM-41 at T = 0.5 K at wave vectors, Q, beyond the roton wave vector (QR = 1.92 A-1). Measurements beyond the roton require access to high wave vectors (up to Q = 4 A-1) with excellent energy resolution and high statistical precision. The present results show for the first time that at T = 0.5 K the P-R mode in MCM-41 extends out to wave-vector Q 3.6 A-1 with the same energy and zero width (within precision) as observed in bulk superfluid 4He. Layer modes in the roton region are also observed. Specifically, the P-R mode energy, !Q, increases with Q for Q > QR and reaches a plateau at a maximum energy !Q = 2 where is the roton energy, = 0.74 0.01 meV in MCM-41. This upper limit means the P-R mode decays to two rotons when its energy exceeds 2 . It also means that the P-R mode does not decay to two layers modes. If the P-R could decay to two layer modes, !Q would plateau at a lower energy, !Q = 2 L where L = 0.60 meV is the energy of the roton like minimum of the layer mode. The observation of the P-R mode with energy up to 2 shows that the P-R mode and the layer modes are independent modes with apparently little interaction between them.

Azuah, Richard T [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD] NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL] ORNL; Adams, Mark A. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Kirichek, Oleg [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Glyde, Henry R [University of Delaware] University of Delaware

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Heavy Truck Engine Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

Nelson, Christopher

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

q008.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

b b ' (4 th Generation) Quark, Searches for NODE=Q008 b ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions b ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions b ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions b ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions NODE=Q008BPP NODE=Q008BPP VALUE (GeV) CL% DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT >685 (CL = 95%) >685 (CL = 95%) >685 (CL = 95%) >685 (CL = 95%) [>128 GeV (CL = 95%) OUR 2012 BEST LIMIT] >480 >480 >480 >480 95 1 AAD 12AT ATLS B(b ' → W t) = 1 >400 >400 >400 >400 95 2 AAD 12AU ATLS B(b ' → Z b) = 1 >350 >350 >350 >350 95 3 AAD 12BC ATLS B(b ' → W q) = 1 (q=u,c) >685 >685 >685 >685 95 4 CHATRCHYAN 12BH CMS m t ' = m b ' >611 >611 >611 >611 95 5 CHATRCHYAN 12X CMS B(b ' → W t) = 1 >190 >190 >190 >190 95 6 ABAZOV 08X D0 cτ = 200mm >190 >190 >190 >190 95 7 ACOSTA 03 CDF quasi-stable

403

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Buildings Using Any Energy Source Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 63,343 63,307 43,468 15,157 5,443 2,853 7,076 1,401 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 6,362 6,346 3,084 600 Q Q 806 199 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 6,212 6,197 3,692 716 Q Q 725 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 11,370 11,370 7,053 966 289 Q 1,014 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 8,385 8,385 6,025 825 369 240 638 Q

404

b16.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 15,492 6,166 7,803 10,989 7,934 6,871 9,528 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 4,659 1,264 689 155 Q Q N 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 3,323 1,373 1,109 689 Q Q N 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 4,006 2,075 2,456 2,113 692 Q N 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,222 836 1,327 2,920 1,648 667 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 704 291 1,157 2,865 2,151 1,518 371 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 804 Q Q 1,558 2,014 2,455 1,452 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q Q Q 533 1,077 1,706 2,571 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q N N Q Q Q 5,087 Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

405

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

406

Table HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 1.4 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 13.0 10.8 1.1 0.5 0.6 11.4 New England .............................. 3.5 3.1 0.2 Q 0.1 16.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 9.5 7.7 0.9 0.4 0.4 13.4 Midwest ......................................... 17.5 16.0 0.3 Q 1.0 10.3 East North Central ......................

407

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.0 2.9 1.3 Total Owner-Occupied Units ....... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 15.8 12.5 0.8 0.9 1.6 10.3 2 Persons ...................................... 25.9 23.4 0.5 0.5 1.5 10.1 3 Persons ...................................... 11.6 9.6 0.5 Q 1.3 12.1 4 Persons ...................................... 11.8 10.9 Q Q 0.7 15.7 5 Persons ...................................... 5.1 4.5 Q Q 0.4 24.2 6 or More Persons

408

b23.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 63,343 63,307 43,468 15,157 5,443 2,853 7,076 1,401 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 6,362 6,346 3,084 600 Q Q 806 199 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 6,212 6,197 3,692 716 Q Q 725 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 11,370 11,370 7,053 966 289 Q 1,014 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,385 8,385 6,025 825 369 240 638 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 9,031 9,031 6,683 1,740 574 332 925 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 9,018 9,018 6,645 2,927 1,399 793 989 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 7,056 7,051 5,679 3,400 1,018 495 1,165 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,908 5,908 4,606 3,981 1,693 822 Q Q Principal Building Activity

409

b41.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 56,940 11,035 9,041 12,558 2,853 11,636 29,969 1,561 1,232 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,007 1,568 675 972 Q Q 1,957 179 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,408 1,523 563 1,012 Q Q 2,741 207 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,922 2,173 1,441 1,740 Q 456 5,260 378 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,776 1,683 1,155 2,301 240 729 4,264 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,331 1,388 1,440 1,958 332 1,722 4,732 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,339 993 1,158 2,259 793 2,366 4,504 Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,565 1,136 1,273 1,223 495 3,023 3,834 Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,591 569 1,334 1,095

410

TableHC14.5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Heating Equpment............................ 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Space Heating Equpment............................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Space Heating Equpment.............................. 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 2.1 Q 1.9 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 2.1 0.4 1.7 500 to 999......................................................... 27.7 6.0 1.6 4.4 1,000 to 1,499................................................... 26.0 5.2 1.8 3.4 1,500 to 1,999................................................... 17.6 3.9 1.7 2.2 2,000 to 2,499...................................................

411

set7.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Heat Pumps Furnaces Individual Space Heaters District Heat Boilers Packaged Heating Units Other All Buildings ............................................... 67,338 61,602 8,923 14,449 17,349 5,534 19,522 25,743 4,073 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 5,684 679 2,271 1,183 Q 463 1,779 250 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 7,090 745 2,848 1,350 Q 1,040 2,301 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 9,865 1,288 3,047 3,021 307 2,047 3,994 401 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 8,565 1,376 1,674 2,218 617 2,591 3,695 510 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 10,112 9,597 1,493 1,718 2,492 905 3,698 4,262 511 100,001 to 200,000 ......................................

412

CT NC0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x-L* d! x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,. i, .' i :.:(e.!' ,A\~, L.,t, - (iI :i' , . y- 2 .L i ._ 1 c\ :- i;! Ii $ 4. Ci:lc:i.nnati. 39, t>:::i.f> (J&l3 q-1 -3 sui3 Jrn T3 FRCM .I iirz 1 ?j ~ 1.3 bL1 T:' IP !REFOI?T TC 5YC?CZCiC~ :EWllIFl;j",tsSS L' I"JIsIc:;. .:;xli3;. iCAN !fA(=;-fL,yg-j L' sc,, E. $.iCLX:i?, -iIJ,x:q()Is. ON hL4X 24 - 25 ) 1.9tic ;i. A. Quiglel;, A.3, 3, M. ChenauEt gpxrIvB OF TP.~ The purpose of t3is trip was tc observe a proposed method for the dchy- dratim of green salt md to determine that all health and safety measures were being xrried out, SurveiU.ance of this nature provided protection against excessi3z personnel exposure, insured compliance with ICC shipping regulaticns, tion of the equ'~ and determined when adequate decontamira-

413

F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7' )J i b' ' -* . * 1 **-p-d ra . - .., -. -. -. ,- ? i. (, . . . . . ..* . s ,' ;. .-, jd .: ,... ',_ .<'t ':<';. ::-,' -. i y,- , . ,,- ., I ..d . c ~~; ZC ANT %C -~j~~~i-: ~~~~~s~~ !~~~,KS b ~' ,cc,!~~,L' ~~~ N,~,' , ?:;c,:g iz c:~~-&y~ 30 .-.;;.z-' ::; ggf~g.piJ\ ,I..? , .7* -26 g z -_ I . f ;' ., :dy~gj-";:, ;:.:1; : -;; ;-+,,: -. 1; .- . . c J " y&=;@ F / tEfW?& FUS ' *Lx5 ms .xm I? ,ziic%*~g~J&a~ yF.n?-m- - - me rsaa.jxig q 1, c P 32 h qpg?~Io2 m ~i.liB-&& ccsy &tw SL SaaP eax@ &mcl I22 p&g& #a a&! Ya;tj,ss imd a? aacctim &wcivta?d. tri3.s w&s %em f&o zatot $vr the sm~2azl.g b8wisec vas ideci ia' da the S&XI @betrkat pfD~% 5x! 9?w 5z%im.~* Rt o;= c?EA u4 cac5 fpzxh esae? t&9 xf.acr

414

Untitled Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Upgrade Diagram - Beam Optics Post-Upgrade Diagram - Beam Optics \\serv1\d-drive\mike\drawings\Post Upgrade Diagram Beam Optics.doc Page 1 of 2 Michael Wiplich 09/21/05 9:20 AM MP-6 NII = Steerer = Quad = Faraday Cup = Multiwire = Slits = Beam Xformer = Valve 6DH01 Velocity Selector 6VSB/E 6QV1 (QA) 6QH1 (QB) Fast Valve 6VA007 7TDH1 7TDV1 7MW020 7FC020 7QH1 7QV1 7TDH2 7TDV2 5XF.LE 6XF.HE MP-6 Object Foils 7VP019 7VP021 6VP019 6TDH1 6TDV1 7Q1 Not Used 6MW017 6TV2 6TH2 Electrostatic MP-6 HE Cup MP-6 LE Cup MP-6 Dump Cup = Viewer Viewer Rotary Aperture ESAG Lens N = Foil Holder = Beam Stop MP-6 Beam Stops H/V Magnetic Steerer/Wiggler LE Gate Valve MP6 Object Slits HE Gate Valve = ESAG Lens Patch Panel A MP-6 HE Quad 7DH01 A

415

c21.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Square Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 190 341 360 12,543 28,786 21,977 15.1 11.8 16.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ....................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q Food Service ..................................... 47 16 Q 986 664 Q 47.8 24.5 Q Health Care ....................................... 6 17 50 445 835 1,883 13.1 20.5 26.3 Inpatient .......................................... N Q 47 N Q 1,723 N Q 27.0 Outpatient ....................................... 6 11 Q 445 652 Q 13.1 17.4 Q Lodging ............................................. 4 31 34 260 2,274 2,563 14.0 13.5 13.5 Retail (Other Than Mall)..................... 17 28 18 1,363 2,133 821 12.2 12.9 21.5 Office ................................................

416

c9a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

684 684 446 617 9,022 4,207 8,613 75.8 106.1 71.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 87 44 64 788 466 871 110.9 94.8 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 67 39 84 957 465 878 69.7 84.8 95.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 77 91 89 1,555 933 1,429 49.4 97.2 62.4 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 70 56 71 1,062 568 1,239 65.8 98.2 57.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 92 49 78 1,514 492 1,092 61.0 100.2 71.2 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 119 Q 79 1,426 346 1,007 83.4 Q 78.0 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 60 Q 68 749 339 977 80.4 Q 69.6 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q Q 1,119 Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 74 53 76 1,198

417

TableHC2.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Household Size 1 Person......................................................... 30.0 18.6 13.2 1.4 0.7 1.3 2.1 2 Persons........................................................ 34.8 26.8 22.9 1.3 0.5 0.7 1.4 3 Persons........................................................ 18.4 12.8 10.7 0.5 0.4 Q 1.0 4 Persons........................................................ 15.9 11.5 9.8 0.6 Q Q 0.9 5 Persons........................................................ 7.9 5.9 5.3 0.2 Q Q 0.3 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 2.4 2.1 Q Q N Q 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 4.7 3.1 0.3 0.3 Q 0.8 $10,000 to $14,999.........................................

418

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 1. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* Cooled Build- ings Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply) Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners Heat Pumps Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners District Chilled Water Central Chillers Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units Swamp Coolers Other All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 56,940 11,035 9,041 12,558 2,853 11,636 29,969 1,561 1,232 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 5,007 1,568 675 972 Q Q 1,957 179 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 5,408 1,523 563 1,012 Q Q 2,741 207 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 9,922 2,173 1,441 1,740 Q 456 5,260 378 Q

419

m129.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3100) 3100) I G (J PC ) = ? ? (? ?? ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Narrow peak observed in several (Λ p + pions) and (Λ p + pions) states in Σ - Be reactions by BOURQUIN 86 and in n p and n A re- actions by ALEEV 93. Not seen by BOEHNLEIN 91. If due to strong decays, this state has exotic quantum numbers (B=0,Q=+ 1,S=- 1 for Λ p π + π + and I ≥ 3/2 for Λ p π - ). Needs confirmation. K (3100) MASS K (3100) MASS K (3100) MASS K (3100) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID ≈ 3100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 3100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 3100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 3100 OUR ESTIMATE 3-BODY DECAYS 3-BODY DECAYS 3-BODY DECAYS 3-BODY DECAYS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3054± 11 OUR AVERAGE 3054± 11 OUR AVERAGE 3054± 11 OUR AVERAGE 3054± 11 OUR AVERAGE 3060± 7± 20 1 ALEEV 93 BIS2 K (3100) → Λ p π + 3056± 7± 20 1 ALEEV 93 BIS2 K (3100) → Λ p π - 3055± 8± 20 1 ALEEV 93 BIS2 K (3100) → Λ p π - 3045± 8± 20 1 ALEEV 93 BIS2 K (3100) → Λ p π + 4-BODY DECAYS

420

LANL Calendar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calendar Calendar LANL Calendar LANL Public Events. . . Careers» Community» Environment» 70th Anniversary» C Your browser does not appear to support JavaScript, but this page needs to use JavaScript to display correctly. You can visit the HTML-only version of this page at: https://www.google.com/calendar/htmlembed?showTitle=0&showTabs=0&showCalendars=0&height=600&wkst=1&bgcolor=%23FFFFFF&src=19q3q9uc7hhi0n1g26a2lrjtbk@group.calendar.google.com&color=%23875509&src=fgk10mie1loqb2j74p1d31f1p0@group.calendar.google.com&color=%23853104&src=q1tai2uhgddrvti32ntk5c8s0o@group.calendar.google.com&color=%232F6309&src=lanleventscalendar@gmail.com&color=%232952A3&src=2irr2g4nfn589m88hatkpa4v8k@group.calendar.google.com&color=%23253b55&src=2irr2g4nfn589m88hatkpa4v8k@group.calendar.google.com&color=%23182C57&ctz=America%2FDenver

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421

Table 11.2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Sales and Net Demand Economic Total Onsite Transfers for Characteristic(a) Purchases Transfers In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 91,909 Q 1,406 194 93,319 20-49 86,795 81 2,466 282 89,060 50-99 90,115 215 2,593 1,115 91,808 100-249 124,827 347 11,375 5,225 131,324 250-499 116,631 2,402 24,079 5,595 137,516 500 and Over 225,242 6,485 91,741 20,770 302,699 Total 735,520 9,728 133,661 33,181 845,727 Employment Size Under 50

422

b23.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

67,338 67,338 61,602 17,627 32,729 3,719 5,077 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 5,684 1,567 3,080 482 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 7,090 1,496 4,292 557 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 9,865 3,035 5,320 597 232 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 8,565 2,866 4,416 486 577 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 10,112 9,597 2,765 5,261 484 836 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 8,271 7,893 2,497 4,128 383 853 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 6,851 6,445 1,509 3,531 474 894 Over 500,000 ............................................... 6,628 6,465 1,892 2,701 Q 1,554 Principal Building Activity

423

m129.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

29 29 K (3100) I G (J PC ) = ? ? (? ?? ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Narrow peak observed in several (Λ p + pions) and (Λ p + pions) NODE=M129 states in Σ - Be reactions by BOURQUIN 86 and in n p and n A re- actions by ALEEV 93. Not seen by BOEHNLEIN 91. If due to strong decays, this state has exotic quantum numbers (B=0,Q=+1,S=- 1 for Λ p π + π + and I ≥ 3/2 for Λ p π - ). Needs confirmation. K (3100) MASS K (3100) MASS K (3100) MASS K (3100) MASS NODE=M129205 NODE=M129M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID ≈ 3100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 3100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 3100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 3100 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 3-BODY DECAYS 3-BODY DECAYS 3-BODY DECAYS 3-BODY DECAYS NODE=M129M1 NODE=M129M1 VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3054 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 3054 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 3054 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 3054 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 3060 ± 7 ± 20 1 ALEEV 93 BIS2 K (3100) → Λ p π + OCCUR=2 3056 ± 7 ± 20 1 ALEEV 93 BIS2 K (3100) → Λ p π - OCCUR=3 3055

424

I I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Header Sheet Header Sheet .Doc ID # 7 e) AW-h a""- - 'IN r 1,9- / q 1-1- 31 0 )c // C) SC CCN: FUSRAP COMMUNICATIONS DISTRIBUTION FSRD= COMM. TYPELL-1-1 FORMER SITES RESTORATION DIVISION (EW-93) SAIC SENSITIVE DATE PROCESSED BY PDCC APR 0 3 1997 COMM REF ADMIN RCD SUBJECT .1 lrhnu rn t FROM To r P, COMM DATE ADDR CODE I I CLOSES CNN Wes I - RESPONSE TRACKING INFORMATION AC TION DESCRIPTION: 01: Ioi: OWEOTO- OWED BY: (ORG) I (ORG) TARGETDAT9.A IcLosiNr cco..coaoip. DATE CLOSING REF- 02: 1 02'. OWED M. OWED BY: (ORG) fORG). .TARGET-DATE CLOSING CCN..COMP. DATE CLOSING REF- MESSAGE: FSRD W/A W/0 SITES: W/A W/0 BNI W/A W/o ACTNG DIRECTOR: W S.., las nup 138 MIS PROGRAM MANAGER: k B.. WIA W/O W/A W/O 112 PNV 139 CIS DEPUTY PROGRAM MGR-: W. F.Vell D. AcK., R. Kii* IISSLD 140 His PROGRAM INT. MGk: G. D..,

425

c12.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,488 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 172 328 173 2,449 4,128 2,091 70.4 79.4 82.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 150 380 228 2,060 4,018 2,979 73.0 94.6 76.7 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 214 438 281 2,124 3,947 2,993 100.7 111.1 94.0 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 219 354 152 2,155 3,427 1,593 101.7 103.2 95.3 Over 500,000 ................................... 176 421 Q 1,566 2,986 1,357 112.1 141.2 Q Principal Building Activity

426

viv-pmg-2002-02.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 15, 2002 February 15, 2002 February 15, 2001 Vivian O'Dell, US CMS User Facilities Status 2 Progress Since Last PMG Progress Since Last PMG Schedule Overview Current Status of Hardware R&D Quarterly Summary (Q1 FY02) Summary February 15, 2001 Vivian O'Dell, US CMS User Facilities Status 3 Major Milestones Major Milestones FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1-2% Data Challenge 12/1/2001 User Analysis Cluster Commissioned 6/1/2002 FY02 Hardware Upgrade 8/1/2002 DAQ TDR 11/1/2002 Software Baseline: persistency choice 12/1/2002 5 % Data Challenge 1/1/2003 * Design of T1 5% prototype 6/1/2003 Implementation of 5 % prototype 3/1/2004 Software and Computing TDR 12/1/2003 1st Pilot Tier 2 center 1/1/2004 20 % Data Challenge 6/1/2004 Physics TDR 12/1/2004

427

Microsoft PowerPoint - UTSR-Biot, 2010-10-19-Shih.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UTSR Workshop on Heat Transfer UTSR Workshop on Heat Transfer Co-Organized by Penn State University and DoE NETL 19-21 October 2010 The Role of the Biot Number i T bi C li D i d A l i in Turbine-Cooling Design and Analysis Tom Shih, 1,2 Kyle Chi, 1 Prashanth Ramachandran, 1 Robin Ames, 3 and Rich Dennis 3 1 School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University 2 Ames National Laboratory U S Dept of Energy Ames National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy 3 National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy DoE - NETL & Ames Laboratory What are the issues on Biot numbers? Biot number is a dimensionless parameter that cuts across equations. * gas phase: Re, Pr, Nu, Mach, ... gas phase: Re, Pr, Nu, Mach, ... * solid phase: Fourier number Biot number is easy to define only in 0-D and 1-D. c h L T T q 1 1     If local T

428

c35.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

65 65 170 104 63 6,080 2,832 4,122 2,123 0.21 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................... 381 Q Q Q 757 Q 255 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................... 375 63 Q Q 1,704 643 833 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................. 509 20 44 Q 3,618 1,983 3,034 1,673 0.14 0.01 0.01 Q Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 282 Q Q Q 933 Q Q Q 0.30 Q Q Q Health Care...................................... Q Q 17 7 Q 492 786 262 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office .............................................. 105 6 14 1 1,379 714 1,235 748 0.08 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others ........................................ 837 Q 44 40 3,426 1,281 1,644 984 0.24 Q 0.03 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before ................................ 555 Q Q Q 2,126 Q Q Q 0.26 Q Q Q 1946 to 1959 ...................................

429

c21a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Square Square Feet All Buildings .................................... 201 412 431 13,124 31,858 25,200 15.3 12.9 17.1 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ....................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q Food Service ..................................... 47 16 Q 986 664 Q 47.8 24.5 Q Health Care ....................................... 6 17 50 445 835 1,883 13.1 20.5 26.3 Inpatient .......................................... N Q 47 N Q 1,723 N Q 27.0 Outpatient ....................................... 6 11 Q 445 652 Q 13.1 17.4 Q Lodging ............................................. 4 31 34 260 2,274 2,563 14.0 13.5 13.5 Mercantile ......................................... 28 99 89 1,944 5,204 4,044 14.2 19.0 21.9 Retail (Other Than Mall) ..................

430

GC-62  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5/99 WED 13:10 FAX 202a862805 5/99 WED 13:10 FAX 202a862805 GC-62 , OAlKU*D o 0 0 -*, . ,.. ..,"',. The Cotactor agras ihabU ny producta mbodying any wuAi vv orproducd rhmreg the uer a ivfdy wm invenion wiH be namfenred mbs*amiy in the Uni~ud Satg unals thm Conrtor can A*hw to the aifi~tion ofDOE tb*a it is nt com rciafly f~Asibl to do so. la th* eve DOE ages to fixign arnrre e will be a rei en the the Goveramarns Apport of hrb tcnolgy be recognid in some appruopiate t n , g., recoup r aofte Oovraument's invien, etc. Thu Conacutor ftlirra arrsm to mnaktho Oabo *OnQ1 hi CwfM;imy on any Ussi gnra li an r any onky athmawime acquidng rilht to Wny gini g gjgm lwwinn in bsequaeTst **5. n mr Should the Conr=oatrm ar such atityifctinmg rigts in any vaa chne in onr p a chroUllDaginrus tti-tb waivUr, ulicenn or othr asfr of rigis i Wy

431

b12.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 9,874 1,255 1,654 1,905 1,258 5,096 4,317 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 409 409 544 N 165 99 638 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 399 356 442 N 280 160 725 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 931 Q 345 Q 312 631 1,284 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,756 Q Q Q Q 803 578 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 2,690 Q Q Q 206 841 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 2,167 Q N Q Q 930 524 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 1,420 N Q 467 Q 1,185 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q N N 973 N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 3,769 410 Q 281 Q Q Q 220 1920 to 1945 .....................................

432

table10.8_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Thousand Barrels. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(c) Switchable Switchable Receipts(d) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.7 1.6 1.7 0.9 1.5 0.6 0.7 1.7 0.3 0.8 311 Food 3,177 986 767 Q 297 Q 1 Q 0 Q 10.4 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 4 10 * 3 0 1 2 0 * 0.8 31131 Sugar 169 W 143 W W 0 0 0 0 0 0.7 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 242 Q 121 0 Q 0 0 0 0 * 27.1 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

433

q009.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t t ' (4 th Generation) Quark, Searches for NODE=Q009 t ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions t ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions t ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions t ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions NODE=Q009TPP NODE=Q009TPP;CHECK LIMITS VALUE (GeV) CL% DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT >685 (CL = 95%) >685 (CL = 95%) >685 (CL = 95%) >685 (CL = 95%) [>256 GeV (CL = 95%) OUR 2011 BEST LIMIT] >656 >656 >656 >656 95 1 AAD 13F ATLS B(t ' → W b) = 1 >350 >350 >350 >350 95 2 AAD 12BC ATLS B(t ' → W q)=1 (q=d,s,b) >420 >420 >420 >420 95 3 AAD 12C ATLS t ' → X t (m X < 140 GeV) >685 >685 >685 >685 95 4 CHATRCHYAN 12BH CMS m b ' = m t ' >557 >557 >557 >557 95 5 CHATRCHYAN 12P CMS t ' t ' → W + b W - b → b ℓ + ν b ℓ - ν * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc.

434

Embargoed Deletion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PNAS proof PNAS proof Embargoed Deletion of Cel48S Q:1 from Clostridium thermocellum ; 2 Daniel G. Olson a,b,c , Shital A. Tripathi a,c , Richard J. Giannone c,d , Jonathan Lo b,c , Nicky C. Caiazza a,c , David A. Hogsett a,c , Robert Hettich c,d , Adam M. Guss b,c , Genia Dubrovsky b,c , and Lee R. Lynd a,b,c,e,1 a Mascoma Corporation, NH 03766; b Thayer School of Engineering and e Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, NH 03755; and c BioEnergy Science Center, d Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN 37830 Q:3 Edited* by Lonnie O'Neal Ingram, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, and approved August 16, 2010 (received for review April 9, 2010) Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium that rapidly solubilizes cellulose with the aid of a multienzyme cel- lulosome complex. Creation of knockout mutants for Cel48S (also known as CelS, S S , and S8), the most abundant cellulosome

435

Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units........................................ Housing Units........................................ 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q N 0.3 0.8 Have Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.8 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.7 22.0 Use Space Heating Equipment.............................. 109.1 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.2 21.7 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N Q 0.5 Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None.................................................................. 3.6 Q 0.5 Q 1.4 1.4 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 0.2 1.2 1.5 1.9 1.2 500 to 999.......................................................... 27.7 2.3 6.9 6.5 6.5 5.6 1,000 to 1,499....................................................

436

b20.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 45,144 10,960 1,958 1,951 2,609 2,161 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,613 916 Q Q N 223 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,304 1,031 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,098 1,732 383 Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 5,807 1,837 355 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 6,218 1,739 273 337 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 6,102 1,545 539 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 4,246 1,361 Q 389 531 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 2,756 800 Q Q 1,522 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 8,714 946 Q N N N Food Sales .......................................

437

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sumary Comparison Table Sumary Comparison Table Return to: A Look at CBECS Building Activities SUMMARY COMPARISON TABLE Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Average Square Feet per Building (thousand) Total Workers (thousand) Average Square Feet per Worker All Commercial Buildings 4,579 58,772 12.8 76,767 766 Building Activity Retail and Service 1,289 12,728 9.9 13,464 945 -- Retail 704 9,127 13.0 8,675 1,052 --- Strip Mall 130 2,887 22.3 3,529 818 --- Enclosed Mall 12 1,817 Q 1,814 1,001 --- Other Retail 562 4,423 7.9 3,332 1,328 --Service 585 3,601 6.2 4,788 752 Office 705 10,478 14.9 27,053 387 Warehouse 580 8,481 14.6 4,904 1,730 Public Assembly 326 3,948 12.1 2,997 1,317 Education 309 7,740 25.1 10,096 767

438

A<ACD6B;GAQ=CD4Q  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AQ(%,1-Q .WAFTWbe?#Q 9TT@Xe (3* e.AO AW:K e&T[ O"Q- W:OY d  ]L *aA <[YI ^Ae) IWA= YTWe 0T: Oe 4WTF W:M Xe3C >Ae %RS[:Ke2:YITO:Ke+O_IWTONAOY:Ke5TKH=ce %

439

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

440

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings* ............................... 32 116 153 2,942 9,867 11,373 10.8 11.7 13.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 4 9 20 345 652 908 12.7 13.8 22.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 3 7 8 350 732 781 7.7 9.6 10.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 16 20 Q 1,390 1,934 Q 11.2 10.5

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441

Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 4.7 3.8 Q Q Q 0.6 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 16.0 13.3 0.8 0.4 Q 1.3 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 32.1 26.5 1.6 0.7 1.1 2.2 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 19.3 15.8 1.3 0.4 0.6 1.3 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 2.8 2.2 Q N Q 0.3 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.7 2.3 Q Q Q Q No Hot Meals Cooked.................................................. 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................

442

tablehc3.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.1 8.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Household Size 1 Person......................................................... 30.0 18.6 13.2 1.4 0.7 1.3 2.1 2 Persons........................................................ 34.8 26.8 22.9 1.3 0.5 0.7 1.4 3 Persons........................................................ 18.4 12.8 10.7 0.5 0.4 Q 1.0 4 Persons........................................................ 15.9 11.5 9.8 0.6 Q Q 0.9 5 Persons........................................................ 7.9 5.9 5.3 0.2 Q Q 0.3 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 2.4 2.1 Q Q N Q 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 4.7 3.1 0.3 0.3 Q 0.8 $10,000 to $14,999......................................... 8.5 3.9 2.7 Q Q Q 0.8 $15,000 to $19,999.........................................

443

Total U.S. Housing Units............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Heating Equipment............................... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Space Heating Equipment................................ 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Space Heating Equipment................................. 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.............................. 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................................... 3.6 Q 0.7 Q 1.3 1 to 499................................................................. 6.1 0.5 0.4 0.5 1.4 500 to 999............................................................. 27.7 2.7 1.4 2.4 3.4 1,000 to 1,499....................................................... 26.0 1.4 2.2 1.6 2.5 1,500 to 1,999.......................................................

444

Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.4 1.0 0.4 0.6 1.2 Q 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 8.6 2.3 1.0 1.6 3.5 0.2 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 10.1 2.3 1.1 2.1 4.3 0.4 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 7.8 2.0 0.7 1.3 3.6 Q About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.1 Q Q Q 0.6 Q Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 1.4 Q Q Q 1.0 N No Hot Meals Cooked.................................................. 0.9 0.4 Q N Q 0.3 Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................

445

Table HC2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S............................................................ 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................... 109.6 71.3 7.4 7.7 16.4 6.8 1.............................................................. 103.3 66.2 7.2 7.4 15.9 6.7 2 or More................................................. 6.2 5.1 Q 0.3 0.5 Q Do Not Use an Oven................................... 1.5 0.7 Q Q 0.4 Q Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric..................................................... 67.9 45.5 4.4 3.7 10.7 3.7 Natural Gas.............................................. 36.4 22.0 3.0 3.9 5.6 1.8 Propane/LPG........................................... 5.2 3.8 Q Q Q 1.3 Self-Cleaning Oven Use a Self-Cleaning Oven........................

446

b9.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 3,769 6,871 7,045 8,101 10,772 10,332 12,360 5,533 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 490 796 860 690 966 1,149 1,324 515 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 502 827 643 865 1,332 721 1,209 486 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 804 988 1,421 1,460 1,869 1,647 2,388 958 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 677 838 935 1,234 1,720 1,174 1,352 739 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 491 641 927 1,483 1,146 1,390 2,058 921 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 Q 704 1,148 1,039 1,411 1,496 1,934 1,060 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q 1,288 569 947 1,243 1,237 984 609 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q 790 541 382 1,085 1,518 1,111 Q Principal Building Activity

447

c35a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

02 02 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................... 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................... 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................. 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 282 Q Q Q 933 Q Q Q 0.30 Q Q Q Health Care...................................... Q Q 17 7 Q 492 786 262 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office .............................................. 105 6 14 1 1,379 714 1,235 748 0.08 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others ........................................ 873 Q 47 40 3,810 1,358 2,186 1,091 0.23 Q 0.02 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before ................................ 562 Q Q Q 2,162 Q Q Q 0.26 Q Q Q 1946 to 1959 ...................................

448

q008.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

' ' (4 th Generation) Quark, Searches for b ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions b ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions b ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions b ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions VALUE (GeV) CL% DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT >480 >480 >480 >480 95 1 AAD 12AT ATLS B(b ' → W t) = 1 >400 >400 >400 >400 95 2 AAD 12AU ATLS B(b ' → Z b) = 1 >350 >350 >350 >350 95 3 AAD 12BC ATLS B(b ' → W q) = 1 (q=u,c) >685 >685 >685 >685 95 4 CHATRCHYAN 12BH CMS m t ' = m b ' >611 >611 >611 >611 95 5 CHATRCHYAN 12X CMS B(b ' → W t) = 1 >190 >190 >190 >190 95 6 ABAZOV 08X D0 cτ = 200mm >190 >190 >190 >190 95 7 ACOSTA 03 CDF quasi-stable b ' * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * >450 95 8 AAD 12BE ATLS B(b ' → W t) = 1 >372 95 9 AALTONEN 11J CDF b

449

q009.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

' ' (4 th Generation) Quark, Searches for t ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions t ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions t ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions t ' -quark/hadron mass limits in p p and p p collisions VALUE (GeV) CL% DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT >656 >656 >656 >656 95 1 AAD 13F ATLS B(t ' → W b) = 1 >350 >350 >350 >350 95 2 AAD 12BC ATLS B(t ' → W q)=1 (q=d,s,b) >420 >420 >420 >420 95 3 AAD 12C ATLS t ' → X t (m X < 140 GeV) >685 >685 >685 >685 95 4 CHATRCHYAN 12BH CMS m b ' = m t ' >557 >557 >557 >557 95 5 CHATRCHYAN 12P CMS t ' t ' → W + b W - b → b ℓ + ν b ℓ - ν * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * >404 95 6 AAD 12AR ATLS B(t ' → W b) = 1 >570 95 7 CHATRCHYAN 12BC CMS t ' t ' → W + b W - b >400 95 8 AALTONEN 11AH CDF t ' → X t (m X < 70 GeV) >358 95 9 AALTONEN 11AL

450

/sup 11/B study of spin dynamics in Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. [RE = Gd, Er  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been intense interest in re-entrance and coexistence in ternary rare earth magnetic superconductors of the form RE Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. Of particular interest in this investigation is the effect of the superconducting state on the RKKY (Yosida, 1957) coupling between RE ions. Since one expects the conduction electron spin susceptibility chi/sup e/(q) to be cut off for q < 1/xi in the superconducting state, a depression f the RKKY coupling should follow. Such an effect would both depress the magnetic ordering temperature and result in slower relaxation rates tau/sub m//sup -1/ for the RE moments in the superconducting state. This paper reports on the spin dynamics of the RE ions using the /sup 11/B nuclear magnetic relaxation rate T/sub 1//sup -1/ in dilute Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/ (RE = Gd and Er).

Kumagai, K.; Fradin, F.Y.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Termination of Safeguards for Accountable Nuclear Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Termination of safeguards ends requirements of Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) and thereby removes the safeguards basis for applying physical protection requirements for theft and diversion of nuclear material, providing termination requirements are met as described. Department of Energy (DOE) M 470.4 6 (Nuclear Material Control and Accountability [8/26/05]) stipulates: 1. Section A, Chapter I (1)( q) (1): Safeguards can be terminated on nuclear materials provided the following conditions are met: (a) 'If the material is special nuclear material (SNM) or protected as SNM, it must be attractiveness level E and have a measured value.' (b) 'The material has been determined by DOE line management to be of no programmatic value to DOE.' (c) 'The material is transferred to the control of a waste management organization where the material is accounted for and protected in accordance with waste management regulations. The material must not be collocated with other accountable nuclear materials.' Requirements for safeguards termination depend on the safeguards attractiveness levels of the material. For attractiveness level E, approval has been granted from the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) Safeguards and Security (S&S). In some cases, it may be necessary to dispose of nuclear materials of attractiveness level D or higher. Termination of safeguards for such materials must be approved by the Departmental Element (this is the DOE Headquarters Office of Nuclear Energy) after consultation with the Office of Security.

Michael Holzemer; Alan Carvo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cielo is a massively parallel supercomputer funded by the DOE/NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, and operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES), a partnership between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The primary Cielo compute platform is physically located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model documents the capabilities and the environment to be provided for the Q1 FY12 Level 2 Cielo Capability Computing (CCC) Platform Production Readiness Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, or Sandia National Laboratories, but also addresses the needs of users working in the unclassified environment. The Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the Production Readiness Milestone user environment capabilities of the ASC community. A description of ACE requirements met, and those requirements that are not met, are included in each section of this document. The Cielo Computing Environment, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and reviewed throughout the tri-Lab community.

Vigil,Benny Manuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ballance, Robert [SNL; Haskell, Karen [SNL

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

453

Affine toric SL(2)-embeddings  

SciTech Connect

In the theory of affine SL(2)-embeddings, which was constructed in 1973 by Popov, a locally transitive action of the group SL(2) on a normal affine three-dimensional variety X is determined by a pair (p/q,r), where 0

q<=1 is a rational number written as an irreducible fraction and called the height of the action, while r is a positive integer that is the order of the stabilizer of a generic point. In the present paper it is shown that the variety X is toric, that is, it admits a locally transitive action of an algebraic torus if and only if the number r is divisible by q-p. For that, the following criterion for an affine G/H-embedding to be toric is proved. Let X be a normal affine variety, G a simply connected semisimple group acting regularly on X, and H subset of G a closed subgroup such that the character group X(H) of the group H is finite. If an open equivariant embedding G/H{yields}X is defined, then X is toric if and only if there exist a quasitorus T-hat and a (GxT-hat)-module V such that X{approx_equal}{sup G}V//T-hat. In the substantiation of this result a key role is played by Cox's construction in toric geometry. Bibliography: 12 titles.

Gaifullin, S A [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Effective field theory and integrability in two-dimensional Mott transition  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Mott transition in 2d lattice fermion model. > 3D integrability out of 2D. > Effective field theory for Mott transition in 2d. > Double Chern-Simons. > d-Density waves. - Abstract: We study the Mott transition in a two-dimensional lattice spinless fermion model with nearest neighbors density-density interactions. By means of a two-dimensional Jordan-Wigner transformation, the model is mapped onto the lattice XXZ spin model, which is shown to possess a quantum group symmetry as a consequence of a recently found solution of the Zamolodchikov tetrahedron equation. A projection (from three to two space-time dimensions) property of the solution is used to identify the symmetry of the model at the Mott critical point as U{sub q}(sl(2)-circumflex)xU{sub q}(sl(2)-circumflex), with deformation parameter q = -1. Based on this result, the low-energy effective field theory for the model is obtained and shown to be a lattice double Chern-Simons theory with coupling constant k = 1 (with the standard normalization). By further employing the effective filed theory methods, we show that the Mott transition that arises is of topological nature, with vortices in an antiferromagnetic array and matter currents characterized by a d-density wave order parameter. We also analyze the behavior of the system upon weak coupling, and conclude that it undergoes a quantum gas-liquid transition which belongs to the Ising universality class.

Bottesi, Federico L. [Facultad de Ingenieria Pontificia Universidad Catolica Argentina, Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 1500, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Physics Department, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zemba, Guillermo R., E-mail: zemba@tander.cnea.gov.ar [Facultad de Ingenieria Pontificia Universidad Catolica Argentina, Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 1500, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Physics Department, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

KEPLER'S OPTICAL SECONDARY ECLIPSE OF HAT-P-7b AND PROBABLE DETECTION OF PLANET-INDUCED STELLAR GRAVITY DARKENING  

SciTech Connect

We present observations spanning 355 orbital phases of HAT-P-7 observed by Kepler from 2009 May to 2011 March (Q1-9). We find a shallower secondary eclipse depth than initially announced, consistent with a low optical albedo and detection of nearly exclusively thermal emission, without a reflected light component. We find an approximately 10 ppm perturbation to the average transit light curve near phase -0.02 that we attribute to a temperature decrease on the surface of the star, phased to the orbit of the planet. This cooler spot is consistent with planet-induced gravity darkening, slightly lagging the sub-planet position due to the finite response time of the stellar atmosphere. The brightness temperature of HAT-P-7b in the Kepler bandpass is T{sub B} = 2733 {+-} 21 K and the amplitude of the deviation in stellar surface temperature due to gravity darkening is approximately -0.18 K. The detection of the spot is not statistically unequivocal due its small amplitude, though additional Kepler observations should be able to verify the astrophysical nature of the anomaly.

Morris, Brett M.; Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Mandell, Avi M. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

456

Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

Kao, F.T.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Thermal Regulation of Gravitational Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks II. Extended Simulations with Varied Cooling Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to investigate mass transport and planet formation by gravitational instabilities (GIs), we have extended our 3-D hydrodynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks from a previous paper. Our goal is to determine the asymptotic behavior of GIs and how it is affected by different constant cooling times. Initially, Rdisk = 40 AU, Mdisk = 0.07 Mo, M* = 0.5 Mo, and Qmin = 1.8. Sustained cooling, with tcool = 2 orps (outer rotation periods, 1 orp ~ 250 yrs), drives the disk to instability in ~ 4 orps. This calculation is followed for 23.5 orps. After 12 orps, the disk settles into a quasi-steady state with sustained nonlinear instabilities, an average Q = 1.44 over the outer disk, a well-defined power-law Sigma(r), and a roughly steady Mdot ~ 5(-7) Mo/yr. The transport is driven by global low-order spiral modes. We restart the calculation at 11.2 orps with tcool = 1 and 1/4 orp. The latter case is also run at high azimuthal resolution. We find that shorter cooling times lead to increased Mdots, denser and t...

Mejia, A C; Pickett, M K; Cai, K; Mejia, Annie C.; Durisen, Richard H.; Pickett, Megan K.; Cai, Kai

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Cold Neptune-Mass Planet OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb: Cold Neptunes Are Common  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb with a planet-star mass ratio of q=[9.5 +/- 2.1] x10^{-5} via gravitational microlensing. The planetary deviation was detected in real-time thanks to the high cadence of the MOA survey, real-time light curve monitoring and intensive follow-up observations. A Bayesian analysis returns the stellar mass and distance at M_l = 0.64_{-0.26}^{+0.21} M_\\sun and D_l = 5.9_{-1.4}^{+0.9} kpc, respectively, so the mass and separation of the planet are M_p = 20_{-8}^{+7} M_\\oplus and a = 3.3_{-0.8}^{+1.4} AU, respectively. This discovery adds another cold Neptune-mass planet to the planetary sample discovered by microlensing, which now comprise four cold Neptune/Super-Earths, five gas giant planets, and another sub-Saturn mass planet that could be a cold Neptune or Super-Earth. The discovery of these ten cold exoplanets by the microlensing method implies that the mass function of cold exoplanets scales as \\Psi(q) \\propto q^{-1.7+/- 0.2} with a 95% confi...

Sumi, T; Bond, I A; Udalski, A; Batista, V; Dominik, M; Fouqu, P; Kubas, D; Gould, A; Macintosh, B; Cook, K; Dong, S; Skuljan, L; Cassan, A; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Nagaya, M; Nagayama, T; Ohnishi, K; Okumura, T; Perrott, Y C; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sako, T; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; P.,; Yock, P C M; Beaulieu, J P; Cole, A; Coutures, Ch; Duran, M F; Greenhill, J; Jablonski, F; Marboeuf, U; Martioli, E; Pedretti, E; Pejcha, O; Rojo, P; Albrow, M D; Brillant, S; Bode, M; Bramich, D M; Burgdorf, M J; Caldwell, J A R; Calitz, H; Corrales, E; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Hill, K; Hoffman, M; Horne, K; J, U G; Kains, N; Kane, S; Marquette, J B; Martin, R; Meintjes, P; Menzies, J; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I; Street, R; Tsapras, Y; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Zub, M; Szyma, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzy, G; Soszy, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Allen, W; Christie, G W; DePoy, D L; Gaudi, B S; Han, C; Janczak, J; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; Mallia, F; Monard, B; Natusch, T; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Santallo, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

PRODUCTION OF NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS ON RETROGRADE ORBITS  

SciTech Connect

While computing an improved near-Earth object (NEO) steady-state orbital distribution model, we discovered in the numerical integrations the unexpected production of retrograde orbits for asteroids that had originally exited from the accepted main-belt source regions. Our model indicates that {approx}0.1% (a factor of two uncertainty) of the steady-state NEO population (perihelion q < 1.3 AU) is on retrograde orbits. These rare outcomes typically happen when asteroid orbits flip to a retrograde configuration while in the 3:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and then live for {approx}0.001 to 100 Myr. The model predicts, given the estimated near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population, that a few retrograde 0.1-1 km NEAs should exist. Currently, there are two known MPC NEOs with asteroidal designations on retrograde orbits which we therefore claim could be escaped asteroids instead of devolatilized comets. This retrograde NEA population may also answer a long-standing question in the meteoritical literature regarding the origin of high-strength, high-velocity meteoroids on retrograde orbits.

Greenstreet, S.; Gladman, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ngo, H. [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics, and Astronomy, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Granvik, M. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Larson, S., E-mail: sarahg@phas.ubc.ca [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Cross-Flow Ceramic Heat Recuperator for Industrial Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With increasing fuel costs, the efficient use of fuel is very important to the U.S. process heat industries. Increase in fuel usage efficiency can be obtained by transferring the waste exhaust heat to the cold combustion air. The metallic recuperators currently available suffer from problems of creep, corrosion and oxidation, particularly at high temperatures. The Department of Energy and GTE Products corporation have pursued a jointly funded venture, Contract No. EX-76-C-Q1-2162, to establish performance criteria and demonstrate a cross-flow ceramic heat recuperator for high temperature industrial heat recovery applications. The immediate goals of the ceramic recuperator project were to demonstrate a heat exchanger capable of handling high temperatures (1600-2400oF), that is compact with a high surface area and with costs comparable to the lower temperature metal heat exchangers. This paper describes the basic GTE Products Corporation design and details the design basis, the predicted recuperator performance, the ceramic and housing materials, the recuperator design procedure and the fabrication and assembly. The data provided includes NTU-Effectiveness and low friction and heat transfer ("f" and "J") plots.

Gonzalez, J. M.; Cleveland, J. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Rebello, W. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

U. S. energy and economic growth, 1975--2010  

SciTech Connect

This study projects economic growth (GNP) and energy demand for the U.S. to the year 2010. The main finding is that both GNP and total energy demand are likely to grow significantly more slowly than has been assumed in most analyses of energy policy. Projections of energy, GNP, and electricity (total and per capita) are summarized, with electricity demand expected to grow more rapidly than total energy demand. Two scenarios designated ''high'' and ''low'' were developed in this study. However, even the ''high'' scenario, 126 quads (q; 1 q equals 10/sup 15/ Btu) in 2000, is much lower than most previous estimates. It is felt that this raises serious questions about fundamental energy and energy R and D policies which, generally, have been based on perceptions of more lavish energy futures. Although the aggregate demands and GNP are projected to increase rather modestly, the energy demands per capita and GNP per capita increase at rates comparable to or even higher than historic rates. The authors believe that the projections developed in this study represent a logical culmination of many trends toward lower growth. These trends have not yet been factored into the older energy projections upon which so much energy policy is based. 136 references.

Allen, E.L.; Cooper, C.L.; Edmonds, F.C.; Edmonds, J.A.; Reister, D.B.; Weinberg, A.M.; Whittle, C.E.; Zelby, L.W.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Broad-beam multi-ampere metal ion source  

SciTech Connect

An embodiment of the MEVVA (metal vapor vacuum arc) high current metal ion source has been developed in which the beam is formed from a 10-cm diameter set of extractor grids and which produces a peak beam current of up to several Amperes. The source, MEVVA V, operates in a pulsed mode with a pulse width at present 0.25 ms and a repetition rate of up to several tens of pulses per second (power supply limited). The multicathode feature that was developed for the prior source version, MEVVA IV, has been incorporated here also; one can switch between any of 18 separate cathodes and thus metallic beam species. Maximum beam extraction voltage is over 90 kV, and since the ion charge state typically from Q = 1 to 5, depending on the metal employed, the ion energy in the extracted beam can thus be up to several hundred keV. This source is a new addition to the MEVVA family of metal ion sources, and we are at present investigating the operational regimes and the limits to the source performance. In this paper we describe the source and present some preliminary results. 10 refs., 4 figs.

Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.; MacGill, R.A.; Paoloni, F.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Wollongong Univ. (Australia). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Coherent and turbulent fluctuations in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

Classification of the sawteeth observed in the TFTR tokamak has been carried out to highlight the differences between the many types observed. Three types of sawteeth are discussed: ''simple,'' ''small,'' and ''compound.'' During the enhanced confinement discharges on TFTR, sawteeth related to q = 1 are usually not present, but a sawtooth-like event is sometimes observed. ..beta.. approaches the Troyon limit only at low q/sub cyl/ with a clear reduction of achievable ..beta../sub n/ at high q/sub cyl/. This suggests that a ..beta../sub p/ limit, rather than the Troyon-Gruber limit, applies at high q/sub cyl/ in the enhanced confinement discharges. These discharges also reach the stability boundary for n ..-->.. infinity ideal MHD ballooning modes. Turbulence measurements in the scrape-off region with Langmuir and magnetic probes show strong edge density turbulence n-tilde/n = 0.3 - 0.5, with weak magnetic turbulence B-tilde/sub theta/B/sub theta/ > 5 x 10/sup -6/ measured at the wall, but these measurements are very sensitive to local edge conditions.

McGuire, K.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Callen, J.D.; Chance, M.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

TESTING THE BLACK HOLE NO-HAIR THEOREM WITH OJ287  

SciTech Connect

We examine the ability to test the black hole no-hair theorem at the 10% level in this decade using the binary black hole in OJ287. In the test we constrain the value of the dimensionless parameter q that relates the scaled quadrupole moment and spin of the primary black hole: q{sub 2} = -q {chi}{sup 2}. At the present we can say that q = 1 {+-} 0.3 (1{sigma}), in agreement with general relativity and the no-hair theorems. We demonstrate that this result can be improved if more observational data are found in historical plate archives for the 1959 and 1971 outbursts. We also show that the predicted 2015 and 2019 outbursts will be crucial in improving the accuracy of the test. Space-based photometry is required in 2019 July due the proximity of OJ287 to the Sun at the time of the outburst. The best situation would be to carry out the photometry far from the Earth, from quite a different vantage point, in order to avoid the influence of the nearby Sun. We have considered in particular the STEREO space mission, which would be ideal if it has a continuation in 2019, or the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager on board the New Horizons mission to Pluto.

Valtonen, M. J.; Mikkola, S.; Lehto, H. J. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, 21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Gopakumar, A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Hudec, R.; Polednikova, J. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences, Fricova 298, 25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

Testing black hole no-hair theorem with OJ287  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the ability to test the black hole no-hair theorem at the 10% level in this decade using the binary black hole in OJ287. In the test we constrain the value of the dimensionless parameter q that relates the scaled quadrupole moment and spin of the primary black hole: q2 = -q 2 . At the present we can say that q = 1 \\pm 0.3 (one), in agreement with General Relativity and the no-hair theorems. We demonstrate that this result can be improved if more observational data is found in historical plate archives for the 1959 and 1971 outbursts. We also show that the predicted 2015 and 2019 outbursts will be crucial in improving the accuracy of the test. Space-based photometry is required in 2019 July due the proximity of OJ287 to the Sun at the time of the outburst. The best situation would be to carry out the photometry far from the Earth, from quite a different vantage point, in order to avoid the influence of the nearby Sun. We have considered in particular the STEREO space mission which would be ideal if ...

Valtonen, M J; Lehto, H J; Gopakumar, A; Hudec, R; Polednikova, J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Twist-3 Distribution Amplitudes of Scalar Mesons within the QCD Sum Rules and Its Application to the $B \\to S$ Transition Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the twist-3 light cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) of the scalar mesons $a_0$, $K^{\\ast}_0$ and $f_0$ within the QCD sum rules. The sum rules are improved by a consistent treatment of the sizable mass effects. Adopting the valence quark component $(\\bar{q}_1 q_2)$ as the dominant structure of the scalar mesons, our estimation for their masses are close to the measured $a_0(1450)$, $K^{\\ast}_0(1430)$ and $f_0(1710)$. From the sum rules, we obtain the first two non-zero moments of the twist-3 DAs $\\phi^{s,\\sigma}_{a_0}$: $=0.369 (0.245)$ and $=0.203 (0.093)$; those of the twist-3 DAs $\\phi_{K^*_0}^{s,\\sigma}$: $ =0.004 (0.355)$ and $ =0.018 (0.207)$; and those of the twist-3 DAs $\\phi_{f_0}^{s,\\sigma}$: $=0.335 (0.212)$ and $=0.196 (0.088)$, respectively. As an application of these twist-3 LCDAs, we study the $B \\to S$ transition form factors by introducing proper chiral currents in the correlator, which is constructed such that the twist-3 DAs give dominant contribution and the twist-2 DAs m...

Han, Hua-Yong; Fu, Hai-Bing; Zhang, Qiong-Lian; Zhong, Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Scaling dependence on time and distance in nonlinear fractional diffusion equations and possible applications to the water transport in soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, fractional derivatives have been employed to analyze various systems in engineering, physics, finance and hidrology. For instance, they have been used to investigate anomalous diffusion processes which are present in different physical systems like: amorphous semicondutors, polymers, composite heterogeneous films and porous media. They have also been used to calculate the heat load intensity change in blast furnace walls, to solve problems of control theory \\ and dynamic problems of linear and nonlinear hereditary mechanics of solids. In this work, we investigate the scaling properties related to the nonlinear fractional diffusion equations and indicate the possibilities to the applications of these equations to simulate the water transport in unsaturated soils. Usually, the water transport in soils with anomalous diffusion, the dependence of concentration on time and distance may be expressed in term of a single variable given by $\\lambda _{q}=x/t^{q}.$ In particular, for $q=1/2$ the systems obey Fick's law and Richards' equation for water transport. We show that a generalization of Richards' equation via fractional approach can incorporate the above property.

Kwok Sau Fa; E. K. Lenzi

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Large N Duality, Mirror Symmetry, and a Q-deformed A-polynomial for Knots.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reconsider topological string realization of SU(N) Chern-Simons theory on S^3. At large N, for every knot K in S^3, we obtain a polynomial A_K(x,p;Q) in two variables x,p depending on the t'Hooft coupling parameter Q=e^{Ng_s}. Its vanishing locus is the quantum corrected moduli space of a special Lagrangian brane L_K, associated to K, probing the large N dual geometry, the resolved conifold. Using a generalized SYZ conjecture this leads to the statement that for every such Lagrangian brane L_K we get a distinct mirror of the resolved conifold given by uv=A_K(x,p;Q). Perturbative corrections of the refined B-model for the open string sector on the mirror geometry capture BPS degeneracies and thus the knot homology invariants. Thus, in terms of its ability to distinguish knots, the classical function A_K(x,p;Q) contains at least as much information as knot homologies. In the special case when N=2, our observations lead to a physical explanation of the generalized (quantum) volume conjecture. Moreover, the specialization to Q=1 of A_K contains the classical A-polynomial of the knot as a factor.

469

Jordan cells of periodic loop models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan cells in transfer matrices of finite lattice models are a signature of the logarithmic character of the conformal field theories that appear in their thermodynamical limit. The transfer matrix of periodic loop models, T_N, is an element of the periodic Temperley-Lieb algebra EPTL_N(\\beta, \\alpha), where N is the number of sites on a section of the cylinder, and \\beta = -(q+1/q) = 2 \\cos \\lambda and \\alpha the weights of contractible and non-contractible loops. The thermodynamic limit of T_N is believed to describe a conformal field theory of central charge c=1-6\\lambda^2/(\\pi(\\lambda-\\pi)). The abstract element T_N acts naturally on (a sum of) spaces V_N^d, similar to those upon which the standard modules of the (classical) Temperley-Lieb algebra act. These spaces known as sectors are labeled by the numbers of defects d and depend on a {\\em twist parameter} v that keeps track of the winding of defects around the cylinder. Criteria are given for non-trivial Jordan cells of T_N both between sectors with distinct defect numbers and within a given sector.

Alexi Morin-Duchesne; Yvan Saint-Aubin

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

470

c8a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

456 456 1,241 340 5,680 13,999 3,719 80.2 88.7 91.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 60 123 37 922 1,283 547 64.9 96.2 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 45 111 27 738 1,468 420 61.6 75.4 63.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 71 145 74 1,204 2,443 861 59.0 59.3 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 107 133 Q 949 1,867 545 112.5 71.1 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 66 163 71 664 1,797 749 99.0 90.4 95.1 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 49 278 Q 614 2,422 Q 79.8 114.8 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 118 Q 441 1,148 Q Q 102.4 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 171 Q Q 1,572 Q Q 109.0 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 45 198 Q

471

c12a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,522 3,228 1,772 18,031 33,384 20,243 84.4 96.7 87.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 193 300 193 2,168 2,904 1,850 89.0 103.2 104.2 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 134 263 165 2,032 3,217 1,784 66.0 81.9 92.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 241 432 226 3,273 5,679 3,707 73.6 76.1 60.9 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 181 370 191 2,517 4,518 2,347 71.8 81.8 81.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 156 473 285 2,095 4,763 3,433 74.3 99.3 82.9 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 219 523 323 2,161 4,706 3,350 101.1 111.1 96.5 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 221 371 160 2,179 3,623 1,692 101.4 102.3 94.3 Over 500,000 ................................... 179 497 Q 1,606 3,974 2,080 111.2 125.0 Q Principal Building Activity

472

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods methods This section describes methods used to generate MODIS Land Subsets for Collection 4 and Collection 5 data products. Methods for Selected Sites (Collections 4 and 5) Methods for North America Tool (Collection 4) Methods for the Global Tool (Collection 5) Methods for Selected Sites (Collection 4 and 5) Source for Selected Site Data: Full MODIS scenes (1200-km x 1200-km) are initially subset to 11-km x 31-km (Collection 4) or 25-km x 25-km (Collection 5) by the MODAPS; these initial subsets contain the field site or flux tower. Reformatting and additional subsetting to 7-km x 7-km containing the field site or flux tower are done by the ORNL DAAC. Tools Used: The ORNL DAAC uses the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) to reformat the MODIS data from HDF-EOS to binary format. A tool developed at ORNL is then used to convert the binary format to ASCII. The MRT is available from the Land Processes DAAC. Whereas the MRT can also be used to reproject data from its native projection to other projections, ORNL chose to forgo the resampling associated with reprojection to minimize data manipulation and distortion. The MOD12Q1 Land Cover Collection 3 data are in I-Sin projection, and the Collection 4 and Collection 5 data are in Sinusoidal projection.

473

b32.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 56,478 27,490 28,820 1,880 3,088 1,422 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 4,759 2,847 1,699 116 N 169 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,348 2,821 2,296 Q Q 205 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,562 4,809 4,470 265 Q 430 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,734 3,924 4,055 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,412 3,659 5,005 Q 303 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,300 3,884 4,754 Q 822 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,680 2,722 4,076 Q 621 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,683 2,824 2,467 Q 1,064 N Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 9,481 3,829

474

set5.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings ............................................... 67,338 65,753 65,716 45,525 13,285 5,891 2,750 6,290 2,322 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 6,309 6,280 3,566 620 Q Q 635 292 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 7,721 7,721 5,088 583 Q Q 986 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 10,851 10,843 7,001 983 414 Q 1,203 290 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 9,175 9,175 6,405 983 660 294 568 250 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 10,112 10,034 10,034 7,165 1,612 933 525 865 350 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 8,271

475

a4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings .................................... 71,658 3,452 10,543 12,424 5,680 13,999 3,719 9,022 4,207 8,613 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,922 383 676 986 922 1,283 547 788 466 871 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 7,033 369 800 939 738 1,468 420 957 465 878 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 12,659 674 1,448 2,113 1,204 2,443 861 1,555 933 1,429 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 9,382 366 1,022 1,763 949 1,867 545 1,062 568 1,239 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 10,291 590 1,682 1,712 664 1,797 749 1,514 492 1,092 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 10,217 448 1,790 1,872 614 2,422 Q 1,426 346 1,007 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

476

table10.6_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Natural Distillate Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Receipts(c) Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(d) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1.4 0.9 1.6 1.7 0.6 0.8 1.7 0.5 0.9 311 Food 68,230 2,270 49,890 239 2,125 17 9 72 0 Q 12.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 7,098 77 6,062 77 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.9 31131 Sugar 733 21 602 * 11 9 9 0 0 * 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 1,987 Q 1,764 Q Q 0 0 25

477

Toy Models for Galaxy Formation versus Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe simple useful toy models for key processes of galaxy formation in its most active phase, at z > 1, and test the approximate expressions against the typical behaviour in a suite of high-resolution hydro-cosmological simulations of massive galaxies at z = 4-1. We address in particular the evolution of (a) the total mass inflow rate from the cosmic web into galactic haloes based on the EPS approximation, (b) the penetration of baryonic streams into the inner galaxy, (c) the disc size, (d) the implied steady-state gas content and star-formation rate (SFR) in the galaxy subject to mass conservation and a universal star-formation law, (e) the inflow rate within the disc to a central bulge and black hole as derived using energy conservation and self-regulated Q ~ 1 violent disc instability (VDI), and (f) the implied steady state in the disc and bulge. The toy models provide useful approximations for the behaviour of the simulated galaxies. We find that (a) the inflow rate is proportional to mass and to (...

Dekel, A; Tweed, D; Cacciato, M; Ceverino, D; Primack, J R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Progress in short period multilayer coatings for water windowapplications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absolute photoionization cross-section measurements for amixture of ground and metastable states of Xe4+, Xe5+, and Xe6+ arereported in the photon energy range of 4d-nf transitions, which occurwithin or adjacent to the 13.5 nm window for extreme ultravioletlithography light source development. The reported values allow thequantification of opacity effects in xenon plasmas due to these 4d-4fautoionizing states. The oscillator strengths for the 4d-4f and 4d-5ftransitions in Xeq+ (q=1-6) ions are calculated using nonrelativisticHartree-Fock and random phase approximations. These are compared withpublished experimental values for Xe+ to Xe3+ and with the valuesobtained from the present experimental cross-section measurements forXe4+ to Xe6+. The calculations assisted in the determination of themetastable content in the ion beams for Xe5+T and Xe6+. The experimentswere performed by merging a synchrotron photon beam generated by anundulator beamline of the Advanced Light Source with an ion beam producedby an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

Gullikson, E.M.; Salmassi, F.; Aquila, A.L.; Dollar, F.

2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

479

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.5,0.1,0.2,0.6,"Q" 1,24.2,11,1.2,3,7.3,1.7 2,37.5,21.4,2.4,3.3,7.7,2.7 3,26.6,18.4,2,1.8,2.8,1.6 4,14.2,11.6,0.7,0.6,0.5,0.7 "5 or More",9.7,8.8,0.4,0.2,"Q",0.2 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size"

480

a3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 252 509 728 577 926 360 587 316 603 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 134 240 372 356 474 217 294 166 333 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 49 106 128 100 200 59 127 62 117 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 46 92 133 78 151 54 103 61 91 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 10 29 48 27 52 16 28 16 34 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 8 23 25 10 26 11 21 7 15 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 3 12 14 5 18 Q 10 3 7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 Q 6 6 1 4 Q 3 1 3 Over 500,000 .................................... 8 Q 2 1 Q 2 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 Q 21 34 29 87 Q 56 39 97 Food Sales .......................................

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481

gxxx005-sumtab.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAUGE GAUGE AND HIGGS BOSONS GAUGE AND HIGGS BOSONS GAUGE AND HIGGS BOSONS GAUGE AND HIGGS BOSONS γ γ γ γ I (J PC ) = 0,1(1 - - ) Mass m < 1 × 10 -18 eV Charge q < 1 × 10 -35 e Mean life τ = Stable g g g g or gluon or gluon or gluon or gluon I (J P ) = 0(1 - ) Mass m = 0 [a] SU(3) color octet graviton graviton graviton graviton J = 2 Mass m < 7 × 10 -32 eV W W W W J = 1 Charge = ± 1 e Mass m = 80.385 ± 0.015 GeV m Z - m W = 10.4 ± 1.6 GeV m W + - m W - = - 0.2 ± 0.6 GeV Full width Γ = 2.085 ± 0.042 GeV N π ± = 15.70 ± 0.35 N K ± = 2.20 ± 0.19 N p = 0.92 ± 0.14 N charged = 19.39 ± 0.08 HTTP://PDG.LBL.GOV Page 1 Created: 7/31/2013 15:19 Citation: J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), PR D86, 010001 (2012) and 2013 partial update for the 2014 edition (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov) W - modes are charge conjugates of the modes below. p W + DECAY MODES W + DECAY MODES W + DECAY MODES W + DECAY MODES Fraction (Γ i /Γ) Confidence level (MeV /c)

482

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

483

Switching power pulse system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

Aaland, Kristian (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

ON THE FORMATION OF DOUBLE WHITE DWARFS THROUGH STABLE MASS TRANSFER AND A COMMON ENVELOPE  

SciTech Connect

Although several dozen double white dwarfs (DWDs) have been observed, for many the exact nature of the evolutionary channel(s) by which they form remains uncertain. The canonical explanation calls for the progenitor binary system to undergo two subsequent mass-transfer events, both of which are unstable and lead to a common envelope (CE). However, it has been shown that if both CE events obey the standard {alpha}{sub CE}-prescription (parameterizing energy loss), it is not possible to reproduce all of the observed systems. The {gamma}-prescription was proposed as an alternative to this description, instead parameterizing the fraction of angular momentum carried away in dynamical-timescale mass loss. However, this too has proven problematic, and does not provide a clear physical mechanism. In this paper, we consider in detail the first episode of mass transfer in binary systems with initially low companion masses, with a primary mass in the range 1.0-1.3 M{sub Sun} and an initial mass ratio between the secondary and primary stars of 0.83-0.92. In these systems, the first episode of dramatic mass loss may be stable, non-conservative mass transfer. This strips the donor's envelope and dramatically raises the mass ratio; the considered progenitor binary systems can then evolve into DWDs after passing through a single CE during the second episode of mass loss. We find that such a mechanism reproduces the properties of the observed DWD systems which have an older component with M {approx}< 0.46 M{sub Sun} and mass ratios between the younger and older WDs of q {>=} 1.

Woods, T. E.; Ivanova, N. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Ave., Edmonton, AB T6G 2E7 (Canada); Van der Sluys, M. V. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Chaichenets, S. [Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Alberta, CAB, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G1 (Canada)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) of the project (October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, no changes occurred during the fifth or sixth quarters of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, refinements have been made to the general mapping and screening of sources and sinks. Integration and geographical information systems (GIS) mapping is ongoing. Characterization during this period was focused on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB continues to expand upon its assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has used results of a survey and focus group meeting to refine approaches that are being taken to educate and involve the public. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB has evaluated findings from work performed during the first 18-months. The focus of the project team has shifted from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team is developing an integrated approach to implementing the most promising opportunities and in setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. Milestones completed during the fifth and sixth project quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A Time Dependent Leptonic Model for Microquasar Jets: Application to LSI 61 303  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Galactic high-mass X-ray binary and jet source (microquasar) LSI +61 303 has recently been detected at TeV gamma-ray energies by the MAGIC telescope. We have applied a time-dependent leptonic jet model to the broadband spectral energy distribution and suggested (though not unambiguously detected) orbital modulation of the very high energy gamma-ray emission of this source. Our model takes into account time dependent electron injection and acceleration, and the adiabatic and radiative cooling of non-thermal electrons. It includes synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and external inverse Compton (with seed photons from the companion star), as well as gamma-gamma absorption of gamma-rays by starlight photons. The model can successfully reproduce the available multiwavelength observational data. Our best fit to the SED indicates that a magnetic field of B_0 ~ 5 X 10^3 G at ~ 10^3 R_g is required, and electrons need to be accelerated out to TeV energies (gamma_2 = 10^6) with a nonthermal injection spectrum with a spectral index of q = 1.7, indicating the operation of acceleration mechanisms beyond the standard first-order Fermi mechanism at relativistic or non-relativistic shocks. The orbital modulation of the VHE gamma-ray emission can be explained solely by the geometrical effect of changes in the relative orientation of the stellar companion with respect to the compact object and jet as it impacts the position and depth of the gamma-gamma absorption trough. Such a scenario predicts a trend of spectral hardening during VHE gamma-ray low orbital phases.

Swati Gupta; Markus Boettcher

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

487

THE PROPERTIES OF THE STAR-FORMING INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AT z = 0.8-2.2 FROM HiZELS: STAR FORMATION AND CLUMP SCALING LAWS IN GAS-RICH, TURBULENT DISKS  

SciTech Connect

We present adaptive optics assisted integral field spectroscopy of nine H{alpha}-selected galaxies at z = 0.84-2.23 drawn from the HiZELS narrowband survey. Our observations map the kinematics of these star-forming galaxies on {approx}kpc scales. We demonstrate that within the interstellar medium of these galaxies, the velocity dispersion of the star-forming gas ({sigma}) follows a scaling relation {sigma}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1/n} {sub SFR} + constant (where {Sigma}{sub SFR} is the star formation surface density and the constant includes the stellar surface density). Assuming the disks are marginally stable (Toomre Q = 1), this follows from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation ({Sigma}{sub SFR} = A{Sigma} {sup n} {sub gas}), and we derive best-fit parameters of n = 1.34 {+-} 0.15 and A = 3.4{sup +2.5} {sub -1.6} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, consistent with the local relation, and implying cold molecular gas masses of M {sub gas} = 10{sup 9-10} M {sub Sun} and molecular gas fractions of M {sub gas}/(M {sub gas} + M {sub *}) = 0.3 {+-} 0.1, with a range of 10%-75%. We also identify 11 {approx}kpc-scale star-forming regions (clumps) within our sample and show that their sizes are comparable to the wavelength of the fastest growing mode. The luminosities and velocity dispersions of these clumps follow the same scaling relations as local H II regions, although their star formation densities are a factor {approx}15 {+-} 5 Multiplication-Sign higher than typically found locally. We discuss how the clump properties are related to the disk, and show that their high masses and luminosities are a consequence of the high disk surface density.

Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Theuns, T. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Sobral, D. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Best, P. N. [SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH19 3HJ (United Kingdom); Geach, J. E., E-mail: a.m.swinbank@dur.ac.uk [Department of Physics, McGill University, Ernest Rutherford Building, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada)