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1

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Current Forecast: December 10, 2013; Previous Forecast: November 13, 2013 Current Forecast: December 10, 2013; Previous Forecast: November 13, 2013 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 2012 2013 2014 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 U.S. Energy Supply U.S. Crude Oil Production (million barrels per day) Current 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 5.65 6.49 7.50 8.54 14.8% 15.6% 13.8% Previous 6.22 6.30 6.43 7.04 7.13 7.30 7.60 7.91 8.22 8.40 8.52 8.80 5.65 6.50 7.49 8.49 15.0% 15.2% 13.3% Percent Change 0.0% -0.1% -0.2% -0.2% -0.3% -0.1% 0.1% 0.7% 0.5% 0.5% 0.6% 0.6% 0.0% -0.1% 0.1% 0.6% U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (billion cubic feet per day) Current 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.88 67.99 67.74 67.37 67.70 62.74 65.75 66.82 67.70 4.8% 1.6% 1.3% Previous 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.30 67.47 67.41 67.04 67.37 62.74 65.75 66.68 67.32

2

After starting with a 12,000-job bang in 2010-Q2, Connecticut's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sales -0.1% State Exports -2.9% Personal Income (est.) +3.2% Coincident GDI +0.6% Indicators of Future GDI +4.1% TAKING STOCK 'TIS THE SEASON? -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 Retail Construction Q4Q3Q2Q1 CT JOBS

Holsinger, Kent

3

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total" Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total" "Alabama",1595069,1422595,1446039,4463703,1651900,1673270,1619686,4944856,1609758,1743418,1702481,5055657,1618031,1459125,1520148,4597304,19061520 "Alaska",132989,119164,123742,375895,111713,113169,109538,334420,76798,83175,78226,238199,80312,66775,50123,197210,1145724 "Arizona",1158076,1038925,1084980,3281981,1017804,1030975,974342,3023121,988049,1095624,1063939,3147612,1183635,1062729,1104980,3351344,12804058 "Arkansas",978,1085,2107,4170,1565,1582,1524,4671,636,689,971,2296,935,843,871,2649,13786 "Colorado",3163974,2824806,2885394,8874174,2997782,3036576,2869817,8904175,2629615,2915930,3075236,8620781,3004721,2814415,2884793,8703929,35103059

4

SustSciTeam_ProgramSummary_051611.xlsx.5/16/11 1Q 2Q 3Q Summer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-month) Orientation and Team Building Year 1 Sustainability Science ESS280A (4units) Independent Research XXX299 (4 units) Independent Research XXX299 (4 units) Summer Salary Sustainability Science Course; Define Team Report; Progress mtgs. Sustainability Science Team - Summary Schedule Apply to Sustainability Science

Rose, Michael R.

5

R Measurements at High Q^2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous Measurements of R at high Q^2 are reviewed. Recent R measurement results, including those from the Beijing Spectrometer Experiment, are described. The present status of R measurements and future measurement possiblities are summarized.

F. A. Harris

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q3 2013) Q3 2013) FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA's exemptions to protect information that is: classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; proprietary; personal; and pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of

7

Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

I (Q3) Wind Farm I (Q3) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q3) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer RES/Horizon Energy Purchaser Direct Energy Location Callahan and Shackelford counties TX Coordinates 32.594885°, -99.506464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.594885,"lon":-99.506464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q2 by Origin State: Alabama Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Florida Railroad - - 8 - 8 Georgia Railroad 118 - - - 118 Georgia Truck s - 15 - 15 Georgia Total 118 - 15 - 133 Indiana Railroad - 83 - - 83 Indiana Truck 17 34 - - 50 Indiana Total 17 116 - - 133 Kentucky Railroad 83 - - - 83 Pennsylvania Railroad 95 - - - 95 Origin State Total 2,197 212 285 - 2,695 Railroad 1,171 95 40 - 1,305 River 855 - - - 855 Truck 171 118 245 - 534 2 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alaska

9

Electrolux: ENERGY STAR Referral (GAH105Q2T1)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE referred the matter of Electrolux room air conditioner model GAH105Q2T1 to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification.

10

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2013) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q2 2013) Q2 2013) FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA's exemptions to protect information that is: classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; proprietary; personal; and pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of

11

Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Q2) Wind Farm Q2) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q2) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer RES/Horizon Energy Purchaser Direct Energy Location Callahan and Shackelford counties TX Coordinates 32.594885°, -99.506464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.594885,"lon":-99.506464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Origin State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Colorado Railroad 123 - - - 123 Illinois River 145 - - - 145 Indiana River 246 - - - 246 Indiana Truck 37 - - - 37 Indiana Total 283 - - - 283 Kentucky Railroad 426 - 30 - 457 Kentucky (East) Railroad 172 - 30 - 202 Kentucky (West) Railroad 255 - - - 255 Oklahoma Railroad - 6 - - 6 Utah Railroad 30 - - - 30 Virginia Railroad - 14 - - 14 West Virginia Railroad - 75 - -

13

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs - FY13 Q2 ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs - FY13 Q2 Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs - FY13 Q2 This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich...

14

Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY13 Q2 Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2 This document summarizes the progress of this Jet Propulsion Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter...

15

TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls More Documents &...

16

A measurement of $alpha_s(Q^2)$ from the Gross-Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extract a set of values for the Gross-Llewellyn Smith sum rule at different values of 4-momentum transfer squared ($Q^{2}$), by combining revised CCFR neutrino data with data from other neutrino deep-inelastic scattering experiments for $1 < Q^2 < 15 GeV^2/c^2$. A comparison with the order $\\alpha^{3}_{s}$ theoretical predictions yields a determination of $\\alpha_{s}$ at the scale of the Z-boson mass of $0.114 \\pm^{.009}_{.012}$. This measurement provides a new and useful test of perturbative QCD at low $Q^2$, because of the low uncertainties in the higher order calculations.

J. H. Kim; D. A. Harris

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

On the roughening transition in the Potts model (q=2, 3) in two and three dimensions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Roughening-respectively depinning-transitions of interfaces between regions...q-state Potts model (q=2, 3) in two and three dimensions. For two dimensions the depinning temperatureT ...

I. Schmidt; W. Pesch

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Jefferson Lab's results on the Q^2-evolution of moments of spin structure functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the recent JLab measurements on moments of spin structure functions at intermediate and low Q^2. The Bjorken sum and Burkhardt-Cottingham sum on the neutron are presented. The later appears to hold. Higher moments (generalized spin polarizabilities and d_2^n) are shown and compared to chiral perturbation theory and lattice QCD respectively.

A. Deur

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Moments of the neutron $g_2$ structure function at intermediate $Q^2$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new experimental results of the $^3$He spin structure function $g_2$ in the resonance region at $Q^2$ values between 1.2 and 3.0 (GeV/c)$^2$. Spin dependent moments of the neutron were then extracted. Our main result, the resonance contribution to the neutron $d_2$ matrix element, was found to be small at $$=2.4 (GeV/c)$^2$ and in agreement with the Lattice QCD calculation. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule for $^3$He and the neutron was tested with the measured data and using the Wandzura-Wilczek relation for the low $x$ unmeasured region. A small deviation was observed at $Q^2$ values between 0.5 and 1.2 (GeV/c)$^2$ for the neutron.

P. Solvignon; N. Liyanage; J. -P. Chen; Seonho Choi; K. Slifer; K. Aniol; T. Averett; W. Boeglin; A. Camsonne; G. D. Cates; C. C. Chang; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; R. Ent; R. Feuerbach; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; V. Gorbenko; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; H. Ibrahim; X. Jiang; M. Jones; A. Kelleher; J. Kelly; C. Keppel; W. Kim; W. Korsch; K. Kramer; G. Kumbartzki; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; B. Ma; D. J. Margazioti; P. Markowitz; K. McCormick; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; C. Munoz Camacho; K. Paschke; B. Reitz; A. Saha; R. Shneor; J. Singh; V. Sulkosky; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; S. Woo; J. -C. Yang; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via ?*p ? n?+ at high Q2  

We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the n?+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4? CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the ?-N multipole E0+/GD were measured using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.

Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bennett, R P; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Boiarinov, S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Euginio, P; Fedotov, G; Fradi, A; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Khandaker, M; Khertarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, S; Anefalos Pereira, S; Phelps, E; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabati ee, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tian, Y; Tkachenko, S; Trivedi, A; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Measurement of the proton structure function $F_L(x,Q^2)$ at low x  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A first measurement is reported of the longitudinal proton structure function F_L(x,Q^2) at the ep collider HERA. It is based on inclusive deep inelastic e^+p scattering cross section measurements with a positron beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 575 and 460 GeV. Employing the energy dependence of the cross section, F_L is measured in a range of squared four-momentum transfers 12 < Q^2 < 90 GeV^2 and low Bjorken x 0.00024 < x < 0.0036. The F_L values agree with higher order QCD calculations based on parton densities obtained using cross section data previously measured at HERA.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Del Degan, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; Dek, M; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Grlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jhnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Jnsson, L; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krmer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lpez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Murn, P; Mller, K; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Prez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schning, A; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Trul, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkrov, A; Valle, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wnsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zcek, J; Zlesk, J; De Boer, Y

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Jet Production in ep Collisions at High $Q^2$ and Determination of $\\alpha_s$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic ep scattering at large negative four momentum transfer squared 150<Q^2<15000 GeV^2 using HERA data taken in 1999-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 395 pb^-1. Inclusive jet, 2-jet and 3-jet cross sections, normalised to the neutral current deep-inelastic scattering cross sections, are measured as functions of Q^2, jet transverse momentum and proton momentum fraction. The measurements are well described by perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects. The strong coupling as determined from these measurements is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1168 +/-0.0007 (exp.) +0.0046/-0.0030 (th.) +/-0.0016(pdf).

Aaron, FD; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Asmone, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D -J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H -U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H -C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Jet Production in ep Collisions at Low Q^2 and Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e+p scattering at low negative four momentum transfer squared 5<Q^2<100 GeV^2 and at inelasticity 0.2Q^2 and jet transverse momentum. The 2-jet cross section is also measured as a function of the proton momentum fraction xi. The measurements are well described by perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects and are subsequently used to extract the strong coupling alpha_s.

Aaron, FD; Alexa, C; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kosior, E; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Tabasco, J E Ruiz; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Trevino, A Vargas; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Flavor decomposition of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors at low $Q^2$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial distribution of charge and magnetization within the proton is encoded in the elastic form factors. These have been precisely measured in elastic electron scattering, and the combination of proton and neutron form factors allows for the separation of the up- and down-quark contributions. In this work, we extract the proton and neutron form factors from world's data with an emphasis on precise new data covering the low-momentum region, which is sensitive to the large-scale structure of the nucleon. From these, we separate the up- and down-quark contributions to the proton form factors. We combine cross section and polarization measurements of elastic electron-proton scattering to separate the proton form factors and two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions. We combine the proton form factors with parameterization of the neutron form factor data and uncertainties to separate the up- and down-quark contributions to the proton's charge and magnetic form factors. The extracted TPE corrections are compared to previous phenomenological extractions, TPE calculations, and direct measurements from the comparison of electron and positron scattering. The flavor-separated form factors are extracted and compared to models of the nucleon structure. With the inclusion of the precise new data, the extracted TPE contributions show a clear change ofsign at low $Q^2$, necessary to explain the high-$Q^2$ form factor discrepancy while being consistent with the known $Q^2 \\to 0$ limit. We find that the new Mainz data yield a significantly different result for the proton magnetic form factor and its flavor-separated contributions. We also observe that the RMS radius of both the up- and down-quark distributions are smaller than the RMS charge radius of the proton.

I. A. Qattan; J. Arrington; A. Alsaad

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

Electroproduction of $\\phi(1020)$ Mesons at High $Q^2$ with CLAS  

SciTech Connect

http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.025210
Electroproduction of exclusive $\\phi$ vector mesons has been studied with the CLAS detector in the kinematical range $1.6\\leq Q^2\\leq 3.8$ GeV$^{2}$, $0.0\\leq t^{\\prime}\\leq 3.6$ GeV$^{2}$, and $2.0\\leq W\\leq 3.0$ GeV. The scaling exponent for the total cross section as $1/(Q^2+M_{\\phi}^2)^n$ was determined to be $n=2.49\\pm 0.33$. The slope of the four-momentum transfer $t'$ distribution is $b_{\\phi}=0.98 \\pm 0.17$ GeV$^{-2}$. The data are consistent with the assumption of s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC). Under this assumption, we determine the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross sections to be $R=0.86 \\pm 0.24$. A 2-gluon exchange model is able to reproduce the main features of the data.

Santoro, Joseph; Smith, Elton; Garcon, Michel; Guidal, Michel; Laget, Jean; Weiss, Christian; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, James; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crannell, Hall; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Sanctis, Enzo; De Vita, Raffaella; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feuerbach, Robert; Ficenec, John; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, A

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Resonance Region at High $Q^2$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process $ep \\to e^{\\prime}p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$ has been measured at $Q^2$ = 6.4 and 7.7 GeV/c$^2$)$^2$ in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center of mass frame considering the process $\\gamma^{\\ast}p \\to p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well known $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios $R_{EM}$ and $R_{SM}$ along with the magnetic transition form factor $G_M^{\\ast}$. It is found that the rapid fall off of the $\\Delta(1232)$ contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances

A. N. Villano; P. Stoler; P. E. Bosted; S. H. Connell; M. M. Dalton; M. K. Jones; V. Kubarovsky; G. S Adams; A. Ahmidouch; J. Arrington; R. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; H. Breuer; M. E. Christy; S. Danagoulian; D. Day; J. A. Dunne; D. Dutta; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; V. V. Frolov; L. Gan; D. Gaskell; W. Hinton; R. J. Holt; T. Horn; G. M. Huber; K. Joo; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; Y. Li; A. Lung; D. Mack; S. Malace; P. Markowitz; D. G. Meekins; H. Mkrtchyan; J. Napolitano; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; D. H. Potterveld; Paul E. Reimer; J. Reinhold; J. Roche; S. E. Rock; G. R. Smith; S. Stepanyan; V. Tadevosyan; V. Tvaskis; M. Ungaro; A. Uzzle; S. Vidakovic; F. R. Wesselmann; B. Wojtsekhowski; S. A. Wood; L. Yuan; X. Zheng; H. Zhu

2009-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

Strangeness Production at low $Q^2$ in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2 and the inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.6. The K_s and Lambda production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K_s production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Lambda - anti-Lambda asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H.-U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, Paul R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2  

SciTech Connect

Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleons quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this Letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5??GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the nonperturbative regime.

Puckett, A J.R.; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nedev, S; Nuruzzaman,; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvingnon, P; Subedi, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

P2Q2Iso2D = 2D ISOPARAMETRIC FEM IN MATLAB S. BARTELS, C. CARSTENSEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P2Q2Iso2D = 2D ISOPARAMETRIC FEM IN MATLAB S. BARTELS, C. CARSTENSEN , AND A. HECHT Abstract. A short Matlab implementation realizes a flexible isoparametric finite element method up to quadratic a short Matlab implementation of this finite element method for the Laplace equation in two dimensions

Bartels, Soeren

30

2014_Q3.indd  

Energy Savers (EERE)

continue monitoring the region very closely." LM is currently assessing the best way to repair the damage that occurred to the mud pit caps and is scheduled to conduct biological...

31

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Livestock Seasonal Price Variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal price movements can be measured and used to help in marketing livestock. This publication includes 10-year seasonal price indexes for several livestock categories, and explains how to interpret and use the information....

Davis, Ernest E.; Sartwelle III, James D.; Mintert, James R.

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

Intertie Open Season  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement (CBPI) Customer Forum Energy Imbalance Market Generator Interconnection Reform Implementation Intertie Initiatives Intertie Open Season Transmission Utilization...

34

Angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay in the low-$q^2$ region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay is performed using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 ${\\mbox{fb}^{-1}}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. For the first time several observables are measured in the dielectron mass squared ($q^2$) interval between 0.002 and 1.120${\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V^2\\!/}c^4}$. The angular observables $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}}$ which are related to the $K^{*0}$ polarisation and to the lepton forward-backward asymmetry, are measured to be $F_{\\mathrm{L}}= 0.16 \\pm 0.06 \\pm0.03$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}} = 0.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The angular observables $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Im}}$ which are sensitive to the photon polarisation in this $q^2$ range, are found to be $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)} = -0.23 \\pm 0.23 \\pm 0.05$ a...

Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frdric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Dlage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Surez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Frber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garca Pardias, Julin; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gian, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Gbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gndara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugs, Eugeni; Graverini, Helena

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay in the low-$q^2$ region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay is performed using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 ${\\mbox{fb}^{-1}}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. For the first time several observables are measured in the dielectron mass squared ($q^2$) interval between 0.002 and 1.120${\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V^2\\!/}c^4}$. The angular observables $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}}$ which are related to the $K^{*0}$ polarisation and to the lepton forward-backward asymmetry, are measured to be $F_{\\mathrm{L}}= 0.16 \\pm 0.06 \\pm0.03$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}} = 0.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The angular observables $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Im}}$ which are sensitive to the photon polarisation in this $q^2$ range, are found to be $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)} = -0.23 \\pm 0.23 \\pm 0.05$ ...

LHCb Collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2  

SciTech Connect

The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Electroexcitation of the Roper resonance for 1.7 < Q**2 < 4.5 -GeV2 in vec-ep ---> en pi+  

SciTech Connect

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045209
The helicity amplitudes of the electroexcitation of the Roper resonance are extracted for 1.7 < Q2 < 4.5 GeV2 from recent high precision JLab-CLAS cross section and longitudinally polarized beam asymmetry data for pi+ electroproduction on protons at W=1.15-1.69 GeV. The analysis is made using two approaches, dispersion relations and a unitary isobar model, which give consistent results. It is found that the transverse helicity amplitude A_{1/2} for the gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 transition, which is large and negative at Q2=0, becomes large and positive at Q2 ~ 2 GeV2, and then drops slowly with Q2. The longitudinal helicity amplitude S_{1/2}, which was previously found from CLAS ep -> eppi0,enpi+ data to be large and positive at Q2=0.4,0.65 GeV2, drops with Q2. Available model predictions for gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 allow us to conclude that these results provide strong evidence in favor of N(1440)P11 as a first radial excitation of

Aznauryan, Inna; Burkert, Volker; Kim, Wooyoung; Park, Kil; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Bagdasaryan, H.; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Batourine, V.; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, Wilbert; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Donnelly, J.; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Gonenc, Atilla; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, L.; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hafnaoui, Khadija; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hakobyan, Rafael; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Andreas; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lee, T.; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, Konstantin; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, S.; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Jerome; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Polli, Ermanno; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, J.; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Berechenbarkeitstheorie Ralf Schindler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tafel (eine Matrix) der Gr¨o?e n · m wiedergegeben werden, wobei n die Zahl der Element von Q und m die ¨Ubergangsfunktion : Q ? Q durch folgende Tafel gegeben sein. 0 1 q0 q1 q2 q1 q2 q3 q2 q3 q3 q3 q3 q3 Die

Schindler, Ralf

39

Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarised positron beams at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first measurements of the cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with longitudinally polarised positron beams are presented. The total cross section for e+p charged current deep inelastic scattering is presented at positive and negative values of positron beam longitudinal polarisation for an integrated luminosity of 37.0 pb^-1 H1 data and 30.5 pb^-1 ZEUS data collected in 2003 and 2004 at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. In addition, the ZEUS collaboration measured the single differential cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in the kinematic region Q^2>200 GeV^2. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. The H1 collaboration extrapolate the cross section to a fully left handed positron beam and find it to be consistent with the Standard Model expectation.

Julian Rautenberg

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Separated cross sections in ?^0 electroproduction at threshold at Q^2 = 0.05 GeV^2/c^2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The differential cross sections \\sigma_0=\\sigma_T+\\epsilon \\sigma_L, \\sigma_{LT}, and \\sigma_{TT} of \\pi^0 electroproduction from the proton were measured from threshold up to an additional center of mass energy of 40 MeV, at a value of the photon four-momentum transfer of Q^2= 0.05 GeV^2/c^2 and a center of mass angle of \\theta=90^\\circ. By an additional out-of-plane measurement with polarized electrons \\sigma_{LT'} was determined. This showed for the first time the cusp effect above the \\pi^+ threshold in the imaginary part of the s-wave. The predictions of Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory are in disagreement with these data. On the other hand, the data are somewhat better predicted by the MAID phenomenological model and are in good agreement with the dynamical model DMT.

M. Weis; P. Bartsch; D. Baumann; J. Bermuth; A. M. Bernstein; K. Bohinc; R. Bhm; M. Ding; M. O. Distler; I. Ewald; J. M. Friedrich; J. Friedrich; M. Kahrau; M. Kohl; K. W. Krygier; A. Liesenfeld; H. Merkel; P. Merle; U. Mller; R. Neuhausen; M. M. Pavan; Th. Pospischil; M. Potokar; G. Rosner; H. Schmieden; M. Seimetz; S. irca; A. Wagner; Th. Walcher

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Seasonal Landscape Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Landscape Maintenance Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII State University's Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture and Oklahoma Cooperative to dry between watering allows plants to develop stronger, deeper roots. However, some landscape plants

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

42

Berechenbarkeitstheorie Ralf Schindler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

endlicher Automat, A = (Q, #, #, q 0 , F ). Dann kann # auch durch eine Tafel (eine Matrix) der Gr? o?e n ? Ubergangsfunktion # : Q? # # Q durch folgende Tafel gegeben sein. 0 1 q 0 q 1 q 2 q 1 q 2 q 3 q 2 q 3 q 3 q 3 q 3 q

Schindler, Ralf

43

Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d(sigma)/dQ2, d(sigma)/dx and d(sigma)/dy and the reduced cross-section were measured in the kinematic region Q2 > 185 GeV2 and y energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F3 and F3(gamma)Z were determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; P. Antonioli; A. Antonov; M. Arneodo; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. Bamberger; A. N. Barakbaev; G. Barbagli; G. Bari; F. Barreiro; N. Bartosik; D. Bartsch; M. Basile; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; L. Bellagamba; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; M. Bindi; C. Blohm; V. Bokhonov; T. Bold; K. Bondarenko; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; D. Boscherini; D. Bot; I. Brock; E. Brownson; R. Brugnera; N. Brummer; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; B. Bylsma; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; R. Carlin; C. D. Catterall; S. Chekanov; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; A. Contin; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; N. Coppola; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; M. Costa; G. D'Agostini; F. Dal Corso; J. del Peso; R. K. Dementiev; S. De Pasquale; M. Derrick; R. C. E. Devenish; D. Dobur; B. A. Dolgoshein; G. Dolinska; A. T. Doyle; V. Drugakov; L. S. Durkin; S. Dusini; Y. Eisenberg; P. F. Ermolov; A. Eskreys; S. Fang; S. Fazio; J. Ferrando; M. I. Ferrero; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Galas; E. Gallo; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; I. Gialas; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; D. Gladkov; C. Glasman; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; P. Gottlicher; I. Grabowska-Bold; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grigorescu; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; C. Gwenlan; T. Haas; W. Hain; R. Hamatsu; J. C. Hart; H. Hartmann; G. Hartner; E. Hilger; D. Hochman; R. Hori; A. Huttmann; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; R. Ingbir; M. Ishitsuka; H. -P. Jakob; F. Januschek; T. W. Jones; M. Jungst; I. Kadenko; B. Kahle; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; F. Karstens; I. I. Katkov; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; A. Keramidas; L. A. Khein; J. Y. Kim; D. Kisielewska; S. Kitamura; R. Klanner; U. Klein; E. Koffeman; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; P. Kooijman; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; A. Lee; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; T. Y. Ling; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; K. R. Long; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; S. Magill; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; R. Mankel; A. Margotti; G. Marini; J. F. Martin; A. Mastroberardino; M. C. K. Mattingly; I. -A. Melzer-Pellmann; S. Mergelmeyer; S. Miglioranzi; F. Mohamad Idris; V. Monaco; A. Montanari; J. D. Morris; K. Mujkic; B. Musgrave; K. Nagano; T. Namsoo; R. Nania; A. Nigro; Y. Ning; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; A. E. Nuncio-Quiroz; B. Y. Oh; N. Okazaki; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; K. Papageorgiu; A. Parenti; E. Paul; J. M. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; P. G. Pelfer; A. Pellegrino; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; K. Piotrzkowski; P. Plucinski; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. Polini; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; D. D. Reeder; B. Reisert; Z. Ren; J. Repond; Y. D. Ri; A. Robertson; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; R. Sacchi; U. Samson; G. Sartorelli; A. A. Savin; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; S. Schlenstedt; P. Schleper; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; V. Schonberg; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; F. Sciulli; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shehzadi; S. Shimizu; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; W. H. Smith; V. Sola; A. Solano; D. Son; V. Sosnovtsev; A. Spiridonov; H. Stadie; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; A. Stifutkin; P. Stopa; S. Suchkov; G. Susinno; L. Suszycki; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; A. D. Tapper; E. Tassi; J. Terron; T. Theedt; H. Tiecke; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; M. Vazquez; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; N. N. Vlasov; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; J. J. Whitmore; K. Wichmann; L. Wiggers; M. Wing; M. Wlasenko; G. Wolf; H. Wolfe; K. Wrona; A. G. Yagues-Molina; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; R. Yoshida; C. Youngman; O. Zabiegalov; A. F. . Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; W. Zeuner; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; A. Zichichi; Z. Zolkapli; D. S. Zotkin

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Measurement of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron at Q^2 = 0.3-0.8 (GeV/c)^2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric form factor of the neutron, G_En, has been measured at the Mainz Microtron by recoil polarimetry in the quasielastic D(e_pol,e'n_pol)p reaction. Three data points have been extracted at squared four-momentum transfers Q^2 = 0.3, 0.6 and 0.8 (GeV/c)^2. Corrections for nuclear binding effects have been applied.

D. I. Glazier; M. Seimetz; J. R. M. Annand; H. Arenhvel; M. Ases Antelo; C. Ayerbe; P. Bartsch; D. Baumann; J. Bermuth; R. Bhm; D. Bosnar; M. Ding; M. O. Distler; D. Elsner; J. Friedrich; S. Hedicke; P. Jennewein; G. Jover Maas; F. H. Klein; F. Klein; M. Kohl; K. W. Krygier; K. Livingston; I. J. D. MacGregor; M. Makek; H. Merkel; P. Merle; D. Middleton; U. Mller; R. Neuhausen; L. Nungesser; M. Ostrick; R. Prez Benito; J. Pochodzalla; Th. Pospischil; M. Potokar; A. Reiter; G. Rosner; J. Sanner; H. Schmieden; A. Sle; Th. Walcher; D. Watts; M. Weis

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Prova Scritta di Robotica I 4 Dicembre 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cartesiane ammesse sono pari a Vmax = 1 m/s e, rispettivamente, Amax = 4 m/s2 . Determinare la legge oraria A4(q3, q4) = 2 R4(q3, q4) 0 Nc4 q3 + Ns4 0T 1 1 A4(q2, q3, q4) = 1 R4(q2, q3, q4) s2(q3 + Ns4) -c2(q3 + Ns4) Nc4 0T 1 0 A4(q1, q2, q3, q4) = 0 R4(q1, q2, q3, q4) Mc1 + c1s2(q3

De Luca, Alessandro

46

Four seasons of giving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kurt's Column Kurt's Column Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Four seasons of giving We value a culture of giving and appreciate our employees' on-going volunteerism throughout Northern New Mexico and even nationwide. January 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email We value a culture of giving and appreciate our employees' on-going volunteerism throughout Northern New Mexico and even nationwide. So, as the Lab, its employees, and retirees wrap up this year's season, I'm happy to say this is not our only time of giving. Programs such as our Science Education Community Service Time efforts mean that whenever school is in

47

LLQR-2012-Q3.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 September 5, 2012; Issue no. 72 NEPA Lessons Learned September 2012 1 Secretary Chu: Integrate Project Management with NEPA To Improve Decision Making "I cannot overstate the importance of integrating the NEPA compliance process with program and project management and of applying best management practices to NEPA compliance in DOE," said Secretary of Energy Steven Chu in a June 12, 2012, memorandum on Improved Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance. He reminded DOE officials that NEPA compliance is a "pre-requisite to successful implementation of DOE programs and projects" and that "the NEPA process is a valuable planning tool and provides an opportunity to improve the quality of DOE's

48

Q3 1997 STEO, Final  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (Released July 8, 1997) 7 (Released July 8, 1997) Energy Information Administration DOE/EIA-0202(97/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections Third Quarter 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to W. Calvin Kilgore (202-586-1617), Director

49

Consistent threshold pi0 electro-production at Q^2=0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 GeV^2/c^2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New, accurate data are presented on the near threshold p(e,e'p)pi^0 reaction in the range of four-momentum transfers between Q^2=0.05 and 0.15GeV^2/c^2. The data were taken with the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. The complete center of mass solid angle was covered up to a center of mass energy of 4MeV above threshold. These results supersede the previous analysis based on three separate experiments, and are compared with calculations in Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory and with phenomenological models.

H. Merkel; P. Achenbach; C. Ayerbe Gayoso; M. Ases Antelo; D. Baumann; A. M. Bernstein; R. Bhm; D. Bosnar; M. Ding; M. O. Distler; L. Doria; J. Garcia Llongo; D. W. Higinbotham; G. Jover Maas; M. Makek; U. Mller; R. Neuhausen; L. Nungesser; R. Prez Benito; J. Pochodzalla; M. Seimetz; S. Sirca; S. Stave; Th. Walcher; M. Weis

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

50

A new measurement of the structure functions $P_{LL}-P_{TT}/epsilon$ and $P_{LT}$ in virtual Compton scattering at $Q^2=$ 0.33 (GeV/c)$^2$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cross section of the $ep \\to e' p' \\gamma$ reaction has been measured at $Q^2 = 0.33$ (GeV/c)$^2$. The experiment was performed using the electron beam of the MAMI accelerator and the standard detector setup of the A1 Collaboration. The cross section is analyzed using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering, yielding a new determination of the two structure functions $P_LL}-P_{TT}/epsilon$ and $P_{LT}$ which are linear combinations of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton. We find somewhat larger values than in the previous investigation at the same $Q^2$. This difference, however, is purely due to our more refined analysis of the data. The results tend to confirm the non-trivial $Q^2$-evolution of the generalized polarizabilities and call for more measurements in the low-$Q^2$ region ($\\le$ 1 (GeV/c)$^2$).

The MAMI-A1 Collaboration; :; P. Janssens; L. Doria; P. Achenbach; C. Ayerbe Gayoso; D. Baumann; J. C. Bernauer; I. K. Bensafa; R. Bhm; D. Bosnar; E. Burtin; N. D'Hose; X. Defa; M. Ding; M. O. Distler; H. Fonvieille; J. Friedrich; J. M. Friedrich; G. Laveissire; M. Makek; J. Marroncle; H. Merkel; U. Mller; L. Nungesser; B. Pasquini; J. Pochodzalla; O. Postavaru; M. Potokar; D. Ryckbosch; S. Sanchez Majos; B. S. Schlimme; M. Seimetz; S. irca; G. Tamas; R. Van de Vyver; L. Van Hoorebeke; A. Van Overloop; Th. Walcher; M. Weinriefer

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Seasonal Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seasonal Tips Seasonal Tips Seasonal Tips January 23, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis Amanda McAlpin I've often wished I lived in one of those fabulous places where it's 72 degrees and sunny year-round. But unfortunately, most of us don't. And to stay comfortable, we need heat and hot coffee in the winter, and air-conditioning and lemonade in the summer. Luckily, part of the Energy Savers site is dedicated to helping us save energy during all four seasons. Bring up the dedicated Energy Savers seasonal website and learn great ways to reduce your energy bill. Tips range from small changes you can make immediately, such as closing your drapes, to information on modifications you can make to your home for even larger benefits. There is even information on assistance for energy-savings improvements to your home.

52

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun ","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2003 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Total" 3 Total" "Alabama",1771113,1510892,1622954,4904959,1863504,1845388,1776824,5485716,1600128,1565897,1672632,4838657,1763889,1479114,1734574,4977577,20206909 "Alaska",87443,76405,79754,243602,62928,62232,69581,194741,67907,66760,67789,202456,156990,131143,152391,440524,1081323 "Arizona",1073559,941887,1030496,3045942,943093,932681,884672,2760446,1040168,1016416,1058519,3115103,1107584,941831,1088188,3137603,12059094 "Arkansas",829,426,1561,2816,484,478,264,1226,442,432,494,1368,769,439,946,2154,7564 "Colorado",2846715,2541328,2830992,8219035,2865526,2903720,2827776,8597022,3131374,3268010,3269638,9669022,3014173,2950843,3381090,9346106,35831185 "Illinois",2961000,2440349,2876040,8277389,2706876,2702220,3169886,8578982,2373950,2388551,2344648,7107149,2993442,2346572,2456095,7796109,31759629

53

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun ","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2004 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Total" 4 Total" "Alabama",1725998,1581616,2004066,5311680,1926051,1739300,2099141,5764492,1605125,1654151,1850943,5110219,1976865,2078720,2086665,6142250,22328641 "Alaska",140314,131982,185547,457843,61887,55405,120646,237938,131114,130814,96529,358457,149748,156396,151405,457549,1511787 "Arizona",977250,897698,1100939,2975887,1049375,950831,1069753,3069959,1098199,1113785,977716,3189700,1129140,1195127,1171016,3495283,12730829 "Arkansas",1133,1013,845,2991,679,692,1274,2645,411,400,432,1243,170,166,113,449,7328 "Colorado",3527103,3179582,3398625,10105310,3407363,3451070,3468743,10327176,3293260,3357952,3258228,9909440,3172777,3167266,3188128,9528171,39870097 "Illinois",2888652,2695556,3272892,8857100,2664839,2497528,2930733,8093100,2657588,2695324,2480874,7833786,2322429,2411032,2394081,7127542,31911528

54

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2008  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season is summarized and the years tropical cyclones are described. Sixteen named storms formed in 2008. Of these, eight became hurricanes with five of them strengthening into major hurricanes (category 3 or higher on ...

Daniel P. Brown; John L. Beven; James L. Franklin; Eric S. Blake

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

LLQR-2012-Q2.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA NEPA 1 June 2012 Second Quarter FY 2012 June 5, 2012; Issue No. 71 U.S. DepartmeNt oF eNergY QUarterlY report National environmental policy act LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A How to Manage an EIS Schedule Successfully By: Brian Costner and Carrie Moeller, Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Developing and maintaining the schedule for preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is one of a NEPA Document Manager's most important responsibilities. The Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance recently asked several NEPA Compliance Officers (NCOs) and NEPA Document Managers to share their advice for completing an EIS on time. An EIS schedule goes through several stages, they observed. An initial schedule must be revised as data

56

LLQR-2000-Q2.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2000 June 2000 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For Second Quarter FY 2000 June 1, 2000; Issue No. 23 NEPA Compliance Officers Celebrate 10 Years of Progress, Look to Future Los Alamos Site-wide EIS Analyzed Wildfire Impacts, Prompted Mitigation Actions continued on page 3 As DOE and the Los Alamos region cope with the effects of last month's devastating fire, the 1999 Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Site- wide EIS has proved to be a valuable reference document. In fact, the NEPA process had earlier focused DOE attention on the risks of wildfire at LANL and prompted mitigation actions within the past year that reduced the severity of impacts of the fire. Moreover, the analyses in the Site-wide EIS

57

Determination of quadrupole strengths in the gamma*p-->Delta(1232) transition at Q2= 0.20 (GeV/c)2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report new precise p$(\\vec{e},e^\\prime p)\\pi^0$ measurements at the peak of the $\\Delta^{+}(1232)$ resonance at $Q^2=\\unit[0.20](GeV/c)^2$ performed at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI). The new data are sensitive to both the electric quadrupole ($E2$) and the coulomb quadrupole ($C2$) amplitudes of the $\\gamma^* N\\to\\Delta$ transition. They yield precise quadrupole to dipole amplitude ratios CMR $= (-5.09 \\pm 0.28_{stat+sys}\\pm 0.30_{model})%$ and EMR $= (-1.96 \\pm 0.68_{stat+sys} \\pm 0.41_{model})%$ for $M^{3/2}_{1+} = (39.57 \\pm 0.75_{stat+sys}\\pm 0.40_{model})(10^{-3}/m_{\\pi^+})$. The new results are in disagreement with Constituent Quark Model predictions and in qualitative agreement with models that account for mesonic contributions, including recent Lattice calculations. They thus give further credence to the conjecture of deformation in hadronic systems favoring the attribution of the origin of deformation to the dominance of mesonic effects.

N. F. Sparveris; P. Achenbach; C. Ayerbe Gayoso; D. Baumann; J. Bernauer; A. M. Bernstein; R. Bohm; D. Bosnar; T. Botto; A. Christopoulou; D. Dale; M. Ding; M. O. Distler; L. Doria; J. Friedrich; A. Karabarbounis; M. Makek; H. Merkel; U. Muller; I. Nakagawa; R. Neuhausen; L. Nungesser; C. N. Papanicolas; A. Piegsa; J. Pochodzalla; M. Potokar; M. Seimetz; S. Sirca; S. Stave; S. Stiliaris; Th. Walcher; M. Weis

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

CHAPTER XVI - TIME SERIES: SEASONAL FLUCTUATIONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the seasonal fluctuations in time series. Seasonal variations are defined either to be studied separately ormore oftento be removed, thus, allowing concentrating on the remaining variation. If the annual data are not strongly influenced by trend movements or cyclical changes, it is possible to compare seasonal data usuallymonthly data with averages not adjusted for trend and express them as percentages of these averages. In reality, the amplitude and period of seasonal movements vary in most cases from year to year, being affected by seasonal as well as by cyclical, random, and other nonseasonal factors. The averages, expressed in percentages, thus obtained are preliminary seasonal indexes. Seasonal indices based on the fitting of curves to monthly ratios, expressed as percentages, to moving averages are called moving seasonal indexes.

ISAAC PAENSON

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

How to Construct a Seasonal Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many crops, seasonality is often the dominant factor influencing prices within a single production period. This publication explains how to construct and use several kinds of seasonal indexes for crop marketing information....

Tierney Jr., William I.; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

Attachment 1 - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan | *** Q2 * 100 D-H Proposed Plan * Draft Land Conveyance EA | Q2 * Natural Gas Pipeline EIS | * Q2 * 2014 Budget Meetings (2015 & 2016 Budgets) | ** Q3 *...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nebraska Preparing for the Upcoming Heating Season  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Drivers * Crops Proactive Moves Heating Season Preparations by Nebraska Dealers * Contracting a bigger percentage of the amount of propane or heating oil that they estimate...

62

Influenza Seasonality: Underlying Causes and Modeling Theories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sporadic localized outbreaks. Such cases...mathematical models (31, 68...climates, flu infections...epidemics and outbreaks occur in tropical...seasonality. Flu season is characterized...dissemination model poses intriguing...accurately predict the incidence...respiratory syndrome outbreak at the Amoy...

Eric Lofgren; N. H. Fefferman; Y. N. Naumov; J. Gorski; E. N. Naumova

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

Regimes of the North Australian Wet Season  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The variability of the north Australian wet season is examined by performing cluster analysis on the wind and thermodynamic information contained in the 2300 UTC radiosonde data at Darwin for 49 wet seasons (SeptemberApril) from 1957/58 to 2005/...

Mick Pope; Christian Jakob; Michael J. Reeder

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Q3 1996 STEO TEXT/TABLES  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

202(96/3Q) 202(96/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections Third Quarter 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to W. Calvin Kilgore (202-586-1617), Director of EMEU; Mark Rodekohr (202-586-1441), Director of Energy Markets and Contingency

65

Microsoft Word - Q3_Jun_07.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Title Project Title Seismic Gas Hydrate Quantification by Cumulative Attributes (CATTs) Quarterly Progress Report DE-FC26-06NT42961 Prepared for: DOE/NETL, Morgantown, WV Prepared by: Rock Solid Images 2600 S. Gessner, Suite 650 Houston, TX, 77063 Principal Investigator: Joel Walls Phone: 713-783-5593 Fax: 713-783-5594 j.walls@rocksolidimages.com Date: July 30, 2007 2 Progress Report Award No. DE-FC26-06NT42961 Seismic Gas Hydrate Quantification by Cumulative Attributes (CATTs) Reporting Period: April 1, 2007 to June 30, 2007 Reporting Date: July 30, 2007 Executive Summary During this period, we have narrowed our data selection to the Milne Point area of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. We feel this data set offers the best combination of known hydrate

66

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report that captures quarterly FOIA data at the DOE level. Through the use of an Applied Programming Interface (or API), the information will display on www.FOIA.gov.

67

Electroproduction of ppi+pi- off protons at 0.2<Q^2<0.6 GeV^2 and 1.3 < W < 1.57 GeV with CLAS.  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the most comprehensive data set obtained on differential and fully integrated cross sections for the process $e p \\rightarrow e' p \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-} $. The data were collected with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. Measurements were carried out in the so-far unexplored kinematic region of photon virtuality 0.2 $<$ $Q^{2}$ $<$ 0.6 GeV$^{2}$ and invariant mass of the final hadron system $W$ from 1.3 to 1.57~GeV. For the first time, nine independent 1-fold differential cross sections were determined in each bin of $W$ and $Q^{2}$ covered by the measurements. A phenomenological analysis of the data allowed us to establish the most significant mechanisms contributing to the reaction. The non-resonant mechanisms account for a major part of cross-sections. However, we find sensitivity to s-channel excitations of low-mass nucleon resonances, especially to the $N(1440)P_{11}$ and $N(1520)D_{13}$ states in kinematical dependencies of the 1-fold

Fedotov, Gleb; Mokeev, Viktor; Burkert, Volker; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Golovach, Evgeny; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Shvedunov, Nikolay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Microsoft Word - S08364_SeasonalVariation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Groundwater Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site February 2012 LMS/RVT/S08364 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation, Riverton, Wyoming February 2012 Doc. No. S08364 Page 1 Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Executive Summary Historical groundwater monitoring at the Riverton site included collecting samples for a variety of analyses, including general water quality, inorganics, metals, and radionuclides. Evaluations of these constituents were conducted and presented in past documents, which resulted in four constituents of concern (COCs). This paper presents a reevaluation of 47 constituents using

69

Propane: A Mid-heating Season Assessment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2001 9, 2001 Propane - A Mid-Heating Season Assessment by David Hinton and Alice Lippert, Petroleum Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration In early October 2000, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecast that heating fuel markets would be expected to start the season with much higher prices and lower inventories than in recent years. While this assessment was true for both the heating oil and natural gas markets, propane markets actually began the season with adequate supplies but with high prices. Since EIA's forecast, propane inventories have plunged nearly 20 million barrels from their peak during the first half of the 2000-01 heating season while propane prices have continued to soar even higher than expected during this same period. This report will analyze some

70

On the Seasonality of the Hadley Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual march of the climatological mean meridional circulations (MMCs) in the NCEPNCAR reanalyses is dominated by two components of roughly comparable mean-squared amplitude: 1) a seasonally invariant pair of Hadley cells with rising ...

Ioana M. Dima; John M. Wallace

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

NOVA Making Stuff Season 2  

SciTech Connect

Over the course of four weeks in fall 2013, 11.7 million Americans tuned in to PBS to follow host David Pogue as he led them in search of engineering and scientific breakthroughs poised to change our world. Levitating trains, quantum computers, robotic bees, and bomb-detecting plantsthese were just a few of the cutting-edge innovations brought into the living rooms of families across the country in NOVAs four-part series, Making Stuff: Faster, Wilder, Colder, and Safer. Each of the four one-hour programs gave viewers a behind-the-scenes look at novel technologies poised to change our worldshowing them how basic research and scientific discovery can hold the keys to transforming how we live. Making Stuff Season 2 (MS2) combined true entertainment with educational value, creating a popular and engaging series that brought accessible science into the homes of millions. NOVAs goal to engage the public with such technological innovation and basic research extended beyond the broadcast series, including a variety of online, educational, and promotional activities: original online science reporting, web-only short-form videos, a new online quiz-game, social media engagement and promotion, an educational outreach toolkit for science educators to create their own makerspaces, an online community of practice, a series of nationwide Innovation Cafs, educator professional development, a suite of teacher resources, an Idealab, participation in national conferences, and specialized station relation and marketing. A summative evaluation of the MS2 project indicates that overall, these activities helped make a significant impact on the viewers, users, and participants that NOVA reached. The final evaluation conducted by Concord Evaluation Group (CEG) confidently concluded that the broadcast, website, and outreach activities were successful at achieving the projects intended impacts. CEG reported that the MS2 series and website content were successful in raising awareness and sparking interest in innovation, and increased public awareness that basic research leads to technological innovation; this interest was also sustained over a six month period. Efforts to create an online community of practice were also successful: the quality of collaboration increased, and community members felt supported while using Maker pedagogy. These findings provide clear evidence that large-scale science media projects like MS2 are an effective means of moving the needle on attitudes about and excitement for science. NOVAs broadcast audience and ratings have always indicated that a large portion of the population is interested in and engages with educational science media on a weekly basis. Yet these evaluation results provide the empirical evidence that beyond being capable of attracting, maintaining, and growing a dedicated group of citizens interested in science, these showswith their diverse content provided on a variety of media channelsare capable of sparking new interest in science, raising public awareness of the importance of science, and maintaining and growing that interest over time. In a country where approximately a quarter of the population doesnt know the earth rotates around the sun,1 roughly half still dont accept evolution,2 and about 20% dont think climate change is happening,3 the importance of these findings cannot be overstated. The success of MS2 suggests that large-scale media projects dedicated to and linked by coverage of scientific big ideas are an effective means of shifting public opinion onand improving understanding ofscience. REFERENCES 1, 2 National Science Foundation, Science and Engineering Indicators (2014). Chapter 7: Science and Technology: Public Attitudes and Understanding. 3 Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., Feinberg, G., & Rosenthal, S. (2014) Climate change in the American mind: April, 2014. Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Project on Climate Change Communication.

Leombruni, Lisa; Paulsen, Christine Andrews

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nutritional Correlates of the "Lean Season": Effects of Seasonality and Frugivory on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy intakes, though season had an independent effect. These results suggest that factors restricting, Bronx, NY 6 Department of Anthropology, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, NY 7 New to understand 1) how macronutrient and energy intakes vary seasonally, including whether these intakes respond

Rothman, Jessica M.

73

Microchannel Receiver Development- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this OSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

74

FOIA QUARTERLY REPORTS (Q2-2014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOEs mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

75

fu-q(2)-99.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FDTD Scheme for Light Scattering by Dielectric Particles FDTD Scheme for Light Scattering by Dielectric Particles with Large Complex Refractive Index Q. Fu and W. B. Sun Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Numerical solution for light scattering by highly refractive dielectric particles is examined with the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) technique. In the FDTD, the computational domain is truncated using the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition (Sun et al. 1999). It is found that for dielectric particles with large refractive index, the FDTD simulation is sensitive to the treatment of particle edge. In this study, we have introduced an effective particle edge treatment to reduce the FDTD errors. Using this treatment for particles with large refractive index (e.g., 7.15 i + 2.92 i), the

76

What's in Season from the Garden State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the system. New Jersey is deficient in a distribution mechanism which respects and embraces seasonality or restaurants or have refrigerated trucks for deliveries. What the New Jersey wholesale produce distribution it with Jersey and bridge the gap in the system: Gaurino Sons Produce and Zone 7. Guarino Sons Produce Long

Goodman, Robert M.

77

1, 681707, 2004 Seasonal P cycling in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recycling that takes place in the water10 column. The DOP concentration exhibits two peaks during a seasonal the POP content decreases. This indicates two periods of increased phosphorus recycling activity The southern bight of the North Sea receives nutrients from domestic, industrial and agricultural wastewater

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

78

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.  

SciTech Connect

International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Dynamical Seasonal Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Dynamical Seasonal Forecasting Seasonal Prediction · POAMA · Issues for future Outline #12;Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Major source Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program El Nino Mean State · Easterlies westward surface current upwelling

Lim, Eun-pa

80

Original article Belowground biomass seasonal variation in two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Belowground biomass seasonal variation in two Neotropical savannahs (Brazilian March 2001) Abstract ­ The belowground biomass of two types of ecosystems, frequently burned open by flotation and sieving. Belowground biomass showed significant seasonal variation, values being higher during

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Seasonal Cycle over the United States and Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual cycle occupies a unique position in the spectra of meteorological time series. This cycle and its first three harmonics are extracted from the series as a seasonal cycle. The distributions of the annual and seasonal cycles are studied ...

Vernon E. Kousky; S. Srivatsangam

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season December 5, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce...

83

St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but has a high tolerance for shade-season grass. It does best in full sun and high temperatures. Goes dormant and turns brown in winter. Very

Ishida, Yuko

84

FY 2014 Metric Summary | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

4 Metric Summary FY 2014 Metric Summary FY 2014 Q1 Metric Summary.pdf FY 2014 Q2 Metric Summary.pdf FY 2014 Q3 Metric Summary.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2014 Q3 Metric...

85

AT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an important role in an area's local vertical temperature distribution. Below, Figure 1 shows the verticalAT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3) Question #1: Seasons (20 pts) A. In your own words, describe the cause of the seasons. B. In the Northern Hemisphere we are closer to the sun during

Rutledge, Steven

86

Managing Warm-season Improved Pastures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. However, west of a line from Corpus Christi through San Antonio to Fort Worth, rainfall is greatly reduced year round and spring calving is preferred. The rainfall pattern in this area corresponds to for- age production as shown in Fig. 1. Spring calving... season corresponds to better forage quality and quantity in native rangeland and improved pastures. Because improved small grain pastures must be irrigated in many areas of west Texas, the cost of producing improved winter forages for cow-calf op...

Stichler, Charles; Prostko, Eric P.; Livingston, Stephen

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

Influences on seasonal ski worker intention to return and indicators and standards of quality for seasonal ski jobs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF. August 2002 Major Subject: Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences INFLUENCES ON SEASONAL SKI WORKER INTENTION TO RETURN AND INDICATORS AND STANDARDS OF QUALiTY FOR SEASONAL SKI JOBS A Thesis By MATTHEW D... 'Lear (He c of partment) August 2002 Major Subject: Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences ABSTRACT Influences on Seasonal Ski Worker Intention to Return and Indicators and Standards of Quality for Seasonal Ski Jobs. (August 2002) Matthew D. Ismert...

Ismert, Matthew D

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EIS (TC & WM EIS), Q4 * Draft Land Conveyance Environmental Assessment, Q2 * Natural Gas Pipeline Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), Q3 * 2014 Budget meetings (2015 & 2016...

89

J. theor. Biol. (1997) 189, 171174 00225193/97/220171 + 04 $25.00/0/jt970503 7 1997 Academic Press Limited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with regard to their statistical #12;p1 5' -- 3' -- C( ) q3 p2 -- -- C( ) q2 p3 -- -- C( ) q1 -- -- 3' 5' A

Michel, Christian

90

A Bayesian approach to forecast intermittent demand for seasonal products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the forecasting of a large fluctuating seasonal demand prior to peak sale season using a practical time series, collected from the US Census Bureau. Due to the extreme natural events (e.g. excessive snow fall and calamities), sales may not occur, inventory may not replenish and demand may set off unrecorded during the peak sale season. This characterises a seasonal time series to an intermittent category. A seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA), a multiplicative exponential smoothing (M-ES) and an effective modelling approach using Bayesian computational process are analysed in the context of seasonal and intermittent forecast. Several forecast error indicators and a cost factor are used to compare the models. In cost factor analysis, cost is measured optimally using dynamic programming model under periodic review policy. Experimental results demonstrate that Bayesian model performance is much superior to SARIMA and M-ES models, and efficient to forecast seasonal and intermittent demand.

Mohammad Anwar Rahman; Bhaba R. Sarker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Bering Sea Chinook Salmon Seasonal Bycatch Report (includes CDQ)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

101 IPA Season Total Catch Allocation Remaining Allocation % Taken Last Week Catch A 2,153 6,748 4,595 32% 0 B 5 4,024 4,019 0% 5 Total 2,158 10,772 8,614 20% 5 BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 102 IPA Season 0 0% 0 BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 103 IPA Season Total Catch Allocation Remaining Allocation % Taken

92

Bering Sea Chinook Salmon Seasonal Bycatch Report (includes CDQ)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

101 IPA Season Total Catch Allocation Remaining Allocation % Taken Last Week Catch A 0 6,748 6,748 0% 0 B 0 4,024 4,024 0% 0 Total 0 10,772 10,772 0% 0 BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 102 IPA Season Total BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 103 IPA Season Total Catch Allocation Remaining Allocation % Taken Last

93

It Just Tastes Better When It's In Season  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i IT JUST TASTES BETTER WHEN IT?S IN SEASON A Dissertation by LAURA NICOLA THOMAS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR... OF PHILOSOPHY May 2012 Major Subject: Nutrition ii It Just Tastes Better When It?s in Season Copyright 2012 Laura Nicola Thomas iii IT JUST TASTES BETTER WHEN IT?S IN SEASON A Dissertation...

Thomas, Laura

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

BPA revises policy for managing seasonal power oversupply  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

y-for-managing-seasonal-power-oversupply Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

95

Four Seasons Windpower, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Windpower, LLC Windpower, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Four Seasons Windpower, LLC Address 1697 Wilbur Road Place Medina, Ohio Zip 44256 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Retail product sales and distribution Phone number 866-412-8346 Website http://www.fswindpower.com Coordinates 41.169146°, -81.7476779° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.169146,"lon":-81.7476779,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

Tracing The Largest Seasonal Migration on Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is estimated that over 3.6 billion passengers are travelling during the Chinese Spring Festival travel season. They leave their working cities and return their hometowns to enjoy annual family time, and back to cities after the holiday. In this study, with the massive location-based data collected from millions of smartphone users, we propose a novel method to trace the migration flow and explore the migration patterns of Chinese people. From the temporal perspective, we explore the migration trend over time during a 34-days period, about half a month before and after the Spring Festival. From the spatial perspective, the migration directions and routes are estimated and quantified, and the migration flow is visualized. The spatial range of influence of developed regions could be reflected with the destinations of migration, the migration destinations and originations have obvious characteristic of geographical proximity.

Wang, Xianwen; Mao, Wenli; Hu, Zhigang; Gu, Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Seasonal variation of radon concentrations in UK homes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The patterns of seasonal variation of radon concentrations were measured in 91 homes in five regions of the UK over a period of two years. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the regions in the pattern or magnitude of seasonal variation in radon concentrations. The arithmetic mean variation was found to be close to that found previously in the UK national survey. Differences in the pattern between the two years of the study were not significant. Two-thirds of homes in the study followed the expected pattern of high radon in the winter and low radon in the summer. Most of the rest showed little seasonal variation, and a few showed a reversed seasonal pattern. The study does not provide any clear evidence for the recorded house characteristics having an effect on the seasonal variation in radon concentrations in UK homes, though the statistical power for determining such effects is limited in this study. The magnitude of the seasonal variation varied widely between homes. Analysis of the individual results from the homes showed that because of the wide variation in the amount of seasonal variation, applying seasonal correction factors to the results of three-month measurements can yield only relatively small improvements in the accuracy of estimates of annual mean concentrations.

J C H Miles; C B Howarth; N Hunter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Seasonal mass balance gradients in Norway L. A. Rasmussen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) P. O. Box 5091 Majorstua, N-0301 Oslo, Norway16 Aug 05 Seasonal mass balance gradients in Norway L. A. Rasmussen1 and L. M. Andreassen2 1 in Norway exists in their profiles of both seasonal balances, winter bw(z) and summer bs(z). Unlike many

Rasmussen, L.A.

99

Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better and affect the magnitude of seasonal change in water levels through water loss as LE (evapotranspiration (ET that produce considerable variation in the hydrologic cycle, affecting nutrient delivery, ecosystem primary

100

SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY AND RESPONSES TO GLOBAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY AND RESPONSES TO GLOBAL WARMING Mxolisi Excellent Shongwe #12;ISBN : 978-90-902-5046-5 #12;SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY;. . . Dedicated to my late father John Mabhensa Shongwe #12;ABSTRACT Climate extremes are rarely occurring natural

Haak, Hein

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season August 17, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? First-responder training sessions at the Department help prepare employees for hurricane season and other potential energy-sector emergencies. If you live in a part of the country where hurricanes might cause damage, be sure to have a plan and a kit ready. On June 29, Hurricane Alex became the first hurricane of the 2010 season, and the first Atlantic hurricane to occur as early as June since 1995. The next day, a Department of Energy "energy response team" gathered in Washington, D.C. for the last in a series of first-responder training

102

Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season August 17, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? First-responder training sessions at the Department help prepare employees for hurricane season and other potential energy-sector emergencies. If you live in a part of the country where hurricanes might cause damage, be sure to have a plan and a kit ready. On June 29, Hurricane Alex became the first hurricane of the 2010 season, and the first Atlantic hurricane to occur as early as June since 1995. The next day, a Department of Energy "energy response team" gathered in Washington, D.C. for the last in a series of first-responder training

103

Department of Energy Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prepares for Hurricane Season Prepares for Hurricane Season Department of Energy Prepares for Hurricane Season May 30, 2006 - 10:50am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Director of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Kevin Kolevar today outlined a number of steps that the department is taking to prepare for hurricane season in the United States. Last year, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita knocked out electricity to a large portion of the Gulf Coast and damaged a number of oil and gas recovery platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and refineries along the shore. "Electricity and fuel are necessary to sustain the public's health and grow the nation's economy. After a disaster that shuts down energy supplies, the federal government, state and local leaders, and the industry need to

104

Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season October 18, 2011 - 6:42am Addthis Andrea Spikes Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory I'm sure you've noticed the change in seasons by now. Fall brings cooler weather, and with it my thoughts turn to warm things like putting blankets on the couch, enjoying my fireplace, and adjusting my thermostat (as little as possible, of course). One thing we did over the weekend is we insulated our water heater. Depending on how efficient your water heater tank is, adding insulation can reduce standby heat losses by 25%-45% and save you around 4%-9% in water heating costs. Since water heating contributes an average of 18% to the typical home utility bill, it's definitely worth it to add insulation!

105

NNSA Employees give back this holiday season | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees give back this holiday season | National Nuclear Security Employees give back this holiday season | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Employees give back this holiday season NNSA Employees give back this holiday season Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA celebrates the contributions of the men and women working across the

106

Diurnal Variations of Warm-Season Precipitation over Northern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the diurnal variations of the warm-season precipitation over northern China using the high-resolution precipitation products obtained from the Climate Prediction Centers morphing technique (CMORPH) during MayAugust of 2003...

Huizhong He; Fuqing Zhang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Oxygen isotope records of carboniferous seasonality on the Russian platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OXYGEN ISOTOPE RECORDS OF CARBONIFEROUS SEASONALITY ON THE RUSSIAN PLATFORM A Thesis by HUAYU WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1998 Major Subject: Geology OXYGEN ISOTOPE RECORDS OF CARBONIFFROUS SEASONALITY ON THE RUSSIAN PLATFORM A Thesis by HUAYU WANG Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Wang, Huayu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Bering Sea Chinook Salmon Seasonal Bycatch Report (includes CDQ)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

values are numbers of fish. Report run on: March 11, 2014 8:28 AM AFA BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 101 IPA,771 4,024 1,253 69% 0 Total 4,140 10,772 6,632 38% 0 BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 102 IPA Season Total BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 103 IPA Season Total Catch Allocation Remaining Allocation % Taken Last

109

Bering Sea Chinook Salmon Seasonal Bycatch Report (includes CDQ)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

values are numbers of fish. Report run on: March 11, 2014 5:05 AM AFA BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 101 IPA,255 4,024 769 81% 0 Total 4,632 10,772 6,140 43% 0 BS Chinook Salmon AFA COOP 102 IPA Season Total Catch Salmon AFA COOP 103 IPA Season Total Catch Allocation Remaining Allocation % Taken Last Week Catch A 609

110

Geographical and seasonal variability of the global practical wind resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides global and seasonal estimates of the practical wind power obtained with a 3-D numerical model (GATOR-GCMOM) that dynamically calculates the instantaneous wind power of a modern 5MW wind turbine at 100-m hub height at each time step. Practical wind power is defined as that delivered from wind turbines in high-wind locations (year-average 100-m wind speed?7m/s) over land and near-shore, excluding both polar regions, mountainous, and conflicting land use areas, and including transmission, distribution, and wind farm array losses. We found that seasonal variations in the global practical wind resources are significant. The highest net land plus near-shore capacity factors globally are found during DecemberJanuaryFebruary and the lowest during JuneJulyAugust. The capacity factors in the transitional seasons (MarchAprilMay and SeptemberOctoberNovember) are rather similar to one another in terms of geographical patterns and frequency distributions. The yearly-average distributions of capacity factors, whether in terms of geographic patterns or frequency distributions, differ from those in all four seasons, although they are closest to the transitional seasons. Regional practical wind resources are sensitive to seasons and to thresholds in year-average wind speed and bathymetry, but are more than enough to supply local electricity demand in all regions except Japan.

Cristina L. Archer; Mark Z. Jacobson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Microsoft Word - Q3report_rev.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2009 to June 2009 April 2009 to June 2009 Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01 Submitted by: College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Trehu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 28, 2009 Oil & Natural Gas Technology 1 Progress Report April 2009 to June 2009 Heat flow and gas hydrates on the continental margin of India: Building on results from NGHP expedition 01 DE-NT0005669 Principal Investigator Anne Trehu (PI) Oregon State University July 28, 2009 2 Table of Contents: Executive Summary..................................................................................................

112

Microsoft Word - DOE_ANNUAL_METRICS_2009Q3.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

14404 14404 Third Quarter 2009 Modeling Program Metric: Coupled model comparison with observations using improved dynamics at coarse resolution Quantifying the impact of a finite volume dynamical core in CCSM3 on simulated precipitation over major catchment areas July 2009 Peter J. Gleckler and Karl E. Taylor Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research 
 2
 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty,

113

Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

114

Observations from The EV Project in Q3 2013  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report that summarizes results published in numerous other reports. It describes the usage of electric vehicles and charging units in the EV Project over the past 3 months. There is no new data or information provided in this report, only summarizing of information published in other reports (which have all been approved for unlimited distribution publication). This report will be posted to the INL/AVTA website for viewing by the general public.

John Smart

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Released: June 4, 2010 Download Full Report (PDF) This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly. Research finds that a significant portion of data collected on EIA’s primary monthly natural gas consumption survey reflects billing data that does not strictly coincide with the actual calendar month, which creates an aggregate-level discrepancy with EIA’s other natural gas supply and disposition data series. This discrepancy is especially observable during the fall and spring as one transitions into and out of the winter heating season. The report also outlines improved data collection and estimation procedures that will be implemented later this year to more closely align reported and actual calendar month consumption. This discussion will be helpful to users of EIA’s volumetric natural gas data. Questions about this report should be directed to Andy Hoegh at andrew.hoegh@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-9502.

116

DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season May 30, 2007 - 1:25pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today outlined a number of steps that the Department is taking to strengthen its hurricane response system in the United States. Since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, DOE has made operational and administrative improvements, including coordination between federal, state and local leaders, deployment of trained staff, and improvements to modeling tools. "Bringing power back online is a critical step in recovering and rebuilding from a disaster and the Department of Energy stands ready to help coordinate fuel delivery to affected areas and remove barriers in energy recovery efforts," Alex de Alvarez, DOE Deputy Director of the Office of

117

Cruising to Energy Savings This Summer Driving Season | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cruising to Energy Savings This Summer Driving Season Cruising to Energy Savings This Summer Driving Season Cruising to Energy Savings This Summer Driving Season May 11, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy My dad is obsessed with fuel efficiency. I joked with him on a recent road trip that when he retires, he'll have more time to pursue his dream career as a fuel-economy promoter. Well guess what, I just found the treasure trove of information on smart driving that's going to make his whole week-it's at fueleconomy.gov. Now, I know we've blogged on this in the past. But it's been a while, and this stuff is good to keep fresh in your mind as the price of gasoline creeps up this summer. The site provides information on everything

118

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Seasonal Dependance of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal Dependance of the Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity Seasonal Dependance of the Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Feltz, Wayne University of Wisconsin Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Satellite observations have been used to derive a seasonal dependance of the infrared land surface emissivity in the vicinity of the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility site. In particular, the observations of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua platform have been used over the two year period from Sept 2002 to Sept 2004 to derive spectra of IR land surface emissivity across the IR window regions. These satellite observations have been used to empirically fit the

119

DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season May 30, 2007 - 1:25pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today outlined a number of steps that the Department is taking to strengthen its hurricane response system in the United States. Since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, DOE has made operational and administrative improvements, including coordination between federal, state and local leaders, deployment of trained staff, and improvements to modeling tools. "Bringing power back online is a critical step in recovering and rebuilding from a disaster and the Department of Energy stands ready to help coordinate fuel delivery to affected areas and remove barriers in energy recovery efforts," Alex de Alvarez, DOE Deputy Director of the Office of

120

Frostbite Theater - Just for Fun - Season One Bloopers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jefferson Lab Open House (2010) Jefferson Lab Open House (2010) Previous Video (Jefferson Lab Open House (2010)) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Season Two Bloopers) Season Two Bloopers Season One Bloopers Filming videos isn't as easy as it may seem. Mistakes happen. Often. Here is a sampling of what went wrong while filming our first set of experiments. Enjoy! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: I hope you've enjoyed watching this first set of videos that we've put together. Now, as surprising as it may seem, things don't always go quite as we expect them to. So, if you enjoy watching people mess up their lines... Steve: ...or things not working as they should.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Surveillance Guide - MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEASONAL PREPARATION SEASONAL PREPARATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is implementing appropriate measures to protect equipment and systems from damage due to the effects of cold weather. The Facility Representative evaluates systems necessary for the protection of the public and workers to determine if they have been adequately prepared for cold weather. The Facility Representative also examines other preparations for cold weather to ensure that materials are properly stored, permanent and auxiliary heating systems are functional, and other appropriate preparations have been completed. During the surveillance, the Facility Representative ensures that applicable DOE requirements have been implemented.

122

Forecasting intraday time series with multiple seasonal cycles using parsimonious seasonal exponential smoothing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper concerns the forecasting of seasonal intraday time series that exhibit repeating intraweek and intraday cycles. A recently proposed exponential smoothing method involves smoothing a different intraday cycle for each distinct type of day of the week. Similar days are allocated identical intraday cycles. A limitation is that the method allows only whole days to be treated as identical. We introduce a new exponential smoothing formulation that allows parts of different days of the week to be treated as identical. The result is a method that involves the smoothing and initialisation of fewer terms. We evaluate forecasting up to a day ahead using two empirical studies. For electricity load data, the new method compares well with a range of alternatives. The second study involves a series of arrivals at a call centre that is open for a shorter duration at the weekends than on weekdays. Among the variety of methods considered, the new method is the only one that can model in a satisfactory way in this situation, where the number of periods on each day of the week is not the same.

James W. Taylor; Ralph D. Snyder

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Essential epidemiological mechanisms underpinning the transmission dynamics of seasonal influenza  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...age-structured model with non-random...multiple strains|model comparison| 1...subtypes are hard to predict [1]. Understanding...2]. The initial outbreak of this novel H1N1...resolution to fit such a model are not available...characteristics of seasonal flu epidemics and hence...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

2011 Colorado Wildfire Season September 12, 2011 Weekly Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 2011 Colorado Wildfire Season September 12, 2011 Weekly Update About this report: This weekly wildfire report is provided by the Colorado State Forest Service to keep you current on the fire situation in Colorado. The report will be released every Monday from May 2 to Oct. 24, along with daily

Hardy, Darel

125

Marriage, Rank, and Seasonal Migration: Fractality in Social Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 7 Marriage, Rank, and Seasonal Migration: Fractality in Social Structure Every society and practices to see most clearly principles that are in place and how competing claims, including rank and leadership, are negotiated or resolved. For the nomad clan the principles of rank and equality are often

White, Douglas R.

126

Seasonal glacier melt contribution to streamflow Neil Schaner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extent and water storage globally have lead to concerns about the implications for water supplies to seasonal streamflow by computing the energy balance of glaciers globally. Melt water quantities%) of streamflow, mostly in the High Asia region. One sixth of the world's population, and one quarter of its gross

Washington at Seattle, University of

127

How do variations in seasonality affect population Electronic Supplementary Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How do variations in seasonality affect population cycles? Electronic Supplementary Material Rachel is the Holling Type II functional form which incorporates handling time of prey. The predators have a logistic the procedure in Taylor et al. (2012). The bifurcation diagrams were created using essentially standard

Sherratt, Jonathan A.

128

Radiative forcing from aircraft NOx emissions: Mechanisms and seasonal dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependence. The long-term globally integrated annual mean net forcing calculated here is approximately zero, related to the annual cycle in photochemistry; the O3 radiative forcing calculations also have a seasonal, although earlier work suggests a small net positive forcing. The model design (e.g., upper tropospheric

129

On the Strong Seasonal Currents in the Deep Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a set of models, including one with a resolution of , several aspects of the simulated seasonal currents in the deep ocean are considered. It is shown that over vast areas of the deep interior, particularly in the Indian Ocean, annual-...

Oleg A. Saenko

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

SEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and disinfect anyy microorganisms that may be present The majority of Recycled water produced in ArizonaSEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY Ch h M R k Ph D W t Q lit S i li tChannah M. Rock, Ph.D., Water Quality Specialist James Walworth, Ph

Fay, Noah

131

Seasonal Forecasting of Extreme Wind and Precipitation Frequencies in Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Forecasting of Extreme Wind and Precipitation Frequencies in Europe Matthew J. Swann;Abstract Flood and wind damage to property and livelihoods resulting from extreme precipitation events variability of these extreme events can be closely related to the large-scale atmospheric circulation

Feigon, Brooke

132

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Title Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Edward J. Dlugokencky, Colm Sweeney, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 39 Issue 16 Keywords atmospheric transport, inverse modeling, nitrous oxide Abstract We estimate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Central California for the period of December 2007 through November 2009 by comparing N2O mixing ratios measured at a tall tower (Walnut Grove, WGC) with transport model predictions based on two global a priori N2O emission models (EDGAR32 and EDGAR42). Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models. Regression analyses show that the slopes of predicted on measured N2O from both emission models are low, suggesting that actual N2O emissions are significantly higher than the EDGAR inventories for all seasons. Bayesian inverse analyses of regional N2O emissions show that posterior annual N2O emissions are larger than both EDGAR inventories by factors of 2.0 ± 0.4 (EDGAR32) and 2.1 ± 0.4 (EDGAR42) with seasonal variation ranging from 1.6 ± 0.3 to 2.5 ± 0.4 for an influence region of Central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. These results suggest that if the spatial distribution of N2O emissions in California follows the EDGAR emission models, then actual emissions are 2.7 ± 0.5 times greater than the current California emission inventory, and total N2O emissions account for 8.1 ± 1.4% of total greenhouse gas emissions from California.

133

The effects of early season and late season prescribed fires on small mammals in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prescribed fire is an important management tool used in the restoration of Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests where fire has been suppressed over the last century. It is not well known, however, how the timing of prescribed fire affects wildlife populations. We used model selection and multi-model inference methods to compare the effects of early (spring and early summer) and late (late summer and fall) season prescribed fires on small mammal populations, based on 4 years of mark-recapture data collected in Sequoia National Park, California. The effects of prescribed fires on four small mammal metrics were evaluated: deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) densities, deer mouse age ratios, lodgepole chipmunk (Neotamias speciosus) densities, and total small mammal biomass. For each of these four metrics, the top ranked model in the evaluation of prescribed fire treatment effects contained no prescribed fire effects, but did contain effects of strong year-to-year variation in populations. Models which predicted that fire effects differed depending on the season of fire received only limited support for each of the four metrics. Our results suggest that initial prescribed fires set during the early season will have similar impacts as late season fires on deer mouse populations, lodgepole chipmunk populations, and total small mammal biomass in Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests.

Michelle E. Monroe; Sarah J. Converse

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Seasonal Tropical Cyclone Predictions Using Optimized Combinations of ENSO Regions: Application to the Coral Sea Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines combining ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) regions for seasonal prediction of Coral Sea tropical cyclone (TC) frequency. The Coral Sea averages ~4 TCs per season, but is characterized by strong interannual variability, with 1...

Hamish A. Ramsay; Michael B. Richman; Lance M. Leslie

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Skillful Seasonal Prediction of the Southern Annular Mode and Antarctic Ozone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a set of seasonal hindcast simulations produced by the Met Office Global Seasonal Forecast System, version 5 (GloSea5), significant predictability of the southern annular mode (SAM) is demonstrated during the austral spring. The correlation ...

William J. M. Seviour; Steven C. Hardiman; Lesley J. Gray; Neal Butchart; Craig MacLachlan; Adam A. Scaife

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Improving Seasonal Forecast Skill of North American Surface Air Temperature in Fall Using a Postprocessing Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A statistical postprocessing approach is applied to seasonal forecasts of surface air temperatures (SAT) over North America in fall, when the original uncalibrated predictions have little skill. The data used are ensemble-mean seasonal forecasts ...

XiaoJing Jia; Hai Lin; Jacques Derome

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Heavy Daily Precipitation Frequency over the Contiguous United States: Sources of Climatic Variability and Seasonal Predictability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By matching large-scale patterns in climate fields with patterns in observed station precipitation, this work explores seasonal predictability of precipitation in the contiguous United States for all seasons. Although it is shown that total ...

Alexander Gershunov; Daniel R. Cayan

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Title Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Volume 117 Issue D11 Keywords atmospheric transport, emission inventory, greenhouse gas, inverse model, methane Abstract We estimate seasonal variations in methane (CH4) emissions from central California from December 2007 through November 2008 by comparing CH4 mixing ratios measured at a tall tower with transport model predictions based on a global 1° a priori CH4emissions map (EDGAR32) and a 10 km seasonally varying California-specific map, calibrated to statewide by CH4emission totals. Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport models. Uncertainties due to wind velocity and boundary layer mixing depth are evaluated using measurements from radar wind profilers. CH4signals calculated using the EDGAR32 emission model are larger than those based on the California-specific model and in better agreement with measurements. However, Bayesian inverse analyses using the California-specific and EDGAR32 maps yield comparable annually averaged posterior CH4emissions totaling 1.55 ± 0.24 times and 1.84 ± 0.27 times larger than the California-specific prior emissions, respectively, for a region of central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. If these results are applicable across California, state total CH4 emissions would account for approximately 9% of state total greenhouse gas emissions. Spatial resolution of emissions within the region near the tower reveal seasonality expected from several biogenic sources, but correlations in the posterior errors on emissions from both prior models indicate that the tower footprints do not resolve spatial structure of emissions. This suggests that including additional towers in a measurement network will improve the regional specificity of the posterior estimates.

139

Seasonal changes in periphyton nitrogen fixation in a protected tropical wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban development (e.g. phosphorous enrichment)? ReferenceSW (2000) Seasonality in phosphorous release rates from the

Vargas, Rodrigo; Novelo, E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis of seasonal and day-of-week traffic patterns at national parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seasonal and day-of-week traffic patterns exhibit consistency from one year to the next, the seasonal and day-of-week factors were compared across all five years. Using the Kruskal-Wallis test, it was determined that the seasonal and day-of-week factors...

Liggett, Lindsay Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Seasonal Maize Forecasting for South Africa and Zimbabwe Derived from an Agroclimatological Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Maize Forecasting for South Africa and Zimbabwe Derived from an Agroclimatological Model, with a hindcast correlation over 16 seasons of 0.92 for South Africa and 0.62 for Zimbabwe. Over 17 seasons and actual maize water-stress in South Africa, and a correlation of 0.79 for the same relationship

Martin, Randall

142

Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Sector Solar Product Company involved in selling solar power equipment in China. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

143

Cloud and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season P. T. May Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, 3001, Victoria, Australia Introduction An interesting, and very relevant question, for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is how cloud characteristics and their seasonal and diurnal variation changes across the tropics. In particular, how does he cloud field around the new SRCS site compare with nearby regions. Thus, the aim of this study is to look at the characteristics of clouds and precipitation in the area around Darwin and to compare the cloud statistics estimated from geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) satellite data with other nearby regions. Towards this end, GMS satellite imagery and radar data from

144

President Obama Visits DOE to Discuss Preparations for Hurricane Season |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE to Discuss Preparations for Hurricane DOE to Discuss Preparations for Hurricane Season President Obama Visits DOE to Discuss Preparations for Hurricane Season May 16, 2013 - 6:22pm Addthis President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. Rob Roberts Rob Roberts Director of Digital Strategy What are the key facts? Last week, President Obama visited the Department of Energy to meet

145

Corn Varieties in Texas : Their Regional and Seasonal Adaptation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presented in Progress Reports from Angleton, Denton, Beaumont, Troup, Beeville, Temple, Spur, Lubbock, Pecos, and Nacogdoches, and in Bulletin 276, "Corn Variety Experiments, Substation No. 3, Angleton." SCOPE OF THE BULLETIN Two of the most important... to both regional ' and seasonal variations. To determine the adaptation of varieties to these two influences a variety-date-of-planting test was instituted in 1918. This test has been conducted at eleven substations throughout the State, in most cases...

Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph)

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Meteorological characteristics associated with warm-season positive lightning events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . 60 29 Percent-positive values vs. Showalter Index for pre-storm soundings, with the outlier in Figure 28 removed. . 61 30 Percent-positive values vs. Total Totals Index for pre-storm soundings. . . . . . 64 31 Percent-positive values vs. Total... lightning and others primarily positive. Percent-positive values also vary greatly by season, with winter thunderstorms exhibiting much more positive lightning (Orville and Silver 1997). Positive lightning was not known to exist until 60 years ago, when...

Heggen, Paul Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Seasonal structure of fish communities at three barrier island habitats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

island ecosystems in the life cycle of these fishes must be better understood before we can effectively manage these important species. Previous studies (Reid 1955, Gunter 1958, Hellier 1962, HcFar land 1963, Pranks 1970, Livingston 1976, Naughton... Bay, Florida and the adjacent beachfront have been described by Naughton and Saloman (1978). Franks (1970) studied species composition and relative abundance of' the fish population inland of Horn Island, Mississippi. Seasonality of' fishes...

Pitts, Donald Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Microsoft Word - 2011Q2Report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1) 1) Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments Submitted by: The University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station C0300 Austin, TX 78712-0228 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 26, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy 1 MECHANISMS LEADING TO CO-EXISTENCE OF GAS AND HYDRATE IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-06NT43067 QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT Reporting Period: 1 Apr 11 - 30 Jun 11 Prepared by Steven L. Bryant Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering The University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station C0300 Austin, TX 78712-0228 Phone: (512) 471 3250 Email: steven_bryant@mail.utexas.edu Ruben Juanes Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

149

Microsoft Word - Q2 2010 DOE Report Aug 26.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Half 2010 Half 2010 ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test Submitted by: ConocoPhillips 700 G Street Anchorage, AK 99501 Principal Investigator: David Schoderbek Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 26, 2010 Office of Fossil Energy Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

150

10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this National Renewable Energy Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

151

Hydrogen Tank Project Q2 Report - FY 11  

SciTech Connect

Quarterly report that represents PNNL's results of HDPE, LDPE, and industrial polymer materials testing. ASTM D638 type 3 samples were subjected to a high pressure hydrogen environment between 3000 and 4000 PSI. These samples were tested using an instron load frame and were analyzed using a proprietary set of excel macros to determine trends in data. The development of an in-situ high pressure hydrogen tensile testing apparatus is discussed as is the stress modeling of the carbon fiber tank exterior.

Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Dahl, Michael E.; Pitman, Stan G.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

153

NBB Enclosed Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

154

High-Performance Nanostructured Coating- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this UCSD project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

155

Measurements of the ?* p --> ?(1232) reaction at low Q2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report new p$(\\vec{e},e^\\prime p)\\pi^\\circ$ measurements in the $\\Delta^{+}(1232)$ resonance at the low momentum transfer region utilizing the magnetic spectrometers of the A1 Collaboration at MAMI. The mesonic cloud dynamics are predicted to be dominant and appreciably changing in this region while the momentum transfer is sufficiently low to be able to test chiral effective calculations. The results disagree with predictions of constituent quark models and are in reasonable agreement with dynamical calculations with pion cloud effects, chiral effective field theory and lattice calculations. The reported measurements suggest that improvement is required to the theoretical calculations and provide valuable input that will allow their refinements.

N. Sparveris; S. Stave; P. Achenbach; C. Ayerbe Gayoso; D. Baumann; J. Bernauer; A. M. Bernstein; R. Bohm; D. Bosnar; T. Botto; A. Christopoulou; D. Dale; M. Ding; M. O. Distler; L. Doria; J. Friedrich; A. Karabarbounis; M. Makek; H. Merkel; U. Muller; I. Nakagawa; R. Neuhausen; L. Nungesser; C. N. Papanicolas; A. Piegsa; J. Pochodzalla; M. Potokar; M. Seimetz; S. Sirca; S. Stiliaris; Th. Walcher; M. Weis

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this PNNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

157

Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm June 5, 2012 - 4:01pm Addthis Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the ninth named storm, first hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 2011 hurricane season. | Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the ninth named storm, first hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 2011 hurricane season. | Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. William Bryan William Bryan

158

The seasonality of aerosol properties in Big Bend National Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growth cycle present in the daily averaged 32 Day (December 2003) Dp (um) Day (December 2003) Dp (um) Day (January 2004) Dp (um) Day (January 2004) Dp (um) Day (June 2003) Dp (um) Day (June 2003) Dp (um) Day (April 2003) Dp (um) Day (April 2003) Dp... (um) Day (December 2003) Dp (um) Day (December 2003) Dp (um) Day (January 2004) Dp (um) Day (January 2004) Dp (um) Day (June 2003) Dp (um) Day (June 2003) Dp (um) Day (April 2003) Dp (um) Day (April 2003) Dp (um) Fig. 12. Seasonal aerosol number...

Allen, Christopher Lee

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Seasonal frequency of ciguatoxic barracuda in southwest Puerto Rico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ciguatoxicity of barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) head, viscera and flesh tissues has been determined in 219 specimens caught along the southwest coast of Puerto Rico from March 1985 through May 1987. Twenty-nine percent of these specimens were toxic. Monthly frequencies of ciguatoxic barracuda showed an apparent seasonal variability, with peak values (6070% toxic fish) in the late winter-early spring (JanuaryMay) and fall (AugustNovember). Minimal frequencies (010% toxic fish) were observed during JuneJuly and December. The most frequently toxic tissues in poisonous animals were the viscera and head. Viscera tissue was the only toxic tissue found in 31% of the posionous fish assayed, and this tissue was poisonous in all toxic fish. In no case was a poisonous specimen found to have toxic flesh alone. Marked temporal variation in frequency of ciguatoxicity suggests that ciguatera toxins, at least in their active form, are not accumulated in barracuda tissues for extended periods of time. Variability in barracuda ciguatoxicity may reflect fluctuations in the toxicity of smaller reef fish prey, seasonal fluctuations in toxic benthic dinoflagellates and/or changes in the ability of the barracuda to detoxify ingested poisons or their precursors.

T.R. Tosteson; D.L. Ballantine; H.D. Durst

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Seasonal energy storage using bioenergy production from abandoned croplands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bioenergy has the unique potential to provide a dispatchable and carbon-negative component to renewable energy portfolios. However, the sustainability, spatial distribution, and capacity for bioenergy are critically dependent on highly uncertain land-use impacts of biomass agriculture. Biomass cultivation on abandoned agriculture lands is thought to reduce land-use impacts relative to biomass production on currently used croplands. While coarse global estimates of abandoned agriculture lands have been used for large-scale bioenergy assessments, more practical technological and policy applications will require regional, high-resolution information on land availability. Here, we present US county-level estimates of the magnitude and distribution of abandoned cropland and potential bioenergy production on this land using remote sensing data, agriculture inventories, and land-use modeling. These abandoned land estimates are 61% larger than previous estimates for the US, mainly due to the coarse resolution of data applied in previous studies. We apply the land availability results to consider the capacity of biomass electricity to meet the seasonal energy storage requirement in a national energy system that is dominated by wind and solar electricity production. Bioenergy from abandoned croplands can supply most of the seasonal storage needs for a range of energy production scenarios, regions, and biomass yield estimates. These data provide the basis for further down-scaling using models of spatially gridded land-use areas as well as a range of applications for the exploration of bioenergy sustainability.

J Elliott Campbell; David B Lobell; Robert C Genova; Andrew Zumkehr; Christopher B Field

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Homework #1: Critical Reading Describe each of the elements of a System Engineering Design and Analysis (in the table below)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(rate equation) 4) Bi-valve reproduction and sustainability (not modeled) 5) Benthic growth/decay (complex biological processes modeled in VIMS) Q2: What is the context of the study? Q3: Who are the major

163

Fuel reduction and coarse woody debris dynamics with early season and late season prescribed fire in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fire exclusion has led to an unnatural accumulation and greater spatial continuity of organic material on the ground in many forests. This material serves both as potential fuel for forest fires and habitat for a large array of forest species. Managers must balance fuel reduction to reduce wildfire hazard with fuel retention targets to maintain other forest functions. This study reports fuel consumption and changes to coarse woody debris attributes with prescribed burns ignited under different fuel moisture conditions. Replicated early season burn, late season burn, and unburned control plots were established in old-growth mixed conifer forest in Sequoia National Park that had not experienced fire for more than 120 years. Early season burns were ignited during June 2002 when fuels were relatively moist, and late season burns were ignited during September/October 2001 when fuels were dry. Fuel loading and coarse woody debris abundance, cover, volume, and mass were evaluated prior to and after the burns. While both types of burns reduced fuel loading, early season burns consumed significantly less of the total dead and down organic matter than late season burns (67% versus 88%). This difference in fuel consumption between burning treatments was significant for most all woody fuel components evaluated, plus the litter and duff layers. Many logs were not entirely consumed therefore the number of logs was not significantly changed by fire but burning did reduce log length, cover, volume, and mass. Log cover, volume, and mass were reduced to a lesser extent by early season burns than late season burns, as a result of higher wood moisture levels. Early season burns also spread over less of the ground surface within the burn perimeter (73%) than late season burns (88%), and were significantly patchier. Organic material remaining after a fire can dam sediments and reduce erosion, while unburned patches may help mitigate the impact of fire on fire-sensitive species by creating refugia from which these species can recolonize burned areas. Early season burns may be an effective means of moderating potential ecosystem damage when treating heavy and/or continuous fuels resulting from long periods of fire exclusion, if burning during this season is not detrimental to other forest functions.

Eric E. Knapp; Jon E. Keeley; Elizabeth A. Ballenger; Teresa J. Brennan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP  

SciTech Connect

This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

Elder, Betsy

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Seasonal ambient air pollution correlates strongly with spontaneous abortion in Mongolia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air pollution is a major health challenge worldwide and ... association between spontaneous abortion and seasonal variation of air pollutants in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

Davaasambuu Enkhmaa; Nicole Warburton; Badrakh Javzandulam

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seasons lead to less carbon sequestration by a subalpineboreal forests to global carbon sequestration (Kurz et al. ,off- set point when carbon sequestration equals carbon loss

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

North Pacific carbon cycle response to climate variability on seasonal to decadal timescales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the subarctic North Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.of the tropical Pacific Ocean: I. Seasonal and interannualthe subtropical North Pacific Ocean, Nature, 424, 754 757.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drop Test #12;End Drop Test Results · Pre- and post-drop position of SCAs and radial shock absorber configuration in HalfPACT under current design and licensing bases: - 7,600 lb max payload - 30 watts max decay Q-2 Q-3 Q-4 Q-1 Q-2 Q-3 Q-4 2007 2008 2009 Engineering and testing Stakeholder meeting 11/29/07 EPA

170

Joint Top-K Spatial Keyword Query Processing Dingming Wu, Man Lung Yiu, Gao Cong, and Christian S. Jensen, Fellow, IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-8200 Aarhus, Denmark. E-mail: csj@cs.au.dk p1 q3 q1 {pizza, grill} {curry, sushi}{curry, seafood} Q p3 p2 q2 {sushi, soup, curry} {seafood, grill, sushi} {seafood, sushi} p4 {soup, steak} Q Fig. 1. Top1 prefers `curry' and `sushi,' user q2 prefers `seafood' and `sushi,' and user q3 prefers `curry

Yiu, Man Lung

171

Solar: annual and seasonal average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

global horizontal (GHI) GIS data global horizontal (GHI) GIS data (contours) for Brazil from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual and seasonal mean of Global Horizontal Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day based on data from 1995 to 2002 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The cross-calibration process worked with data from 3 ground stations: Caicó (located in the Northeast of Brazil), Florianópolis (located in the South) and Balbina (located in Amazonia). These data have been used for validation and comparison of radiation transfer models operated in SWERA to estimate the incidence of solar radiation on the surface of the country from satellite images

172

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Direct and semi-direct radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols in the Western United States: Seasonal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a regional climate model (RCM) in conjunction with the aerosol fields from a GEOS-Chem chemical- transport emissions and the seasonal low-level winds. The RCM-simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative effects vary, respectively, following the seasonal AOD. In Arizona-New Mexico (AZNM), the effect of anthropogenic sulfates

Liou, K. N.

174

Management Options for Late-Season Hail Damaged Stripper Harvested Cotton Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management Options for Late-Season Hail Damaged Stripper Harvested Cotton Fields Extension Agronomy Cooperative Extension Agronomist ­ Cotton Lubbock, TX Dr. Robert Lemon Texas Cooperative Extension Agronomist ­ Cotton College Station, TX Late-season severe weather can result in significant hail damage to immature

Mukhtar, Saqib

175

Seasonal variations of global lightning activity extracted from Schumann resonances using a genetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal variations of global lightning activity extracted from Schumann resonances using a genetic of Schumann resonances (SR). Comparison of the results derived from our FDTD model and the previous studies by other authors on related subjects shows that Schumann resonance is a good probe to indicate the seasonal

Pasko, Victor

176

Project EARTH-12-GMH4: The role and response of seasonal climate change in the Pleistocene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project EARTH-12-GMH4: The role and response of seasonal climate change in the Pleistocene at different climates. The first component of the project will be to assess these issues with field and lab the role that this seasonal change has played in the climate system. The project might subsequently develop

Henderson, Gideon

177

Seasonal controls on sediment delivery in a small coastal plain watershed, North Carolina, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal controls on sediment delivery in a small coastal plain watershed, North Carolina, USA of drainage ditch sedimentation and suspended sediment transport were used to construct a simple sediment to sediment dynamics in a small agricultural watershed in North Carolina. Results indicate that seasonal

Lecce, Scott A.

178

Interannual and seasonal variability of biomass burning emissions constrained by satellite observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--composition and chemistry; KEYWORDS: Biomass burning, interannual seasonal variation Citation: Duncan, B. N., R. V. Martin, A. C. Staudt, R. Yevich, and J. A. Logan, Interannual and seasonal variability of biomass burning [Malingreau, 1990; Stricker et al., 1995; Hsu et al., 1996; Cooke et al., 1996; Justice et al., 1996; Herman

Jacob, Daniel J.

179

Seasonal modulation of seismicity in the Himalaya of Nepal L. Bollinger,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal modulation of seismicity in the Himalaya of Nepal L. Bollinger,1 F. Perrier,2 J.-P. Avouac; accepted 19 March 2007; published 26 April 2007. [1] For the period 1995­2000, the Nepal seismic network. Sapkota, U. Gautam, and D. R. Tiwari (2007), Seasonal modulation of seismicity in the Himalaya of Nepal

Avouac, Jean-Philippe

180

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges in the implications of seasonal disinfection practices of wastewater effluents for meeting water quality goals from municipal wastewater outfalls along the river, as well as upstream and downstream of each outfall

Mitch, William A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Abrupt seasonal variation of the ITCZ and the Hadley circulation Yongyun Hu,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abrupt seasonal variation of the ITCZ and the Hadley circulation Yongyun Hu,1 Dawei Li,1 and Jiping of the Hadley circulation, we also examine whether there exists such an abrupt seasonal change in the Hadley circulation. It is found that the intensity of the Hadley cells evolves smoothly with time. However

Hu, Yongyun

182

Frostbite Theater - Just for Fun - When Liquid Nitrogen Attacks! - Season 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Season One Bloopers Season One Bloopers Previous Video (Season One Bloopers) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Freezing Balloons!) Freezing Balloons! When Liquid Nitrogen Attacks! - Season 2 Bloopers Making videos is just another opportunity to catch mistakes on film! Enjoy these outtakes from Season 2! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: We made more videos! Steve: And we made more mistakes! Joanna: Enjoy! ----------------------------------------- Joanna: What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen... Steve: Oh, jeez! Joanna: Oh, oh, oh! That was a little too much! Steve: You okay? Joanna: Uh, huh. I'm fine. Steve: This is why you wear the safety gear. This is why you have the

183

2014 Federal Benefits Open Season & Wellness Fair | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2014 Federal Benefits Open Season & Wellness Fair 2014 Federal Benefits Open Season & Wellness Fair 2014 Federal Benefits Open Season & Wellness Fair November 19, 2013 11:00AM to 2:00PM EST Germantown, Auditorium The Fairs are free and open to All DOE Federal Employees. Accommodations for people with disabilities will be provided upon request. The Federal Benefits Open Season is Monday, November 11 to Monday, December 9, 2013 Open Season is your opportunity to make enrollment decisions for 2014 with respect to the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHB), the Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP), and the Federal Flexible Spending Account Program (FSAFEDS). To assist employees in determining the health, dental, and vision benefit plans that best meet their needs, representatives from the various FEHB and

184

Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of about 19 million barrels of U.S. crude oil and 46 billion cubic feet of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That's about one-third more than the amount of oil and gas production knocked offline during last year's hurricane season. Government weather forecasts predict 13 to 20 named storms will form between June and the end of November, with 7 to 11 of those turning into hurricanes. Production outages in previous hurricane seasons were as high as 107 million barrels of crude oil

185

SEASONAL DISAPPEARANCE OF FAR-INFRARED HAZE IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

A far-infrared emission band attributed to volatile or refractory haze in Titan's stratosphere has been decreasing in intensity since Cassini's arrival in 2004. The 220 cm{sup -1} feature, first seen by the Voyager Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer, has only been found in Titan's winter polar region. The emission peaks at about 140 km altitude near the winter stratospheric temperature minimum. Observations recorded over the period 2004-2012 by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini show a decrease in the intensity of this feature by about a factor of four. Possible seasonal causes of this decline are an increase in photolytic destruction of source chemicals at high altitude, a lessening of condensation as solar heating increased, or a weakening of downwelling of vapors. As of early 2012, the 220 cm{sup -1} haze has not yet been detected in the south. The haze composition is unknown, but its decrease is similar to that of HC{sub 3}N gas in Titan's polar stratosphere, pointing to a nitrile origin.

Jennings, Donald E.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Cottini, V. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Samuelson, R. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Kunde, V. G.; Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); De Kok, R. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Calcutt, S. B., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

186

Each cotton season presents it own unique challenges. Crop management decisions are largely based on current conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each cotton season presents it own unique challenges. Crop management decisions are largely based of the early growth and development of a cotton crop can provide an objective gauge to evaluate this crop's progress, regardless of the season's challenges. Compared to most plants, cotton's early season growth

Mukhtar, Saqib

187

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason Lutterman Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Drive smart this holiday season and stay informed with tools such as the speed penalty calculator on fueleconomy.gov. Yesterday you learned from Becky about three tools to help you save on fuel

188

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! December 12, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for the ENERGY STAR® label to find energy-efficient appliances. It's the holiday season, which is a perfect time to find a great deal on

189

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason Lutterman Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Drive smart this holiday season and stay informed with tools such as the speed penalty calculator on fueleconomy.gov. Yesterday you learned from Becky about three tools to help you save on fuel

190

Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season April 15, 2013 - 2:28pm Addthis Solar energy systems are among the renewable and efficiency purchases that are eligible for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Industrial Solar Technology Corp. Solar energy systems are among the renewable and efficiency purchases that are eligible for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Industrial Solar Technology Corp. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? If you missed the energy efficiency and renewable energy tax credits for 2012, you can still take advantage of them in 2013. Tax season comes to a close today, and if you missed the energy efficiency

191

A Reason to Put Science in the Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Reason to Put Science in the Season A Reason to Put Science in the Season A Reason to Put Science in the Season December 23, 2010 - 9:45am Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science At this time of year, few people would consider decorating their trees with tinsel ...and test tubes. But there's a good reason to put a bit of science in the season. Specifically, Christmas Day marks the birth one of the foremost scientists of all time, Sir Isaac Newton. He was born 368 years ago in the town of Woolsthorpe, Linconshire. Newton is probably best known for being bonked in the head with an apple and discovering gravity as a result. Newton's most creative years came while he was on a holiday of sorts, staying in the countryside to avoid the plague raging at Cambridge. While there, he seems to have wondered why

192

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! December 12, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for the ENERGY STAR® label to find energy-efficient appliances. It's the holiday season, which is a perfect time to find a great deal on

193

Seasonal variations and environmental control of water use efficiency in subtropical plantation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To understand the seasonal variations of water use efficiency (WUE) of coniferous plantation in the ... and normal climatic condition in 2004). The water stress influenced WUE greatly, which caused a...

Xia Song; Girimi Yu; Yunfen Liu; Xiaomin Sun

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Statistical Downscaling Multimodel Forecasts for Seasonal Precipitation and Surface Temperature over the Southeastern United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study compared two types of approaches to downscale seasonal precipitation (P) and 2-m air temperature (T2M) forecasts from the North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) over the states of Alabama, Georgia, and Florida in the southeastern ...

Di Tian; Christopher J. Martinez; Wendy D. Graham; Syewoon Hwang

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Seasonal Cycle Shifts in Hydroclimatology over the Western United States SATISH KUMAR REGONDA AND BALAJI RAJAGOPALAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Cycle Shifts in Hydroclimatology over the Western United States SATISH KUMAR REGONDA, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado MARTYN CLARK CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado JOHN PITLICK Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado (Manuscript received 4 November

Balaji, Rajagopalan

196

Understanding the seasonal and reproductive biology of olive fruit fly is critical to its management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J, et al. 2006. Olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)season and availability of fruit. J Econ Entomol 99(6):2072for integrated control of olive fruit fly are promising in

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Climate effects of seasonally varying Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The climate impact of the seasonality of Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA) is studied using an aerosol-climate model coupled with a slab ocean model in a set of 60-year long simulations, driven by BBCA ...

Jeong, Gill-Ran

198

Effect of pasteurization and season on the sensorial and rheological traits of Mexican Chihuahua cheese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The seasonal changes in the flavors and textures (sensorial and rheological traits) of young Mexican Chihuahua cheese made with either raw or pasteurized ... of the cheese. Four selected brands of Chihuahua chees...

Diane L. Van Hekken; Mary Anne Drake; Michael H. Tunick

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A comparison of two approaches for generating spatial models of growing season variables for Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study produced annual spatial models (or grids) of 27 growing season variables for Canada that span two centuries (1901-2100). Temporal gaps in the availability of daily climate data the typical and preferred source for calculating growing ...

John H. Pedlar; Daniel W. McKenney; Kevin Lawrence; Pia Papadopol; Michael F. Hutchinson; David Price

200

Design and evaluation of seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system (SSHPESS) is a gigawatt-year hydrogen storage system which stores excess electricity produced as hydrogen during off-peak periods and consumes the stored hydrogen ...

Oloyede, Isaiah Olanrewaju

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Simulations of the West African Monsoon with a Superparameterized Climate Model. Part I: The Seasonal Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The West African monsoon seasonal cycle is simulated with two coupled general circulation models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), which uses traditional convective parameterizations, and the superparameterized CCSM (SP-CCSM), in which ...

Rachel R. McCrary; David A. Randall; Cristiana Stan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons- August 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In an effort to better understand what actions the energy industry has taken in response to the 2005 and 2008 hurricane seasons, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and...

203

Seasonal Mean Circulation on the Irish Shelf { A Model-Generated Climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Mean Circulation on the Irish Shelf { A Model-Generated Climatology Daniel R. Lynch and interpret the climatological mean circulation in these waters, with emphasis on the Irish Shelf

204

The INGVCMCC Seasonal Prediction System: Improved Ocean Initial Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC) Seasonal Prediction System (SPS) is documented. In this SPS the ocean initial-conditions estimation includes ...

Andrea Alessandri; Andrea Borrelli; Simona Masina; Annalisa Cherchi; Silvio Gualdi; Antonio Navarra; Pierluigi Di Pietro; Andrea F. Carril

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A Seasonal Storage Solar Heating System for the Charlestown, Boston Navy Yard National Historic Park  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper concerns the design and analysis of a solar energy system using seasonal heat storage for ... Park in the Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts. The system uses two existing underground concrete...

D. S. Breger; A. I. Michaels

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nonlinear equilibration of baroclinic eddies : the role of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, the influence of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing on baroclinic eddy equilibration is studied to understand how the baroclinic adjustment is modified when taking into account these two factors. ...

Zhang, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A house four all seasons : a suggested habitation model for Great Barrington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Great Barrington, Massachusetts. A naturally beautiful setting combined with four distinct weather seasons dictates a lifestyle for this small South Berkshire town's residents and visitors alike. This thesis proposes that ...

Davis, Jeffrey R

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Correlative Evolutions of ENSO and the Seasonal Cycle in the Tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines whether shifts between the correlative evolutions of ENSO and the seasonal cycle in the tropical Pacific Ocean can produce effects that are large enough to alter the evolution of the coupled atmosphereocean system. The ...

Heng Xiao; Carlos R. Mechoso

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Role of the seasonally-oscillating Hadley Cell in interhemispheric mixing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The contribution of the seasonally-oscillating Hadley cell to the interhemispheric mixing of trace chemical species is studied using a zonally-symmetric kinematic model of the Hadley (more)

Cohen, Peter J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Role of the Ocean in the Seasonal Cycle of the Hadley Circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of ocean heat transport on the seasonal cycle of the Hadley circulation is investigated using idealized experiments with a climate model. It is found that ocean heat transport plays a fundamental role in setting the structure and ...

Amy C. Clement

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Assessing Seasonal Transport and Deposition of Agricultural Emissions in Eastern North Carolina, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the variability and uncertainty in the regional pollutant transport. Key words: Air pollution, atmospheric values obtained using an air pollution transport and dispersion model. This mesoscale information Carolina. Results show that highly variable seasonal and diurnal atmospheric circulations characterize

Raman, Sethu

212

Impact of Atmosphere and Land Surface Initial Conditions on Seasonal Forecasts of Global Surface Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of land surface and atmosphere initialization on the forecast skill of a seasonal prediction system is investigated, and an effort to disentangle the role played by the individual components to the global predictability is done, via a ...

Stefano Materia; Andrea Borrelli; Alessio Bellucci; Andrea Alessandri; Pierluigi Di Pietro; Panagiotis Athanasiadis; Antonio Navarra; Silvio Gualdi

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Recruitment of the intertidal barnacle Semibalanus balanoides : metamorphosis and survival from daily to seasonable timescales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The benthic habitat is the terminal destination for marine animals in terms of their reproductive lifecycle. Recruitment dynamics relating to seasonal changes in the benthic habitat may be the best source of information ...

Blythe, Jonathan N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Seasonal changes in agar characteristics of two populations ofPterocladia capillacea in Gran Canaria, Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agar characteristics ofPterocladia capillacea...were examined seasonally at two intertidal populations exposed to different wave energy on the northern rocky shore of Gran Canaria Island. Plants were collected mo...

Y. Freile-Pelegrn; D. Robledo; R. Armisn; G. Garca-Reina

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The role of seasonal wetlands in the ecology of the American alligator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, open water and juveniles and nesting females relying on vegetated marsh. In certain regions of the inland portion of the alligators range, these different aquatic habitats are represented by seasonal wetlands and riverine systems that are separated...

Subalusky, Amanda Lee

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Seasonal photosynthate partitioning in Stenotaphrum secundatum as influenced by temperature and nitrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEASONAL PHOTOSYNTHATE PARTITIONING IN ~dt t A d t AS INFLUENCED BY TEMPERATURE AND NITROGEN A Thesis by GARY RUSSELL FORRESTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Agronomy SEASONAL PHOTOSYNTHATE PARTITIONING IN ~dt t t d t AS INFLUENCED BY TEMPERATURE AND NITROGEN A Thesis by GARY RUSSELL FORRESTER Approved as to style and content by: James B. Beard...

Forrester, Gary Russell, 1958-

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Experiments with a time-dependent, zonally averaged, seasonal, enery balance climatic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTS WITH A TI&E-DEPENDENT, ZONALLY AVERAGED, SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the decree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EXPERIMENTS WITH A TIME DEPENDENT~ ZONALLY AVERAGED~ SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee...

Thompson, Starley Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Effect of seasonal variations and time of insemination on reproduction in Brahman females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECT OF SEASONAL VARIATIONS AND TIME OF INSEMINATION ON REPRODUCTION IN BRAHMAN FEMALES A Thesis by WARREN REA GARRETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction EFFECT OF SEASONAL VARIATIONS AND TIME OF INSEMINATION ON REPRODUCTION IN BRAHMAN FEMALES A Thesis by WARREN REA GARRETT Approved as to style and content by: Chai rman...

Garrett, Warren Rea

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Follicular changes and reproductive hormones in captive white- tailed deer during the breeding season  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOLLICULAR CHANGES AND REPRODUCTIVE HORMONES IN CAPTIVE WHITE-TAILED DEER DURING THE RREEDING SEASON A Thesis by TIMOTHY GERARD BIEDIGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Veterinary Physiology FOLLICULAR CHANGES AND REPRODUCTIVE HORMONES IN CAPTIVE WHITE-TAILED DEER DURING THE BREEDING SEASON A Thesis by TIMOTHY GERARD BIEDIGER Approved as to style and content...

Biediger, Timothy Gerard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Nuclear Reports All Nuclear Reports Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly Data for 3rd Quarter 2013 | Release Date: October 31, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 2014 | full report Previous Issues Year: 2013-Q2 2013-Q1 2012-Q4 2012-Q3 2012-Q2 2012-Q1 2011-Q4 2011-Q3 2011-Q2 2011-Q1 2010-Q4 2010-Q3 2010-Q2 2010-Q1 2009-Q4 2009-Q3 2009-Q2 2009-Q1 2008-Q4 2008-Q3 2008-Q2 2008-Q1 Go 3rd Quarter 2013 U.S. production of uranium concentrate in the third quarter 2013 was 1,171,278 pounds U3O8, down 16 percent from the previous quarter and up 12 percent from the third quarter 2012. Third quarter 2013 uranium production is at its highest level since 1999. During the third quarter 2013, U.S. uranium was produced at six U.S. uranium facilities. U.S. Uranium Mill in Production (State)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ocean acoustic thermometry and the seasonal cycle of temperature in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With several years of long?range (several Mm) acoustic propagation data obtained during the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) and North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) projects the seasonal cycle of oceantemperature in the North Pacific can be examined. Acoustic transmissions have been made from a source located off the northern Californian coast and from a source located north of Kauai HI to several receivers of opportunity located in the North Pacific Basin. The acoustic data are a high signal?to?noise measure of large?scale temperature with excellent temporal resolution. Although only a few realizations of the seasonal cycle are available it is clear that inter? and intraannual variabilities are large contributions to the time series with signal amplitudes comparable to the seasonal cycle. Such variabilities are likely advective in origin. The time scales for some of the changes in temperature are short sometimes of order weeks. Not all available acoustic paths are suitable for assessing the seasonal cycle however. Near Hawaii the acoustic sampling does not extend to the near?surface waters so seasonal variations there are not measured. The acoustic results will be compared to measures of the seasonal cycle by satellite altimetry profiling floats and the ECCO numerical ocean model.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings November 27, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program How can I participate? Choose ENERGY STAR-certified products when picking out electronics for presents. The catchy advertising jingles are back, sale signs are in every window, and a man with a white beard, hearty laugh, and a stomach that shakes like a bowl full of jelly is sitting at every mall across the country. It's

223

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner October 20, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability As temperatures start to drop Americans around the country are pulling out their flannel sheets, putting the storm windows back on, and switching their air conditioning units with heaters. These transformations have an impact on the way our nation uses our energy resources, particularly heating fuels. Since 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) have held an annual Winter Fuels Outlook Conference to provide the energy community with information on global and

224

'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings November 27, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program How can I participate? Choose ENERGY STAR-certified products when picking out electronics for presents. The catchy advertising jingles are back, sale signs are in every window, and a man with a white beard, hearty laugh, and a stomach that shakes like a bowl full of jelly is sitting at every mall across the country. It's

225

Saving Energy and Keeping Seniors Warm This Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy and Keeping Seniors Warm This Season Saving Energy and Keeping Seniors Warm This Season Saving Energy and Keeping Seniors Warm This Season January 7, 2013 - 12:44pm Addthis Seniors check out the new energy-efficient fitness facility at the Rockville Senior Center. | Photo courtesy of Chris Galm, Energy Department. Seniors check out the new energy-efficient fitness facility at the Rockville Senior Center. | Photo courtesy of Chris Galm, Energy Department. Using money from a Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, the Greater Randolph Senior Center installed a 7-kW Solar PV system to reduce energy consumption. | Photo courtesy of Bexar County, Texas. Using money from a Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, the Greater Randolph Senior Center installed a 7-kW Solar PV system to reduce

226

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office What does this mean for me? LED holiday lights reduce energy usage by 90 percent when compared to traditional incandescent lights. A South Carolina community is proving that energy efficiency can improve the holidays by reducing energy and maintenance costs, thanks to its new

227

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office What does this mean for me? LED holiday lights reduce energy usage by 90 percent when compared to traditional incandescent lights. A South Carolina community is proving that energy efficiency can improve the holidays by reducing energy and maintenance costs, thanks to its new

228

Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season May 15, 2013 - 1:16pm Addthis President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. The group met to discuss lessons learned during the response to Hurricane Sandy, as well as the ongoing preparations for 2013 hurricane season, which begins June 1. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8,

229

Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages June 6, 2013 - 5:41pm Addthis President Barack Obama listens to then-Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. President Barack Obama listens to then-Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza.

230

Get Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment Get Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment September 7, 2010 - 4:48pm Addthis Andrea Spikes Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory As I walked outside this morning, I noticed something- a chill in the air! I live in Colorado, where the nights get cooler long before the days do. This is the time where it's common to see people walking around with shorts and sweaters in the morning (gotta be prepared). The sight of my breath was a reminder that soon I'll be running my heater again and will want to run it as little as possible while staying comfortable. If that sounds like your plan, consider scheduling a home energy assessment. Also known as an energy audit, an energy assessment

231

Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages June 6, 2013 - 5:41pm Addthis President Barack Obama listens to then-Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. President Barack Obama listens to then-Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza.

232

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner October 20, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability As temperatures start to drop Americans around the country are pulling out their flannel sheets, putting the storm windows back on, and switching their air conditioning units with heaters. These transformations have an impact on the way our nation uses our energy resources, particularly heating fuels. Since 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) have held an annual Winter Fuels Outlook Conference to provide the energy community with information on global and

233

Drying Clothes and Saving Money this Fall Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drying Clothes and Saving Money this Fall Season Drying Clothes and Saving Money this Fall Season Drying Clothes and Saving Money this Fall Season November 8, 2012 - 3:16pm Addthis The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that just cleaning the lint screen before each and every load of laundry can save you an average of $34 per year. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Kameleon007 The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that just cleaning the lint screen before each and every load of laundry can save you an average of $34 per year. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Kameleon007 Jason Lutterman Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What are the key facts? Even after cleaning out your lint screen, there are other ways to make sure that your clothes dryer is running as efficiently as possible.

234

MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95 3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95 MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95 The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is implementing appropriate measures to protect equipment and systems from damage due to the effects of cold weather. The Facility Representative evaluates systems necessary for the protection of the public and workers to determine if they have been adequately prepared for cold weather. The Facility Representative also examines other preparations for cold weather to ensure that materials are properly stored, permanent and auxiliary heating systems are functional, and other appropriate preparations have been completed. During the surveillance, the Facility Representative ensures that applicable DOE requirements have been implemented.

235

Experiment Design and First Season Observations with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the instrumentation, experiment design and data reduction for the first season of observations with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), a compact microwave interferometer designed to measure anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on degree and sub-degree scales (l=100--900). The telescope was deployed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station during the 1999--2000 austral summer and conducted observations of the CMB throughout the following austral winter. In its first season of observations, DASI has mapped CMB fluctuations in 32 fields, each 3.4 deg across, with high sensitivity.

E. M. Leitch; C. Pryke; N. W. Halverson; J. Kovac; G. Davidson; S. LaRoque; E. Schartman; J. Yamasaki; J. E. Carlstrom; W. L. Holzapfel; M. Dragovan; J. K. Cartwright; B. S. Mason; S. Padin; T. J. Pearson; M. C. Shepherd; A. C. S. Readhead

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Seasonal tolerance in the boll weevil: Anthonomus grandis, BOH., to several insecticides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the requirements for the degree of' . . QLSTEL OF SCIENCE 'My 1961 . Iajor Sub)ectt Entomology SEASONAL TOLERANCE IN THE POLI WEEVIL, ANTHONOMUS GRANDIS, BOH. , TO SEVERAL INSECTICIDES A Thesis Travis L. Pate Approved as to style and oontent bye a rman o... developed resistance to many of the insecti- cides presently used during the past 10 to 15 years as a result of their extensive use. Seasonal tolerance to some of these organic insecticides has been observed. These aevelopments have been of much concern...

Pate, Travis Leon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide April 3, 2009 - 5:47pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL If you're a regular visitor to EERE's Consumer's Guide to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, you may have noticed some changes this week. The site has moved to EnergySavers.gov and is now called "Energy Savers." The same in-depth information is still available, and we hope this new address will make the site easier for people to find. Along with this move came a home page facelift. Visit the site at EnergySavers.gov and let us know what you think! In the spirit of spring renewal, we've also refreshed our seasonal Web site; the winter "Stay Warm, Save Money" site is now " Stay Cool, Save

238

EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide April 3, 2009 - 5:47pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL If you're a regular visitor to EERE's Consumer's Guide to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, you may have noticed some changes this week. The site has moved to EnergySavers.gov and is now called "Energy Savers." The same in-depth information is still available, and we hope this new address will make the site easier for people to find. Along with this move came a home page facelift. Visit the site at EnergySavers.gov and let us know what you think! In the spirit of spring renewal, we've also refreshed our seasonal Web site; the winter "Stay Warm, Save Money" site is now " Stay Cool, Save

239

Seasonality in Community Water Demand Ronald C. Griffin and Chan Chang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are more price responsive than winter demands implies that price can be a more effective al- locative tool price, (b) demand price elasticity appears to vary seasonally, and (c) the demand price specification functional forms are contrasted for their abilities to identify monthly price elasticities. Results

Griffin, Ronald

240

Edinburgh Research Explorer Can seasonal and interannual variation in landscape CO2 fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edinburgh Research Explorer Can seasonal and interannual variation in landscape CO2 fluxes be detected by atmospheric observations of CO2 concentrations made at a tall tower? Citation for published in landscape CO2 fluxes be detected by atmospheric observations of CO2 concentrations made at a tall tower

Millar, Andrew J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using Positive and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 15, 1999 #12;Abstract Much of the evidence for health e ects of particulate air pollution has come. We thus refer to the `air pollution hypothesis' to describe increased risk of health outcomes dueAssessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using

Washington at Seattle, University of

242

Variations in streamflow response to large hurricane-season storms in a southeastern US watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Floods caused by hurricane storms are responsible for tremendous economic and property losses in the U.S. In order to minimize flood damages associated with large hurricane season storms, it is important to be able to predict streamflow amount in ...

Xing Chen; Mukesh Kumar; Brian L. McGlynn

243

Three-dimensional finite difference time domain modeling of the diurnal and seasonal variations in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Schumann resonance parameters Heng Yang1 and Victor P. Pasko1 Received 3 October 2005; revised 27 January of Schumann resonances (SR) have been reported in a number of experiments. In this paper, a three to study the diurnal and seasonal variability of the power and frequency of the first Schumann resonance

Pasko, Victor

244

Atmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 39673976 Seasonal trends in PM2.5 source contributions in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as dust (20%), secondary sulfate (17%), secondary nitrate (10%), coal combustion (7%), diesel and gasoline heating season, the contributions from coal combustion and biomass aerosol to PM2.5 mass increased of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA c Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, University of Wisconsin

Zheng, Mei

245

SEASONAL V A R IA TIONS IN STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IN THE RED SEA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEASONAL V A R IA TIONS IN STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IN THE RED SEA A DISSERTATION SUBMITTE D and surface circulation in the Red Sea, occur r ing along the north-south axis of the Sea and extending fr om on in the northern Red Sea is frorn the nor th-northwest throughout the year' during the winter ( fr om October

Luther, Douglas S.

246

The Auk 117(3):709717, 2000 SEASONAL FRUIT PREFERENCES FOR LIPIDS AND SUGARS BY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

709 The Auk 117(3):709­717, 2000 SEASONAL FRUIT PREFERENCES FOR LIPIDS AND SUGARS BY AMERICAN AND TIMOTHY WORK4 Department of Biology, Hope College, Holland, Michigan 49423, USA ABSTRACT.--Fruit preference by birds is a complex process based upon the morphology and spatial arrangement of fruits

Radeloff, Volker C.

247

Impact of Verification Grid-Box Size on Warm-Season QPF Skill Measures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 10-km-grid-spacing version of NCEP's Eta Model was used to simulate 11 warm-season convective systems occurring over the U.S. upper midwest. Quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) from the model valid for 6-h periods were verified using 4-...

William A. Gallus Jr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

XI. DIFFUSEGLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is measured on a horizontal surface and intensity on the tilted collector surface is calculated via a two39 XI. DIFFUSE­GLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system requires an accurate assessment of incident solar radiation. Ordinarily, solar radiation

Oregon, University of

249

Preplant Burndown and In-Season Sharpen Use in Cotton J.W. Keeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preplant Burndown and In-Season Sharpen Use in Cotton J.W. Keeling J.D. Reed J.L. Spradley W as a preplant burndown treatment prior to cotton planting and during the fallow period following harvest amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), morningglory (Ipomoea spp.), and volunteer cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) when

Mukhtar, Saqib

250

The seasonal relationship between assault and homicide in England and Wales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, United States Accepted 26 March 2008 and homicide in the same population over the same period of time. One group found assault was seasonal, we require the assault and homicide data to come from the same population over the same time period

Judd, Kevin

251

Deep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 555575 Spatial and seasonal patterns of carbon cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the world's ocean and has been an area of intense scientific interest for several decades (Wu¨ st, 1959Deep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 555­575 Spatial and seasonal patterns of carbon cycling through stations in the Arabian Sea. The goal of this work was to characterize carbon flows and trophic transfers

Jackson, George

252

SEASONAL VARIATION IN SURVIVAL OF LARVAL NORTHERN ANCHOVY, ENGRAULIS MORDAX, ESTIMATED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the observed greater recruitment in 1978 and is consistent with the hypothesis that offshore transport is found within the North Sea where the short spawn- ing season of each herring population bears a fixed surveys (Kramer et aL 1972) on the sampling grid (Fig. 1) of the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries

253

Seasonal Mean Circulation in the Yellow Sea A ModelGenerated Climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Mean Circulation in the Yellow Sea ­ A Model­Generated Climatology Christopher E. Naimie 1://www­nml.dartmouth.edu/Publications/external publications/PUB­00­1 email: d.r.lynch@dartmouth.edu Abstract The three­dimensional climatological circulation

254

Seasonal cycles of O3, CO, and convective outflow at the tropical tropopause  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas species. There is a significant seasonal cycle in ozone (O3) at the tropical tropopause, both a radiative transfer model [Fu and Liou, 1992]. This was done at 10 ozone- sonde stations from the SHADOZ network (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesonde ozonesonde stations [Thompson et al., 2003a, 2003b

Thompson, Anne

255

SEASONAL AND INSHORE-OFFSHORE VARIATIONS IN THE STANDING STOCKS OF MICRONEKTON AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEASONAL AND INSHORE-OFFSHORE VARIATIONS IN THE STANDING STOCKS OF MICRONEKTON AND MACROZOOPLANKTON OFF OREGON WILLIAM G. PEARCyl ABSTRACT Dry weights of pelagic animals captured along an inshore-offshore, shrimps, and squids) were largest inshore (28 and 46 km offshore) in the winter (November

256

Indirect validation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide retrieved from the OMI satellite instrument: Insight into the seasonal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Click Here for Full Article Indirect validation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide retrieved from nitrogen dioxide retrieved from the OMI satellite instrument: Insight into the seasonal variation of the hydroxyl radical (OH). Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an indicator of surface air quality that is associated

Dirksen, Ruud

257

Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that lateral ocean heat flux from the shelf to the basin melts a substantial amount of ice in the marginal iceSeasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M to characterize differences in upwelling near the shelf break in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to varying sea ice

Pickart, Robert S.

258

Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ocean heat flux42 from the shelf to the basin melts a substantial amount of ice in the marginal ice Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M the shelfbreak in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to3 varying sea-ice conditions. The record is divided into three

Pickart, Robert S.

259

Water Research 37 (2003) 37563766 Seasonal and daily variations in concentrations of methyl-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by volume to gasoline from November to February, and blending 11% MTBE by volume during the rest of the year; accepted 24 March 2003 Abstract Methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an additive used to oxygenate gasoline of gasoline-powered watercraft. This paper documents and explains both seasonal and daily variations in MTBE

Toran, Laura

260

Small-scale variation in growing season length affects size structure of scarlet monkeyflower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Levine, Dept of Integrative Biology, Univ. of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. Present address for JLW: Division of Biological Sciences, Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA (jennifer. of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9610, USA. All organisms must contend with seasonality, which affects

Williams, Jennifer L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Seasonal dynamics of sea surface salinity off Panama: The far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal dynamics of sea surface salinity off Panama: The far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool Gaël Alory is confined between Panama's west coast and 85 W in December and extends westward to 95 W in April. Strong SSS at the surface, along with hydrographic profiles. The fresh pool appears off Panama due to the strong summer

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

262

State of Maine residential heating oil survey: 1995--1996 season summary  

SciTech Connect

In Maine the cash price is surveyed, as opposed to lthe retail or charge price, as it has been identified as the price most often paid by Maine consumers. As one can see from the chart in this report, the 1995-1996 cash prices for No. 2 heating oil can be characterized as having an upward trend and much more fluctuation than last years` relatively flat line. The 1995-96 heating season started at the closing price of the previous season and for the first few weeks prices were lower than most of the 1994-95 trendline. When the weather became cooler, however, prices were on a steady incline until well into the winter. Prices leveled off for most of the rest of the season with a dramatic surge on the last week of the survey. The average statewide cash price for No. 2 heating oil this year was .861 1 cents, approximately ten cents higher than the average for 1994-1995 which was .7661 cents per gallon. It has been the observation of the SPO that during most of the 1995-1996 season, Maine`s prices showed a direct correspondence with New England rack or wholesale prices. It appeared that they never fluctuated more than 3-4 cents from each other.

Elder, B.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The adaptive value of energy storage and capital breeding in seasonal environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

where reproductive values are used to optimise energy allocation and diapause strategies over the yearThe adaptive value of energy storage and capital breeding in seasonal environments ?ystein Varpe breeding was also used to increase egg production rates at times of income breeding. For individuals born

Heino, Mikko

264

Cloud frequency climatology at the Andes/Amazon transition: 1. Seasonal and diurnal cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud frequency climatology at the Andes/Amazon transition: 1. Seasonal and diurnal cycles Kate-scale cloud patterns. We examine the cloud climatology of a tropical Andean montane region in the context Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) DX cloud product (1983­2008), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging

Malhi, Yadvinder

265

Seasonal mass-balance gradients in Norway L.A. RASMUSSEN,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal mass-balance gradients in Norway L.A. RASMUSSEN,1 L.M. ANDREASSEN2,3 1 Department of Earth@ess.washington.edu 2 Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE), PO Box 5091, Majorstua, NO-0301 Oslo, Norway 3 Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway ABSTRACT

Rasmussen, L.A.

266

Seasonal variation in the energy content of benthic macroinvertebrates of Lake Nainital, U.P., India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper discusses seasonal variation in the energy contents of four macrobenthic invertebrates of Lake Nainital during 197778. The energy values varied from 1697119437 J/g...Tubifex tubifex, 16 51120 231 J/g...

P. K. Gupta; M. C. Pant

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Seasonal measurements of acetone and methanol: Abundances and implications for atmospheric budgets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2002] and photochemical produc- tion from hydrocarbon precursors. Methanol is often the most abundantSeasonal measurements of acetone and methanol: Abundances and implications for atmospheric budgets December 2005; published 21 February 2006. [1] Acetone and methanol have been measured hourly at a rural

Cohen, Ronald C.

268

Diurnal-seasonal and weather-related variations of land surface temperature observed from geostationary satellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diurnal-seasonal and weather-related variations of land surface temperature observed from geostationary satellites Konstantin Y. Vinnikov,1 Yunyue Yu,2 M. K. Rama Varma Raja,3 Dan Tarpley,2 and Mitchell geostationary satellites, GOES-8 and GOES-10, are presented as a sum of time-dependent expected value (diurnal

Vinnikov, Konstantin

269

Potato Late blight Update and Late Season Recommendations Willie Kirk. PLP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potato Late blight Update and Late Season Recommendations Willie Kirk. PLP Potato late blight has confirmations in potatoes have been the US-23 genotype. This was confirmed by GPI allozyme analysis. Conditions remain conducive for late blight in potato crops and the risk of tuber blight is high especially

Douches, David S.

270

INVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

routinely produced weekly ice charts since the 1970's. From the period of 1995 to 2000, classificationINVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg P1.23 1. INTRODUCTION A number of studies suggest a connections between sea-ice variability

Geiger, Cathleen

271

Seasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service and the U. S. National Ice Center) produces summer outlooks of ice conditions for specific regionsSeasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1 J. Zhang,1 A. J. Schweiger,1 29 February 2008. [1] How well can the extent of arctic sea ice be predicted for lead periods of up

Zhang, Jinlun

272

Seasonal contrast in the surface energy balance of the Sahel R. L. Miller,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Africa, soil moisture is often so depleted that solar heating is balanced mainly by longwave radiationSeasonal contrast in the surface energy balance of the Sahel R. L. Miller,1,2 A. Slingo,3,4 J. C (AMF) in Niamey, Niger, evaporation makes a significant contribution to the surface energy balance only

273

Study of Applications of Solar Heating Systems with Seasonal Storage in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In most northern parts of China, it is cold in winter and needs space heating in winter. This paper studies applications of solar heating systems with seasonal storage in China. A typical residential district was selected, and a solar heating system...

Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Chen, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Supporting Online Material for: Carbon in Amazon forests: Unexpected seasonal fluxes and disturbance-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forest, and the effects of selective logging and land-use change. Three eddy covariance towers operate the Santarém-Cuiabá highway (1), plus the Km 67 and Km 83 tower sites, which constitute a control seasonal variations in important climatic variables at this site: solar radiation, net radiation, air

275

Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with several no-skill metrics (Klotzbach and Gray 2009), with the early April forecast showing less skill approximately 80% of the cross-validated hindcast variance for integrated seasonal metrics such as net tropical- lized primarily weather station and radiosonde data (e.g., Gray et al. 1994). During the past 10­15 yr

Gray, William

276

WindEvaporation Feedback and Abrupt Seasonal Transitions of Weak, Axisymmetric Hadley Circulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind­Evaporation Feedback and Abrupt Seasonal Transitions of Weak, Axisymmetric Hadley Circulations dynamics because the barotropic component of the Hadley circulation, which is coupled to the baroclinic-equatorial Hadley cell can create barotropic westerlies that constructively add to the baroclinic wind

277

Seasonal salt budget of the northwestern tropical Atlantic Ocean along 38o  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle of local storage. 1. Introduction Salinity affects the density of seawater, spatial gradients cycle of local storage. The strongest seasonal cycle of precipitation occurs at 8o N and is balanced by horizontal advection and local storage. At 12o N the balance is mostly local, with only a minor contribution

Carton, James

278

Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

Hansen, René Rydhof

279

Room Temperature Control During Season Switchover with Single Duct Variable Air Volume System Without Reheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of VAV boxes to maintain room temperature at their setpoints. The thermostat action is switched from direct acting (DA) to reverse acting (RA) when the season changes from fall to winter and vice versa from winter to spring, based on the out side air...

Liu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Transport pathways for Asian pollution outflow over the Pacific: Interannual and seasonal variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Synoptic-scale meteorology; KEYWORDS: pollution transport, outflow emissions and of the export of Asian pollution to the global atmosphere. This was one of the majorTransport pathways for Asian pollution outflow over the Pacific: Interannual and seasonal

Liu, Hongyu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Phytologia (April 2012) 94(1) 91 SEASONAL VARIATION IN THE LEAF ESSENTIAL OIL OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phytologia (April 2012) 94(1) 91 SEASONAL VARIATION IN THE LEAF ESSENTIAL OIL OF TAXODIUM DISTICHUM Robert_Adams@baylor.edu ABSTRACT The leaf essential oil of Taxodium distichum is dominated by -pinene (63-69%) with moderate amounts of limonene, - phellandrene, myrcene and -pinene. Oil yield increased from April (3.45 mg

Adams, Robert P.

282

Ecological assessment of Phragmites australis wetlands using multi-season2 SPOT-5 scenes3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Ecological assessment of Phragmites australis wetlands using multi-season2 SPOT-5 scenes3 4 5 indices; multitemporal46 imagery; Phragmites australis; vegetation structure, SPOT-5 satellite; state).59 Common reed Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin. ex Steudel) is the most widely distributed60 flowering plant

Boyer, Edmond

283

Seasonal and interannual variability in algal biomass and primary production in the Mediterranean Sea, as derived from 4 years of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal and interannual variability in algal biomass and primary production in the Mediterranean biomass and primary production on a long- term basis is required to detect possible modificationsWiFS observations. Seasonal variations of algal biomass (estimated using a previously developed regional algorithm

Bricaud, Annick

284

An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of anthropogenic CO2 are presented. Approximating the seasonal CO2 emission cycle using a 2-harmonic Fourier series with regions of strong anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Citation: Erickson, D. J., III, R. T. Mills, J. Gregg, T. J

Hoffman, Forrest M.

285

Instrumented elephant seals reveal the seasonality in chlorophyll and light-mixing regime in the iron-fertilized Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instrumented elephant seals reveal the seasonality in chlorophyll and light-mixing regime and salinity provided by sensors mounted on the elephant seals of Kerguelen Island. Our results were mainly. Xing, H. Claustre, and C. Guinet (2013), Instrumented elephant seals reveal the seasonality

Claustre, Hervé

286

Seasonal dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations driven by cave ventilation: Implications for and modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations driven by cave ventilation: Implications of Mg/ Ca (and Sr/Ca) and Sr isotopes is key in delineating whether Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations seasonal variations in dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, whereas the other drip sites do not. In contrast

Banner, Jay L.

287

Seasonal variation of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric equatorial waves over the tropical Pacific  

SciTech Connect

Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric wind data spanning 31 years from 1964 to 1994 were analyzed at rawinsonde stations in the central/western Pacific. Traditional spectral and cross-spectral analysis led to the conclusion that there is a significant signal with periods between 3 and 4.5 days, which the authors link with the dominant antisymmetric waves predicted by theory to have these periods, mixed Rossby-gravity waves, and equatorial Rossby waves. Then the authors applied the seasonally varying spectral analysis method developed by Madden to study the average seasonal variation of these waves. The seasonally varying analysis suggested that there are significant twice-yearly maxima in equatorial wave activity throughout the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, with peaks occurring in late winter-spring and in late summer-fall. The twice-yearly signal was most prominent at the 70-hPa and 100-hPa levels. Similar and consistent results were also shown by an autoregressive cyclic spectral analysis. The cyclic spectral analysis suggested that the frequency characteristics of the v-wind wave power are different during the two maxima at some stations. In addition, the seasonally varying squared coherence between the u and v winds and the associated phase implied that there is horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves and that the sign of the flux is different during the two maxima. The differences in wave characteristics during the maxima periods may be related to different wave modes, seasonal variation of the basic zonal state, or possibly to different equatorial wave forcing mechanisms (i.e., convective versus lateral excitations). 52 refs., 12 figs.

Wikle, C.K.; Tsing-Chang Chen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Madden, R.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective  

SciTech Connect

We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

Relationship between Use Value and Ecological Importance of Floristic Resources of Seasonally Dry Tropical Forest in the Balsas River Basin, Mxico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relationship between Use Value and Ecological Importance of Floristic Resources of Seasonally Dry Tropical Forest in the Balsas River Basin, Mxico. The use of seasonally dry tropical forest in t...

Belinda Maldonado; Javier Caballero; Alfonso Delgado-Salinas

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ski Season 2008-09: Change is the Only Constant The Anaconda-Pintler Range from Mill Creek highway, near Mount Haggin Nordic Ski Area.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under the lights). My place on the sidelines has been typical this season. I have only skied one day for only four days around Christmas time. At that early point in the season, I decided to take a break

Bardsley, John

291

Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands  

SciTech Connect

Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

The effect of anthropogenic emissions corrections on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2  

SciTech Connect

A previous study (Erickson et al. 2008) approximated the monthly global emission estimates of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} by applying a 2-harmonic Fourier expansion with coefficients as a function of latitude to annual CO{sub 2} flux estimates derived from United States data (Blasing et al. 2005) that were extrapolated globally. These monthly anthropogenic CO{sub 2} flux estimates were used to model atmospheric concentrations using the NASA GEOS-4 data assimilation system. Local variability in the amplitude of the simulated CO{sub 2} seasonal cycle were found to be on the order of 2-6 ppmv. Here we used the same Fourier expansion to seasonally adjust the global annual fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions from the SRES A2 scenario. For a total of four simulations, both the annual and seasonalized fluxes were advected in two configurations of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) used in the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP). One configuration used the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM) coupled with the CASA (carbon only) biogeochemistry model and the other used CLM coupled with the CN (coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles) biogeochemistry model. All four simulations were forced with observed sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre and a prescribed transient atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration for the radiation and land forcing over the 20th century. The model results exhibit differences in the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} between the seasonally corrected and uncorrected simulations. Moreover, because of differing energy and water feedbacks between the atmosphere model and the two land biogeochemistry models, features of the CO{sub 2} seasonal cycle were different between these two model configurations. This study reinforces previous findings that suggest that regional near-surface atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations depend strongly on the natural sources and sinks of CO{sub 2}, but also on the strength of local anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions and geographic position. This work further attests to the need for remotely sensed CO{sub 2} observations from space.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL] [ORNL; Blasing, T J [ORNL] [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

http://www.eh.doe.gov/nepa/process/ll/95q3.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3RD 3RD QUARTER FY 1995 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance U.S. Department of Energy September 1, 1995 INTRODUCTION To foster continuing improvement of the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program, the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA, issued June 13, 1994, requires the Office of Environment, Safety and Health to solicit comments on lessons learned in the process of completing NEPA documents from the NEPA Document Manager, the NEPA Compliance Officer, and team members after completing each environmental impact statement (EIS) and environmental assessment (EA), and to distribute a quarterly summary to all NEPA Compliance Officers and NEPA Document Managers. This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between April 1 and June

294

TOTAL_ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_thru_Q3_2010_11_9_10.pdf | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

TOTALARRAHomesWeatherizedthruQ3201011910.pdf TOTALARRAHomesWeatherizedthruQ3201011910.pdf TOTALARRAHomesWeatherizedthruQ3201011910.pdf More Documents &...

295

High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles- FY13 Q3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this Brayton Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

296

The Mathieu group M12 and the M13 game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The permutation induced by the entire path is (0 8)(7 12) (1 8)(4 9) (1 12)(5 10) (6 12)(3 9) (0 6)(4 5) = (1 7 12 6 8)(3 4 10 5 9). Two paths are called equivalent if they induce the same permutation. We readily check that if p, q, r are collinear..., the points q1, q2, q3, q4 form an oval. Thus we may adopt the labelling (2.1), with q5 = q1q2 ? q3q4 = r1, q6 = q1q3 ? q2q4 = r2, y = s12. If s12 = 0, then the paths [s12, r2, s23] and [s12, r3, r1, s14] induce the permuta- tions ? = (s12 s23 r2)(r3 s34)(r1 s...

Conway, John H.; Elkies, Noam D.; Martin, Jeremy L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Annual and Seasonal Global Variation in Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Ozone » Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone Atmospheric Trace Gases » Ozone » Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone Annual and Seasonal Global Variation in Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone, 1958-1987 (1991) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp023 data Data Investigators J. K. Angell, J. Korshover, and W. G. Planet Description For 1958 through 1987, this data base presents total ozone variations and layer mean ozone variations expressed as percent deviations from the 1958 to 1977 mean. The total ozone variations were derived from mean monthly ozone values published in Ozone Data for the World by the Atmospheric Environment Service in cooperation with the World Meteorological Organization. The layer mean ozone variations are derived from ozonesonde and Umkehr observations. The data records include year, seasonal and annual

298

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

299

Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data D. A. Spangenberg Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Q. Z. Trepte and S. S.-Mack Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Improving climate model predictions over earth's Polar Regions requires a complete knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface observed in satellite data, especially for visible wavelengths. This makes it difficult to

300

Seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of biogenic methane in a coastal sediment  

SciTech Connect

Systematic seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of methane gas occur in the anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, a lagoonal basin on North Carolina's Outer Banks. Values for the carbon isotope ratio (delta /sup 13/C) of methane range from -57.3 per mil during summer to -68.5 per mil during winter in gas bubbles with an average methane content of 95%. The variations are hypothesized to result from changes in the pathways of microbial methane production and cycling of key substrates including acetate and hydrogen. The use of stable isotopic signatures to investigate the global methane cycle through mass balance calculations, involving various sediment and soil biogenic sources, appears to require seasonally averaged data from individual sites. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Martens, C.S.; Blair, N.E.; Green, C.D.; Des Marais, D.J.

1986-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Prediction of regional seasonal fluctuations in precipitation based on chaos theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, the combined effect of flood and drought resulted in the loss of thousands of lives and billions of dollars. Multi season ahead prediction of regional precipitation extremes could significantly reduce losses. However, the evolution of climate is highly sensitive to initial conditions, or chaotic, so practical long term prediction of precipitation in time is impossible. Adding to the difficulty, the climate system is non-stationary; with the energy available to move water and air as tracked by global average surface temperature (GAST) increasing over the last several decades2. Neither purely empirical autoregression, nor global circulation models (GCM) are sufficiently accurate. Here I use statistical methods motivated by chaos theory to predict seasonal fluctuations in regional and local precipitation with high correlation. The change in GAST is accommodated using special runs of a global circulation model to build an initial set of predictive models, while ground data is used to train, co...

LuValle, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Seasonal snow of arctic Alaska R4D investigations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Seasonal snow is present on the Arctic Slope of Alaska for nine months each year. Its presence or absence determines whether 80% of the solar radiation is reflected or absorbed, respectively. Although life on the Arctic Slope is adapted to, and in some cases dependent upon seasonal snow, little is known about it from a scientific point of view. Its quantity has been grossly underestimated, and knowledge of its distribution and the extent of wind transport and redistribution is very limited. This research project dealt with the amount, regional distribution and physical properties of wind blown snow and its biological role in the R4D area of the Arctic Slope. Physical processes which operate within the snow that were studied included the flux of heat and vapor and the fractionation of stable isotopes through it during fall and winter, and the complex heat and mass transfer within the snow and between snow, its substrate and the overlying atmosphere during the melt period.

Benson, C.S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Across the ACRF Using RWP Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Across the ACRF Using RWP Data Richard Coulter, Barry Lesht, and Brad Orr Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL INTRODUCTION The radar wind profilers (RWPs) located at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site have been collecting data for more than a decade at the intermediate facilities (I1: Beaumont, KS; I2: Medicine Lodge, KS; I3 Meeker OK) and 15 years at the Central Facility. They provide a good picture of the temporal and spatial variation across the SGP site over this time period Here we elucidate the variation of the height of the mixed layer (z i ) and precipitation, two parameters that illustrate the potential richness of the wind profiler data beyond wind profiles. Daytime Mixed Layer An automated routine, operating

304

First-order catchment mass balance during the wet season in the Panama Canal Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Tropical hydrology is poorly understood for a number of reasons. Intense biological activity in the tropics introduces complexities to the hydrologic process. Bioturbation, rapid rates of decay, and intensive insect activity all tend to promote rapid flow paths in the upper soil. Aggressive weathering leads to clays depleted of light cations and deep soil profiles. Processes in the seasonal tropics are further complicated by seasonal transitions, and very large changes in catchment storage between seasons. Beginning in 2005, we installed a suite of hydrologic sensors in a 16.7ha first-order catchment in the Panama Canal Watershed to observe hydrologic variables and identify the dominant streamflow generation processes. The site is located near the village of Gamboa, which is located on the east bank of the Panama Canal at the confluence of Lake Gatun and the Chagres River. The study catchment is located on the north side of a ridge off the eastern flank of a 230m tall hill known as Cerro Pelado, and is covered by 70120year old re-growth triple-canopy forest. Measurements included: rainfall above the canopy, throughfall, stemflow, evapotranspiration, shallow groundwater levels and streamflow. Deep groundwater storage was not measured. This paper describes measurements made, data collected, and the worth of those data in estimating the mass balance closure of a first-order catchment during the wet season. We compare measurements of the different components of the water cycle with observations from other published studies from the tropics. Data analysis results indicate water balance closure errors of approximately 8%.

Justin M. Niedzialek; Fred L. Ogden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ARM - Field Campaign - Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWarm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test govCampaignsWarm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test 1993.06.01 - 1993.06.30 Lead Scientist : Dave Parsons Data Availability Complete output from a 10-day simulation using a high resolution mesoscale model is available at 1-hr intervals. Verification of June 1993 IOP Assimilation Dataset and its use in Driving a Single-Column CCM3 Model. Update in May 2006 from Ric Cederwall: We were expecting 4-D variational analysis results for the IOP from Jimy Dudhia's 4DVAR model (a version of MM5), but it never happened. I don't expect that we will get the dataset. For data sets, see below. Summary Special rawinsonde soundings and profiler measurements were taken over a

306

Performance investigation of a solar heating system with underground seasonal energy storage for greenhouse application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reports the performance of a demonstrated 2304m2 solar-heated greenhouse equipped with a seasonal thermal energy storage system in Shanghai, east China. This energy storage system utilises 4970m3 of underground soil to store the heat captured by a 500m2 solar collector in non-heating seasons through U-tube heat exchangers. During heating seasons, thermal energy is delivered by the heat exchange tubes placed on the plants shelves and the bare soil. The system can operate without a heat pump, which can save electricity consumption and further enhance the solar fraction. It was found that in the first operation year, 331.9GJ was charged, and 208.9GJ was later extracted for greenhouse space heating. No auxiliary heating equipment was installed so that solar energy covered all the heating loads directly or indirectly. It was demonstrated that this system was capable of maintaining an interior air temperature that was 13C higher than the ambient value when the latter temperature was?2C at night. The ECOP (electrical coefficient of performance) of the first operation year was approximately 8.7, indicating a better performance than the common heat pump heating system.

J. Xu; Y. Li; R.Z. Wang; W. Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the citys urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592kgcapita?1day?1. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%).

Guadalupe Gmez; Montserrat Meneses; Lourdes Ballinas; Francesc Castells

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city's urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%)

Gomez, Guadalupe [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 (Mexico); Meneses, Montserrat [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ballinas, Lourdes [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 (Mexico); Castells, Francesc [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.castells@urv.cat

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Technical Note: Seasonality in alpine water resources management a regional assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Alpine regions are particularly affected by seasonal variations in water demand and water availability. Especially the winter period is critical from an operational point of view, as being characterised by high water demands due to tourism and low water availability due to the temporal storage of precipitation as snow and ice. The clear definition of summer and winter periods is thus an essential prerequisite for water resource management in alpine regions. This paper presents a GIS-based multi criteria method to determine the winter season. A snow cover duration dataset serves as basis for this analysis. Different water demand stakeholders, the alpine hydrology and the present day water supply infrastructure are taken into account. Technical snow-making and (winter) tourism were identified as the two major seasonal water demand stakeholders in the study area, which is the Kitzbueheler region in the Austrian Alps. Based upon different geographical datasets winter was defined as the period from December to March, and summer as the period from April to November. By determining potential regional water balance deficits or surpluses in the present day situation and in future, important management decisions such as water storage and allocation can be made and transposed to the local level. 1

Hydrology; D. Vanham; E. Fleischhacker; W. Rauch

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Lagoon of Venice ecosystem: Seasonal dynamics and environmental guidance with uncertainty analyses and error subspace data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ensemble data assimilation scheme, Error Subspace Statistical Estimation (ESSE), is utilized to investigate the seasonal ecosystem dynamics of the Lagoon of Venice and provide guidance on the monitoring and management ...

Cossarini, G.

311

Spatial patterns in seasonal and interannual variability of chlorophyll and sea surface temperature in the California Current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Bight, where upwelling winds are less vigorous and/or persistent. Seasonality along south]. Basin-scale oceanic and atmospheric processes modify patterns of physical forcing and biological

Thomas, Andrew

312

Feeding habits of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) in Galveston Bay, Texas: Seasonal diet variation and predator-prey size relationships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Feeding habits, seasonal diet variation, and predator size-prey size relationships of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) were investigated in Galveston Bay, Texas through stomach contents analysis. A total of...Penae...

Frederick S. Scharf; Kurtis K. Schlicht

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Seasonal variations in biomass and species composition of seaweeds along the northern coasts of Persian Gulf (Bushehr Province)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was carried out to evaluate the seasonal variations of seaweed biomass and species composition at six different sites along the coastal areas in Bushehr Province. Sampling depths varied among sites,...

A DADOLAHI-SOHRAB; M GARAVAND-KARIMI; H RIAHI

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Supplemental Guide for Seasonal High Water Table Indicators in Georgia's Onsite Wastewater Manual Section C: Flatwoods Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Supplemental Guide for Seasonal High Water Table Indicators in Georgia's Onsite Wastewater Manual) are part of the Atlantic Coast Flatwoods that run along the eastern shore of the US. They fall within

Ma, Lena

315

Seasonal prevalence and susceptibility to agrochemicals of Tyrophagus similis (Acari: Acaridae) in spinach buds and agricultural soil under greenhouse conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seasonal prevalence of Tyrophagus similis was investigated from 1997 to 1998 in two spinach greenhouses in central Japan. Susceptibility of T. similis to agrochemicals was also tested in the laboratory. Tyrophagu...

Shikoh Kasuga; Hiroshi Amano

316

The Mutton Snapper (Lutjanus analis) Spawning Aggregation Fishery at Gladden Spit, Belize: Inter-annual and Within-season Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................................. 33 2.5. Summary ................................................................................................ 40 CHAPTER III WITHIN-SEASON DYNAMICS OF THE MUTTON SNAPPER (Lutjanus analis) SPAWNING AGGREGATION FISHERY AT GLADDEN SPIT... ............................................................................. 45 3.3. Results .................................................................................................... 54 3.4. Discussion .............................................................................................. 60 3.5. Summary...

Granados-Dieseldorff, Pablo

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

Seasonal agar yield and quality inGelidium canariensis (Grunow) Seoane-Camba (Gelidiales, Rhodophyta) from Gran Canaria, Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The seasonal effects on yield and gel properties ofGelidium canariensis...agar were investigated at two intertidal populations at the northern coast of Gran Canaria. Physical and rheological properties were measu...

Y. Freile-Pelegrn; D. R. Robledo; G. Garca-Reina

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Nutrient content variation in wood and foliage of slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) with season and soil series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUTRIENT. CONTENT VARIATION IN WOOD AND FOLIAGE OF SLASH PINE (PINUS ELLIOTTII ENGELN. ) WITH SEASON AND SOIL SERIES A Thesis by RONALD HOWARD BLACKWELDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AKJ&l University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Decenber 1977 Najor Subject: Forestry NUTRIENT CONTENT VARIATION IN WOOD AND FOLIAGE OF SLASH PINE (PINUS ELLIOTTI ENGELM. ) WITH SEASON AND SOIL SERIES A Thesis by RONAL D HOWARD BL AC KWE L DE R...

Blackwelder, Ronald Howard

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

On the determination of phosphorous via charged particle activation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cyclotron Terminal . "or Activation Analysis Ql ? WATER INLET Q2 ? BNC CONNECTOR Q3 ? LUCITE Q4 ? CA RBON Figure 3. Four-leaved Carl. on Pea, -. Monitor 1. Ta COLLIMATOR 2. Cu HEAT SINK K MONITOR 4. SAMPLE 5. Cu BASE PLATE 6. WATER COOLING I 2... of Cyclotron Terminal . "or Activation Analysis Ql ? WATER INLET Q2 ? BNC CONNECTOR Q3 ? LUCITE Q4 ? CA RBON Figure 3. Four-leaved Carl. on Pea, -. Monitor 1. Ta COLLIMATOR 2. Cu HEAT SINK K MONITOR 4. SAMPLE 5. Cu BASE PLATE 6. WATER COOLING I 2...

Poland, John Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

Evaluation of the pseudo force method applied to large strain dynamic problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) {F2+3 Fl) + Y[] ql q 25 [] + 25 [M] {23q -3q ) (4. 24) The velocities are obtained by rearranging Eq. (4. 23). 5 2 1 1 {q2)= 3Xt{q2)- ht(ql)+ 3ht{q, )- r(ql) The stability of the Park method is compared with 38 that of the Houbolt method... ) {F2+3 Fl) + Y[] ql q 25 [] + 25 [M] {23q -3q ) (4. 24) The velocities are obtained by rearranging Eq. (4. 23). 5 2 1 1 {q2)= 3Xt{q2)- ht(ql)+ 3ht{q, )- r(ql) The stability of the Park method is compared with 38 that of the Houbolt method...

Richardson, Edward Quentin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mercury speciation driven by seasonal changes in a contaminated estuarine environment  

SciTech Connect

In this study, seasonal changes of mercury (Hg) species in the highly variable estuary of So?a/Isonzo River (northern Adriatic Sea) were investigated. Samplings were performed on a seasonal basis (September 2009, May, August and October 2010) and Hg species (total Hg, methylmercury (MeHg), dissolved gaseous Hg (DGM)) in waters, sediments and pore waters were determined. In addition, a range of ancillary parameters were measured (salinity, nutrients, organic carbon (OC), nitrogen species). Hg values were interpreted using these parameters and hydrological conditions (river flow, wave height) around the time of sampling. There were no significant changes in Hg load from river to the gulf, compared to previous studies. The load was temporarily higher in May 2010 due to higher river flow. Wave height, through changing hydrostatic pressure, was most likely to cause resuspension of already deposited Hg from the bottom (August 2010). The estuary is a net source of DGM to the atmosphere as suggested by DGM profiles, with salinity, redox potential and organic matter as the most probable controls over its production. MeHg is produced in situ in sediment or in water column, rather than transported by river, as indicated by its correlation with OC of the marine origin. Calculated fluxes for THg and MeHg showed sediment as a source for both the water column. In pore waters, OC in part affects partitioning of both THg and MeHg; however other factors (e.g. sulphide and/or oxyhydroxides precipitation and dissolution) are also probably important. -- Highlights: ? Water, sediment and pore water mercury species in front of So?a River estuary were measured. ? Seasonally variable hydrological conditions were shown to influence water column Hg speciation. ? Fluxes for total Hg and MeHg from sediment to water were calculated. ? Sediment is a source of total Hg and MeHg to the water column. ? Correlation of MeHg with organic carbon of marine origin suggests in situ formation.

Bratki?, Arne, E-mail: arne.bratkic@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department of Environmental Sciences, Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc, Nives, E-mail: nives.orginc@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department of Environmental Sciences, Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kotnik, Joe, E-mail: joze.kotnik@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department of Environmental Sciences, Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faganeli, Jadran, E-mail: faganeli@mbss.org [Marine Biology Station, Forna?e 41, 6330 Piran (Slovenia)] [Marine Biology Station, Forna?e 41, 6330 Piran (Slovenia); agar, Duan, E-mail: dusan.zagar@fgg.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Yano, Shinichiro [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Tada, Akihide, E-mail: tada@civil.nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Nagasaki University, Bunkyo-machi 1-14, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Nagasaki University, Bunkyo-machi 1-14, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Horvat, Milena, E-mail: milena.horvat@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department of Environmental Sciences, Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

Dexter, W

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Seasonal reproduction in Spanish does and reproductive response to suckling manipulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by monthly intervals in figure 3. Ovulation rate of the lapartomy/ 25 20 I Z IJ + 15 IL z 0 I 10 ac I OC ~ T 0 0 J F M A M J J A 5 0 N D MONTHS Figure 1. Kidding pattern of does maintained continuously with males. 2. 0 1. 5 CI 1. 0 ) ED...-three percent of the does had multiple births resulting from September matings compared with less than 15% for February breeding. Appendix table 3 gives actual twinning per- centage by month and season. Number of parturitions per doe per year averaged 1. 06...

Lawson, Janet Lee

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermal and economical analysis of an underground seasonal storage heating system in Thrace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economical analysis of the solar heating system with seasonal storage, which was established in Edirne (4139?54?N) in order to provide the heat requirement of buildings, has been fulfilled. Optimum collector area for the heating system has been determined. Total heat requirement of 69% has been met by means of heating system concerning the space heating and domestic water heating. In the accordance with the results of the economical analysis, the payback time of the heating system has been determined as 1920 years.

Berrin Karacavus; Ahmet Can

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Seasonal changes in the food habits of the Great-tailed Grackle, Cassidix mexicanus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collected for this study were taken within 1 mile of the university campus, and. opportunities to collect in other parts of the state were ignored. since this would tend. to emphasize dietary variation due to availability rath" r than season. Specimens... retlect a faulty sample rath" r Chan different fe ding behavior, However, eli!nination of estival data for all classes of individuals did reveal a tendency for adult males to place less emphasis on insect food than did adult females, even in non...

Davis, Walter Ragland

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Seasonal Price Change and Costs of Storing Grain Sorghum in the Coastal Bend.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or to store it in commercial I elevators for later sale. During the harvest months of -- June and July, the grain sorghum price in the Coastal E Bend usually is similar to the average Texas price, with the June price slightly above and the July price... slightly below the State price. After July the Coastal Bend " prices move away from, and above, the average Texas price. If price later in the season moves above the har- vest price by an amount that more than covers the farmer's storage costs, he...

Whitney, Howard S.; Moore, Clarence A.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cooling season study and economic analysis of a desiccant cooling system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Gas Cost (3/GJ) Figure 4. 4 Gas Price vs DINC Cycle Payback Period at Various Electricity Prices SEER = 12 35 20 18 16 ~ 14 ~ 12 D o 10 8 6 o 4 $0. 06/Kwh $0. 09/Kwh $0. 12/Kwh $0. 15/Kwh $0. 'I 8/Kwh 10 20... IV ECONOMIC ANALYSIS V CONCLUSIONS 28 36 NOMENCLATURE 39 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A - HOUSE CONSTRUCTION DATA . . APPENDIX B - SECOND LAW COMPARISON 48 53 APPENDIX C - COOLING SEASON AND DINC CYCLE PROGRAM LISTING 72 APPENDIX D - ECONOMIC...

Lee, James Howard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

Influence of row spacing on performance of short-season cotton genotypes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hand har- vests were made at 121, 137, and 174 days after planting (DAP) on 1 Mention of commercial products or trade names is for identifica- tion only and does not imply endorsement by the author or Texas A&M University. 15 3-m row sections.../ha. Percentage maturity was determined at 121 ard 137 days after planting. At each date, differences among spacing treatments were non-significant. Genotype differences were significant at both dates; at 121 DAP, the long-season check variety (genotype 10...

Abreu, Jose?

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Wholesale price rebate vs. capacity expansion: The optimal strategy for seasonal products in a supply chain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We consider a supply chain in which one manufacturer sells a seasonal product to the end market through a retailer. Faced with uncertain market demand and limited capacity, the manufacturer can maximize its profits by adopting one of two strategies, namely, wholesale price rebate or capacity expansion. In the former, the manufacturer provides the retailer with a discount for accepting early delivery in an earlier period. In the latter, the production capacity of the manufacturer in the second period can be raised so that production is delayed until in the period close to the selling season to avoid holding costs. Our research shows that the best strategy for the manufacturer is determined by three driving forces: the unit cost of holding inventory for the manufacturer, the unit cost of holding inventory for the retailer, and the unit cost of capacity expansion. When the single period capacity is low, adopting the capacity expansion strategy dominates as both parties can improve their profits compared to the wholesale price rebate strategy. When the single period capacity is high, on the other hand, the equilibrium outcome is the wholesale price rebate strategy.

Kwei-Long Huang; Chia-Wei Kuo; Ming-Lun Lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Implications of diurnal and seasonal variations in renewable energy generation for large scale energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large scale implementation of solar and wind powered renewable electricity generation will use up to continent sized connected electricity grids built to distribute the locally fluctuating power. Systematic power output variation will then become manifest since solar power has an evident diurnal period but also surface windswhich are driven by surface temperaturesfollow a diurnal periodic behavior lagging about 4 h in time. On an ordinary day a strong diurnal varying renewable electricity generation results when combining wind and solar power on such continent sized grid. Comparison with possible demand patterns indicates that coping with such systematically varying generation will require large scale renewable energy storage and conversion for timescales and storage capacities of at least up to half a day. Seasonal timescales for versatile high quality generally applicable energy conversion and storage are equally essential since the continent wide insolation varies a factor ?3 e.g. in Europe and Northern Africa together. A first order model for estimating required energy storage and conversion magnitudes is presented taking into account potential diurnal and seasonal energy demand and generation patterns. A few scalable energy storage methods are briefly indicated.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Environmental, seasonal, and social modulations of basal activity in a weakly electric fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electric organ discharge (EOD) of weakly electric fish encodes information about species, sex, behavioral, and physiological states throughout the lifetime. Its central command is crucial for sensory-motor coordination, and is therefore the target of plastic mechanisms that adapt fish to environmental and social challenges. The EOD waveform of Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus is modulated by environmental factors and the neuroendocrine system. In this study we investigate the effects of water temperature and daynight cycle upon EOD rate in this species during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. During the non-breeding season, EOD rate is a linear function of water temperature and exhibits counterclockwise hysteresis. During breeding, a thermal resistance strategy prevents the decrease of EOD rate to cooling. A nocturnal increase of EOD basal rate independent of water temperature and locomotor activity was demonstrated in isolated non-breeding adults and in malefemale dyads all year round. An additional increase of nocturnal EOD rate, probably acting as a social courtship signal, was found in breeding dyads. This additional increase of nocturnal EOD rate could not be fully explained by gonadal maturation and was modulated by social stimuli. This study provides novel data on the complex interactions between environment, reproductive cycle, social behavior, and electromotor output in an advantageous model of the vertebrate central nervous system.

Ana Silva; Rossana Perrone; Omar Macadar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Estimation of seasonal correction factors through Fourier decomposition analysisa new  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radon concentrations in homes have been shown to vary considerably with season. It is important to account for this by applying a correction factor to any home radon measurement of less than one year. To date, Irish radon measurement services have used correction factors based on data derived for the UK in the 1980s. In the absence of similar data for Ireland at the time, these were considered suitable for use due to the similarities between the climates, house types and lifestyles in the two countries. In order to better estimate the long-term radon concentration, measurements from 5640 Irish homes were used to derive a set of correction factors specifically for Ireland. These were generated by means of Fourier decomposition analysis and the new correction factors compared, using 95% confidence intervals, to those derived for the UK using the same analysis and to those currently in use for Ireland. In both cases, a significant difference was found between 10 of the 12 monthly seasonal correction factors. This paper presents the methods used in detail and the results of the analysis.

rlaith Burke; Stephanie Long; Patrick Murphy; Catherine Organo; David Fenton; Peter Anthony Colgan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data  

SciTech Connect

Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data  

SciTech Connect

Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Preliminary survey and evaluation of nonaquifer thermal energy storage concepts for seasonal storage  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The main energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)

Blahnik, D.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Microsoft Word - Q2 '09 DOE Report 28 Aug 09.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Quarter 2009 Second Quarter 2009 ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test Submitted by: ConocoPhillips 700 G Street Anchorage, AK 99501 Principle Investigator: David Schoderbek Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 28, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

337

Microsoft Word - Q2 2012 DOE Report 26 July 12.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Half 2012 First Half 2012 ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test Submitted by: ConocoPhillips 700 G Street Anchorage, AK 99501 Principal Investigator: David Schoderbek Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 31, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

338

http://www.eh.doe.gov/nepa/process/ll/95q2.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2ND 2ND QUARTER FY 1995 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance U.S. Department of Energy June 1, 1995 INTRODUCTION To foster continuing improvement of the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program, the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA, issued June 13, 1994, requires the Office of Environment, Safety and Health to solicit comments from the NEPA Document Manager, the NEPA Compliance Officer, and team members after completing each environmental impact statement and environmental assessment on lessons learned in the process, and to distribute a quarterly summary to all NEPA Compliance Officers and NEPA Document Managers. This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between January 1 and March 31, 1995. It is based primarily on responses to the revised questionnaire that was

339

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production- FY12 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this LANL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

340

Probing New Physics with $q^2$ distributions in $\\bar{B} \\to D^{(*)} ?\\bar?$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experimental results for the ratios of the branching fractions of the decays $\\bar{B} \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar\

Yasuhito Sakaki; Minoru Tanaka; Andrey Tayduganov; Ryoutaro Watanabe

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Arkansas",218,114,136,468,174,172,167,513,253,283,245,781,341,303,157,801,2563 "Colorado",3339797,3246183,3644547,10230527,3101948,3095295,3141507,9338750,3284972,3442912...

342

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

901,5222,5790,16913,6096,6383,6653,19132,8430,9527,8169,26126,5636,7084,7786,20506,82677 "Colorado",2732284,2480711,2775220,7988215,3264406,3408511,3417513,10090430,2999471,3278170...

343

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7135,7446,22132,3555,3697,3686,10938,9304,10021,8613,27938,12782,12327,12004,37113,98121 "Colorado",2551829,2353617,2123193,7028639,2286316,2208508,2390122,6884946,2544298,2770090,...

344

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

611611,596681,1843797,3813909 "Arkansas",5862,5366,5865,17093,8039,7743,7457,23239,40332 "Colorado",1750313,1873107,1653903,5277323,2284260,1942356,2289442,6516058,11793381...

345

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this Argonne National Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

346

Flavor decomposition of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors at low $Q^2$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial distribution of charge and magnetization within the proton is encoded in the elastic form factors. These have been precisely measured in elastic electron scattering, and the combination of proton and neutron form factors allows for the separation of the up- and down-quark contributions. In this work, we extract the proton and neutron form factors from world's data with an emphasis on precise new data covering the low-momentum region, which is sensitive to the large-scale structure of the nucleon. From these, we separate the up- and down-quark contributions to the proton form factors. We combine cross section and polarization measurements of elastic electron-proton scattering to separate the proton form factors and two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions. We combine the proton form factors with parameterization of the neutron form factor data and uncertainties to separate the up- and down-quark contributions to the proton's charge and magnetic form factors. The extracted TPE corrections are compare...

Qattan, I A; Alsaad, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this Sandia National Laboratories project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

348

Assessment of SCaMPR and NEXRAD Q2 Precipitation Estimates Using Oklahoma Mesonet Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although satellite precipitation estimates provide valuable information for weather and flood forecasts, infrared (IR) brightness temperature (BT)-based algorithms often produce large errors for precipitation detection and estimation during deep ...

Ronald Stenz; Xiquan Dong; Baike Xi; Robert J. Kuligowski

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Weatherization Assistance Program Homes Weatherized By State through 06302010 (Calendar Year) *State Number of Homes Weatherized in 2nd Quarter 2010 (Apr-Jun) Recovery Act...

350

Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this Stanford/SLAC project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

351

Microsoft Word - SAND2013-2448P - FY13Q2 Field Aged Cable Assesment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

but could be confirmed at a later date) cable (bonded jacketinsulation) from the Zion Nuclear Power Station. Physical property testing was performed on the as received cables....

352

Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this ORNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

353

Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

354

EE290Q-2 Spring 2009 1 Abstract--Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have proven and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reserves, power scavenging), metrics, and tradeoffs affecting energy-aware routing strategies. The proposed production lines, solar power systems, building automation, medical devices, weather monitoring and many performance and thus, its connectivity/survivability. Although there are a number of metrics for routing

Sanders, Seth

355

High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this UCLA project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

356

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acre-?feet 10. flood wetlands inches 11. the 2006/2007 flood-?up season. Sensor . the summer until fall flood-?up. Figure 4.6.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Solar: annual and seasonal average latitude tilt GIS data (contours) for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

latitude tilt GIS data (contours) for latitude tilt GIS data (contours) for Brazil from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual and seasonal mean of Latitude Tilt Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day based on data from 1995 to 2002 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The cross-calibration process worked with data from 3 ground stations: Caicó (located in the Northeast of Brazil), Florianópolis (located in the South) and Balbina (located in Amazonia). These data have been used for validation and comparison of radiation transfer models operated in SWERA to estimate the incidence of solar radiation on the surface of the country from satellite images

358

Solar: annual and seasonal average direct normal (DNI) GIS data (contours)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

direct normal (DNI) GIS data (contours) direct normal (DNI) GIS data (contours) for Brazil from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual and seasonal mean of Direct Normal Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day based on data from 1995 to 2002 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The cross-calibration process worked with data from 3 ground stations: Caicó (located in the Northeast of Brazil), Florianópolis (located in the South) and Balbina (located in Amazonia). These data have been used for validation and comparison of radiation transfer models operated in SWERA to estimate the incidence of solar radiation on the surface of the country from satellite images obtained from 1995 to 2002

359

PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA: RESULTS FROM THE 2010 OBSERVING SEASON  

SciTech Connect

We present results from a season of observations with the Chinese Small Telescope ARray, obtained over 183 days of the 2010 Antarctic winter. We carried out high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 9125 stars with i ?< 15.3 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. We identified 188 variable stars, including 67 new objects relative to our 2008 observations, thanks to broader synoptic coverage, a deeper magnitude limit, and a larger field of view. We used the photometric data set to derive site statistics from Dome A. Based on two years of observations, we find that extinction due to clouds at this site is less than 0.1 and 0.4 mag during 45% and 75% of the dark time, respectively.

Wang, Lingzhi; Zhu, Zonghong [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Macri, Lucas M.; Wang, Lifan [Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Liu, Qiang; Shang, Zhaohui; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Zhenxi [Chinese Center for Antarctic Astronomy, Nanjing 210008 (China); Pennypacker, Carl R. [Center for Astrophysics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); York, Donald G., E-mail: wanglingzhi@bao.ac.cn [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermal and economical analysis of a central solar heating system with underground seasonal storage in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal performance and economic feasibility of two types of central solar heating system with seasonal storage under four climatically different Turkey locations are investigated. The effects of storage volume and collector area on the thermal performance and cost are studied for three load sizes. The simulation model of the system consisting of flat plate solar collectors, a heat pump, under ground storage tank and heating load based on a finite element analysis and finite element code ANSYS is chosen as a convenient tool. In this study, the lowest solar fraction value for Trabzon (41N) and the highest solar fraction value for Adana (37N) are obtained. Based on the economic analysis, the payback period of system is found to be about 2535 years for Turkey.

A. Ucar; M. Inalli

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program  

SciTech Connect

This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

Prater, L.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect

Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Joint Seasonal ARMA Approach for Modeling of Load Forecast Errors in Planning Studies  

SciTech Connect

To make informed and robust decisions in the probabilistic power system operation and planning process, it is critical to conduct multiple simulations of the generated combinations of wind and load parameters and their forecast errors to handle the variability and uncertainty of these time series. In order for the simulation results to be trustworthy, the simulated series must preserve the salient statistical characteristics of the real series. In this paper, we analyze day-ahead load forecast error data from multiple balancing authority locations and characterize statistical properties such as mean, standard deviation, autocorrelation, correlation between series, time-of-day bias, and time-of-day autocorrelation. We then construct and validate a seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model to model these characteristics, and use the model to jointly simulate day-ahead load forecast error series for all BAs.

Hafen, Ryan P.; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Ning

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Interannual variability and seasonal contribution of thermal expansion to sea level in the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an attempt to understand the causes of the sea-level seasonal cycle in the Persian Gulf, we investigated the relationships of sea-level data from 11 stations with atmospheric pressure and thermosteric level. Sea level is significantly correlated among all stations. The mean trend in sea level for the Persian Gulf is about 2.34mm/year. The thermosteric sea-level variability is estimated from temperature profiles at one-degree grid points. Contour maps of thermosteric level show that the height due to thermal expansion is high in summer and autumn, and low during winter and spring. The monthly mean thermostric height ranges from +2.2cm in July to ?2.1cm in February. The major change in sea level due to the thermosteric level seems to be associated with the large change of the thermohaline circulation in the Persian Gulf. The maximum expansion occurs in summer, and the maximum contraction occurs in winter. Results of the regression analysis demonstrate that from 62% to 90.2% of the variance in the seasonal cycle is due to atmospheric pressure. The inclusion of the thermosteric sea level as a secondary forcing in the regression model improves the variance explained to 78.190.7%. The remaining change should be due to the halosteric effect and upwelling. Tide-gauge stations located at the Gulf's head show high correlation with Ekman vertical velocity. There are two distinct tide gauge stations in the Persian Gulf. One is found in the first cyclonic gyre and the other in the second gyre. The inclusion of Ekman upwelling to the model, improves significantly the variations explained as well, from 82.3% to 91.9%.

F. Hosseinibalam; S. Hassanzadeh; A. Kiasatpour

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from five years (2004-2008) of acoustic telemetry studies conducted in the Columbia River estuary using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System. For this synthesis, the Columbia River estuary includes the section of the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam at river kilometer (Rkm) 235 downstream to the mouth where it enters the Pacific Ocean. In this report, we summarize the seasonal salmonid presence and migration patterns in the Columbia River estuary based on information from published studies as well as relevant data from acoustic telemetry studies conducted by NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) between 2004 and 2008. Recent acoustic telemetry studies, conducted using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS; developed by the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), provided information on the migratory behavior of juvenile steelhead (O. mykiss) and Chinook salmon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. In this report, Section 2 provides a summary of information from published literature on the seasonal presence and migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary and plume. Section 3 presents a detailed synthesis of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead migratory behavior based on use of the JSATS between 2004 and 2008. Section 4 provides a discussion of the information summarized in the report as well as information drawn from literature reviews on potential effects of channel maintenance activities to juvenile salmonids rearing in or migrating through the Columbia River estuary and plume.

Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Welch, Ian D.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dependencies of high-latitude plasma convection: Consideration of interplanetary magnetic field, seasonal, and universal time factors in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements were collected over the period 1998­2002. The data were first used to derive a new statistical is kept in motion by processes that couple energy and momentum from the solar wind into Earth, seasonal, and universal time factors in statistical patterns J. M. Ruohoniemi and R. A. Greenwald Johns

Shepherd, Simon

368

Seasonal and ENSO variability in global ocean phytoplankton chlorophyll derived from 4 years of SeaWiFS measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a possible 184 modes, which explain 67% of the total temporal variability associated with the global meanSeasonal and ENSO variability in global ocean phytoplankton chlorophyll derived from 4 years of Sea and other sources of phytoplankton variability on global scales, which is an important component

Yoder, James S.

369

Thermochemical process for seasonal storage of solar energy: characterization and modeling of a high-density reactive bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Thermochemical process for seasonal storage of solar energy: characterization and modeling to maximize the use of solar energy for house heating, it is interesting to valorize the solar energy excess efficiency, and a 20 per cent share of renewable). The use of renewable energies and in particular solar

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

370

Biogeochemisiry of Seasonally Snow-Covered Catchments (Proceedings of a Boulder Symposium July 1995). IAHSPubl. no. 228, 1995. 303  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeochemisiry of Seasonally Snow-Covered Catchments (Proceedings of a Boulder Symposium July 1995 Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA KENNETH E is predominantly through the lower soil horizons, due to such processes as microbial degradation of annual litter

371

Seasonal Drought in the Greater Horn of Africa and Its Recent Increase during the MarchMay Long Rains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a review of atmospheric circulation and sea surface temperature (SST) conditions that are associated with meteorological drought on the seasonal time scale in the Greater Horn of Africa (the region 10S15N, 3052E). New ...

Bradfield Lyon

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Effects of Season and Host Physiological State on the Diversity, Density, and Activity of the Arctic Ground Squirrel Cecal Microbiota  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...EM and GC Burton. 1970. The effect of hibernation on the caecal...CL and BM Barnes. 2000. Effects of ambient temperature on metabolic...bioinformatics/btp636 . 29. Price, MN , PS Dehal and AP Arkin...squirrels: a strong litter effect across the first active season...

Timothy J. Stevenson; Khrystyne N. Duddleston; C. Loren Buck

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Roles of Equatorial Waves and Western Boundary Reflection in the Seasonal Circulation of the Equatorial Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roles of Equatorial Waves and Western Boundary Reflection in the Seasonal Circulation of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado (Manuscript received 17 May 2005, in final form 26 October 2005) ABSTRACT An ocean general circulation model (OGCM) is used to study the roles of equatorial waves and western

Han, Weiqing

374

A unique seasonal pattern in phytoplankton biomass in low-latitude waters in the South China Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unique seasonal pattern in phytoplankton biomass in low-latitude waters in the South China Sea in phytoplankton biomass was observed at the South East Asian Time- series Study (SEATS) station (18°N, 116°E became readily detectable in the winter. The elevation of phytoplankton biomass coincided approximately

Wu, Chau-Ron

375

Seasonal variability and northsouth asymmetry of internal tides in the deep basin west of the Luzon Strait  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Temporal and spatial variability of internal tides (ITs) in the deep basin west of the Luzon Strait were examined, based on two 9-month mooring current observations from autumn 2008 to summer 2009. The baroclinic current measurements exhibited northsouth asymmetry and temporal variation. At the southern site (19.5N), the kinetic energy of diurnal IT was dominant over that of semidiurnal IT by a factor of 3 to 4, whereas at the northern site (~21N), the diurnal energy was comparable to or a little larger than semidiurnal energy. At both sites, the motions of semidiurnal IT were recognized as seasonally invariant, while diurnal IT showed notable seasonal variation, namely, stronger in summer and winter but weaker in spring and autumn. The seasonal variation was mainly modulated by the astronomical tides in the Luzon Strait rather than by the seasonal thermocline. Both diurnal and semidiurnal \\{ITs\\} contained stronger coherent signals than incoherent counterparts at two sites, but the IT at the southern site was more coherent than that at the northern site. Diurnal IT is more coherent than the semidiurnal IT at each site. The spatialtemporal variations were probably due to IT interferences from various sources within the Luzon Strait and modulation by varying background conditions.

Zhenhua Xu; Baoshu Yin; Yijun Hou; Antony K. Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

EARSeL eProceedings x, issue/year 1 SEASONAL VARIABILITY IN SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or threatened. Furthermore, it is estimated that about 90% of dry grassland in Switzerland have been transformed types during the growing season. Continuum removal analysis was used as a spectral transformation method GRASSLANDS ALONG A DRY-MESIC GRADIENT IN SWITZERLAND Achilleas Psomas1,2 , Niklaus E. Zimmermann1 , Mathias

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

377

Use of Spectroradiometers to Guide In-season Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Irrigated Cotton in West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Use of Spectroradiometers to Guide In-season Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Irrigated Cotton in West Texas Following water, nitrogen (N) is the most important constraint to upland cotton production. Most of the cotton in the semiarid western U.S.A. is irrigated, and in areas like the Southern High

Behmer, Spencer T.

378

SUMMARY OF 2013 ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONE ACTIVITY AND VERIFICATION OF AUTHORS' SEASONAL AND TWO-WEEK FORECASTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as past forecasts and verifications are available via the World Wide Web at http Cyclone Energy (ACE) (92) 165 165 142 30 32% Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (103%) 175 175 150 43 42 on November 18, 2013 as calculated from the National Hurricane Center's b-decks. Final season statistics

379

Effects of changing precipitation regimes on dryland soil respiration and C pool dynamics at rainfall event, seasonal and interannual scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, seasonality, and intensity) and the factors contributing to such effects are poorly understood. We used) is a primary pathway through which organic carbon (C) is released into the atmosphere. Rs is influenced terrestrial surface [Reynolds et al., 2007], store about 241 Pg or 15.5% of world's total of 1550 Pg organic C

Phillips, Richard P.

380

Seasonal variations of D/H and 13C/12C ratios of microbial methane in surface sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CLB is a small, partially enclosed marine basin located on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Sulphate-reduction and methanogenesis drive the ... cm per yr)13 organic-rich (3-5% organic carbon)14 sediments of the bight interior (Station A-l)5. Seasonal variation in temperature, and possibly organic matter ...

Roger A. Burke; Christopher S. Martens; William M Sackett

1988-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J. van Aarde b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J Accepted 8 August 2009 Available online 6 October 2009 Keywords: African elephants Conservation ecology Land use change Habitat selection a b s t r a c t As African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana

Pretoria, University of

382

Norconk, Report to STINASU & KSU URC 1 Report of 2007 field season (Jan to May, 2007) at Brownsberg Nature Park,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

communities of South America, like the one in Brownsberg Nature Park in Suriname, it is one of the dominantNorconk, Report to STINASU & KSU URC 1 Report of 2007 field season (Jan to May, 2007) at Brownsberg Nature Park, Suriname to STINASU (Foundation for Nature Conservation in Suriname) and the Research

Norconk, Marilyn A.

383

The Assessment and Calibration of Ensemble Seasonal Forecasts of Equatorial Pacific Ocean Temperature and the Predictability of Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the performance of two 44 year ensemble seasonal hindcast time series for the Nino3 index produced as part of the DEMETER project. We show that the ensemble mean carries useful information out to six months. The ensemble spread, however, only carries useful information out to four months in one of the models, and two months in the other.

Jewson, S; Hagedorn, Rolf; Jewson, Stephen; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Hagedorn, Renate

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Immune expression in a damsely is related to time of season, not to uctuating asymmetry or host size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

patterns of egg hatching and larval abundance of mites. 3. Contrary to expectation, metrics of host size immunity, and indicate the need for studies on the synergistic effects of weather and parasitism on host). The study examined whether time of season, wing cell asymmetry, or a metric of host size was related

385

Eddy-Mediated Regime Transitions in the Seasonal Cycle of a Hadley Circulation and Implications for Monsoon Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eddy-Mediated Regime Transitions in the Seasonal Cycle of a Hadley Circulation and Implications symmetric boundary conditions, the Hadley cells undergo transitions between two regimes distinguishable. The center of the summer and equinox Hadley cell lies in a latitude zone of upper-level westerlies

Bordoni, Simona

386

Permanent scatterer InSAR reveals seasonal and long-term aquifer-system response to groundwater pumping and artificial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and precisely measuring long-term and seasonal aquifer-system response to pumping and recharge. In contrast this methodology can be utilized in heavily pumped groundwater basins to analyze aquifer-system response to long characterize the storage properties of an aquifer system with a high degree of spatial resolution. Citation

Amelung, Falk

387

Long-term-average, solar cycle, and seasonal response of magnetospheric energetic electrons to the solar wind speed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the solar wind speed D. Vassiliadis,1 A. J. Klimas,2 S. G. Kanekal,3 D. N. Baker,3 and R. S. Weigel4. [1] Among the interplanetary activity parameters the solar wind speed is the one best correlated, and seasonal response of magnetospheric energetic electrons to the solar wind speed, J. Geophys. Res., 107(A11

Vassiliadis, Dimitrios

388

Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of fungi in the genus Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that predict atmospheric loads of Fusarium could inform disease spread, air pollution, and climate change. ?Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of fungi in the genus Fusarium collected air pollution and disease spread. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 6 February 2014

Ross, Shane

389

Prediction of Indian summer monsoon onset using dynamical sub-seasonal forecasts: effects of realistic initialization of the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ensembles of retrospective 2-months dynamical forecasts initiated May 1st are used to predict the onset of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) for the period 1989-2005. The Sub-Seasonal Predictions (SSPs) are based on a Coupled General Circulation ...

Andrea Alessandri; Andrea Borrelli; Annalisa Cherchi; Stefano Materia; Antonio Navarra; June-Yi Lee; Bin Wang

390

On the seasonal and synoptic time scale variability of the North Atlantic trades and its low-level clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The seasonality in large-scale meteorology and low-level cloud amount (CClow) is explored for a 55 area in the North-Atlantic trades, using twelve years of ERA-Interim and MODIS data, supported by two years of Barbados Cloud Observatory (BCO) ...

Matthias Brueck; Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens

391

Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean color and composition of phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic, Equatorial Pacific and South Pacific.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean color and composition of phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic, Equatorial Pacific and South Pacific. By : Yves Dandonneaua , Pierre-Yves Deschampsb ­ Picoplankton ­ Seasonal variations ­ Variability ­ Oceanic provinces ) Contact : Yves DANDONNEAU LODYC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

392

Warm water occupancy by North Sea cod  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Southern Bight), 963, 861 (German Bight), 3443 (Flamborough), 10401 (Eastern...the year (Q) for cod from the Southern Bight and west Shetland. region Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4...Gillibrand1996Hydrography of the East Shetland Basin in relation to decadal North Sea variability...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Vegetables, Fruit, and Lung Cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...65-69, 70-74), total energy (quartile), education...ginger, kelp and seaweeds Dark green leafy vegetables...0-118.5 118.6 Dark green leafy vegetables...Q2 Q3 Q4 (high) Total energy, kcal Male (M) 2157...in Japan. Analysis of survey data on incidence in Aomori...

Kristi A. Steinmetz; John D. Potter; and Aaron R. Folsom

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Seasonal trends in the composition and ROS activity of fine particulate matter in Baghdad, Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Baghdad suffers from severe atmospheric particulate matter (PM) pollution and has limited infrastructure to monitor and control PM-pollution. To help better understand the nature of particulate matter in Baghdad, daily PM2.5 samples were collected every 6th day from September, 2012 to September, 2013. The samples were analyzed for chemical composition and cellular oxidative stress activity using a macrophage-based assay. The annual average PM2.5 concentration was 5019?gm?3, and was comprised of approximately 28% crustal materials, 26% organic carbon (OC), 17% sulfate, 12% elemental carbon (EC), and 8.0% ammonium ion. No clear seasonal trend was observed for the total PM2.5 mass and PM2.5 OC, but EC exhibited higher concentrations in the warmer months, likely due to the extensive use of electric generators operated by diesel and gasoline for cooling. April showed the lowest levels of both EC and OC compared with other months due to both sand and rainstorm events which led to increased deposition and dispersion of local emissions. Concentrations of nitrate ion were low in all seasons due to the high temperatures and low humidity, but slightly higher levels were observed in the cooler months of winter. The oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species (ROS)) activity (5935?g Zymosan equivalents m?3) of the PM was relatively lower than in other studied areas. Association between the water soluble PM constituents and the oxidative activity was investigated using a multi-linear regression model which showed no strong relationships between ROS activity and the water soluble components of PM2.5, but a moderate correlation of water soluble organic carbon from biomass burning (WSOC-BB) was observed (R2=0.52). Biomass burning PM has been shown to be an important contributor to ROS activity in other published studies, but additional work is needed to better understand the sources leading to the ROS activity in Baghdad.

Samera Hussein Hamad; Martin Merrill Shafer; Ahmed K.H. Kadhim; Sabah M. Al-Omran; James Jay Schauer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 30, 2009 June 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of June 30,, 2009) PROGRESS Third Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

396

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2009 September 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of September 30, 2009) PROGRESS Fourth Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

397

State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season  

SciTech Connect

The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

Hunton, G.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

State heating oil and propane program: 1995-96 heating season. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1995/96 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. EIA provides ECS with a list of oil and propane retailers that serve customers in New Hampshire. In turn ECS conduct phone surveys twice per month from October through March to determine the average retail price for each fuel. Data collected by ECS is entered into the Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) and transmitted via modem to EIA. The results of the state retail price surveys along with wholesale prices, supply, production and stock levels for oil, and propane are published by EIA in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report. Data is also published electronically via the internet or through the Electronic Publication System.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Population Characteristics and Seasonal Movement Patterns of the Rattlesnake Hills Elk Herd - Status Report 2000  

SciTech Connect

Population characteristics of the Rattlesnake Hills elk herd indicate reduced herd growth rates from the 1980s compared to the 1990s (McCorquodale 1988; Eberhardt 1996). However, the population continued to grow approximately 25% annually through the 1990s, reaching a high of 838 animals in summer 1999. Calf recruitment rates appear to be cyclic and are likely related to reduced calf survival during the first weeks of life; however, late-term abortions may also have occurred. The cause(s) could be predator-related and/or a function of shifts in nutritional condition (age-class distributions, assuming older-age cows are less likely to recruit calves, major climate shifts) or changes in the human-related disturbances during gestation, and/or calf rearing periods. In fall 1999 and spring 2000, the population was reduced from 838 individuals to 660 individuals. The primary controlling factors were modified hunting seasons on private and state lands and the large-scale roundup conducted in spring 2000. Continued removal of animals (particularly females) within the population will be pivotal to maintain the population at a level that minimizes land damage complaints, animal-vehicle collisions, use of central Hanford areas, and deterioration of natural resources.

Tiller, B.L.; Zufelt, R.K.; Turner, S.; Cadwell, L.L.; Bender, L.; Turner, G.K.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program: Progress summary for the period April 1986 through March 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses recent progress in the DOE program, directed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to develop seasonal thermal energy storage (STES). STES has been identified as one method to substantially improve energy efficiency and economics in certain sectors of our economy. It provides a potentially economic means of using waste heat and climatic energy resources to meet a significant portion of our growing energy need for building and industrial process heating and cooling. Environmental benefits accompany the use of STES in many applications. Furthermore, STES can contribute to reduced reliance on premium fuels that are often obtained from foreign sources. Lastly by improving the energy economics of industry, STES can contribute to improved US industrial competitiveness. The report is provided in four sections; the first being this introduction Section 2 of the report describes the program and briefly documents its organization, goals, history, and long-term plans. Section 3 describes the progress during the period from April, 1986, through March, 1988. Section 4 provides a short update on international development of STES. 17 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Kannberg, L.D.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Arthropod abundance and seasonal bird use of bottomland forest harvest gaps.  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the influence of arthropod abundance and vegetation structure on shifts in avian use of canopy gap, gap edge, and surrounding forest understory in a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. We compared captures of foliage-gleaning birds among locations during four periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration). Foliage arthropod densities were greatest in the forest understory in all four seasons, but understory vegetation density was greatest in gaps. Foliage-gleaning bird abundance was positively associated with foliage-dwelling arthropods during the breeding (F = 18.5, P < 0.001) and post-breeding periods (F = 9.4, P = 0.004), and negatively associated with foliage-dwelling arthropods during fall migration (F = 5.4, P = 0.03). Relationships between birds and arthropods were inconsistent, but the arthropod prey base seemed to be least important during migratory periods. Conversely, bird captures were positively correlated with understory vegetation density during all four periods (P < 0.001). Our study suggests high bird abundance associated with canopy gaps during the non-breeding period resulted less from high arthropod food resource availability than from complex understory and midstory vegetation structure.

Moorman, Christopher, E.; Bowen, Liessa T.; Kilgo, John, C.; Hanula, James, L.; Horn, Scott; Ulyshen, Michael, D.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Observation of muon intensity variations by season with the MINOS far detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature of the upper atmosphere affects the height of primary cosmic ray interactions and the production of high-energy cosmic ray muons which can be detected deep underground. The MINOS far detector at Soudan MN, USA, has collected over 67 million cosmic ray induced muons. The underground muon rate measured over a period of five years exhibits a 4% peak-to-peak seasonal variation which is highly correlated with the temperature in the upper atmosphere. The coefficient, $\\alpha_T$, relating changes in the muon rate to changes in atmospheric temperature was found to be: $\\alpha_T = 0.874 \\pm 0.009$ (stat.) $\\pm 0.010$ (syst.). Pions and kaons in the primary hadronic interactions of cosmic rays in the atmosphere contribute differently to $\\alpha_T$ due to the different masses and lifetimes. This allows the measured value of $\\alpha_T$ to be interpreted as a measurement of the K/$\\pi$ ratio for $E_{p}\\gtrsim$\\unit[7]{TeV} of $0.13 \\pm 0.08$, consistent with the expectation from collider experiments.

The MINOS Collaboration

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

403

Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery  

SciTech Connect

One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Solar-powered/fuel-assisted Rankine-cycle power and cooling system: Simulation method and seasonal performance  

SciTech Connect

The subject of this analysis is a solar cooling system based on a novel hybrid steam Rankine cycle. Steam is generated by the use of solar energy collected at about 100/sup 0/C, and it is then superheated to about 600/sup 0/C in a fossil-fuel-fired superheater. The addition of about 20-26 percent of fuel doubles the power cycle's efficiencyas compared to organic Rankine cycles operating at similar collector temperatures. A comprehensive computer program was developed to analyze the operation and performance of the entire power/cooling system. Transient simulation was performed on an hourly basis over a cooling season in two representative climatic regions (Washington, D.C. and Phoenix, Ariz.). One of the conclusions is that the seasonal system COP is 0.82 for the design configuration and that the use of watercooled condensers and flat-plate collectors of higher efficiency increases this value to 1.35.

Lior, N.; Koai, K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DOE-STD-1064-94; DOE Standard Guideline to Good Practices For Seasonal Facility Preservation at DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

64-94 64-94 June 1994 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR SEASONAL FACILITY PRESERVATION AT DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 AREA MNTY DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE94014954 DOE-STD-1064-94 FOREWORD The Guideline to Good Practices for Seasonal Facility Preservation at DOE Nuclear Facilities provides contractor maintenance organizations with information

406

High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season fescue/legume pastures: I. System development  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co.`s ({open_quotes}P&M{close_quotes}) Midway Mine lies 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas, straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. P&M actively mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres of surface mined land were topsoiled and revegetated to cool season fescue/legume pasture. Various pasture management methods are being utilized to meet reclamation success standards and achieve final bond release. The effectiveness and costs of various cool season fescue/legume pasture management methods are evaluated and contrasted. These methods include sharecropping, bush hogging, burning and livestock grazing. It presents guidelines used to develop a site specific rotational livestock grazing programs with land owners or contractors, and local, state and federal agencies. Rotational grazing uses both cow/calf or feeder livestock operations. Key managerial elements used to control grazing activities, either by the landowner or a contractor, are reviewed. Methods used to determine stocking levels for successful rotational grazing on this type of pasture are presented. Rotational grazing of livestock has proven to be the most effective method for managing established cool season fescue/legume pastures at this site. Initial stocking rates of 1 A.U.M. per 5 acres have been modified to a current stocking rate of 1 A.U.M. per 2.5 acres. Supporting physical and chemical data are presented and discussed.

Erickson, W.R.; Carlson, K.E. [Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co., Englewood, CO (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Seasonal variability in coastal fronts and its influence on sea surface wind in the Northern South China Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High-resolution reanalysis data of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) show pronounced seasonal variations in oceanic fronts in the coastal area of the Northern South China Sea (NSCS), which are accompanied by the seasonality of monsoons. The NSCS oceanic fronts cover a wider area of the coastal sea in winter than in summer as strong winter monsoons progress. Nonetheless, the average SST gradients of the frontal area in both seasons are comparable. The response of surface wind to SST perturbations attributed to oceanic fronts in the NSCS coastal area has also been investigated by the observation data of satellite borne scatterometers and the simulation data of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Both the satellite observations and the simulations of the WRF model show apparent positive linear SST-wind coupling for most months in 2008, indicating the local influence of coastal SST fronts on the sea surface wind in the NSCS. The SST-wind coupling coefficients in the NSCS coastal sea are larger than those observed at mid-latitude oceans but smaller than those observed near equatorial oceans. It is also found that the influence of topography on the sea surface wind could be more important than that of the SST front at the southern end of the Taiwan Strait in winter. The transition of the monsoon could also affect the SST-wind coupling in the NSCS.

Rui Shi; Xinyu Guo; Dongxiao Wang; LiLi Zeng; Ju Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Seasonal dynamics of water and air chemistry in an indoor chlorinated swimming pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although swimming is known to be beneficial in terms of cardiovascular health, as well as for some forms of rehabilitation, swimming is also known to present risks to human health, largely in the form of exposure to microbial pathogens and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Relatively little information is available in the literature to characterize the seasonal dynamics of air and water chemistry in indoor chlorinated swimming pools. To address this issue, water samples were collected five days per week from an indoor chlorinated swimming pool facility at a high school during the academic year and once per week during summer over a fourteen-month period. The samples were analyzed for free and combined chlorine, urea, volatile DBPs, pH, temperature and total alkalinity. Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) was used to identify and measure the concentrations of eleven aqueous-phase volatile DBPs. Variability in the concentrations of these \\{DBPs\\} was observed. Factors that influenced variability included bather loading and mixing by swimmers. These compounds have the ability to adversely affect water and air quality and human health. A large fraction of the existing literature regarding swimming pool air quality has focused on trichloramine (NCl3). For this work, gas-phase \\{NCl3\\} was analyzed by an air sparging-DPD/KI method. The results showed that gas-phase \\{NCl3\\} concentration is influenced by bather loading and liquid-phase \\{NCl3\\} concentration. Urea is the dominant organic-N compound in human urine and sweat, and is known to be an important precursor for producing \\{NCl3\\} in swimming pools. Results of daily measurements of urea indicated a link between bather load and urea concentration in the pool.

Mehrnaz Zare Afifi; Ernest R. Blatchley III

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Seasonal variations in sup 7 Be activity in the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

Short-term sediment accumulation rates were determined using activity distribution of {sup 7}Be in the surficial sediments of a station (A-1) in Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina (USA). This semi-enclosed coastal marine basin is characterized by high annual accumulation rates. Protected from high energy conditions by its geomorphology, the relatively quiescent waters of the bight's interior cause it to act as an efficient settling trap for fine-grained sediment. Lack of bioturbation in the surface sediments allowed for variations in depth-integrated activity profiles of {sup 7}Be to be interpreted as short-term accumulation events. Beryllium-7 inventories exhibited seasonal cyclicity with maxima occurring during spring (February through June). The inventory of {sup 7}Be ranged from 5.8 to 32.6 dpm cm{sup {minus}2} and was always well in excess of the atmospherically supported value ({bar x} = 3.8 dpm cm{sup {minus}2}; n = 15). Accumulation rates calculated from {sup 7}Be activity profiles indicate that the delivery of particulate matter to the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight is not constant throughout an annual cycle. The highest monthly accumulation rates appeared to be associated with north/northeastern storm activity. Inputs were generally highest during late winter/early spring when storm frequency is greatest. Short-term accumulation rates derived from this study agree with {sup 210}Pb rates calculated for a ten-year period of accumulation. The annual sediment accumulation rates for each of the two years over which the study was conducted was found to be 4.8 {plus minus} 0.8 g cm{sup {minus}2}y{sup {minus}1} and 3.7 {plus minus} 1.2 g cm{sup {minus}2}y{sup {minus}1}.

Canuel, E.A.; Martens, C.S.; Benninger, L.K. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

Chemical and physical speciation of mercury in Offatts Bayou: A seasonally anoxic bayou in Galveston Bay  

SciTech Connect

A chemical equilibrium model was used to predict the solution speciation of dissolved mercury (Hg) in the stratified water column of Offatts Bayou, a subestuary in Galveston Bay, Texas, which undergoes seasonal anoxia in bottom waters. Chemical equilibrium modeling was conducted using conditional stability constants and concentrations of Hg-complexing organic ligands experimentally determined by competitive ligand equilibration methods. Dissolved Hg complexation was dominated by interactions with sulfide and dissolved organic matter (DOM) (HOHgHS0, HOHgHS(DOM), HgSHS2, and HgS 2{ 2 ) at all depths. Sulfide and glutathione competed for methylmercury (MeHg) complexation in oxic layers; in anoxic waters, sulfide complexation dominated MeHg speciation. The particlewater distribution coefficient (Kd) of Hg decreased in the anoxic layer of the water column, where the dissolved sulfide concentration increased, providing evidence that sulfide complexation influences the solubility of Hg. The solubility of MeHg was elevated in the anoxic as compared to the oxic layers, and this distributional feature was coincident with a change in the solution speciation of dissolved MeHg from glutathione/sulfide complexation in the oxic layers to a predominantly sulfide complexation in the anoxic layers. Maximum enrichment of Hg, MeHg, and iron (Fe) in suspended particulate matter was observed in the lower layer of the pycnocline, most likely resulting from formation of insoluble Fe oxide, which scavenged dissolved Hg sulfide and MeHg-sulfide species. The concomitant decrease in dissolved inorganic Hg, Fe, and sulfide in the anoxic layers is suggested to result from scavenging of inorganic Hg by FeS, which is in accordance with the Hg speciation model. Overall, Hg cycling in the water column of Offatts Bayou was associated with sulfide and DOM complexation, Fe dissolution/precipitation, water column production of MeHg, and/or efflux of MeHg from anoxic sediment.

Han, Seunghee; Lehman, Ronald D.; Choe, Key-Young; Gill, Gary A.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evaluation of Historical and Future Cool Season Precipitation over the Eastern U.S. and Western Atlantic Storm Track using CMIP5 Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzed the contribution of cyclones to projected changes in cool season (1 Nov 31 Mar) precipitation over the eastern United States and western North Atlantic Ocean. First, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5 (CMIP5) ...

Kelly Lombardo; Brian A. Colle; Zhenhai Zhang

413

Malaria in pregnancy in rural Gabon: a cross-sectional survey on the impact of seasonality in high-risk groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Malaria remains one of the most important infectious diseases in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Whereas seasonal malaria chemoprevention is advocated as public health intervention for children in certain areas ...

Mario J Jckle; Christian G Blumentrath; Rella M Zoleko

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Causes and Implications of Extreme Atmospheric Moisture Demand during the Record-Breaking 2011 Wildfire Season in the Southwestern United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2011, exceptionally low atmospheric moisture content combined with moderately high temperatures to produce a record-high vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in the southwestern United States (SW). These conditions combined with record-low cold-season ...

A. Park Williams; Richard Seager; Max Berkelhammer; Alison K. Macalady; Michael A. Crimmins; Thomas W. Swetnam; Anna T. Trugman; Nikolaus Buenning; Natalia Hryniw; Nate G. McDowell; David Noone; Claudia I. Mora; Thom Rahn

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Energy Efficient Integration of Heat Pumps into Solar District Heating Systems with Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar district heating (SDH) with seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) is a technology to provide heat for space heating and domestic hot water preparation with a high fraction of renewable energy. In order to improve the efficiency of such systems heat pumps can be integrated. By preliminary studies it was discovered, that the integration of a heat pump does not always lead to improvements from an overall energy perspective, although the operation of the heat pump increases the efficiency of other components of the system e. g. the STES or the solar collectors. Thus the integration of heat pumps in SDH systems was investigated in detail. Usually, the heat pumps are integrated in such a way, that the STES is used as low temperature heat source. No other heat sources from the ambience are used and only that amount of energy consumed by the heat pump is additionally fed into the system. In the case of an electric driven heat pump, this is highly questionable concerning economic and CO2-emission aspects. Despite that fact the operation of the heat pump influences positively the performance of other components in the system e. g. the STES and makes them more efficient. If the primary energy consumption of the heat pump is lower than the energetic benefits of all other components, the integration makes sense from an energetic point of view. A detailed assessment has been carried out to evaluate the most promising system configurations for the integration of a heat pump. Based on this approach a system concept was developed in which the integration of the heat pump is energetically further improved compared to realised systems. By means of transient system simulations this concept was optimised with regard to the primary energy consumption. A parameter study of this new concept has been performed to identify the most sensitive parameters of the system. The main result and conclusion are that higher solar fractions and also higher primary energy savings can be achieved by SDH systems using heat pumps compared systems without heat pumps.

Roman Marx; Dan Bauer; Harald Drueck

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Macroscopic and molecular-scale assessment of soil lead contamination impacted by seasonal dove hunting activities  

SciTech Connect

Environmental contamination of lead (Pb) in soils and sediments poses serious threats to human and ecological health. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of seasonal dove sports hunting activities on Pb contamination in acid forest soils. A grid sampling method was used to investigate the spatial distribution of Pb contamination in surface soils. Soils were analyzed for total metal(loid) concentration and characterized for physicochemical properties and mineralogy. Adsorption isotherm experiments were also conducted to understand the reactivity and retention capacity of Pb(II) in soils. Finally, synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical speciation of Pb that controls the retention/release mechanisms of Pb in soils. There was no excessive accumulation of Pb at the site. However, the concentration of Pb in surface soils was greater than the background level (<16 mg kg{sup -1}). The contamination level of Pb was as high as 67 mg kg{sup -1} near a patch of corn field where lime was frequently applied. A microfocused X-ray microprobe analysis showed the presence of Pb pellet fragments that predominantly contain oxidized Pb(II), suggesting that oxidative dissolution was occurring in soils. Dissolved Pb(II) can be readily retained in soils up to {approx}3,600 mg kg{sup -1} via inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexation on carbon and aluminol functional groups of soil components, suggesting that partitioning reactions control the concentration of Pb in soil solution. The fate of Pb is likely to be controlled by (1) oxidative dissolution process of Pb(0) pellets and (2) the release of outer-sphere and/or inner-sphere Pb surface complexes in humic substances and aluminosilicate/Al oxyhydroxides. Although no remedial actions are immediately required, the long-term accumulation of Pb in soils should be carefully monitored in protecting ecosystem and water quality at the dove hunting field.

Arai, Y.; Tappero, R.; Rick, A.R.; Saylor, T.; Faas, E. & Lanzirotti, A.

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

417

Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels  

SciTech Connect

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Influence of Individuality, Age, and Season Upon the Weights of Fleeces Produced by Angora Goats Under Range Conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavier fleeces at later ages. The average weight of the fleeces of mohair is more strongly influenced by changes in seasonal con- 3 than is the average weight of the fleeces of wool. Fall fleeces of r are heavier than spring fleeces. ditionr mohai... and concerned the weight of the scoured fleeces produced by twenty-nine Rambouillet wethers one year on the range and three years in the feed lot. The second detailed study was reported in Bulletin No. 311 of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and con...

Lush, Jay L. (Jay Laurence); Jones, J. M. (John McKinley)

1924-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Projected changes of rainfall seasonality and dry spells in a high concentration pathway 21st century scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this diagnostic study we analyze changes of rainfall seasonality and dry spells by the end of the twenty-first century under the most extreme IPCC5 emission scenario (RCP8.5) as projected by twenty-four coupled climate models participating to Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5. We use estimates of the centroid of the monthly rainfall distribution as an index of the rainfall timing and a threshold-independent, information theory-based quantity such as relative entropy (RE) to quantify the concentration of annual rainfall and the number of dry months and to build a monsoon dimensionless seasonality index (DSI). The RE is projected to increase, with high inter-model agreement over Mediterranean-type regions (southern Europe, northern Africa and southern Australia) and areas of South and Central America, implying an increase in the number of dry days up to one month by the end of the twenty-first century. Positive RE changes are also projected over the monsoon regions of southern Africa and North America,...

Pascale, Salvatore; Feng, Xue; Porporato, Amilcare; Hasson, Shabeh ul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT  

SciTech Connect

The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The effect of seasonal changes on the selection of biocide inhibitors for Arabian Gulf seawater for water injection purposes  

SciTech Connect

This investigation was carried out to determine the most effective biocide inhibitor for Northern Arabian Gulf Seawater. This seawater will be used for water injection purposes for some oil fields in Kuwait. Arabian Gulf Seawater is known to be very saline during the summer months and less saline during the rainy season of spring. The biocide inhibitors were tested in a rig with six side streams biofouling monitoring tubes (SBMT). Bacterial nutrients were added to the system and carbon steel studs were placed along the tubes of the biocide evaluation test rig (BETR). After a month, a thin, slimy, and black deposit was formed on the carbon steel studs. The deposit contained 107 general aerobic bacteria (GAB), 107 general anaerobic bacteria (GAnB) and 105 sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The most effective biocide inhibitor was found to be a fatty amine aryl quaternary inhibitor at 50% dosage.

Al-Hashem, A.; Salman, M.; Al-Muhanna, K.; Al-Bazzaz, W. [Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fully differential heavy quark contributions to the photon structure functions $F_{2}^?(x,Q^2)$ and $F_{L}^?(x,Q^2)$ at next-to-leading order QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully differential heavy quark contributions to the photon structure functions in deeply inelastic scattering are computed in next-to-leading order QCD, including both the direct and resolved contributions. A variety of distributions are presented and discussed. Several of the distributions show marked differences between the resolved and direct cases due primarily to the presense of the gluon distribution in the former and lack thereof in the later.

B. W. Harris; J. F. Owens

1996-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

Chemical Composition of Aquatic Dissolved Organic Matter in Five Boreal Forest Catchments Sampled in Spring and Fall Seasons  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition and carbon isotope signature of aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) in five boreal forest catchments in Scandinavia were investigated. The DOM was isolated during spring and fall seasons using a reverse osmosis technique. The DOM samples were analyzed by elemental analysis, FT-IR, solid-state CP-MAS {sup 13}C-NMR, and C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. In addition, the relative abundance of carbon isotopes ({sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}C) in the samples was measured. There were no significant differences in the chemical composition or carbon isotope signature of the DOM sampled in spring and fall seasons. Also, differences in DOM composition between the five catchments were minor. Compared to reference peat fulvic and humic acids, all DOM samples were richer in O-alkyl carbon and contained less aromatic and phenolic carbon, as shown by FT-IR, {sup 13}C-NMR, and C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. The DOM was clearly enriched in {sup 14}C relative to the NBS oxalic acid standard of 1950, indicating that the aquatic DOM contained considerable amounts of organic carbon younger than about 50 years. The weight-based C:N ratios of 31 {+-} 6 and the {delta}{sup 13}Cvalues of -29 {+-} 2{per_thousand}indicate that the isolated DOM is of terrestrial rather than aquatic origin. We conclude that young, hydrophilic carbon compounds of terrestrial origin are predominant in the samples investigated, and that the composition of the aquatic DOM in the studied boreal forest catchments is rather stable during low to intermediate flow conditions.

Schumacher,M.; Christl, I.; Vogt, R.; Barmettler, K.; Jacobsen, C.; Kretzschmar, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Precision Measurements of the Nucleon Strange Form Factors at Q^2 ~ 0.1GeV^2  

SciTech Connect

We report new measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry A{sub PV} in elastic scattering of 3 GeV electrons off hydrogen and {sup 4}He targets with ({theta}{sub lab}) {approx} 6.0{sup o}. The {sup 4}He result is A{sub PV} = (+6.40 {+-} 0.23 (stat) {+-} 0.12 (syst)) x 10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A{sub PV} = (-1.58 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst)) x 10{sup -6}. These results significantly improve constraints on the electric and magnetic strange form factors G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}. We extract G{sub E}{sup s} = 0.002 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.007 at (Q{sup 2}) = 0.077 GeV{sup 2}, and G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.09 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.007 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.006 at (Q{sup 2}) = 0.109 GeV{sup 2}, providing new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions.

Armando Acha Quimper; Konrad Aniol; David Armstrong; John Arrington; Todd Averett; Stephanie Bailey; James Barber; Arie Beck; Hachemi Benaoum; Jay Benesch; Pierre Bertin; Peter Bosted; Florentin Butaru; Etienne Burtin; Gordon Cates; Yu-Chiu Chao; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Brandon Craver; Francesco Cusanno; Raffaele De Leo; Piotr Decowski; Alexandre Deur; Robert Feuerbach; John Finn; Salvatore Frullani; Sabine Fuchs; Kirsten Fuoti; Ronald Gilman; Lindsay Glesener; Klaus Grimm; Joseph Grames; Jens-ole Hansen; John Hansknecht; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Timothy Holmstrom; Hassan Ibrahim; Cornelis De Jager; Xiaodong Jiang; Joseph Katich; Lisa Kaufman; Aidan Kelleher; Paul King; Ameya Kolarkar; Stanley Kowalski; Elena Kuchina; Krishna Kumar; Luigi Lagamba; Peter Laviolette; John LeRose; Richard Lindgren; David Lhuillier; Nilanga Liyanage; Demetrius Margaziotis; Pete Markowitz; David Meekins; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Bryan Moffit; Sirish Nanda; Vladimir Nelyubin; Keith Otis; Kent Paschke; Sasha Philips; Benard Poelker; Roman Pomatsalyuk; Milan Potokar; Yelena Prok; Andrew Puckett; Y. Qian; Yi Qiang; Bodo Reitz; Julie Roche; Arunava Saha; Bradley Sawatzky; Jaideep Singh; Karl Slifer; Simon Sirca; Ryan Snyder; Patricia Solvignon; Paul Souder; Marcy Stutzman; Ramesh Subedi; Riad Suleiman; Vincent Sulkosky; William Tobias; Paul Ulmer; Guido Urciuoli; Kebin Wang; Richard Wilson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Huan Yao; Yunxiu Ye; Xiaohui Zhan; Xiaochao Zheng; Shi-Lin Zhu; Vitaliy Ziskin

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Experimental study of exclusive $^2$H$(e,e^\\prime p)n$ reaction mechanisms at high $Q^2$  

SciTech Connect

The reaction {sup 2}H(e,e{prime} p)n has been studied with full kinematic coverage for photon virtuality 1.75 < 5.5 {approx} GeV{sup 2}. Comparisons of experimental data with theory indicate that for very low values of neutron recoil momentum (p{sub n} < 100 MeV/c) the neutron is primarily a spectator and the reaction can be described by the plane-wave impulse approximation. For 100 < 750 MeV/c proton-neutron rescattering dominates the cross section, while {Delta} production followed by the N{Delta} {yields} NN transition is the primary contribution at higher momenta.

Kim Egiyan; Gegham Asryan; Nerses Gevorgyan; Keith Griffioen; Jean Laget; Sebastian Kuhn; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Gerard Audit; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; Vitaly Baturin; Marco Battaglieri; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Angela Biselli; Lukasz Blaszczyk; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Antoine Cazes; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Rita De Masi; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Haluk Denizli; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Steven Dytman; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Robert Fersch; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Christopher Gordon; Ralf Gothe; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Hayko Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; Charles Hanretty; John Hardie; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Ji Li; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; Marion MacCormick; Claude Marchand; Nikolai Markov; Paul Mattione; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Surik Mehrabyan; Joseph Melone; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; Maryam Moteabbed; James Mueller; Edwin Munevar Espitia; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Sergio Pereira; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for Next-Generation CSP Systems- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

428

Juraj Bracink, Hadron Structure, Modra, September 2007 Physics with eP collisions at highest Q2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Solenoidal magnet Muon system Depleted uranium calorimeter #12;Juraj Braciník, Hadron Structure, Modra

429

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 1:projected changes in seasonal patterns and estimation of PET Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 10691083, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 1:projected changes in seasonal patterns) project, assessing the risk posed by future climatic change to various hydrological and hydraulic systems/1069/2007 © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Regional climate model data used

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

430

Seasonal variability in the vertical attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (K490) in waters around Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ecosystems. KEYWORDS: Water Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient, Kd, Remote Sensing, Ocean Color, Puerto Rico, US this affected sediment resuspension, intense water column mixing, and increased delivery of terrestrialSeasonal variability in the vertical attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (K490) in waters around

Gilbes, Fernando

431

Bio-Optical Variability in Mayaguez Bay during the Rainy Season Joel A. Quiones Rivera, ja23_degrees@hotmail.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bio-Optical Variability in Mayaguez Bay during the Rainy Season Joel A. Quiñones Rivera, ja23 by suspending particles in the water that affects light penetration. This is critical for the bio-optical from different stations collected with an bio-optical rosette along the Mayagüez Bay and considering

Gilbes, Fernando

432

Manulife Financial is proud to be the lead sponsor of the Don Wright Faculty of Music Concert Season. AsweembarkonanotherseasonofperformanceshereattheDonWrightFacultyofMusic,Iinviteyoutojoinuseitheroncampusoratone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Manulife Financial is proud to be the lead sponsor of the Don Wright Faculty of Music Concert Season. #12;AsweembarkonanotherseasonofperformanceshereattheDonWright.WelcometoanotheryearofmusicalexperiencesattheDWFoM;Ilookforwardtosharingtheseexperienceswithyou. BettyAnneYounker,Dean ProfessorofMusicEducation DonWrightFacultyofMusic a message from Dean Betty Anne

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

433

et al. 2003). Seasonal drought and extreme wind events make the WUI especially susceptible to fire. In late October, 2003, Southern California experienced the worst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;et al. 2003). Seasonal drought and extreme wind events make the WUI especially susceptible. Multiple large wildfires driven by Santa Ana winds consumed more than 300,000 ha. These fires were moisture and high wind speeds that cause large wildfires in Southern California may not be predictable

Moritz, Max A.

434

幻灯片 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric-Drive Vehicle Testing Electric-Drive Vehicle Testing at CAERI Hao Zhang China Automotive Engineering Research Institute 1. Overview 2. On-going Work 3. Future Work 4. Conclusion Contents Three-year Plan Full Hybrid BEV Plug-in REEV Mild Hybrid  Three year program in CAERI  Evaluating the performance of the EV, HEV and PHEV  Plan to benchmark more than 12 cars in three years ☆ Milestones 2011-Q2 2011-Q3 2011-Q4 2012-Q1 2012-Q2 2012-Q3 2012-Q4 Test Procedures Research and Preparation for cars Civic Hybrid Test and Analysis Nissan Leaf Test and Analysis MY2010 Prius Test and Analysis Fusion Hybrid Test and Analysis Volt Test and Analysis Plug-in Prius Test and Analysis 2011-2012 works Testing Approach  The vehicle testing activity and analysis approach has been defined:

435

Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Seasonal trends in growth and biomass accumulation of selected nutrients and metals in six species of emergent aquatic macrophytes  

SciTech Connect

Growth and biomass accumulation of selected nutrients and trace metals were monitored for six species of aquatic macrophytes during June, August and November, 1993. Plant species were cultivated in two polyculture treatments, each replicated three times. Polyculture I consisted of Scirpus acutus (hardstem bullrush), Phragmites communes (common reed), and Phalaris arundinacea (canary grass). Polyculture H consisted of Typha spp. (cattail), Scirpus atrovirens (green bullrush), and Scirpus cyperinus (wool grass). Each of the six cells (6 x 9 x 0.6 m), was operated as a gravel-substrate, subsurface-flow wetlands in a continuous recirculating mode. At six week intervals, macro, micro and trace elements were dissolved and added to the sump of the recirculating system. On each of three sampling dates, replicate shoot and root samples were collected, segregated by species and tissue type (roots, rhizomes, stems and leaves), and prepared for gravimetric biomass estimates and chemical analysis. Tissue specific concentrations of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu, were determined on each date for each species and tissue type. Results will be discussed with respect to species specific growth rates, biomass accumulation, and seasonal uptake and translocation of plant nutrients.

Behrends, L.L.; Bailey, E.; Bulls, M.J.; Coonrod, H.S.; Sikora, F.J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Optimal control approach to termination of re-entry waves in cardiac electrophysiology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)Ie(t) - c2 (x)Ie(t) in Q (2) v t = · ¯i v + · ¯i u - Iion(v, w) + Itr(x, t) in Q (3) w t = G(v, w) in Q, (4 electrode. The Iion(v, w) is the current density flowing through the ionic channels and the function g(v, w

Kunisch, Karl

439

Applications of the LM392 Comparator Op Amp IC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications of the LM392 Comparator Op Amp IC The LM339 quad comparator and the LM324 op amp operation and ease of use has contributed to the wide range of applications for these devices. The LM392 FIGURE 1. 00749302 Q1, Q2, Q3 = 2N2369 Q4 = 2N2907 C1, A1 = LM392 amplifier-comparator dual *1% metal

Lanterman, Aaron

440

Second Quarter 2014 Volume 7, number 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5% in Q2, 4.1% in Q3, and 2.6% in Q4. March projections for annual average real GDP provided. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) reports U.S. real GDP expanded at an annual rate of 1.1% in Q1 2013, 2 coincides with positive signals from the market--accelerating GDP growth, employment gains, and rebounding

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Weak solutions to a parabolic nonlinear system arising in biological dynamic in the soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ µ + r + , q2(u) = k u1 Ks + u2 , q3(u) = c1 u5 Km + u5 , q4(u) = c2 u5 Km + u5 , q5(u) = , q6(u) = 0, f1(u) = 0, f2(u) = u5 Km + u5 (c1u3 + c2u4) + u5 + µu1 2 , f3(u) = u5 + µu1 2 , f4(u) = 0, f5(u) = u

Frey, Pascal

442

Robust Spring Drying in the Southwestern U.S. and Seasonal Migration of Wet/Dry Patterns in a Warmer Climate  

SciTech Connect

This study compares climate simulations over the United States produced by a regional climate model with the driving global climate simulations as well as a large multi-model ensemble of global climate simulations to investigate robust changes in water availability (precipitation (P) evapotranspiration (E)). A robust spring dry signal across multiple models is identified in the Southwest that results from a decrease in P and an increase in E in the future. In the boreal winter and summer, the prominent changes in P E are associated with a north south dipole pattern, while in spring, the prominent changes in P E appear as an east west dipole pattern. The progression of the north south and east west dipole patterns through the seasons manifests clearly as a seasonal clockwise migration of wet/dry patterns, which is shown to be a robust feature of water availability changes in the US consistent across regional and global climate simulations.

Gao, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lu, Jian; Liu, Ying; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun

2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Evaluation of Steelhead Kelt Passage into the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse Corner Collector Prior to the Juvenile Migration Seasons, 2007 and 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a steelhead kelt passage study conducted by the PNNL for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Bonneville Dam in early spring 2007 and 2008. At the Second Powerhouse, a surface flow outlet called the corner collector (B2CC) may be an effective non-turbine passage route for steelhead kelt moving downstream in early spring before the main juvenile emigration season. The goal of this project was to inform management decisions regarding B2CC operations by estimating the number of kelt using the B2CC for downstream passage at Bonneville Dam prior to the juvenile spring migration season. We performed a hydroacoustic study from March 2 to April 10, 2007 and from March 13 to April 15, 2008.

Weiland, Mark A.; Kim, Jina; Nagy, William T.; Johnson, Gary E.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The nutritive content of the grazing sheep's diet as affected by season, botanical composition, and stage of maturity of range forage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MJTRITIYE CONTENT OF THE GRAZING- SHEEP'S DIET AS AFFECTED BY SEASON, BOTANICAL COMPOSITION, AND STAGE OP MATURITY- OP RANGE FORAGE T HEMJRJ IY COTNFGA Z-TSPG C''D TBB,LUMV *J 5L J5Y7M *1V 3L15M15 i8Y CL22R55MM THE NUTRITIVE CONTENT... OF THE GRAZING SHEEP* S DIET AS AFFECTED BY SEASON, BOTANICAL COMPOSITION, AND STAGE OF MATURITY OF RANGE FORAGE IY COTNFGA ZT!PG jB'D T HEMJRJ A~82R55MV 5L 5EM ?,*V~*5M A3ELL7 L? 5EM T?,R3~75~,*7 *1V ?M3E*1R3*7 CL77M?M L? HM?*J R1 B*,5R*7 ?~7?R772M15 L? 5...

Cook, C. Wayne

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation  

SciTech Connect

Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Verification of GCM-generated regional seasonal precipitation for current climate and of statistical downscaling estimates under changing climate conditions  

SciTech Connect

Empirical downscaling procedures relate large-scale atmospheric features with local features such as station rainfall in order to facilitate local scenarios of climate change. The purpose of the present paper is twofold: first, a downscaling technique is used as a diagnostic tool to verify the performance of climate models on the regional scale; second, a technique is proposed for verifying the validity of empirical downscaling procedures in climate change applications. The case considered is regional seasonal precipitation in Romania. The downscaling model is a regression based on canonical correlation analysis between observed station precipitation and European-scale sea level pressure (SLP). The climate models considered here are the T21 and T42 versions of the Hamburg ECHAM3 atmospheric GCM run in time-slice mode. The climate change scenario refers to the expected time of doubled carbon dioxide concentrations around the year 2050. Generally, applications of statistical downscaling to climate change scenarios have been based on the assumption that the empirical link between the large-scale and regional parameters remains valid under a changed climate. In this study, a rationale is proposed for this assumption by showing the consistency of the 2 x CO{sub 2} GCM scenarios in winter, derived directly from the gridpoint data, with the regional scenarios obtained through empirical downscaling. Since the skill of the GCMs in regional terms is already established, it is concluded that the downscaling technique is adequate for describing climatically changing regional and local conditions, at least for precipitation in Romania during winter.

Busuioc, A. [National Inst. of Meteorology and Hydrology, Bucharest (Romania); Storch, H. von; Schnur, R. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Hydrophysics

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Seasonal factors affecting egg production and viability of eggs of Acartia tonsa Dana from East Lagoon, Galveston, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Egg production and hatching success were determined between March 1981 and March 1982 for the copepod Acartia tonsa Dana from East Lagoon, Galveston, Texas. During three-day experiments in the laboratory, field collected females were fed diets of (1) natural particles collected over the water column, (2) some modification of this and (3) the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. The latter served to isolate the effects of temperature and salinity from the effects of the natural particle diets on egg production. Specific rates of egg production, i.e. ?g egg biomass/?g body biomass/time, were consistently higher per unit carbon than nitrogen. The influence of seasonal factors on egg production was compared. Salinity was inversely correlated with egg production, but had less effect than temperature. Positive correlations with temperature were always higher for specific rates per unit nitrogen than carbon. At 15C, females produced ?025 of their body carbon (or nitrogen) as eggs per day, whereas at 28C, they produced at least their own biomass as eggs per day (up to 180). These high rates of A. tonsa were probably due to its reproductive biology and adaptation to the subtropical habitat as well as the high temperatures and food concentrations. The correlation between specific egg production rate and temperature was less with the natural particle diets than with the unialgal diet. This indicated that the quantity or quality of natural particle assemblages in East Lagoon influenced egg production. Egg viability was highest in the spring, but was not related to diet or the percentage of females with spermatophores.

Julie Weills Ambler

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Seasonal trends and spatial variations of PM10-bounded polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Veneto Region, Northeast Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Veneto Region extends for ?18.4103km2 in the northeastern part of the Po Valley and includes mountains, hills, plain and coastal environments with very different and discontinuous anthropogenic pressures. Although many efforts have been made to mitigate air pollution, the European air quality standards for atmospheric pollutants are frequently breached. This study investigates the levels of eight PM10-bound \\{PAHs\\} collected in 21 stations categorized as rural background, urban and suburban backgrounds, traffic and industrial hot-spots during one year (2011). Data were statistically processed to detect the PAH seasonal trends, their relationship with other air pollutants and micro-meteorological parameters and the space variations at a regional scale. Results show that \\{PAHs\\} levels are relatively high in the largest part of the region, with 10 sites exceeding the levels of BaP targeted by the European legislation. Two sites exhibited anomalously high \\{PAHs\\} concentrations and this anomaly became even more evident when considering the population density as a surrogate for the potential anthropogenic pressure. The \\{PAHs\\} levels were found directly proportional to other gaseous pollutants (CO, NO, NOx, SO2) suggesting common polluting sources. The analysis of time trends of PAH concentrations reveals significant coincidences throughout the region, i.e. simultaneous changes are observed in most sites as a consequence of similar emission sources and accumulation/removal processes. In this scenario, the control strategies currently imposed at local level (e.g. traffic limitations) have proven scarcely effective in mitigating air pollution and a real coordination at regional or even interregional level cannot be further postponed. Peculiar features of the \\{PAHs\\} pollution in the Veneto were also identified and some measures for protecting the human health were suggested.

Mauro Masiol; Gianni Formenton; Alberto Pasqualetto; Bruno Pavoni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Theatre Seasons and Festivals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s de l Ed n El seo r Adrin , e l prim o Tre s sombrero s d e cop a La ros a d e papel ; L a enamorad a de l Re y Th e Thre e Tow n Thieve s Panoram a desd e e l puent e Do s e n u n sub e y baj a La s preciosa s ridicula s Tartuf o AUTO..., of all things, Schnitzler's La ronda (Reigen) and ended with more nudity in the Villarroel-Rebel El degenrisis, a musical also directed by Eugenio Guzman, which put the petty bourgeois class on trial and combined a series of clich ideas...

Editors

1971-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Theatre Seasons and Festivals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Folklricas Todos los ruiseores cantan La casa sin reloj La encantada Eugenia Victoria Herrera Autor Enrique A. Laguerre Luis R. Agrait Rene Marqus Amaury Veray Myrna Casas ECUADOR196911 FESTIVAL NACIONAL DE TEATRO Ttulo Los inocentes Los... Director Fabio Paccioni Antonio Ordnez Victor Almeida Victor Almeida Grupo Teatro de la Universidad Areyto: Ballet Folklrico Teatro Escolar Dpto. Actividades Culturales Univ. P.R. Ballets de San Juan Ateneo Puertorriqueo Compaa o Teatro...

Editors

1969-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Seasonal Precipitation - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Historical Weather Charts Contacts...

452

Evaluation of seasonal water body extents in Central Asia over the past 27 years derived from medium-resolution remote sensing data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study medium resolution remote sensing data of the AVHRR and MODIS sensors were used for derivation of inland water bodies extents over a period from 1986 till 2012 for the region of Central Asia. Daily near-infrared (NIR) spectra from the AVHRR sensor with 1.1km spatial resolution and 8-day NIR composites from the MODIS sensor with 250m spatial resolution for the months April, July and September were used as input data. The methodological approach uses temporal dynamic thresholds for individual data sets, which allows detection of water pixel independent from differing conditions or sensor differences. The individual results are summed up and combined to monthly composites of areal extent of water bodies. The presented water masks for the months April, July, and September were chosen to detect seasonal patterns as well as inter-annual dynamics and show diverse behaviour of static, decreasing, or dynamic water bodies in the study region. The size of the Southern Aral Sea, as the most popular example for an ecologic catastrophe, is decreasing significantly throughout all seasons (R2 0.96 for April; 0.97 for July; 0.96 for September). Same is true for shallow natural lakes in the northern Kazakhstan, exemplary the Tengiz-Korgalzhyn lake system, which have been shrinking in the last two decades due to drier conditions (R2 0.91 for July; 0.90 for September). On the contrary, water reservoirs show high seasonality and are very dynamic within one year in their areal extent with maximum before growing season and minimum after growing season. Furthermore, there are water bodies such as Alakol-Sasykol lake system and natural mountainous lakes which have been stable in their areal extent throughout the entire time period. Validation was performed based on several Landsat images with 30m resolution and reveals an overall accuracy of 83% for AVHRR and 91% for MODIS monthly water masks. The results should assist for climatological and ecological studies, land and water management, and as input data for different modelling applications.

Igor Klein; Andreas J. Dietz; Ursula Gessner; Anastassiya Galayeva; Akhan Myrzakhmetov; Claudia Kuenzer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kassianov Kassianov Aerosol remote sensing under partly cloudy conditions: How well are we doing? Background Ground-based/airborne lidar observations: Raman Lidar (RL), Micropulse Lidar (MPL) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Can they be extended by other observations? Outline Q1: Why it is important? Q2: What issues do we have? Q3: How can we address them? Q1: IAE and Aerosol RF Simultaneous and coincident measurements of aerosol and cloud properties are desirable: Indirect Aerosol Effects (IAEs) Aerosol Radiative Forcing (RF) Ghan and Schwartz, BAMS, 2007 Myhre et al., ACP, 2009 Q1: Occurrence Partly cloudy sky: 30% (SGP), 40-80% (TWP) Credit: C. Long Q2: 3D Problem Examples of 3D Cloud Impacts: Positive Cloud Radiative Forcing (RF) Reflectance Enhancement Cloud Screening Q2: Positive Cloud RF

454

Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect

The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of terrestrial carbon fluxes ({delta}{sub bio}) provides an important constraint for inverse models of CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, insight into vegetation physiology, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} vegetation productivity, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and {delta}{sup 13}C-CO{sub 2} at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed {delta}{sub bio} weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C{sub 3} winter wheat) and C{sub 4} pasture grasses. {delta}{sub bio} had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8{per_thousand}. Ensemble monthly mean {delta}{sub bio} ranged from -25.8 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} ({+-}SE) in March to -20.1 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} in July. Thus, C{sub 3} vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil {delta}{sub 13}C values were about -15{per_thousand}, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C{sub 4} vegetation and had more positive {delta}{sub bio} values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes ({delta}{sub bio} x NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because {delta}{sub bio} and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in {delta}{sub bio} and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes.

Torn, M.S.; Biraud, S.; Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Berry, J.A.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

A review of "The Calendar of Venetian Opera. Song and Season: Scientific culture and theatrical time in Early Modern Venice" by Eleanor Selfridge-Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opera. Song and Season: Scientific culture and theatrical time in Early Modern Venice. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2007. 394 pp. $60.00. Review by r. Bu r r Li t c h f i e L d, Br o w n un i v e r s i t y . This is a very... the year in January, just after the winter solstice and the re-birth of the sun. However, despite the reform and reinvigoration of the Julian calendar by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582, the March convention continued. Much of Italy began the calendar...

Litchfield, R. Burr

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Assimilation of satellite reflecance dataa into a dynamical leaf model to infer seasonally varying leaf area for climate and carbon models  

SciTech Connect

Leaf area index is an important input for many climate and carbon models. The widely used leaf area products derived from satellite-observed surface reflectances contain substantial erratic fluctuations in time due to inadequate atmospheric corrections and observational and retrieval uncertainties. These fluctuations are inconsistent with the seasonal dynamics of leaf area, known to be gradual. Their use in process-based terrestrial carbon models corrupts model behavior, making diagnosis of model performance difficult. We propose a data assimilation approach that combines the satellite observations of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo with a dynamical leaf model. Its novelty is that the seasonal cycle of the directly retrieved leaf areas is smooth and consistent with both observations and current understandings of processes controlling leaf area dynamics. The approach optimizes the dynamical model parameters such that the difference between the estimated surface reflectances based on the modeled leaf area and those of satellite observations is minimized. We demonstrate the usefulness and advantage of our new approach at multiple deciduous forest sites in the United States.

Liu, Qing [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Dickinson, Robert E. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tian, Y [Georgia Institute of Technology; Zhou, L [Georgia Institute of Technology; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

Newman, J. E.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The Application and Verification of ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) to DOE-2-1e Simulation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESL-TR-08-06-01 THE APPLICATION AND VERIFICATION OF ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) TO DOE-2.1e SIMULATION PROGRAM Jeff S... Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report describes the application and verification of duct model on DOE 2.1e version 119 using ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal...

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

459

Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management  

SciTech Connect

Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Estimating odour impact range of a selected wastewater treatment plant for winter and summer seasons in Polish conditions using CALPUFF model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Odour emission from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is a common cause of odour nuisance to neighbouring areas. The analysed object was mechanical biological WWTP designed for 1,200,000 population equivalent. Collection of the samples was carried out in accordance with the methodology described in VDI 3880 and PN-EN 13725 during the rainless weather. Odour concentration measurement was made using the method of dynamic olfactometry, in accordance with the procedures described in EN:13725 'Air Quality: Determination of odour concentration by dynamic olfactometry'. For selected emission sources model calculations were conducted using CALPUFF dispersion model for neighbouring residential areas, which are exceptionally exposed to odours. This study presents results of modelling in local scale, for different meteorological scenarios, respectively for winter and summer seasons.

Izabela Sówka; Maria Skr?towicz; Piotr Sobczy?ski; Jerzy Zwoździak

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Subpixel monitoring of the seasonal snow cover with MODIS at 250m spatial resolution in the Southern Alps of New Zealand: Methodology and accuracy assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study describes a comprehensive method to produce routinely regional maps of seasonal snow cover in the Southern Alps of New Zealand (upper Waitaki basin) on a subpixel basis, and with the \\{MODerate\\} Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The method uses an image fusion algorithm to produce snow maps at an improved 250m spatial resolution in addition to the 500m resolution snow maps. An iterative approach is used to correct imagery for both atmospheric and topographic effects using daily observations of atmospheric parameters. The computation of ground spectral reflectance enabled the use of image-independent end-members in a constrained linear unmixing technique to achieve a robust estimation of subpixel snow fractions. The accuracy of the snow maps and performance of the algorithm were assessed carefully using eight pairs of synchronic MODIS/ASTER images. Pixel-based metrics showed that subpixel snow fractions were retrieved with a Mean Absolute Error of 6.8% at 250m spatial resolution and 5.1% after aggregation at 500m spatial resolution. In addition, a feature-based metric showed that 90% of the snowlines were depicted generally within 300m and 200m of their correct position for the 500-m and 250-m spatial resolution snow maps, respectively. A dataset of 679 maps of subpixel snow fraction was produced for the period from February 2000 to May 2007. These repeated observations of the seasonal snow cover will benefit the ongoing effort to model snowmelt runoff in the region and to improve the estimation and management of water resources.

Pascal Sirguey; Renaud Mathieu; Yves Arnaud

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring, Mitigation, and Verification Monitoring, Mitigation, and Verification Measuring Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition As a Prelude to Geologic Carbon Sequestration in Eastern Kentucky Thomas (Marty) Parris, Mike Solis, and Kathryn Takacs May 8-11, 2006 * Hilton Alexandria Mark Center * Alexandria, Virginia Organization & Schedule Organization & Schedule Phase I Task 1.0 Task 3.0 Task 4.0 Start 2005 2006 2007 End 07/15/05 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 01/14/08 Phase II Phase III Task 2.0 Task 5.0 Task 6.0 Task 7.0 Task 8.0 Task 9.0 Task 10.0 Task 11.0 Task 12.0 Task 13.0 Phase II Phase II - - Tasks Tasks Task 5.0- Training, instrumentation, calibration, strategy Task 6.0- Surface & shallow measurements Task 7.0- Laboratory GC & isotope measurements Task 8.0- Evaluate surface data- anomalies & deep wells

463

Elemental and structural analysis of silicon forms in herbal drugs using silicon-29 MAS NMR and WD-XRF spectroscopic methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to study concentration of silicon and its structural forms present in herbal drugs. Equisetum arvense and Urtica dioica L. from teapot bags, dietary supplements (tablets and capsules) containing those herbs, dry extract obtained from a teapot bag of E. arvense, and samples of the latter herb harvested in wild habitat over four months were studied using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WD-XRF) and high-resolution solid-state 29Si NMR. The highest concentration of Si, ca. 27mg/g, was found in the herbal material from the teapot bags containing E. arvense. The Si content in natural E. arvense (whole plants) increased from May to August by ca. 7mg/g, reaching value 26mg/g. Three different silicon forms were detected in the studied herbal samples: Si(OSi)4 (Q4), Si(OH)(OSi)3 (Q3) and Si(OH)2(OSi)2 (Q2). Those sites were populated in E. arvense in the following order: Q4?Q3>Q2. A dramatic, ca. 50-fold decrease of the Si concentration during the infusion process was observed. The infusion process and the subsequent drying procedure augmented population of the Q4 sites at the cost of the Q2 sites. The WD-XRF and 29Si NMR methods occurred useful and complementary in the study of herbal materials.

L. Pajchel; P. Nykiel; W. Kolodziejski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

465

Predicting the impact of climate change on regional and seasonal abundance of the mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) using temperature-driven phenology model linked to GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) is a highly invasive and polyphagous pest of global incidence. The fundamental hypothesis of the present study was that the temperature variations due to global climate change may affect seriously the future distribution and abundance of P. solenopsis, which might further aggravate the crop yield losses. We employed a temperature-based phenology model of P. solenopsis in a geographic information system for mapping population growth potentials of P. solenopsis. The three risk indices viz., establishment risk index, generation index and activity index were computed using interpolated temperature data from worldclim database for current (2000) and future (2050) climatic conditions. The daily minimum and maximum temperature data from four selected weather stations in India were used for analysing within-year variation of pest population. A linear relationship was established between the activity indices and yield losses at various locations reported in literatures for predicting the future trend of yield loss due to climate change. The results revealed that, under current temperature conditions P. solenopsis can complete >4.0 generations per year on ?80% of the global cotton production areas. Economic losses are likely to occur in areas where at least 8.0 generations can develop in a year; under current climate ?40% areas fall under this category. The increased geographical suitability at higher latitudes in cotton production areas, additional 2.0 generations per year, and 4.0 fold increase of population abundance of P. solenopsis are expected in tropical and sub-tropical cotton areas of Brazil, South Africa, Pakistan and India due to predicted climate change. Analysis of within year population increase at various selected locations in India revealed that, P. solenopsis attained maximum potential population increase during the major cotton growing season (MayJune to OctoberNovember). On the other hand, the innate ability of P. solenopsis population to increase reduced considerably during off season and cooler winter months. The increased pest activity of P. solenopsis due to climate change may intensify the losses in cotton yield, with forecasted losses in India to increase from existing losses of million US$ 1217.10 to future losses of million US$ 1764.85 by the year 2050. Here, we illustrate the possible impact of climate change on future P. solenopsis exacerbation based on temperature-driven population studies, which will help in undertaking agro-ecoregion specific management strategies.

Babasaheb B. Fand; Henri E.Z. Tonnang; Mahesh Kumar; Santanu K. Bal; Naveen P. Singh; D.V.K.N. Rao; Ankush L. Kamble; Dhananjay D. Nangare; Paramjit S. Minhas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Virtual Compton Scattering and the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton at Q^2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV^2  

SciTech Connect

Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) on the proton has been studied at Jefferson Lab using the exclusive photon electroproduction reaction (e p --> e p gamma). This paper gives a detailed account of the analysis which has led to the determination of the structure functions P{sub LL}-P{sub TT}/epsilon and P{sub LT}, and the electric and magnetic generalized polarizabilities (GPs) alpha{sub E}(Q{sup 2}) and beta{sub M}(Q{sup 2}) at values of the four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} = 0.92 and 1.76 GeV{sup 2}. These data, together with the results of VCS experiments at lower momenta, help building a coherent picture of the electric and magnetic GPs of the proton over the full measured Q{sup 2}-range, and point to their non-trivial behavior.

Helene Fonvieille, Geraud Laveissiere, Natalie Degrande, Stephanie Jaminion, Christophe Jutier, Luminita Todor, L. Van Hoorebeke, Bryon Anderson, Konrad Aniol, Kathleen Arundell, Gerard Audit, Leonard Auerbach, F. Baker, Maud Baylac, J. Berthot, Pierre Bertin, William Bertozzi, Louis Bimbot, Werner Boeglin, Edward Brash, Vincent Breton, Herbert Breuer, Etienne Burtin, John Calarco, Lawrence Cardman, Christian Cavata, Jian-Ping Chen, Eugene Chudakov, Evaristo Cisbani, Daniel Dale, Cornelis De Jager, Raffaele De Leo, Alexandre Deur, Nicole D'Hose, Gail Dodge, John Domingo, Latifa Elouadrhiri, Martin Epstein, Lars Ewell, John Finn, Kevin Fissum, Guy Fournier, Bernhard Frois, Salvatore Frullani, Christophe Furget, Haiyan Gao, Juncai Gao, Franco Garibaldi, Ashot Gasparian, Shalev Gilad, Ronald Gilman, Oleksandr Glamazdin, Charles Glashausser, Javier Gomez, Viktor Gorbenko, Pierre Guichon, Jens-Ole Hansen, Richard Holmes, Maurik Holtrop, Calvin Howell, Garth Huber, Charles Hyde, Sebastien Incerti, Mauro Iodice, Johann Jardillier, Mark Jones, Seigo Kato, James Kelly, Armen Ketikyan, Mohammad Khayat, Kouichi Kino, Serge Kox, Laird Kramer, Krishna Kumar, Gerfried Kumbartzki, Michael Kuss, Antonio Leone, John LeRose, Richard Lindgren, Nilanga Liyanage, George Lolos, Kazushige Maeda, Sergey Malov, D. Manley, Claude Marchand, Dominique Marchand, Demetrius Margaziotis, Pete Markowitz, Jacques Marroncle, Jacques Martino, Kathy McCormick, James McIntyre, Surik Mehrabyan, Fernand Merchez, Zein-Eddine Meziani, Robert Michaels, Jean Mougey, Sirish Nanda, Amra Offermann, Zisis Papandreou, Charles Perdrisat, R. Perrino, Gerassimos Petratos, Stephane Platchkov, Roman Pomatsalyuk, David Prout, Vina Punjabi, Thierry Pussieux, Gilles Quemener, Ronald Ransome, Oliver Ravel, Jean-Sebastien Real, Yves Roblin, David Rowntree, Gary Rutledge, Paul Rutt, Arunava Saha, Teijiro Saito, Adam Sarty, Tim Smith, Paul Souder, Riad Suleiman, Jeffrey Templon, Tatsuo Terasawa, Raphael Tieulent, Egle Tomasi, Hiroaki Tsubota, Hiroaki Ueno, Paul Ulmer, Guido Urciuoli, Marc Vanderhaeghen, Rob van der Meer, R.Van De Vyver, Pascal Vernin, Branislav Vlahovic, Hakob Voskanyan, Eric Voutier, John Watson, Lawrence Weinstein, Krishni Wijesooriya, Richard Wilson, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Dan Zainea, Zilu Zhou, Rachele Di Salvo

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Search for an exotic S = -2, Q = -2 baryon resonance at a mass near 1862 MeV in quasi-real photoproduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the CERN Super Proton Synchroton. A narrow peak at a mass of about 1862 MeV in the - - invariant mass

468

Search for an exotic S = -2, Q = -2 baryon resonance at a mass near 1862 MeV in quasireal photoproduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the CERN Super Proton Synchroton. A narrow peak at a mass of about 1862 MeV in the # - # - invariant mass

469

Quiz # 7, STAT 383, Prof. Suman Sanyal, April 8, 2009 (Q2, Page 354) To decide whether the pipe welds in a nuclear power plant meet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

welds in a nuclear power plant meet specifications, a random sample of welds is to be selected : µ nuclear power plants is to determine if welds

Sanyal, Suman

470

Measured Lifetimes of Selected Metastable Levels of Arq+ Ions (Q=2, 3, 9, and 10) Stored in an Electrostatic Ion-Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

life- 'Present address: Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4814. ~Present address: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Bldg. 88, Berkeley, CA 94720. times, numerous theoretical calculations of transition rates...

Yang, L. S.; Church, David A.; Tu, S. G.; Jin, J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

472

High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season tall fescue/legume pastures: II. Forage production, soil and plant tissue comparisons between grazed and ungrazed pastures  

SciTech Connect

The Midway Mine is located 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres were topsoiled and revegetated with a cool season tall fescue/legume pasture. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing has become the preferred management practice on these pastures. This study evaluated soil and vegetation data collected on 1,250 acres of pasture which was grazed by about 550 cow/calf units. Ongoing monitoring programs are evaluating the effects of rotational grazing. Soil testing includes macro-nutrients, micro-nutrients and microbial activity. Plant tissue analyses monitor levels of principal macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients. Vegetation monitoring consists of measuring forage production. Results were contrasted between pregrazing and postgrazing, and grazed and ungrazed pasture. Agronomic data from the grazed versus ungrazed treatments documented the following results: (1) higher levels of plant tissue nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; (2) higher microbial activity; (3) similar levels of soil nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; and (4) increased biomass production.

Carlson, K.E.; Erickson, W.R. [Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co., Englewood, CO (United States); Bonine, R.C. [Agri-Resource Management, Inc., Gallup, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Annual Report: 2010-2011 Storm Season Sampling For NON-DRY DOCK STORMWATER MONITORING FOR PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA  

SciTech Connect

This interim report summarizes the stormwater monitoring conducted for non-dry dock outfalls in both the confined industrial area and the residential areas of Naval Base Kitsap within the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (referred to as the Shipyard). This includes the collection, analyses, and descriptive statistics for stormwater sampling conducted from November 2010 through April 2011. Seven stormwater basins within the Shipyard were sampled during at least three storm events to characterize non-dry dock stormwater discharges at selected stormwater drains located within the facility. This serves as the Phase I component of the project and Phase II is planned for the 2011-2012 storm season. These data will assist the Navy, USEPA, Ecology and other stakeholders in understanding the nature and condition of stormwater discharges from the Shipyard and inform the permitting process for new outfall discharges. The data from Phase I was compiled with current stormwater data available from the Shipyard, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet watershed, and Puget Sound in order to support technical investigations for the Draft NPDES permit. The permit would require storm event sampling at selected stormwater drains located within the Shipyard. However, the data must be considered on multiple scales to truly understand potential impairments to beneficial uses within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhardt, Christine; Hsu, Larry

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Patch-occupancy models indicate human activity as major determinant of forest elephant Loxodonta cyclotis seasonal distribution in an industrial corridor in Gabon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The importance of human activity and ecological features in influencing African forest elephant ranging behaviour was investigated in the RabiNdogo corridor of the Gamba Complex of Protected Areas in southwest Gabon. Locations in a wide geographical area with a range of environmental variables were selected for patch-occupancy surveys using elephant dung to assess seasonal presence and absence of elephants. Patch-occupancy procedures allowed for covariate modelling evaluating hypotheses for both occupancy in relation to human activity and ecological features, and detection probability in relation to vegetation density. The best fitting models for old and fresh dung data sets indicate that (1) detection probability for elephant dung is negatively related to the relative density of the vegetation, and (2) human activity, such as presence and infrastructure, are more closely associated with elephant distribution patterns than are ecological features, such as the presence of wetlands and preferred fresh fruit. Our findings emphasize the sensitivity of elephants to human disturbance, in this case infrastructure development associated with gas and oil production. Patch-occupancy methodology offers a viable alternative to current transect protocols for monitoring programs with multiple covariates.

Ralph Buij; William J. McShea; Patrick Campbell; Michelle E. Lee; Francisco Dallmeier; Sylvain Guimondou; Loc Mackaga; Nicaise Guisseougou; Serge Mboumba; James E. Hines; James D. Nichols; Alfonso Alonso

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Environmental Ethics in Local Knowledge Responding to Climate Change: An Understanding of Seasonal Traditional Calendar PranotoMongso and its Phenology in Karst Area of GunungKidul, Yogyakarta, Indonesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ethics concern on human relation to nature, where people are considered as moral agents due to their conscience. Water and land are provided by nature to be explored and managed in a wise and sustainable way. Any human induced activities, such as agriculture, settlement, mining, and water pumping could have an impact on the environment and have therefore contributed to Climate change within decades despite of the nature cycles. This study describes human nature relationship, socio spatial processes embedded as environment ethics in a community level of farmers in GunungkidulKarstic region, South Java, Indonesia. People struggle, survive, and cope with harsh conditionsparticularly during dry season due to annual water scarcity that lead them to explore and apply knowledge, skills and available resources to sustain their livelihood, and live in harmony with Karst environment.Karstlandscape in Gunungkidulreflects the human relation with their nature or environment in Karst regions and empirically describes their environmental ethics. In this study, the way people value their environment was explored through field observation and participatory approachontheir understanding of local knowledge called PranotoMongso a traditional seasonal calendar. They have faced changing economic, social, and climatic factors in the past decade. This affected the application of the traditional seasonal calendar and has changed some people's behavior and perception on the environment. Media sharing knowledge is important to reach individual and collective participatory environment ethic behavior.

Arry Retnowati; Esti Anantasari; Muh Aris Marfai; Andreas Dittmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS  

SciTech Connect

Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Toward a Diurnal Climatology of Cold-Season Turbulence Statistics in Continental Stratocumulus as Observed by the Atmospheric Radiation Millimeter- Wavelength Cloud Radars  

SciTech Connect

Numerous observational studies of marine stratocumulus have demonstrated a pronounced diurnal cycle. At night, longwave flux divergence at the top of the cloud drives negatively buoyant eddies that tend to keep the boundary layer well mixed. During the day, solar absorption by the cloud tends to reduce the turbulent intensity and often decouples the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into cloud- and sub-cloud circulations. The delicate balance between turbulent intensity, entrainment, and fluxes dictates cloud geometry and persistence, which can significantly impact the shortwave radiation budget. Millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) have been used to study the turbulent structure of boundary layer stratocumulus (e.g. Frisch et al. 1995; Kollias and Albrecht 2000). Analysis is confined to nondrizzling or lightly drizzling cloud systems for which precipitation contamination is negligible. Under such assumptions the Doppler velocity field becomes a proxy for vertical velocity. Prior research has mainly consisted of a few case studies of specific cloud systems using radar scan strategies optimized for this particular cloud type. The MMCR operating at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility is broadly configured to be able to detect many different cloud types over a broad range of reflectivities and altitudes, so it is not specifically optimized for PBL clouds. Being in more-or-less continuous operation since the end of 1996, it does, however, have the advantage of long data coverage, which suggests that statistically significant measures of the diurnal cycle of turbulence should be attainable. This abstract summarizes the first few steps toward this goal, using 7 months of cold season MMCR data.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.; Childers, M.E.; Donner, K.M.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

478

Suction recirculation and its effects upon axial-flow pump power consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variation with NPSH with Q rl 54 Head Variation with NPSH with Q 2 . r2 55 Head Variation with NPSH with Q 3. r3' 120 128 129 130 131 134 135 136 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Pumps of different types are used to displace liquids from one location... on the impeller blades may also cause damage even if cavitation conditions are not present. One can thus conclude that cavitation not only depends on NPSH but also on flowrate. A controversy persists about the cavitation mechanism in pumps and its relation...

Prince, Tony M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Forecasting seasonal outbreaks of influenza  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ability to predict important...influenza outbreaks is limited...Mathematical models of infectious...greatly affect outbreak dynamics...of a single flu strain assimilated...framework to model size was...of the true outbreak (the truth...relative to the model prior and...the Google Flu Trends Data...

Jeffrey Shaman; Alicia Karspeck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Seasonality in Ocean Microbial Communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the mesopelagic and bathypelagic realms of the North Atlantic basin . Deep Sea Res. II 57 , 1433 ( 2010 ). 10.1016/j.dsr2...patterns of microbial community structure in the Mid-Atlantic Bight . FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 65 , 484 ( 2008 ). 10.1111/j...

Stephen J. Giovannoni; Kevin L. Vergin

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "q3 season q2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Energy Resources for Tornado Season  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Learn about the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's resources for post-tornado recovery.

482

Energy Resources for Hurricane Season  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Learn about the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's resources for post-hurricane recovery.

483

Theatre Seasons, Reports & News Briefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

negr a Te jur o Juan a qu e teng o gana s Co n l a frent e e n e l polv o La mordid a Cinc o bikini s par a u n sord o Traspas o marid o Tre s e n Josefa t Nil o m i hij o La rond a d e la hechizad a Bab y Shower , un a fiesta embarazos a...

Editors

1968-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Seasonal Average Temperature - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Historical Weather Charts Contacts...

485

a5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ....................................... 226 164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1 Inpatient .......................................... 8 N N Q Q Q Q 2 1 Outpatient ....................................... 121 56 38 19 Q 3 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 142 38 21 38 23 11 7 4 Q Mercantile ......................................... 657 275 156 155 34 21 12 2 2 Retail (Other Than Mall) .................. 443 241 97 83 14 Q 4 Q Q Enclosed and Strip Malls ................ 213 Q 59 72 20 18 8 Q 2 Office ................................................

486

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG): Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) brought together a consortium of 14 leading clean energy rural, suburban, and low income communities throughout Connecticut. N2N was awarded $4.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitive BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program on August 10, 2010 to run a two-year pilot program (plus one year of transition and evaluation) (Award No. EMCBC- 00969-10). N2N tested innovative program models and hypotheses for improving Connecticuts existing residential energy efficiency programs that are overseen by the ratepayer fund board and administered by CT utilities. N2Ns original goal was to engage 10 percent of households in participating communities to reduce their energy usage by 20 percent through energy upgrades and clean energy measures. N2N planned for customers to complete more comprehensive whole-home energy efficiency and clean energy measures and to achieve broader penetration than existing utility-administered regulated programs. Since this was an ARRA award, we report the following figures on job creation in Table 1. Since N2N is not continuing in its current form, we do not provide figures on job retention. Table 1 N2N Job Creation by Quarter Jobs Created 2010 Q4 6.65 2011 Q1 7.13 2011 Q2 4.98 2011 Q3 9.66 2011 Q4 5.43 2012 Q1 11.11 2012 Q2 6.85 2012 Q3 6.29 2012 Q4 6.77 2013 Q1 5.57 2013 Q2 8.35 2013 Q3 6.52 Total 85.31 The N2N team encountered several gaps in the existing efficiency program performance that hindered meeting N2Ns and DOEs short-term program goals, as well as the State of Connecticuts long-term energy, efficiency, and carbon reduction goals. However, despite the slow program start, N2N found evidence of increasing upgrade uptake rates over time, due to delayed customer action of one to two years from N2N introduction to completion of deeper household upgrades. Two main social/behavioral principles have contributed to driving deeper upgrades in CT: 1. Word of mouth, where people share their experience with others, which leads to others to take action; and 2. Self-herding, where people follow past behavior, which leads to deeper and deeper actions within individual households.

Donnelly, Kat A.

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

487

Seasonality and dynamics of whooping cough.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Whooping cough (pertussis) dynamics provide an interesting disease ecology case study. Unlike other childhood diseases, the observed patterns of pertussis dynamics are found very diverse (more)

Nguyen, Hanh Thi Hong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Seasonal Variations of Snow Depth on Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rises above the CO2 condensation temperature, and...and has a lower atmospheric pressure, and as...observations of atmospheric water vapor during some...to be a locus of atmospheric CO2 condensation (12, 25, 26...

David E. Smith; Maria T. Zuber; Gregory A. Neumann

2001-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

Managing Warm-season Improved Pastures (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

repetidamente empezar? a robarle al sistema de ra?ces su energ?a para poder reto?ar las hojas que capturen la luz del sol. Al perder energ?a, el sistema de ra?ces comienza a reducirse en tama?o. Un peque?o sistema de ra?ces no puede suplir la cantidad de agua y... f?cilmente digeribles. Hojas y tallos maduros contienen nutrientes complejos y fibra no digerible. Al crecer la planta, las c?lulas maduran y una segunda capa exterior compuesta de celulosa y lignina comienza a desarrollarse y a agregar rigid?z a...

Stichler, Charles; Prostko, Eric P.; Livingston, Stephen

1999-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

490

MFR PAPER 1199 Seasonal Variations in Chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DUBROW, MALCOLM HALE, and ANTHONY BIMBO ABSTRACT-Proximate chemical composition of menhaden collected bioassay. Fatty acid compositions of the extracted fish oils were determined by gas-liquid chromatography

491

What's in Season from the Garden State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the (tomato) flavor gone...long time passing? Well, the answer my friend is not blowin' in the wind. Any one disappointed gardeners in its wake, many of whom contacted Rutgers requesting Ramapo seeds. After complying in the field and tasted their product." Back by Popular Demand: the Ramapo Tomato Dr. Bernard Pollack

Goodman, Robert M.

492

The 1984 Theatre Season in Buenos Aires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. As the four "artists" meta phorically "broke through" the masks and theatrical facades of the middle- class couple and as the latter's world began metaphorically to "fall apart," so too did the stage as the false floor boards separated and spread apart... reminder that all forms of power, all the nuances of any given situation may not be immediately apparent. It was significant that this overwhelmingly large hand, which metaphorically sustained the play and the action therein, was not visible...

Magnarelli, Sharon

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

493