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  1. Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Nominal Prices (dollars per gallon) WTI Crude Oil (Spot) a 1.38 1.11 1.24 1.08 1.06 1.07 -21.4 -4.5 -13.7 Brent Crude Oil Price (Spot) 1.47 1.20 1.33 1.08 1.08 1.08 -26.1 -10.2 -18.8 U.S. Refiner Average Crude Oil Cost 1.37 1.14 1.25 1.00 1.03 1.02 -26.6 -8.8 -18.5 Wholesale Gasoline Price b 2.01 1.84 1.93 1.58 1.46 1.52 -21.6 -20.6 -21.1 Wholesale Diesel Fuel Price b 1.89 1.61 1.75 1.41 1.43 1.42 -25.4 -11.4 -18.8 Regular Gasoline Retail Price c 2.67 2.60

  2. Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Q3) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q3) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  3. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2016)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE FOIA Quarterly Reports for Q2 2016. This information will be displayed on the DOJ http://www.foia.gov

  4. Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Q2) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q2) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  5. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity...

  6. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons)...

  7. Q3dComms Version 0.9

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-01-05

    Q3dComms provides an interface to the commercial package Quest30 . Quest30 connectors called "channels" can be directly mapped to Umbra connectors using this tool. Furthermore, virtual 30 worlds created in Quest30 can be connected to Umbra with this tool.

  8. Electrolux: ENERGY STAR Referral (GAH105Q2T1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE referred the matter of Electrolux room air conditioner model GAH105Q2T1 to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification.

  9. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  10. Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 This document summarizes the progress of this PNNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013. progress_report_sunshot_pnnl_fy13_q2.pdf (274.11 KB) More Documents & Publications Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System for High Efficiency Production of Electricity Highly Efficient Solar Thermochemical Reaction Systems Integrated

  11. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart. Abstract not provided. Authors: Andraka, Charles E. Publication Date: 2014-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1171437 Report Number(s): SAND2014-15691R 533649 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM

  12. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart Abstract not provided. Authors: Andraka, Charles E. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States) Publication Date: 2015-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1211552 Report Number(s): SAND2015--6472R 598782 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type:

  13. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart Abstract not provided. Authors: Andraka, Charles E. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States) Publication Date: 2015-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1178621 Report Number(s): SAND2015-2914R 583301 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000

  14. SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q3 FY15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 rd Quarter FY 2015 *Data does not include MOX, Parsons and some small subcontractors SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q3 FY15 GA County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Burke 34 3 4 0 0 41 Columbia 777 260 100 6 42 1185 Jefferson 2 2 0 0 0 4 Lincoln 8 1 2 0 0 11 McDuffie 8 6 0 0 2 16 Richmond 548 160 102 4 29 843 Screven 23 6 1 0 0 30 Other 35 8 3 0 0 46 GA TOTAL 1435 446 212 10 73 2176 SC County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Aiken 2613 852 353 9 158

  15. TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls (14.26 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program Homes Weatherized By State through 06/30/2010 (Calendar Year) Homes Weatherized by State March 2010 ARRA Homes Weatherized by Grantee

  16. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2009-12-01

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio µpGEp/GMp in the range Q2 = 0.3–0.7 GeV2/c2 was performed using recoil polarimetry in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low Q2 range, previous data from LEDEX [5] along with many fits and calculations [2, 3, 4] indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. In this new measurement, with 80% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve <1% statistical uncertainty. Preliminary results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, indicating a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and strangeness form factors through parity violation experiments.

  17. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2010-01-31

    Experiment E08-007 measured the proton elastic form factor ratio ?pGE/GM in the range of Q2 = 0.3?0.7(GeV/c)2 by recoil polarimetry. Data were taken in 2008 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. A 1.2 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton was detected in the left HRS in coincidence with the elasticly scattered electrons tagged by the BigBite spectrometer. The proton polarization was measured by the focal plane polarimeter (FPP). In this low Q2 region, previous measurement from Jefferson Lab Hall A (LEDEX) along with various fits and calculations indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. For this new measurement, the proposed statistical uncertainty (< 1%) was achieved. These new results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, which indicate a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the new results also have implications in determining the proton Zemach radius and the strangeness form factors from parity violation experiments.

  18. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Resonance Region at High $Q^2$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villano, A N; Bosted, P E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Jones, M K; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Cui, Y; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Elliot, B; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Grullon, S; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E R; Kubarovsky, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Lu, M; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchhyan, H; Napolitano, J; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Pamela, P; Potterveld, D H; Reimer, Paul E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R

    2009-09-01

    The process $ep \\to e^{\\prime}p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$ has been measured at $Q^2$ = 6.4 and 7.7 \\ufourmomts in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center of mass frame considering the process $\\gamma^{\\ast}p \\to p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well known $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios $R_{EM}$ and $R_{SM}$ along with the magnetic transition form factor $G_M^{\\ast}$. It is found that the rapid fall off of the $\\Delta(1232)$ contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances

  19. SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q2, FY 15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 nd Quarter, FY 2015 *Data does not include MOX, Parsons and some small subcontractors SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q2, FY 15 GA County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Burke 34 3 4 0 0 41 Columbia 769 249 102 7 45 1172 Jefferson 2 2 0 0 0 4 Lincoln 9 1 2 0 0 12 McDuffie 9 6 0 0 2 17 Richmond 558 146 103 3 29 839 Screven 23 6 1 0 0 30 Other 36 1 3 0 0 40 GA TOTAL 1440 414 215 10 76 2155 SC County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Aiken 2597 829 360 9

  20. On the determination of the polarized parton distribution in the (x,Q2)-plane: a relativistic quark exchange approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazdanpanah, M.M.; Modarres, M.

    2005-05-06

    We perform a next-to-leading order QCD analysis of polarized distribution functions of proton in the (x,Q2)-plane within the scheme of the radiative parton model. The flavor-broken light sea quark distributions is investigated and a comparison is made with the corresponding available experimental data.

  1. High-precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM at low Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhan, X.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bertozzi, W.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J. -P.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2011-10-06

    Here, we report a new high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM for the four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 0.3-0.7 (GeV/c)2. The measurement was performed at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in Hall A using recoil polarimetry. With the achieved ~1% total uncertainty, the new data clearly show that the deviation of the ratio μpGE/GM from unity observed in previous polarization measurements at high Q2 continues down to the lowest Q2 value of this measurement. The updated global fit that includes the new results yields in this Q2 range an electric (magnetic) form factor ~2% smaller (~1% larger)more » than the previous global fit. We obtain new extractions of the proton electric and magnetic radii, which are (rE2)1/2 = 0.875 ± 0.010 fm and (rM2)1/2 = 0.867 ± 0.020 fm. Moreover, the charge radius is consistent with other recent extractions based on the electron-proton interaction, including the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift measruements, which suggests a missing correction in the comparison of measurements of the proton charge radius using electron probes and the recent extraction from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift.« less

  2. The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Task Name ID 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Mine and Construct the Test Commit to Major Procurements...

  3. 2014_Q3.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July-September 2014 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy Offce of Legacy Management Quarterly Program Update. This publication is designed to provide a status of activities within LM. Please direct all comments and inquiries to lm@hq.doe.gov. July-September 2014 Visit us at http://energy.gov/lm/ Goal 5 2014 LM All-Hands Training The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offce of Legacy Management (LM) 2014 All-Hands Training was held the week of July 28, 2014, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The week

  4. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via γ*p → nπ+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the nπ+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4π CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the π-N multipole E0+/GD were measuredmore » using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.« less

  5. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via γ*p → nπ+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the nπ+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4π CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the π-N multipole E0+/GD were measuredmore »using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.« less

  6. Theoretical investigations of the IO,{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions: Metastability, characterization and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammami, H.; Yazidi, O.; Ben El Hadj Rhouma, M.; Al Mogren, M. M.; Hochlaf, M.

    2014-07-07

    Using ab initio methodology, we studied the IO{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions. Benchmark computations on the IO(X{sup 2}Π) neutral species allow validate the current procedure. For IO{sup 2+}, several potential wells were found on the ground and the electronic excited states potentials with potential barriers with respect to dissociation, where this dication can exist in the gas phase as long-lived metastable molecules. We confirm hence the recent observation of the dication by mass spectrometry. Moreover, we predict the existence of the metastable IO{sup 3+} trication, where a shallow potential well along the IO internuclear distance is computed. This potential well supports more than 10 vibrational levels. The IO{sup 3+} excited states are repulsive in nature, as well as the computed potentials for the IO{sup 4+} tetracation. For the bound states, we give a set of spectroscopic parameters including excitation transition energies, equilibrium distances, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational terms, and rotational constants. At the MRCI + Q/aug-cc-pV5Z(-PP) level, the adiabatic double and triple ionization energies of IO are computed to be ∼28.1 eV and ∼55.0 eV, respectively.

  7. Final analysis of proton form factor ratio data at Q2 = 4.0, 4.8, and 5.6 GeV2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Puckett, A. J. R.; Brash, E. J.; Gayou, O.; Jones, M. K.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Punjabi, V.; Aniol, K. A.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; et al

    2012-04-11

    Recently published measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio R = μp GEp/GMp at momentum transfers Q2 up to 8.5 GeV2 in Jefferson Lab Hall C deviate from the linear trend of previous measurements in Jefferson Lab Hall A, favoring a slower rate of decrease of R with Q2. While statistically compatible in the region of overlap with Hall A, the Hall C data hint at a systematic difference between the two experiments. This possibility was investigated in a reanalysis of the Hall A data. We find that the original analysis underestimated the background in the selection of elasticmore » events. The application of an additional cut to further suppress the background increases the results for R, improving the consistency between Halls A and C.« less

  8. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton in the high-lying resonances at Q2 < 5 GeV2 from CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Kijun

    2014-09-01

    The differential cross sections and structure functions for the exclusive electroproduction process ep --> e'n pi+ were measured in the range of the invariantmass for the np+ system 1.6 GeV lte W lte 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV2 lte Q2 lte 4.0 GeV2 using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in the exclusive p+ production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the np+ center-of-mass system. In this analysis, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points in terms of W, Q2, cosq theta* _ pi, and phi?_p-, were obtained. The preliminary differential cross section and structure function analyses are carried out, which allow us to extract the helicity amplitudes in high-lying resonances.

  9. 2015 Open Season

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Open Season which will run from Monday, November 9, 2015 through Monday, December 14, 2015.  During the annual Open Season period employees can enroll, change, or cancel an existing enrollment in...

  10. Q3 1997 STEO, Final

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 (Released July 8, 1997) Energy Information Administration DOE/EIA-0202(97/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections Third Quarter 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed

  11. Measurement of the Neutron (3He) Spin Structure at Low Q2 and the Extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn Sum Rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioannis Kominis

    2001-01-31

    This thesis presents the results of E-94010, an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) designed to study the spin structure of the neutron at low momentum transfer, and to test the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule. The first experiment of its kind, it was performed in experimental Hall-A of TJNAF using a new polarized 3He facility. It has recently been shown that the GDH sum rule and the Bjorken sum rule are both special examples of a more general sum rule that applies to polarized electron scattering off nucleons. This generalized sum rule, due to Ji and Osborne, reduces to the GDH sum rule at Q2 = 0 and to the Bjorken sum rule at Q2 >> 1 GeV2. By studying the Q2 evolution of the extended GDH sum, one learns about the transition from quark-like behavior to hadronic-like behavior. We measured inclusive polarized cross sections by scattering high energy polarized electrons off the new TJNAF polarized 3He target with both longitudinal and transverse target orientations. The high density 3He target, based on optical pumping and spin exchange, was used as an effective neutron target. The target maintained a polarization of about 35% at beam currents as high as 151tA. We describe the precision 3He polarimetry leading to a systematic uncertainty of the target polarization of 4% (relative). A strained GaAs photocathode was utilized in the polarized electron gun, which provided an electron beam with a polarization of about 70%, known to 3% (relative). By using six different beam energies (between 0.86 and 5.06 GeV) and a fixed scattering angle of 15.5, a wide kinematic coverage was achieved, with 0.02 GeV2< Q2 <1 GcV2 and 0.5 GeV< W < 2.5 GeV for the squared momentum transfer and invariant mass, respectively. From the measured cross sections we extract the 3He spin structure functions He and g1e Finally, we determine the extended GDH sum for the range 0.1 GeV2< Q2 <1 GeV2 for 3He and the neutron.

  12. OPEN SEASON CHECK LIST

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FSAFEDS brochure https:www.fsafeds.comGEMFSAFEDSFormsOPM- FSA-OVTF-10-031.pdf Talk to an FSAFEDS representative Open Season benefits fair Contact your agency HR staff...

  13. Four seasons of giving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 all issues All Issues submit Four seasons of giving We value a culture of giving and appreciate our employees' on-going volunteerism throughout Northern New...

  14. ACBEDGF1DIH P Q2R§STDVU@DVW RYX1`bacSedVagf ShFiSpaqSTr1H£s)t

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ¢¤¥§¦©¨ ¥! ¥ " ¥#¢ $ %¡'&( $ %&()0&1%234 ¥5¨  6§!7580 9 @&1¢2 ACBEDGF1DIH P Q2R§STDVU@DVW RYX1`bacSedVagf ShFiSpaqSTr1H£s)t Wvuwr1HxHbD y €B‚Sƒr„Hx€†…0‡ˆ€†‰@rW‘€’B‚rwWq` “•”!–˜—w™edgfih j rkD Pl€†Wv…eacr1H£sm‡r„ant …o€p r1a q DrH y rw…ƒ…TDGBcBIsmt Wvuwr„H¤HbD s

  15. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; et al

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry Ad1 and the polarized structure function gd1 were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2 < Q2 < 5 GeV2 and 0.9 GeV < W < 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure andmore » a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions An1 and g1n of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, W < 2 GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as parametrizations of the world data. The unprecedented precision and dense kinematic coverage of these data can aid in future extractions of polarized parton distributions, tests of perturbative QCD predictions for the quark polarization at large x, a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and more precise values for higher-twist matrix elements in the framework of the Operator Product Expansion.« less

  16. Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call ...

  17. Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron up to Q2 = 3.4 GeV2 using the Reaction He-3(e,e'n)pp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riordan, Seamus; Craver, Brandon; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Miller, Jonathan; Cates, Gordon; Liyanage, Nilanga; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Quimper, Armando Acha; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Byron; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Averett, Todd; Beck, Arie; Bellis, Matthew; Boeglin, Werner; Breuer, Herbert; Calarco, John; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chudakov, Eugene; Coman, Luminita; Crowe, Benjamin; Cusanno, Francesco; Day, Donal; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Dolph, P.A.M.; Dutta, Chiranjib; Ferdi, Catherine; Fernandez-Ramirez, Cezar; Feuerbach, Robert; Fraile Prieto, Luis; Franklin, Gregg; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuchs, Sabine; Garibaldi, Franco; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilman, Ronald; Glazmazdin, Oleksandr; Gomez, Javier; Grimm, Klaus; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Herraiz, Joaquin Lopez; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmes, Richard; Holmstrom, Timothy; Howell, David; De Jager, Cornelis; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, Mark; Katich, Joseph; Kaufman, Lisa; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kelly, James; Kiselev, Daniela; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Markowitz, Pete; Margaziotis, Demetrius; May-Tal Beck, Sharon; Mayilyan, Samvel; McCormick, Kathy; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Nanda, Sirish; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Ngo, Tim; Nikolenko, Dmitri; Norum, Blaine; Pentchev, Lubomir; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Protopoescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Punjabi, Vina; Qian, XIn; Qiang, Yi; Quinn, Brian; Rachek, Igor; Ransome, Ronald; Reimer, Paul; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Julie; Ron, Guy; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sargsian, Misak; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Shabestari, Mitra Hashemi; Shahinyan, Albert; Singh, Jaideep; Sirca, Simon; Souder, Paul; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stibunov, Victor; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Tobias, William; Moinelo, Jose Udias; Urciuoli, Guido; Vlahovic, Branislav; Voskanyan, Hakob; Wang, Kebin; Wesselmann, Frank; Vignote, Javier Rodriguez; Wood, Stephen; Wright, Justin; Yao, Huan

    2010-12-01

    The electric form factor of the neutron was determined from studies of the reaction \\rea{} in quasi-elastic kinematics in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered off a polarized target in which the nuclear polarization was oriented perpendicular to the momentum transfer. The scattered electrons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer in coincidence with neutrons that were registered in a large-solid-angle detector. More than doubling the $Q^2$-range over which it is known, we find \\GEn{}$ = 0.0225 \\pm 0.0017 (stat) \\pm 0.0024 (syst)$, $0.0200 \\pm 0.0023 \\pm 0.0018$, and $0.0142 \\pm 0.0019 \\pm 0.0013$ for $Q^2$ = 1.72, 2.48, and 3.41~\\gevsq, respectively.

  18. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  19. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report that captures quarterly FOIA data at the DOE level. Through the use of an Applied Programming Interface (or API), the information will display on www.FOIA.gov.

  20. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2016)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA’s exemptions to protect information that is: •classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; •proprietary; •personal; and •pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of individuals, and open and frank discussion.

  1. Q3 1996 STEO TEXT/TABLES

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... are based on annual data for coal-fired generation at nonutilities reported on Form EIA-867. Data for 1994 and 1995 are estimates. d Synfuels plant demand in 1993 was 1.7 million ...

  2. A Woman of All Seasons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Woman of All Seasons Pittsburgh, Pa. - Lilas Soukup, a 35-year employee at NETL, has been recognized by the Pittsburgh Federal Executive Board (FEB) as the 2013 Woman of the Year....

  3. The season of giving begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The season of giving begins Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit The season of giving begins Lab employees encouraged to donate to area communities. September 1, 2016 Los Alamos employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Los Alamos employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Director, Community Partnerships Office Kathy Keith Email Editor Whitney

  4. Four Seasons Windpower, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seasons Windpower, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Four Seasons Windpower, LLC Address: 1697 Wilbur Road Place: Medina, Ohio Zip: 44256 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product:...

  5. Beam-Target Double-Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized He3 Target at 1.4<Q2<2.7 GeV2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, J.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Katich, J.; Qian, X.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; et al

    2012-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 < x < 0.35 with 1.4 < Q2 < 2.7 GeV2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function g1Tq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for π- production on 3Hemore » and the neutron, while our π+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.« less

  6. fu-q(2)-99.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FDTD Scheme for Light Scattering by Dielectric Particles with Large Complex Refractive Index Q. Fu and W. B. Sun Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Numerical solution for light scattering by highly refractive dielectric particles is examined with the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) technique. In the FDTD, the computational domain is truncated using the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition (Sun et al. 1999). It is found that for dielectric particles with

  7. Microchannel Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this OSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  9. FOIA QUARTERLY REPORTS (Q2-2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  10. Q2 External Package.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    376,031 285,072 76% 214,494 57% Interest Expense and (Income) 33 Interest Expense 352,982 351,730 331,697 94% 158,351 45% 34 AFUDC (43,062) (43,204) (45,230) 105% (26,819)...

  11. Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Milestones & Deliverables (Actual) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q1 (Oct-Dec) Legend Summary Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q1 (Oct-Dec) Q2 (Jan-Mar) FY2012 FY2013 ...

  12. Microsoft Word - S08364_SeasonalVariation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site February 2012 LMS/RVT/S08364 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation, Riverton, Wyoming February 2012 Doc. No. S08364 Page 1 Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Executive Summary Historical groundwater monitoring at the Riverton site included collecting

  13. ARM - Lesson Plans: Reason for the Seasons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reason for the Seasons Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Reason for the Seasons Objective The objective of this activity is to understand the reasons for the seasons and to study the motion of the earth. Materials Each student or group of students will need the

  14. Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency, call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (2.92 MB) More Documents & Publications Hit the Road: Applying Lessons from National Campaigns to a Local Context (201) Strengthening the Front

  15. Preparing for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preparing for Hurricane Season Preparing for Hurricane Season June 1, 2015 - 9:49am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins today and will last through November 30. As the lead Federal agency responsible for coordinating the response to major energy disruptions, the Department of Energy works closely with other Federal agencies, State, local and tribal governments, and our

  16. Microsoft Word - Heating Oil Season.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4-2015 Heating Oil Season Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Trigger Mechanism (Cents per Gallon, Except Where Noted) Week Residential Heating Oil Price Average Brent Spot Price ...

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Seasonal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the seasonal variation of land cover which is dominated by the agricultural land use, primarily winter wheat production. http:gi.ssec.wisc.eduairsknutesonindex.html...

  18. compare_tables.xlsx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2014 2015 2016 2017 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 U.S. Petroleum WTI spot (barrel) Current 48.48 57.85 46.55 41.94 33.35 44.52 46.00 47.00 ...

  19. Final Meeting Summary Page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    committee and introductions were made. The committee approved the June meeting summary. ... Assessment, Q2 * Natural Gas Pipeline Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), Q3 ...

  20. Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China...

  1. Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land cover ... Title: Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land ...

  2. Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern Ocean Cloud Albedo Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial ...

  3. NOVA Making Stuff Season 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leombruni, Lisa; Paulsen, Christine Andrews

    2014-12-12

    Over the course of four weeks in fall 2013, 11.7 million Americans tuned in to PBS to follow host David Pogue as he led them in search of engineering and scientific breakthroughs poised to change our world. Levitating trains, quantum computers, robotic bees, and bomb-detecting plants—these were just a few of the cutting-edge innovations brought into the living rooms of families across the country in NOVA’s four-part series, Making Stuff: Faster, Wilder, Colder, and Safer. Each of the four one-hour programs gave viewers a behind-the-scenes look at novel technologies poised to change our world—showing them how basic research and scientific discovery can hold the keys to transforming how we live. Making Stuff Season 2 (MS2) combined true entertainment with educational value, creating a popular and engaging series that brought accessible science into the homes of millions. NOVA’s goal to engage the public with such technological innovation and basic research extended beyond the broadcast series, including a variety of online, educational, and promotional activities: original online science reporting, web-only short-form videos, a new online quiz-game, social media engagement and promotion, an educational outreach “toolkit” for science educators to create their own “makerspaces,” an online community of practice, a series of nationwide Innovation Cafés, educator professional development, a suite of teacher resources, an “Idealab,” participation in national conferences, and specialized station relation and marketing. A summative evaluation of the MS2 project indicates that overall, these activities helped make a significant impact on the viewers, users, and participants that NOVA reached. The final evaluation conducted by Concord Evaluation Group (CEG) confidently concluded that the broadcast, website, and outreach activities were successful at achieving the project’s intended impacts. CEG reported that the MS2 series and website content were

  4. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Nigeria - 2.9 Trinidad &Tobago - 2.1 Equitorial Guinea - 0.5 Oman - 1.5 UAE - 0.8 USA - 0.2 Peru - 0.6 Source: Waterborne, Cheniere Research 26 Q4 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q2 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q2 ...

  5. Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) This presentation is from a DOE-NASEO webinar held June 23, 2015, on forecasting energy infrastructure risk for the 2015 hurricane season. A variety of sources predict a below-normal season, with hurricane intensity lower than the 1981-2010 averages. The presentation includes an overview of hurricane season classification, historic impacts, and

  6. Observations from The EV Project in Q3 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2013-12-01

    This is a brief report that summarizes results published in numerous other reports. It describes the usage of electric vehicles and charging units in the EV Project over the past 3 months. There is no new data or information provided in this report, only summarizing of information published in other reports (which have all been approved for unlimited distribution publication). This report will be posted to the INL/AVTA website for viewing by the general public.

  7. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. FY 2014 Q3 Metric Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY 2014 Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets FY 2015 Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and ...

  9. FY 2016 Q3 Metrics Summary.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY 2016 Target 95% 95% 90% 85% 90% 90% FY 2016 3rd Qtr Actual Comment FY 2016 Forecast ... Schedule Compliance, Projects Less Than 5 Years Duration: Projects will meet the project ...

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE_ANNUAL_METRICS_2009Q3.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14404 Third Quarter 2009 Modeling Program Metric: Coupled model comparison with observations using improved dynamics at coarse resolution Quantifying the impact of a finite volume dynamical core in CCSM3 on simulated precipitation over major catchment areas July 2009 Peter J. Gleckler and Karl E. Taylor Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research 
 2
 Disclaimer This

  11. Central solar heating plants with seasonal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, D.S.; Sunderland, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    The University of Massachusetts has recently started a two year effort to identify and design a significant Central Solar Heating Plant with Seasonal Storage (CSHPSS) in Massachusetts. The work is closely associated with the U.S. participation in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on CSHPSS. The University is working closely with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to assist in identifying State facilities as potential sites and to explore and secure State support which will be essential for product development after the design phase. Currently, the primary site is the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus with particular interest in several large buildings which are funded for construction over the next 4-5 years. Seasonal thermal energy storage will utilize one of several geological formations.

  12. Retrofitting Doors on Open Refrigerated Cases

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Q2 (Jan-Mar) FY2012 FY2013 Legend Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q1 (Octt-Dec) * Met all original project milestones to date * Original project ...

  13. Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season December 5, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce ...

  14. Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season ... reduce standby heat losses by 25%-45% and save you around 4%-9% in water heating costs. ...

  15. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid ...

  16. February most likely month for flu season to peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February most likely month for flu season to peak February most likely month for flu season to peak The Los Alamos team's model is an ongoing research project that forecasts the current flu season probabilistically, similar to best-practice forecasts of weather, presidential elections, and sporting events. December 20, 2015 The Los Alamos team's model is an ongoing research project that forecasts the current flu season probabilistically, similar to best-practice forecasts of weather,

  17. Nebraska Preparing for the Upcoming Heating Season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    N E B R A S K A Nebraska "Preparing for the Upcoming Heating Season" E N E R G Y O F F I C E State Heating Oil and Propane Conference October 8, 2014 Profile of Nebraska Population - 1,868,516 Occupied Housing Units - 733,570 Occupied Housing by Fuel Used for Home Heating in 2012 Natural Gas 63% Fuel Oil and Kerosene 0.50% Electricity 26% Propane 8% Wood 1.60% All Other Fuels 0.09% Coal or Coke 0.01% Solar Energy 0.04% No Fuel Used 0.20% http://www.neo.ne.gov/statshtml/75.html History

  18. Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corrective Measures Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Released: June 4, 2010 Download Full Report (PDF) This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly. Research finds that a significant portion of data collected on EIA’s primary monthly natural gas

  19. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program ...

  20. Department of Energy Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is taking to prepare for hurricane season in the United States. ... the Gulf of Mexico and refineries along the shore. ... oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve available for ...

  1. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor’s Seasonal Fluctuations, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, June 7, 2012.

  2. BPA revises policy for managing seasonal power oversupply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    policy-for-managing-seasonal-power-oversupply Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  3. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  4. SU{sub {ital q}}(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bimonte, G.; Stern, A.; Vitale, P.

    1996-07-01

    We reformulate the Hamiltonian approach to lattice gauge theories such that, at the classical level, the gauge group does not act canonically, but instead as a Poisson-Lie group. At the quantum level, the symmetry gets promoted to a quantum group gauge symmetry. The theory depends on two parameters: the deformation parameter {lambda} and the lattice spacing {ital a}. We show that the system of Kogut and Susskind is recovered when {lambda}{r_arrow}0, while QCD is recovered in the continuum limit (for any {lambda}). We, thus, have the possibility of having a two-parameter regularization of QCD. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this National Renewable Energy Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  6. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  7. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - 1Q - 2Q 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification (TSE) sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved. the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  8. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCSD project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  9. NBB Enclosed Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  10. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Jet Propulsion Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  11. Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    gathered in Washington, D.C. for the last in a series of first-responder training sessions, preparing for the rest of the season and other potential energy-sector emergencies. ...

  12. Energy Resources for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hurricane Season Energy Resources for Hurricane Season This aerial photo of New Orleans from August 29, 2005, shows a flooded neighborhood with a roadway going down into flood waters. Photo courtesy of FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino This aerial photo of New Orleans from August 29, 2005, shows a flooded neighborhood with a roadway going down into flood waters. Photo courtesy of FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino Find helpful resources for incorporating energy into disaster planning, response, and rebuilding.

  13. Energy Resources for Tornado Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tornado Season Energy Resources for Tornado Season The aftermath of a tornado in Greensburg, Kansas. | Photo courtesy of Federal Emergency Mgmt. Agency, NREL 16290 The aftermath of a tornado in Greensburg, Kansas. | Photo courtesy of Federal Emergency Mgmt. Agency, NREL 16290 Find helpful resources for incorporating energy into disaster planning, response, and rebuilding. Sustainable Transportation Alternative Fueling Station Locator U.S. Department of Energy Find alternative fueling stations

  14. DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season May 30, 2007 - 1:25pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today outlined a number of steps that the Department is taking to strengthen its hurricane response system in the United States. Since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, DOE has made operational and administrative improvements, including coordination between federal, state and local leaders, deployment of trained staff, and

  15. Cloud and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season P. T. May Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, 3001, Victoria, Australia Introduction An interesting, and very relevant question, for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is how cloud characteristics and their seasonal and diurnal variation changes across the tropics. In particular, how does he cloud field around the new SRCS site compare with nearby regions. Thus, the aim of this study is to look at the

  16. Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01

    This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

  17. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to continued declines in profits. * Capital expenditure per barrel produced was the ... Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Capital expenditure decreased 11 billion since ...

  18. Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the PEM Stack Transport Studies Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell ... 11 Q1 12 Q2 12 Q3 12 1. Systems Analysis NFC 2. Test ...

  19. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are applied to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.

  20. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are appliedmore » to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.« less

  1. Successional trajectories of rhizosphere bacterial communities over consecutive seasons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Shengjing; Nuccio, Erin; Herman, Donald J.; Rijkers, Ruud; Estera, Katerina; Li, Jiabao; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; He, Zhili; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Brodie, Eoin L.; Zhou, Jizhong; Firestone, Mary

    2015-08-04

    It is well known that rhizosphere microbiomes differ from those of surrounding soil, and yet we know little about how these root-associated microbial communities change through the growing season and between seasons. We analyzed the response of soil bacteria to roots of the common annual grass Avena fatua over two growing seasons using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Over the two periods of growth, the rhizosphere bacterial communities followed consistent successional patterns as plants grew, although the starting communities were distinct. Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative to background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities. Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Taxa that increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere soil displayed phylogenetic clustering, suggesting some conservation and an evolutionary basis for the response of complex soil bacterial communities to the presence of plant roots. The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence. We document the successional patterns of rhizosphere bacterial communities associated with a “wild” annual grass, Avena fatua, which is commonly a dominant plant in Mediterranean-type annual grasslands around the world; the plant was grown in its grassland soil. Most studies documenting rhizosphere microbiomes address “domesticated” plants growing in soils to which they are introduced. Rhizosphere bacterial communities exhibited a pattern of temporal

  2. Successional trajectories of rhizosphere bacterial communities over consecutive seasons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Shengjing; Nuccio, Erin; Herman, Donald J.; Rijkers, Ruud; Estera, Katerina; Li, Jiabao; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; He, Zhili; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Brodie, Eoin L.; et al

    2015-08-04

    It is well known that rhizosphere microbiomes differ from those of surrounding soil, and yet we know little about how these root-associated microbial communities change through the growing season and between seasons. We analyzed the response of soil bacteria to roots of the common annual grass Avena fatua over two growing seasons using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Over the two periods of growth, the rhizosphere bacterial communities followed consistent successional patterns as plants grew, although the starting communities were distinct. Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative tomore » background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities. Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Taxa that increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere soil displayed phylogenetic clustering, suggesting some conservation and an evolutionary basis for the response of complex soil bacterial communities to the presence of plant roots. The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence. We document the successional patterns of rhizosphere bacterial communities associated with a “wild” annual grass, Avena fatua, which is commonly a dominant plant in Mediterranean-type annual grasslands around the world; the plant was grown in its grassland soil. Most studies documenting rhizosphere microbiomes address “domesticated” plants growing in soils to which they are introduced. Rhizosphere bacterial communities exhibited a pattern of temporal succession that was consistent and repeatable

  3. New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory By Raphael Rosen September 15, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The new colloquium committee. From left to right: Mike Mardenfeld, David Mikkelsen, Committee Administrator Carol Ann Austin, Brent Stratton (Photo by Elle Starkman) The new colloquium committee. From left to right: Mike Mardenfeld, David Mikkelsen, Committee Administrator Carol Ann Austin, Brent Stratton Just as

  4. Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of ...

  5. South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm ...

  6. Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm June 5, 2012 - 4:01pm Addthis Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the ninth named storm, first hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 2011 hurricane season. | Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a

  7. Impact of the 2008 Hurricane Season on the Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season and its impacts on the natural gas industry

  8. Rooftop Unit Campaign

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Future work Report on first year's impact Final achievement recognitions (November 2014) Q1 (Octt-Dec) Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q1 (Octt-Dec) Legend Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q4 ...

  9. Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

  10. Attachment 1 - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting Summary Page 12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting Summary Page 12 Public Involvement Committee September 4, 2013 Strategic Planning: Quarters by month * Q1: Oct. - Dec. * Q2: Jan - March * Q3: April - June * Q4: July - Sept. Page 1 Strategic Planning: 2014 Topics (Interactive activity) * = priority topic for discussion at meeting; �= priority for future discussion | Quarter prioritized for discussion (Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4) * 100-F Proposed Plan | *** Q2 * 100 D-H Proposed Plan * Draft Land

  11. Response of mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) populations to seasonally unpredictable perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, M.J.; Stewart, A.J.

    1990-07-01

    Many questions remain unresolved about the linkages between life history attributes of fishes and the tactics that these organisms employ in response to environmental uncertainty. Such questions include (1). If a perturbation affects the entire ecosystem, what are the consequences for a given population of fish (2) What tactics can a fish employ to increase its chances of leaving offspring (3) Do fish respond differently to such perturbations depending on the season (4) How do these changes relate to the overall resilience of the population The research reported here was designed to address such questions. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) populations in thirteen experimental ponds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were sampled ten times between June 1988, and July 1989 in response to a series of chemical disturbances. During each sampling period the population size and total biomass of Gambusia in each pond was estimated using photographs and a length weight regression. Size-frequency histograms were used to examine seasonal and dose-related changes in population structure. Lipid content and reproductive allotment were measured for a series of fish from each pond on all dates to explore the energy allocation patterns at the individual. 106 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  13. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): SAND2014-15691R 533649 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM ...

  14. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coatings to short-term test initiated * Enhanced powder screening method initiated * Heat pipe advanced wick development * Two heat pipe wicks assembled into bench scale devices...

  15. High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Brayton Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. FY 2014 Q3 RCA CAP Performance Metrics Report 2014-09-05.xlsx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2014 Target FY 2014 Pre- & Post- CAP* ... TPC is Total Project Cost. No. FY 2014 Target FY 2014 3rd Qtr Actual 2 95% 92% 3 95% ...

  17. Microsoft Word - Q3 MDA 8_11_2015 Update of $172M for Reposting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver on its mission. BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

  18. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  19. Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  20. High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this ANL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  1. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storge- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  2. Advanced Low-Cost Recievers for Parabolic Troughs- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  3. Enclosure - FY 2015 Q3 Metrics Report 2015-08-12.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2015 Target FY 2015 Pre- & Post- CAP* Forecast Comment 1 Capital Asset Project Management Success: Complete 90% of capital asset ...

  4. bbnp_bb_an_0003578_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  5. bbnp_bb_an_0004442_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  6. bbnp_bb_an_0003562_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3_0.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  7. bbnp_bb_an_0003576_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  8. connecticut_bb_an_0003806_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  9. bbnp_bb_an_0003566_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  10. bbnp_bb_an_0003572_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  11. bbnp_bb_an_0003809_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  12. bbnp_bb_an_0003569_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  13. bbnp_bb_an_0003580_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  14. TOTAL_ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_thru_Q3_2010_11_9_10.pdf | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy (73.65 KB) More Documents & Publications TOTAL_ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_thru_Q4_2010_3.7.11.pdf ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_by_State_for_February_4.14.11.pdf Homes_Weatherized_State_July_10.15.10.pdf

  15. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. A Small Particle Solar Receiver for High Temperature Brayton Power Cycles- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this San Diego State University project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  17. Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data D. A. ... over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. ...

  18. State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, Betsy

    2002-05-22

    This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

  19. Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly.

  20. Copper smelters and atmospheric visibility in the southwest, seasonal analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nochumson, D.H.; Williams, M.D.

    1984-07-01

    Seasonal results from a study which evaluated the effects of sulfur oxides (SO/sub x/) emitted from 11 copper smelters on atmospheric visibility in 14 national parks and wilderness areas are presented. In addition two alternative strategies for controlling SO/sub x/ are compared. They are supplementary control systems (SCS) and continuous emission controls (CEC). The objective of each strategy is not to improve visibility but is to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). SCS is a strategy that has been used by almost all of the 11 copper smelters. It reduces SO/sub x/ emissions during adverse meteorological conditions through production curtailment. SCS has not been successful at eliminating NAAQS violations. The emissions used for the SCS control alternative are based upon actual copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions and operating conditions during 1979. The year 1979 was selected because it is fairly representative of production levels, though highly variable, from 1965 to 1978 and copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions during the latter half of the 1970s. In more recent years, the copper industry has been economically depressed and copper smelter production and SO/sub x/ emissions have been lower. The southwestern states are implementing the CEC strategy to control SO/sub x/ emissions from copper smelters as part of their state implementation plans. For production levels typical of 1979, the CEC regulations would require about a two-thirds reduction in SO/sub x/ emissions from that allowed under SCS. The study estimates the effect of this reduction upon the improvement of visibility in southwestern national parks and wilderness areas.

  1. Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons- August 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In an effort to better understand what actions the energy industry has taken in response to the 2005 and 2008 hurricane seasons, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and...

  2. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  3. Program listing for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM). [CNHSPM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30

    The computer program CNHSPM is listed which predicts heat pump seasonal energy consumption (including defrost, cyclic degradation, and supplementary heat) using steady state rating point performance and binned weather data. (LEW)

  4. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970

  5. Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season U.S. natural gas inventories are expected to be at record levels to start the winter heating season. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the amount of natural gas stored underground should total almost 4 trillion cubic feet by the beginning of November, reflecting record high natural gas production. Inventories could go even higher if heating demand is not strong during October

  6. Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season April 15, 2013 - 2:28pm Addthis Solar energy systems are among the renewable and efficiency purchases that are eligible for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Industrial Solar Technology Corp. Solar energy systems are among the renewable and efficiency purchases that are eligible for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Industrial Solar Technology Corp. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations

  7. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCLA project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. Lowest Q2 Measurement of the gamma*p-> Delta Reaction: Probing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    While there is qualitative agreement with the models, there is no quantitative agreement thus indicating the need for further improvement of the models. Temp HTML Storage 2: Stave, ...

  9. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Lorenzon, Wolfgang ; Mammei, Juliette ; Martin, J W ; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet ; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana more ; Piercey, Rodney ; Potterveld, David ; Smith, Gregory ; Spurlock, Kurt ; ...

  10. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Andraka, Charles E. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), ... Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), ...

  11. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    storage module * Module design complete * Major elements ordered and in fabrication Heat pipe advanced wick development * Complete 5000 hours of wick operation at...

  12. Self-Cleaning CSP Optics with EDS- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Boston University project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  13. Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  14. High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  15. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this ORNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storage- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  17. Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP- FY13 Q2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this 3M project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  18. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  19. High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Argonne National Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  20. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich Technologies project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  1. New parton distributions from large-x and low-Q2 data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alberto Accardi; Christy, M. Eric; Keppel, Cynthia E.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Monaghan, Peter A.; Morfin, Jorge G.; Owens, Joseph F.

    2010-02-11

    We report results of a new global next-to-leading order fit of parton distribution functions in which cuts on W and Q are relaxed, thereby including more data at high values of x. Effects of target mass corrections (TMCs), higher twist contributions, and nuclear corrections for deuterium data are significant in the large-x region. The leading twist parton distributions are found to be stable to TMC model variations as long as higher twist contributions are also included. Furthermore, the behavior of the d quark as x → 1 is particularly sensitive to the deuterium corrections, and using realistic nuclear smearing modelsmore » the d-quark distribution at large x is found to be softer than in previous fits performed with more restrictive cuts.« less

  2. Enclosure - FY 2016 Q2 Metrics Report 2016-05-03.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY 2016 Target 95% 95% 90% 85% 90% 90% FY 2016 2nd Qtr Actual Comment FY 2016 Forecast ... Schedule Compliance, Projects Less Than 5 Years Duration: Projects will meet the project ...

  3. Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Stanford/SLAC project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  4. Microsoft Word - EE0003005-2016Q2-Final Technical Report FTR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    005 RiverHeath: Neighborhood Loop Geothermal Exchange System RiverHeath LLC Final Technical Report (FTR) for DOE/EERE Project Title: RiverHeath: Neighborhood Loop Geothermal Exchange System Covering Period: January 29, 2010 - June 30, 2015 Approved Project Period: 1/29/2010 - 6/30/2015 Submission Date: Recipient: Website (if available) Award Number: 07/11/2016 RiverHeath LLC 201 S RiverHeath Way, Suite 1800 Appleton Wl 54915 www.riverheath.com DE-EE0003005 PI: Submitted by: (if other than PI)

  5. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Sandia National Laboratories project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  6. High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production- FY12 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this LANL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  7. Direct s-CO2 Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. Photoperiodic Regulation of the Seasonal Pattern of Photosynthetic Capacity and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauerle, William L.; Oren, Ram; Way, Danielle A.; Qian, Song S.; Stoy, Paul C.; Thornton, Peter E; Bowden, Joseph D.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Reynolds, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO{sub 2} cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% ({approx}4 PgC y{sup -1}), resulting in a >3% ({approx}2 PgC y{sup -1}) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  9. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Advisory Board Meeting May 11, 2016 1 We do the right thing. Nuclear Workforce Initiative Larry Ling Chief of Staff Acting Director of Administrative Services Savannah River Remediation Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting May 11, 2016 2 We do the right thing. SRR Contract Headcount 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Q4-09 Q2-10 Q4-10 Q2-11 Q4-11 Q2-12 Q4-12 Q2-13 Q4-13 Q2-14 Q4-14 Q1-15 Q2-15 Q3-15 Q4-15 Q1-16 SRR Headcount (December 31, 2009 through March 2016) All data at

  10. Directives Quarterly Updates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Quarterly Updates by Diane Johnson Listings of new Justification Memoranda and new or revised Directives that have been posted to the DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Portal. Updated quarterly. FY2016 FY 16, Q2 - January through March 2016 FY2015 FY15, Q1 - October through December 2014 FY15, Q3 - April through June 2015 FY15, Q4 - July through September 2015 FY 2014 FY14, Q1 - October through December 2013 FY14, Q2 - January through March 2014 FY14, Q3 - April

  11. Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

    1981-01-01

    Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

  12. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  13. Intercomparison of the seasonal cycle in 200 hPa kinetic energy in AMIP GCM simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The 200 hPa kinetic energy is represented by means of the spherical harmonic components for the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations, the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA). The data used are the monthly mean wind fields from 1979 to 1988. The kinetic energy is decomposed into the divergent (DKE) and rotational (RKE) components and emphasis is placed on examining the former. The two reanalysis data sets show reasonable agreement that is best for the rotational kinetic energy. The largest difference in the divergent kinetic energy occurs during the northern summer. As might be expected, the two analyses are closet in regions where there are sufficient observations such that the effect of the model used in the assimilation cycle are minimized. The observed RKE show only a slight seasonal cycle with a maximum occuring during the northern winter. The DKE, on the other hand, has a very pronounced seasonal cycle with maxima at the solsticial seasons and minima during the equinoctial seasons. The model results show a very large spread in the magnitudes of the RKE and DKE although the models all evince a seasonal variation in phase with that observed. The median values of the seasonal cycle of RKE and DKE for the models are usually superior to those of any individual model. Results are also presented for simulation following the AMIP protocol but using updated versions of the original AMIP entries. In most cases these new integrations show better agreement with the observations.

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsWarm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test 1993.06.01 - 1993.06.30 Lead Scientist : Dave Parsons Data Availability Complete output from a 10-day simulation using a high resolution mesoscale model is available at 1-hr intervals. Verification of June 1993 IOP Assimilation Dataset and its use in Driving a

  15. EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide April 3, 2009 - 5:47pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL If you're a regular visitor to EERE's Consumer's Guide to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, you may have noticed some changes this week. The site has moved to EnergySavers.gov and is now called "Energy Savers." The same in-depth information is still

  16. Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating season Despite the jump in natural gas use to meet heating demand during the recent winter storm that walloped the East Coast, total U.S. natural gas inventories remain near 3 trillion cubic feet. That's about 20 percent higher than at this time last year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said that by the end of the winter heating season at the close of March, it expects natural gas inventories

  17. Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Money and Energy All Year! | Department of Energy an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! December 12, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. When shopping for appliances or electronics for the

  18. Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season May 15, 2013 - 1:16pm Addthis President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. The group met to discuss lessons learned during the response to Hurricane Sandy, as well as the

  19. Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason

  20. 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings November 27, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Weatherization and Intergovernmental

  1. The magic school bus TV project. Final technical performance report, July 1, 1992--July 31, 1995. Season III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    For Season III, our goal has been to produce 13 new episodes that can optimally benefit from our research and experience in developing this unique series. With a total of 39 episodes, MSB`s third season will move the production from a weekly to a daily series, airing Monday to Friday and Sundays on PBS. As we delivered the 13 Season II episodes to PBS during fall of 1995, we also completed 13 more scripts for Season III production. During the remaining portion of Season III, these 13 scripts are being animated and prepared for delivery to PBS for an October 7th, 1996 launch date. Based on staggered phases of production used since the project`s inception, the development of science topics and show scripting for Season IV occurs at the same time that Season III shows are in animation and post-production. Thus, topics for Season IV shows are being selected, and science research and scripting have also begun during this time period. Both the National Science Foundation and PBS have made a commitment to Season IV, and a proposal has been submitted to Microsoft for consideration.

  2. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  3. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  4. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I foundmore » that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.« less

  5. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This

  6. Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hardening and Resiliency U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy August 2010 OE/ISER Final Report 8/16/10 i For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about

  7. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern formore » sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.« less

  8. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.

  9. Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Guadalupe; Meneses, Montserrat; Ballinas, Lourdes; Castells, Francesc

    2009-07-15

    Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city's urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%)

  10. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  11. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore » new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for

  12. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a

  13. Diagnosis of extratropical variability in seasonal integrations of the ECMWF model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferranti, L.; Molteni, F.; Brankovic, C.; Palmer, T.N. )

    1994-06-01

    Properties of the general circulation simulated by the ECMWF model are discussed using a set of seasonal integrations at T63 resolution. For each season, over the period of 5 years, 1986-1990, three integrations initiated on consecutive days were run with prescribed observed sea surface temperature (SST). This paper presents a series of diagnostics of extratropical variability in the model, with particular emphasis on the northern winter. Time-filtered maps of variability indicate that in this season there is insufficient storm track activity penetrating into the Eurasian continent. Related to this the maximum of lower-frequency variability for northern spring are more realistic. Blocking is defined objectively in terms of the geostrophic wind at 500 mb. Consistent with the low-frequency transience, in the Euro-Atlantic sector the position of maximum blocking in the model is displaced eastward. The composite structure of blocks over the Pacific is realistic, though their frequency is severely underestimated at all times of year. Shortcomings in the simulated wintertime general circulation were also revealed by studying the projection of 5-day mean fields onto empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of the observed flow. The largest differences were apparent for statistics of EOFs of the zonal mean flow. Analysis of weather regime activity, defined from the EOFs, suggested that regimes with positive PNA index were overpopulated, while the negative PNA regimes were underpopulated. A further comparison between observed and modeled low-frequency variance revealed that underestimation of low-frequency variability occurs along the same axes that explain most of the spatial structure of the error in the mean field, suggesting a common dynamical origin for these two aspects of the systematic error. 17 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation

  15. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-12-31

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  16. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  17. Preliminary survey and evaluation of nonaquifer thermal energy storage concepts for seasonal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1980-11-01

    Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The main energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)

  18. Seasonal and multiannual roost use by Rafinesque's Big-eared Bats in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about factors affecting year-round use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) or the long-term fidelity of this species to anthropogenic or natural roosts. The objectives of this study were to test whether seasonal use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats varied with roost type and environmental conditions within and among seasons and to document multiannual use of natural and anthropogenic structures by this species. We inspected 4 bridges, 1 building, and 59 tree roosts possessing basal cavity openings; roosts were inspected at least once per week from May through October in every year from 2005 through 2008 and once a month from November through April in every year from 2005 through 2009. We found that use of anthropogenic roosts was significantly greater than the use of tree roosts in summer but that the use of structure types did not differ in other seasons. There was significant seasonal variation in use of anthropogenic and tree roosts. Anthropogenic roost use was higher in summer than in all other seasons. There was no significant difference in tree use among spring, summer, and fall, but use in winter was significantly lower in 2 years of the study. Overall use of anthropogenic and tree roosts was positively related to minimum temperature, but the relationship between use of roosts and minimum temperature varied among seasons. Bats showed multiannual fidelity ({ge} 4 years) to all anthropogenic roosts and to some tree roosts, but fidelity of bats to anthropogenic roosts was greater and more consistent than to tree roosts. Our data indicate that Rafinesque's big-eared bats responded differently to environmental conditions among seasons; thus, a variety of structure types and characteristics are necessary for conservation of these bats. We suggest long-term protection of roost structures of all types is necessary for conservation of Rafinesque's big-eared bats in the southeast Coastal Plain.

  19. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS near and far detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. Thus, at the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. In contrast and unexpectedly, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  20. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  1. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation thatmore » peaks in the winter.« less

  2. Seasonality of soil CO2 efflux in a temperate forest: Biophysical effects of snowpack and spring freezethaw cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuankuan; Han, Yi; Chen, Jiquan; Wang, Xingchang; Zhang, Quanzhi; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-08-15

    Changes in characteristics of snowfall and spring freezethaw-cycle (FTC) events under the warming climate make it critical to understand biophysical controls on soil CO2 efflux (RS) in seasonally snow-covered ecosystems. We conducted a snow removal experiment and took year-round continuous automated measurements of RS, soil temperature (T5) and soil volumetric water content at the 5 cm depth (W5) with a half-hour interval in a Chinese temperate forest in 20102011. Our objectives were to: (1) develop statistical models to describe the seasonality of RS in this forest; (2) quantify the contribution of seasonal RS to the annual budget; (3) examine biophysical effects of snowpack on RS; and (4) test the hypothesis that an FTC-induced enhancement of RS is jointly driven by biological and physical processes.

  3. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 58 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  4. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrecengost, J. D.; Kilgo, J. C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H. Scott; Miller, K. V.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  5. PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA: RESULTS FROM THE 2010 OBSERVING SEASON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingzhi; Zhu, Zonghong; Macri, Lucas M.; Wang, Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V.; Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Liu, Qiang; Shang, Zhaohui; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Zhenxi; Pennypacker, Carl R.; York, Donald G.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a season of observations with the Chinese Small Telescope ARray, obtained over 183 days of the 2010 Antarctic winter. We carried out high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 9125 stars with i ∼< 15.3 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. We identified 188 variable stars, including 67 new objects relative to our 2008 observations, thanks to broader synoptic coverage, a deeper magnitude limit, and a larger field of view. We used the photometric data set to derive site statistics from Dome A. Based on two years of observations, we find that extinction due to clouds at this site is less than 0.1 and 0.4 mag during 45% and 75% of the dark time, respectively.

  6. Sensitive response of a model of symbiotic ecosystem to seasonal periodic drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rekker, A.; Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-12

    A symbiotic ecosysytem (metapopulation) is studied by means of the stochastic Lotka-Volterra model with generalized Verhulst self-regulation. The effect of variable environment on the carrying capacities of populations is taken into account as an asymmetric dichotomous noise and as a deterministic periodic stimulus. In the framework of the mean-field theory an explicit self-consistency equation for the system in the long-time limit is presented. Also, expressions for the probability distribution and for the moments of the population size are found. In certain cases the mean population size exhibits large oscillations in time, even if the amplitude of the seasonal environmental drive is small. Particularly, it is shown that the occurrence of large oscillations of the mean population size can be controlled by noise parameters (such as amplitude and correlation time) and by the coupling strength of the symbiotic interaction between species.

  7. Seasonal thermal energy storage in unsaturated soils: Model development and field validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.; Nir, Aharon, Tsang, Chin-Fu

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes ten years of activity carried out at the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBI) in the subject of seasonal storage of thermal energy in unsaturated soils. The objectives of the work were to make a conceptual study of this type of storage, to offer guidelines for planning and evaluation of the method, to produce models and simulation for an actual field experiment, to participate in an on-line data analysis of experimental results. and to evaluate the results in terms of the validation of the concept, models and the experimental techniques. The actual field experiments were performed in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Details of engineering and field operations are not included in this report.

  8. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  9. Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Welch, Ian D.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-04-30

    To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from five years (2004-2008) of acoustic telemetry studies conducted in the Columbia River estuary using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System. For this synthesis, the Columbia River estuary includes the section of the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam at river kilometer (Rkm) 235 downstream to the mouth where it enters the Pacific Ocean. In this report, we summarize the seasonal salmonid presence and migration patterns in the Columbia River estuary based on information from published studies as well as relevant data from acoustic telemetry studies conducted by NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) between 2004 and 2008. Recent acoustic telemetry studies, conducted using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS; developed by the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), provided information on the migratory behavior of juvenile steelhead (O. mykiss) and Chinook salmon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. In this report, Section 2 provides a summary of information from published literature on the seasonal presence and migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary and plume. Section 3 presents a detailed synthesis of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead migratory behavior based on use of the JSATS between 2004 and 2008. Section 4 provides a discussion of the information summarized in the report as well as information drawn from literature reviews on potential effects of channel maintenance activities to juvenile salmonids rearing in

  10. Seasonal Variability in Clouds and Radiation at the Manus ARM Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, Jim H.

    2005-07-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates three climate observation stations in the tropical western Pacific region. Two of these sites, located on Manus island in Papua New Guinea and on the island republic of Nauru, have been operating for over five years. This data set provides an opportunity to examine variability in tropical cloudiness on a wide range of time scales. The focus of this study is on the annual cycle. The most obvious manifestation of the annual cycle in this region is the oscillation of monsoon convection between Asia and Australia. The impact of the annual cycle on Manus and Nauru is more subtle; however, analysis of radiation and cloud observations from the Manus and Nauru ARM sites reveals links to the annual monsoon cycle. One such link relates to the proximity of Manus to the Maritime Continent, the collection of islands separating the Pacific and Indian oceans. Convection over the large islands in the maritime continent exhibits a distinct annual cycle. Outflow from large-island convection is shown to modulate the cirrus population over Manus. During neutral or cool ENSO periods, convection over Nauru is relatively suppressed. During such periods, Nauru is shown to exhibit an annual cycle in local convective activity. During the inactive season, cirrus are often found near the tropopause over Nauru. These clouds are not formed directly by the outflow from convection. The seasonality and source of these clouds is also examined. Identifying the source of cirrus observed at Manus and Nauru is important because of the potential dependence of cirrus properties on the source of convection.

  11. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunderson, Carla A; Edwards, Nelson T; Walker, Ashley V; O'Hara, Keiran H; Campion, Christina M; Hanson, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have related current and historical temperatures to phenological shifts, but experimental evidence is sparse, particularly for autumn responses. A five-year field experiment exposed four deciduous forest species from contrasting climates (Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Populus grandidentata, and Betula alleghaniensis) to air temperatures 2 and 4 C above ambient controls. Impacts of year-round warming on bud burst (BB), senescence and abscission were evaluated in relation to thermal provenance. Leaves emerged earlier in all species, by an average of 6-9 days at +2 and +4 C. Magnitude of advance varied with species and year, but was larger for the first 2 C increment than the second. The effect of warming increased with early BB, favoring Liquidambar, from the warmest climate, but even BB in northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. Treatment differences in BB were poorly explained by temperature sums, which increased with treatment. In autumn, chlorophyll was retained an average of 4 and 7 days longer in +2 and +4 C treatments, and abscission delayed by 8 and 13 days. Species differences in autumn responses were marginally significant. Growing seasons in the warmer atmospheres were 6 - 28 days longer, with the least impact in Quercus. Results are compared with a 16-year record of canopy onset and offset in a nearby upland deciduous forest, where BB showed similar responsiveness to spring temperatures (2 - 4 days C-1). Offset dates in the stand tracked August-September temperatures, except when late summer drought caused premature senescence. The common garden-like experimental approach provides evidence that warming alone extends the growing season, at both ends, even if stand-level impacts are complicated by other environmental factors.

  12. Measurement of the Neutron electric form factor at Q2=0.8 2(GeV\\\\c)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Glazier

    2007-09-30

    Nucleon form factors allow a sensitive test for models of the nucleon. Recent experiments utilising polarisation observables have resulted, for the first time, in a model-independent determination of the neutron electric form factor GnE. This method employed an 80% longitudinally polarised, high intensity (10 uA) electon beam (883 MeV) that was quasi-elastically scattered off a liquid deuterium target in the reaction D (e, en)p. A neutron polarimeter was designed and installed to measure the ratio of transverse-to-longitudinal polarisation using neutron scattering asymmetries. This ratio allowed a determination of the neutron elastic form factor, GnE, free of the previous large systematic uncertainties associated with the deuterium wave function. The experiment took place in the A1 experimental hall at MAMI taking advantage of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer. A detailed investigation was carried out into the performance of the neutron polarimeter.

  13. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Paul ; Reinhold, Joerg ; Roche, Julie ; Roos, Philip ; Sarty, Adam ; Shin, Ilkyoung ; Smith, Gregory ; Stepanyan, Stepan ; Tang, Liguang ; Tvaskis, Vladas ; van der Meer, Rob ; ...

  14. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Paul ; Reinhold, Joerg ; Roche, Julie ; Roos, Philip ; Sarty, Adam ; Shin, Ilkyoung ; Smith, Gregory ; Stepanyan, Stepan ; Tang, Liguang ; Tvaskis, Vladas ; van der Meer, Rob ; ...

  15. Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for Next-Generation CSP Systems- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. Quarterly Report for LANL Activities: FY12-Q2 National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawar, Rajesh J.

    2012-04-17

    This report summarizes progress of LANL activities related to the tasks performed under the LANL FWP FE102-002-FY10, National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program. This FWP is funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Overall, the NRAP activities are focused on understanding and evaluating risks associated with large-scale injection and long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in deep geological formations. One of the primary risks during large-scale injection is due to changes in geomechanical stresses to the storage reservoir, to the caprock/seals and to the wellbores. These changes may have the potential to cause CO{sub 2} and brine leakage and geochemical impacts to the groundwater systems. While the importance of these stresses is well recognized, there have been relatively few quantitative studies (laboratory, field or theoretical) of geomechanical processes in sequestration systems. In addition, there are no integrated studies that allow evaluation of risks to groundwater quality in the context of CO{sub 2} injection-induced stresses. The work performed under this project is focused on better understanding these effects. LANL approach will develop laboratory and computational tools to understand the impact of CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical stress by creating a geomechanical test bed using inputs from laboratory experiments, field data, and conceptual approaches. The Geomechanical Test Bed will be used for conducting sensitivity and scenario analyses of the impacts of CO{sub 2} injection. The specific types of questions will relate to fault stimulation and fracture inducing stress on caprock, changes in wellbore leakage due to evolution of stress in the reservoir and caprock, and the potential for induced seismicity. In addition, the Geomechanical Test Bed will be used to investigate the coupling of stress-induced leakage pathways with impacts on groundwater quality. LANL activities are performed under two tasks: (1) develop laboratory and computational tools to understand CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical impacts and (2) use natural analog sites to determine potential groundwater impacts. We are using the Springerville-St. John Dome as a field site for collecting field data on CO{sub 2} migration through faults and groundwater impacts as well as developing and validating computational models. During the FY12 second quarter we have been working with New England Research Company to construct a tri-axial core-holder. We have built fluid control system for the coreflood system that can be ported to perform in-situ imaging of core. We have performed numerical simulations for groundwater impacts of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage using the reservoir model for Springerville-St John's Dome site. We have analyzed groundwater samples collected from Springerville site for major ion chemistry and isotopic composition. We are currently analyzing subsurface core and chip samples acquired for mineralogical composition.

  17. A Small-Particle Solar Receiver for High-Temperature Brayton Power Cycles- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SDSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  18. Semi volatile organic compounds in ambient PM2.5. Seasonal trends and daily resolved source contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juergen Schnelle-Kreis; Martin Sklorz; Juergen Orasche; Matthias Stoelzel; Annette Peters; Ralf Zimmermann

    2007-06-01

    Concentrations of ambient semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the PM2.5 fraction of Augsburg, Germany, have been monitored on a daily basis from January 2003 through December 2004. Samples were taken in a large garden in the city center. Quantitative analysis of n-alkanes, alkanones, alkanoic acid methylesters, long chain linear alkyl benzenes and toluenes, hopanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and oxidized PAH, and some abietan type diterpenes was done. All compounds showed distinct seasonal variations in concentration. Most compounds showed highest concentrations during the cold seasons, but some n-alkanones and 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecanone showed maximum concentration during summer. Changes in patterns between and within compound classes were obvious, e.g., the hopane pattern exhibited a strong seasonal variation. The main source related contributions to changes observed were discussed. Using positive matrix factorization (PMF) for the statistical investigation of the data set, five factors have been separated. These factors are dominated by the pattern of single sources or groups of similar sources: factor 1, lubricating oil; factor 2, emissions of unburned diesel and heating oil consumption; factor 3, wood combustion; factor 4, brown coal combustion; and factor 5, biogenic emissions and transport components. Like the SVOC, the factors showed strong seasonality with highest values in winter for factors 1-4 and in summer for factor 5. 56 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for Elcam Tempe Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The analysis used is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for at least one full season of operation. The objective of the analysis is to report the long-term field performance of the installed system and to make technical contributions to the definition of techniques and requirements for solar energy system design. The solar system, Elcam-Tempe, was designed to supply commercial domestic hot water heating systems that utilize two, four by eight foot flat plate collectors to heat water in a fifty-two gallon preheat tank or a fifty-two gallon domestic hot water (DHW) tank. The DHW tank provides hot water to the Agriculture Department residence at Arizona State University. The system uses an automatic cascade control system to control three independent actuators, the coolant circulation pump, the cascade valve, and the electric heating element. The system provides freeze protection by automatically circulating hot water from the hot water tank through the collectors when the collector outlet temperature is below a specified value. The building is a single story residence located at the agriculture experiment farm of the Arizona State University. The Elcam-Tempe Solar Energy System has four modes of operation.

  20. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N. W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  1. State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunton, G.

    1998-06-01

    The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

  2. Michigan residential heating oil and propane price survey: 1995--1996 heating season. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, C.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of residential No. 2 distillate fuel (home heating oil) and liquefied petroleum gas (propane) prices over the 1995--1996 heating season in Michigan. The Michigan`s Public Service Commission (MPSC) conducted the survey under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). This survey was funded in part by a grant from the DOE. From October 1995 through March 1996, the MPSC surveyed participating distributors by telephone for current residential retail home heating oil and propane prices. The MPSC transmitted the data via a computer modem to the EIA using the Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). Survey results were published in aggregate on the MPSC World Wide Web site at http://ermisweb.state.mi.us/shopp. The page was updated with both residential and wholesale prices immediately following the transmission of the data to the EIA. The EIA constructed the survey using a sample of Michigan home heating oil and propane retailers. The sample accounts for different sales volumes, geographic location, and sources of primary supply.

  3. Passive solar/earth sheltered office/dormitory cooling season thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.

    1984-01-01

    Continuous detailed hourly thermal performance measurements have been taken since February 1982 in and around an occupied, underground, 4000 ft/sup 2/ office/dormitory building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This building has a number of energy saving features which have been analyzed relative to their performance in a southeastern US climate and with respect to overall commercial building performance. This analysis documents cooling season performance, as well as effects of earth contact, interior thermal mass, an economizer cycle and interface of an efficient building envelope with a central three-ton heat pump. The Joint Institute Dormitory obtains a cooling energy savings of about 30% compared with an energy-efficient, above-grade structure and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The proper installation of the overhand, interior thermal mass, massive supply duct system, and earth contact team up to prevent summertime overheating. From May through September, this building cost a total of $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate 24 hours per day. Besides thermal performance of the building envelope, extensive comfort data was taken illustrating that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time according to the PMV measurements.

  4. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-07-15

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore » annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  5. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Le Roy, L.

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  6. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming.

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  7. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-12-08

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore » annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  8. Effect of seasonal changes in quantities of biowaste on full scale anaerobic digester performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illmer, P. Gstraunthaler, G.

    2009-01-15

    A 750,000 l digester located in Roppen/Austria was studied over a 2-year period. The concentrations and amounts of CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S and several other process parameters like temperature, retention time, dry weight and input of substrate were registered continuously. On a weekly scale the pH and the concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N and volatile fatty acids (acetic, butyric, iso-butyric, propionic, valeric and iso-valeric acid) were measured. The data show a similar pattern of seasonal gas production over 2 years of monitoring. The consumption of VFA and not the hydrogenotrophic CH{sub 4} production appeared to be the limiting factor for the investigated digestion process. Whereas the changes in pH and the concentrations of most VFA did not correspond with changes in biogas production, the ratio of acetic to propionic acid and the concentration of H{sub 2} appeared to be useful indicators for reactor performance. However, the most influential factors for the anaerobic digestion process were the amount and the quality of input material, which distinctly changed throughout the year.

  9. Seasonal trend of photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, L; Baldocchi, DD

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Understanding seasonal changes in photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance is crucial for modeling long-term carbon uptake and energy fluxes of ecosystems. Gas exchange measurements of CO{sub 2} and light response curves on blue oak leaves (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) were conducted weekly throughout the growing season to study the seasonality of photosynthetic capacity (V{sub cmax}) and Ball-Berry slope (m) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature. A leaf photosynthetic model was used to determine V{sub cmax}. There was a pronounced seasonal pattern in V{sub cmax}. The maximum value of V{sub cmax}, 127 {micro}molm{sup -2} s{sup -1},was reached shortly after leaf expansion in early summer, when air temperature was moderate and soil water availability was high. Thereafter, V{sub cmax} declined as the soil water profile became depleted and the trees experienced extreme air temperatures, exceeding 40 C. The decline in V{sub cmax} was gradual in midsummer, however, despite extremely low predawn leaf water potentials ({Psi}{sub pd}, {approx} -4.0 MPa). Overall, temporal changes in V{sub cmax} were well correlated with changes in leaf nitrogen content. During spring leaf development, high rates of leaf dark respiration (R{sub d}, 5-6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were observed. Once a leaf reached maturity, R{sub d} remained low, around 0.5 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. In contrast to the strong seasonality of V{sub cmax}, m and marginal water cost per unit carbon gain ({partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A) were relatively constant over the season, even when leaf {Psi}{sub pd} dropped to -6.8 MPa. The constancy of {partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A suggests that stomata behaved optimally under severe water-stress conditions. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of modeling carbon and water vapor exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  10. Low-Cost, Highly Transparent Flexible low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Berland, bberland@itnes.com ITN Energy Systems Low-Cost, Highly Transparent Flexible low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: October 1, 2013 Planned end date: September 30, 2014 Key Milestones 1.Low-e Film: 90% T,vis & R,ir (100 cm 2 ) (Q2) 2.Low-e Film: 90% T,vis & R,ir (2m long, %T,%R variation < 2% cross web) (Q3) 3.Demonstrate Low-e/EC Film (Q3) Budget:

  11. Cooling season performance of an earth-sheltered office/dormitory building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Detailed hourly measurements taken in and around an underground office-dormitory building for two summers document energy savings; whole building-component interface problems; and specific cooling contributions from earth contact, interior thermal mass, and an economizer. The Joint Institute Dormitory (JID) saves about 30% compared with well-built above-grade buildings in a climate typical of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The detailed measurements, which include extensive thermal comfort data, indicate that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time. The thermal performance measurements and analysis determine that the peak cooling requirement of this building is 50% less than that of well-built above-grade structures, permitting a cost savings on installed cooling capacity. The dominant building components contributing to the good thermal performance are the structural thermal mass, the earth-covered roof, and the earth contact provided by the bermed walls and slab floor. The 372-m/sup 2/ (4000 gross ft/sup 2/) building used about $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate from May through September. Eliminating a number of building design and construction anomalies could improve the whole-building performance and reduce the seasonal cooling cost another $85. Close examination of the thermal performance of this building revealed that a very efficient heat pump and thermally sound envelope do not necessarily produce otpimum performance without careful attention given to component interface details. 8 references, 24 figures, 12 tables.

  12. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliqueivis, T.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Karl, Thomas G.; Guenther, Alex B.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Poeschl, U.; Jiminez, J. L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time mass spectra of non-refractory component of submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon basin during the wet season of 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic components accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. Ammonium was present in sufficient quantities to halfway neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-dominated, low-NOx environment the high-resolution mass spectra as well as mass closures with ion chromatography measurements did not provide evidence for significant contributions of organosulfate species, at least at concentrations above uncertainty levels. Positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the variance of the signal intensities of the organic constituents: a factor HOA having a hydrocarbon-like signature and identified as regional emissions of primary organic material, a factor OOA-1 associated with fresh production of secondary organic material by a mechanism of BVOC oxidation followed by gas-to-particle conversion, a factor OOA-2 consistent with reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially epoxydiols by acidic particles, and a factor OOA-3 associated with long range transport and atmospheric aging. The OOA-1, -2, and -3 factors had progressively more oxidized signatures. Diameter-resolved mass spectral markers also suggested enhanced reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products to the accumulation mode for the OOA-2 factor, and such size partitioning can be indicative of in-cloud process. The campaign-average factor loadings were in a ratio of 1.1:1.0 for the OOA-1 compared to the OOA-2 pathway, suggesting the comparable importance of gas-phase compared to particle-phase (including cloud waters) production pathways of secondary organic material during

  13. Studies of Annual and Seasonal Variations in Four Species of Reptiles and Amphibians at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, D.C.; Nelson, E.I.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S.; Haarmann, T.K.

    1998-07-01

    Baseline studies of reptiles and amphibians of the Pajarito wetlands at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been conducted by the Ecology group since 1990. With the data gathered from 1990-1997 (excluding 1992), we examined the annual and seasonal population changes of four species of reptiles and amphibians over the past seven years. The four species studied are the Woodhouse toad (Bufo woodhousii), the western chorus frog (Pseudacris triseriata), the many-lined skink (Eunzeces nudtivirgatus), and the plateau striped whiptail lizard (Cnemidophorus velox). Statistical analyses indicate a significant change on a seasonal basis for the western chorus frog and the many-lined skink. Results indicate a significant difference in the annual population of the Woodhouse toad.

  14. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-01-01

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7,more » 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.« less

  15. Seasonal trends in photosynthesis and electron transport during the Mediterranean summer drought in leaves of deciduous oaks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Osuna, Jessica L.; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Kobayashi, Hideki; Dawson, Todd E.

    2015-04-08

    The California Mediterranean savanna has harsh summer conditions with minimal soil moisture, high temperature, high incoming solar radiation and little or no precipitation. Deciduous blue oaks, Quercus douglasii Hook. and Arn., are winter-deciduous obligate phreatophytes, transpiring mostly groundwater throughout the summer drought. Our objective for this work is to fully characterize the seasonal trends of photosynthesis in blue oaks as well as the mechanistic relationships between leaf structure and function.

  16. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-07-28

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7, 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.

  17. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: cosmological parameters from three seasons of data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sievers, Jonathan L.; Appel, John William; Hlozek, Renée A.; Nolta, Michael R.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Acquaviva, Viviana; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Battistelli, Elia S.; Burger, Bryce; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Brown, Ben; Calabrese, Erminia; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; and others

    2013-10-01

    We present constraints on cosmological and astrophysical parameters from high-resolution microwave background maps at 148 GHz and 218 GHz made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) in three seasons of observations from 2008 to 2010. A model of primary cosmological and secondary foreground parameters is fit to the map power spectra and lensing deflection power spectrum, including contributions from both the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect, Poisson and correlated anisotropy from unresolved infrared sources, radio sources, and the correlation between the tSZ effect and infrared sources. The power ℓ{sup 2}C{sub ℓ}/2π of the thermal SZ power spectrum at 148 GHz is measured to be 3.4±1.4  μK{sup 2} at ℓ = 3000, while the corresponding amplitude of the kinematic SZ power spectrum has a 95% confidence level upper limit of 8.6  μK{sup 2}. Combining ACT power spectra with the WMAP 7-year temperature and polarization power spectra, we find excellent consistency with the LCDM model. We constrain the number of effective relativistic degrees of freedom in the early universe to be N{sub eff} = 2.79±0.56, in agreement with the canonical value of N{sub eff} = 3.046 for three massless neutrinos. We constrain the sum of the neutrino masses to be Σm{sub ν} < 0.39 eV at 95% confidence when combining ACT and WMAP 7-year data with BAO and Hubble constant measurements. We constrain the amount of primordial helium to be Y{sub p} = 0.225±0.034, and measure no variation in the fine structure constant α since recombination, with α/α{sub 0} = 1.004±0.005. We also find no evidence for any running of the scalar spectral index, dn{sub s}/dln k = −0.004±0.012.

  18. Quantification of massive seasonal aggregations of blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus) in Southeast Florida

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kajiura, Stephen M.; Tellman, Shari L.; Patterson, Heather M.

    2016-03-30

    Southeast Florida witnesses an enormous seasonal influx of upper trophic level marine predators each year as massive aggregations of migrating blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus) overwinter in nearshore waters. The narrow shelf and close proximity of the Gulf Stream current to the Palm Beach County shoreline drive tens of thousands of sharks to the shallow, coastal environment. This natural bottleneck provides a unique opportunity to estimate relative abundance. Over a four year period from 2011–2014, an aerial survey was flown approximately biweekly along the length of Palm Beach County. A high definition video camera and digital still camera mounted out ofmore » the airplane window provided a continuous record of the belt transect which extended 200 m seaward from the shoreline between Boca Raton Inlet and Jupiter Inlet. The number of sharks within the survey transect was directly counted from the video. Shark abundance peaked in the winter (January-March) with a maximum in 2011 of 12,128 individuals counted within the 75.6 km-2 belt transect. This resulted in a maximum density of 803.2 sharks km-2. By the late spring (April-May), shark abundance had sharply declined to 1.1% of its peak, where it remained until spiking again in January of the following year. Shark abundance was inversely correlated with water temperature and large numbers of sharks were found only when water temperatures were less than 25°C. Shark abundance was also correlated with day of the year but not with barometric pressure. Although shark abundance was not correlated with photoperiod, the departure of the sharks from southeast Florida occurred around the vernal equinox. The shark migration along the United States eastern seaboard corresponds spatially and temporally with the spawning aggregations of various baitfish species. As a result, these baseline abundance data can be compared to future studies to determine if shark population size is changing and if sharks are restricting

  19. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractors Seasonal Fluctuations Call Slides and Discussion Summary, June 7, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  What strategies has your program been thinking about or implemented to align program demand with seasonal fluctuation? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Rutland County, VT: Mary Cohen, NeighborWorks of Western Vermont  Austin, TX: Jill Maness, Austin Energy *

  20. Potential for savings in compliance costs for reducing ground-level ozone possible by instituting seasonal versus annual nitric oxide emission limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lookman, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    Ground-level ozone is formed in the atmosphere from its precursor emissions, namely nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and volatile organic compounds (VOC), with its rate of formation dependent on atmospheric conditions. Since ozone levels tend to be highest during the summer months, seasonal controls of precursors have been suggested as a means of reducing the costs of decreasing ozone concentrations to acceptable levels. This paper attempts to quantify what the potential savings if seasonal control were instituted for coal-fired power plants, assuming that only commercially available NO{sub x} control technologies are used. Cost savings through seasonal control is measured by calculating the total annualized cost of NO{sub x} removal at a given amount of seasonal control for different target levels of annual control. For this study, it is assumed that trading of NO{sub x} emissions will be allowed, as has been proposed by the Ozone Transportation Commission (OTC). The problem has been posed as a binary integer linear programming problem, with decision variables being which control to use at each power plant. The results indicate that requiring annual limits which are lower than seasonal limits can substantially reduce compliance costs. These savings occur because requiring stringent compliance only on a seasonal basis allows power plants to use control methods for which the variable costs are paid for only part of the year, and through the use of gas-based controls, which are much cheaper to operate in the summer months.

  1. A Seasonal Perspective on Regional Air Quality in CentralCalifornia - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.; Tonse, Shaheen R.; Jin, Ling

    2006-12-01

    Central California spans a wide variety of urban, agricultural, and natural terrain, including the San Francisco Bay area, the Central Valley, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Population within this region is growing rapidly, and there are persistent, serious air pollution problems including fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and ozone. Summertime photochemical air pollution is the focus of the present study, which represents a first phase in the development and application of a modeling capability to assess formation and transport of ozone and its precursors within Central California over an entire summer season. This contrasts with past studies that have examined pollutant dynamics for a few selected high-ozone episodes each lasting 3-5 days. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) has been applied to predict air pollutant formation and transport in Central California for a 15-day period beginning on July 24, 2000. This period includes a 5-day intensive operating period (July 29 to August 2) from the Central California Ozone Study (CCOS). Day-specific meteorological conditions were modeled by research collaborators at NOAA using a mesoscale meteorological model (MM5). Pollutant emissions within the study domain were based on CARB emission inventory estimates, with additional efforts conducted as part of this research to capture relevant emissions variability including (1) temperature and sunlight-driven changes in biogenic VOC, (2) weekday/weekend and diurnal differences in light-duty (LD) and heavy-duty (HD) motor vehicle emissions, (3) effects of day-specific meteorological conditions on plume rise from point sources such as power plants. We also studied the effects of using cleaner pollutant inflow boundary conditions, lower than indicated during CCOS aircraft flights over the Pacific Ocean, but supported by other surface, ship-based, balloon and aircraft sampling studies along the west coast. Model predictions were compared with measured

  2. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  3. Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

  4. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  5. completed_td_projects | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forecast: August 9, 2016; Previous Forecast: July 12, 2016 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2014 2015 2016 2017 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 U.S. Energy Supply U.S. Crude Oil Production (million barrels per day) Current 9.48 9.50 9.43 9.32 9.17 8.87 8.45 8.44 8.42 8.36 8.16 8.29 8.71 9.43 8.73 8.31 8.3% -7.4% -4.9% Previous 9.48 9.50 9.43 9.32 9.17 8.79 8.26 8.23 8.24 8.21 8.09 8.27 8.71 9.43 8.61 8.20 8.3% -8.7% -4.8% Percent Change 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.2% 1.8% 0.9%

  6. Quarterly Research Performance Progress Report (2015 Q3). Ultrasonic Phased Arrays and Interactive Reflectivity Tomography for Nondestructive Inspection of Injection and Production Wells in Geothermal Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Polsky, Yarom; Kisner, Roger A; Johnson, Christi R; Collins, Case; Bouman, Charles; Abdulrahman, Hani; Foster, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    For the past quarter, we have placed our effort in implementing the first version of the ModelBased Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, assembling and testing the electronics, designing transducers mounts, and defining our laboratory test samples. We have successfully developed the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasound imaging. The current algorithm was tested with synthetic data and we are currently making new modifications for the reconstruction of real ultrasound data. Beside assembling and testing the electronics, we developed a LabView graphic user interface (GUI) to fully control the ultrasonic phased array, adjust the time-delays of the transducers, and store the measured reflections. As part of preparing for a laboratory-scale demonstration, the design and fabrication of the laboratory samples has begun. Three cement blocks with embedded objects will be fabricated, characterized, and used to demonstrate the capabilities of the system. During the next quarter, we will continue to improve the current MBIR forward model and integrate the reconstruction code with the LabView GUI. In addition, we will define focal laws for the ultrasonic phased array and perform the laboratory demonstration. We expect to perform laboratory demonstration by the end of October 2015.

  7. Emergency Diesel Generation System Surveillance Test Policy Optimization Through Genetic Algorithms Using Non-Periodic Intervention Frequencies and Seasonal Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapa, Celso M.F.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [CNEN, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rua General Severiano 90, Rio de Janeiro, RJ-22-294-900 (Brazil); Frutuoso e Melo, P.F. [COPPE/UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco G, sala 101, Ilha do Fundao, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    Nuclear standby safety systems must frequently, be submitted to periodic surveillance tests. The main reason is to detect, as soon as possible, the occurrence of unrevealed failure states. Such interventions may, however, affect the overall system availability due to component outages. Besides, as the components are demanded, deterioration by aging may occur, penalizing again the system performance. By these reasons, planning a good surveillance test policy implies in a trade-off between gains and overheads due to the surveillance test interventions. In order maximize the systems average availability during a given period of time, it has recently been developed a non-periodic surveillance test optimization methodology based on genetic algorithms (GA). The fact of allowing non-periodic tests turns the solution space much more flexible and schedules can be better adjusted, providing gains in the overall system average availability, when compared to those obtained by an optimized periodic tests scheme. The optimization problem becomes, however, more complex. Hence, the use of a powerful optimization technique, such as GAs, is required. Some particular features of certain systems can turn it advisable to introduce other specific constraints in the optimization problem. The Emergency Diesel Generation System (EDGS) of a Nuclear Power Plant (N-PP) is a good example for demonstrating the introduction of seasonal constraints in the optimization problem. This system is responsible for power supply during an external blackout. Therefore, it is desirable during periods of high blackout probability to maintain the system availability as high as possible. Previous applications have demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of the methodology. However, no seasonal constraints have ever been imposed. This work aims at investigating the application of such methodology in the Angra-II Brazilian NPP EDGS surveillance test policy optimization, considering the blackout probability

  8. Annual Report: 2011-2012 Storm Season Sampling, Non-Dry Dock Stormwater Monitoring for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Rupert, Brian; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhart, Christine

    2013-07-03

    Annual PSNS non-dry dock storm water monitoring results for 2011-2012 storm season. Included are a brief description of the sampling procedures, storm event information, laboratory methods and data collection, a results and discussion section, and the conclusions and recommendations.

  9. How do rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations behave under seasonal water stress in northeastern Thailand and central Cambodia?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Mudd, Ryan G.; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Kobayashi, Nakako; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Lim, Tiva Khan; Liu, Wen; Huang, Maoyi; Fox, Jefferson M.; Ziegler, Alan D.; Yin, Song; Mak, Sophea Veasna; Kasemsap, Poonpipope

    2015-11-01

    Plantation rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Mll. Arg.) is a viable economic resource for Southeast Asian countries. Consequently, rubber plantations are rapidly expanding into both climatically optimal and sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia, potentially changing the partitioning of water, energy, and carbon at multiple scales, compared with the traditional land covers they are replacing. Delineating the characteristics of biosphere-atmosphere exchange in rubber plantations is therefore important to understanding the impacts of such land use change on environmental processes. We have conducted eddy flux measurements in two rubber plantation sites: (1) Som Sanuk (SS), located northern Thailand; and (2) Cambodian Rubber Research Institute (CRRI), central Cambodia. Both sites have a distinct dry season. Measurements were made over a 3-year period. We used combination of actual evapotranspiration (ET) flux measurements and an inversed version of a simple 2-layer ET model for estimating the mean canopy stomatal conductances (gs), which is among the most effective measures for describing water and energy exchanges and tree water use characteristics. A main novelty in this analysis is that the rubber canopy conductance can be extracted from total surface conductance (including the canopy and the vegetation floor effects) and hence environmental and biological controls on rubber tree gs are explicitly compared at each site in different seasons and years. It is demonstrated how each studied rubber plantation copes with each strong seasonal drought via tree water use strategies. Potential tree water use deficit (precipitation (P) potential evaporation (ET_POT)) for each season (i.e., December-February: DJF, March-May: MAM, June-August: JJA, and September-November: SON) revealed in which season and how the water use should be controlled. We found that in seasons when actual tree water use deficit (P E

  10. Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.