National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for q3 season q2

  1. Mathematics 1052 Exam 2, May 3rd, 2014 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Total Bonus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaygun, Atabey

    Mathematics 1052 Exam 2, May 3rd, 2014 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Total Bonus 15pts 20pts 10pts 15pts 30pts) (9 points) n=1 1 n(n+2) #12;Mathematics 1052 Exam 2, May 3rd, 2014 2. Consider the region bounded above about the line y = 1. Page 2 of 5 #12;Mathematics 1052 Exam 2, May 3rd, 2014 3. (10 points) (a

  2. Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .00/W Concentrating Solar Power (CSP and CPV) 6 MWac of concentrating solar capacity was installed installations totaled 723 MW in Q1 2013, up 33% over Q1 2012 Cumulative operating PV capacity in the U.S. now, installers, and manufacturers to collect granular data on the U.S. solar market. This data provides

  3. Measurement of the Q2-evolution of the Bjorken integral at low Q2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Deur

    2004-11-30

    We report on the extraction of the Q2-dependence of the Bjorken sum between 0.16 < Q2 < 1.1 GeV2. A twist analysis performed on these data shows that the higher twist corrections are small due to a cancellation between the twist-4 and 6 terms. The extraction of an effective strong coupling constant is discussed.

  4. Insights into $Q^2 \\bar{Q}^2$ states from an effective perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ll. Ametller; P. Talavera

    2015-09-25

    We discuss the two photon coupling of the lightest scalar meson on the basis of an extension of $\\chi$PT. Using low energy data on the pion form-factor and the $\\gamma\\gamma\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-(\\pi^0\\pi^0)$ cross-sections as inputs, we find $\\Gamma(\\sigma\\to\\gamma\\gamma) \\cong 0.126~\\rm{keV} $. The smallness of the result and the relative weight between its components, ${\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma\\to S_1}\\over \\Gamma{ \\gamma\\gamma\\to\\pi\\pi\\to S_1}} < 1$, suggests that the scalar $0^{++}$ meson is mainly a $Q^2\\bar{Q}^2$ state.

  5. Multi Jet Production at High Q2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2005-10-31

    Deep-inelastic $e^+p$ scattering data, taken with the H1 detector at HERA, are used to investigate jet production over a range of four-momentum transfers $150 < Q^2 < 15000 \\mathrm{GeV}^2$ and transverse jet energies $5 < E_T < 50 \\mathrm{GeV}$. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}_\\mathrm{int} = 65.4 \\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$ taken in the years 1999-2000 at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\approx 319 \\mathrm{GeV}$. Jets are defined by the inclusive $k_t$ algorithm in the Breit frame of reference. Dijet and trijet jet cross sections are measured with respect to the exchanged boson virtuality and in addition the ratio of the trijet to the dijet cross section $R_{3/2}$ is investigated. The results are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD calculations in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$. The value of $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ determined from the study of $R_{3/2}$ is $\\alpha_s(m_Z) = 0.1175 \\pm 0.0017 (\\mathrm{stat.}) \\pm 0.0050 (\\mathrm{syst.}) ^{+0.0054}_{-0.0068} (\\mathrm{theo.})$.

  6. IBM Systems Journal Q3 2002 Comparing Autonomic & Proactive Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somayaji, Anil

    IBM Systems Journal Q3 2002 Comparing Autonomic & Proactive Computing Roy Want , Trevor Pering between proactive computing and autonomic computing, considering the design of systems that are beyond principles we call proactive computing, enabling the transition from today's interactive systems to proactive

  7. 1. (25 pts) Three point charges, q1, q2 and q3 that have the same +2 Coulomb charge are fixed to a circle of radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akerib, Daniel S.

    of 6.0 nF and a plate area of 2 2 5.0 10 m- × is connected to a 12 V battery. a. What is the electric A wire and the magnetic field at point O is zero tesla. a. Determine the value of the current, I

  8. Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguided wavesLone Star I (4Q07)Q3)

  9. FY 2014 Q3 Metric Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederal Realin TargetEnergy4 Q3

  10. Table of contents www.q2s.ntnu.no 1 Centre for Quantifiable Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Table of contents www.q2s.ntnu.no 1 Q2S Centre for Quantifiable Quality of Service in Communication Systems AnnualReport2008 #12;www.q2s.ntnu.no Table of contents2 The sixth year of Q2S Telefax: +47 73 59 27 90 Email: secretary@q2s.ntnu.no Internet: www.q2s.ntnu.no Table of contents #12;3The

  11. From $sl_q(2)$ to a parabosonic Hopf algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    A Hopf algebra with four generators among which an involution (reflection) operator, is introduced. The defining relations involve commutators and anticommutators. The discrete series representations are developed. Designated by $sl_{-1}(2)$, this algebra encompasses the Lie superalgebra $osp(1|2)$. It is obtained as a $q=-1$ limit of the $sl_q(2)$ algebra and seen to be equivalent to the parabosonic oscillator algebra in irreducible representations. It possesses a noncocommutative coproduct. The Clebsch-Gordan coefficients (CGC) of $sl_{-1}(2)$ are obtained and expressed in terms of the dual -1 Hahn polynomials. A generating function for the CGC is derived using a Bargmann realization.

  12. From $sl_q(2)$ to a Parabosonic Hopf Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Tsujimoto; Luc Vinet; Alexei Zhedanov

    2011-10-07

    A Hopf algebra with four generators among which an involution (reflection) operator, is introduced. The defining relations involve commutators and anticommutators. The discrete series representations are developed. Designated by $sl_{-1}(2)$, this algebra encompasses the Lie superalgebra $osp(1|2)$. It is obtained as a $q=-1$ limit of the $sl_q(2)$ algebra and seen to be equivalent to the parabosonic oscillator algebra in irreducible representations. It possesses a noncocommutative coproduct. The Clebsch-Gordan coefficients (CGC) of $sl_{-1}(2)$ are obtained and expressed in terms of the dual -1 Hahn polynomials. A generating function for the CGC is derived using a Bargmann realization.

  13. Neutron charge form factor at large $q^2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schiavilla; I. Sick

    2001-07-06

    The neutron charge form factor $G_{En}(q)$ is determined from an analysis of the deuteron quadrupole form factor $F_{C2}$ data. Recent calculations, based on a variety of different model interactions and currents, indicate that the contributions associated with the uncertain two-body operators of shorter range are relatively small for $F_{C2}$, even at large momentum transfer $q$. Hence, $G_{En}(q)$ can be extracted from $F_{C2}$ at large $q^2$ without undue systematic uncertainties from theory.

  14. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic43,728 243,242Consumers (DollarsQ2 by Origin

  15. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site: City ofNovelQ3:Q3: Charles

  16. Study of the $f_2(1270)$ and $a_2(1320)$ resonances in $\\gamma^*(Q^2)\\gamma$ collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achasov, N N; Shestakov, G N

    2015-01-01

    We discuss studies of the $Q^2$ dependence of the $f_2(1270)$ and $a_2 (1320)$ production cross sections in $\\gamma^*(Q^2)\\gamma $ collisions at current and coming into operation colliders with a high luminosity. Changing the dominant helicity amplitude occurs in the reactions $\\gamma^*(Q ^2)\\gamma\\to f_2(1270)$ and $\\gamma^*(Q^2) \\gamma\\to a_2(1320)$ with increasing $Q^2$. This is caused by the coming of the QCD asymptotics. It is shown that the transition to the asymptotic behavior of QCD in the amplitudes $\\gamma^*(Q^2) \\gamma\\to f_2(1270),a_2(1320)$ is provided by the compensation of the contributions of ground vector states $\\rho$ and $\\omega$ in $Q^2$-channel with the contributions of their radial excitations.

  17. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site: City ofNovelQ3: Charles E.

  18. $g_{1}$ at low x and low $Q^{2}$ with Polarized ep Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, S D; Bass, Steven D.; De Roeck, A

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of g_1 at low x and low Q^2 are expected to provide a sensitive probe of the transition from Regge to perturbative QCD dynamics, offering a new testing ground for models of small x physics. We discuss the potential of polarized ep colliders (Polarized HERA and eRHIC) to investigate this physics --- varying Q^2 between 0.01 and 1 GeV^2 --- and to constrain the high-energy part of the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum-rule for polarized photoproduction.

  19. g_1 at low x and low Q^2 with Polarized ep Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Bass; Albert De Roeck

    2000-08-28

    Measurements of g_1 at low x and low Q^2 are expected to provide a sensitive probe of the transition from Regge to perturbative QCD dynamics, offering a new testing ground for models of small x physics. We discuss the potential of polarized ep colliders (Polarized HERA and eRHIC) to investigate this physics --- varying Q^2 between 0.01 and 1 GeV^2 --- and to constrain the high-energy part of the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum-rule for polarized photoproduction.

  20. Nuclear shadowing in deep inelastic scattering on nuclei at low and medium Q^2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bugaev, Edgar V

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear shadowing corrections to the structure functions of deep inelastic scattering of intermediate-mass nuclei are calculated at very low values of Bjorken x and small values of Q^2 (Q^2<5 GeV^2). The two-component approach (generalized VMD plus hard pomeron) is used for a description of the underlying virtual photon - nucleon interaction. The hard component of the nucleon structure function is calculated in a framework of the colour dipole model with dipole cross section having Regge-type energy dependence. Numerical results for nuclear shadowing corrections are compared with available data of E665 and NMC collaborations.

  1. Jefferson Lab's results on the Q^2-evolution of moments of spin structure functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Deur

    2005-07-15

    We present the recent JLab measurements on moments of spin structure functions at intermediate and low Q^2. The Bjorken sum and Burkhardt-Cottingham sum on the neutron are presented. The later appears to hold. Higher moments (generalized spin polarizabilities and d_2^n) are shown and compared to chiral perturbation theory and lattice QCD respectively.

  2. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via ?*p ? n?+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the n?+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4? CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the ?-N multipole E0+/GD were measuredmore »using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.« less

  3. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via $?^* p \\to n?^+$ at high $Q^2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kijun Park; Ralf Gothe; Krishna Adhikari; Dasuni Adikaram-Mudiyanselage; Marco Anghinolfi; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Jacques Ball; Marco Battaglieri; Vitaly Baturin; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Robert Bennett; Angela Biselli; Craig Bookwalter; Sergey Boyarinov; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Volker Burkert; Daniel Carman; Andrea Celentano; Shloka Chandavar; Gabriel Charles; Philip Cole; Marco Contalbrigo; Volker Crede; Annalisa D'Angelo; Aji Daniel; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Alexandre Deur; Chaden Djalali; David Doughty; Raphael Dupre; Ahmed El Alaoui; Lamiaa Elfassi; Paul Eugenio; Gleb Fedotov; Ahmed Fradi; Marianna Gabrielyan; Nerses Gevorgyan; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Wesley Gohn; Evgeny Golovach; Lewis Graham; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Lei Guo; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Charles Hanretty; David Heddle; Kenneth Hicks; Maurik Holtrop; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Evgeny Isupov; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Mahbubul Khandaker; Puneet Khetarpal; Andrey Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; A. Kubarovsky; Valery Kubarovsky; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Nicholas Kvaltine; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; Ian MacGregor; Nikolai Markov; Michael Mayer; Bryan McKinnon; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Taisiya Mineeva; Marco Mirazita; Viktor Mokeev; Herve Moutarde; Edwin Munevar Espitia; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Michael Paolone; Luciano Pappalardo; Rafayel Paremuzyan; Seungkyung Park; Sergio Pereira; Evan Phelps; Silvia Pisano; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; John Price; Sebastien Procureur; Yelena Prok; Giovanni Ricco; Dipak Rimal; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Mukesh Saini; Carlos Salgado; Diane Schott; Reinhard Schumacher; Heghine Seraydaryan; Youri Sharabian; Elton Smith; Gregory Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Paul Stoler; Igor Strakovski; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Wei Tang; Charles Taylor; Ye Tian; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Arjun Trivedi; Maurizio Ungaro; Brian Vernarsky; Alexander Vlasov; Eric Voutier; Daniel Watts; Dennis Weygand; Michael Wood; Nicholas Zachariou; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Hyde

    2012-02-21

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the $n\\pi^+$ channel at relatively high momentum transfer ($Q^2$ up to 4.2 $\\rm{GeV^2}$). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole ($E_{0+}$), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor $G_1$ within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor $G_A$. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly $4\\pi$ CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754 $\\rm{GeV}$ electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the $\\pi-N$-multipole $E_{0+}/G_D$ were measured using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost $Q^2$ independent.

  4. Moments of the neutron $g_2$ structure function at intermediate $Q^2$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia H.; et. al.,

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results of the $^3$He spin structure function $g_2$ in the resonance region at $Q^2$ values between 1.2 and 3.0 (GeV/c)$^2$. Spin dependent moments of the neutron were then extracted. The resonance contribution to the neutron $d_2$ matrix element was found to be small at $\\ $=2.4 (GeV/c)$^2$ and in agreement with the Lattice QCD calculation. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule for neutron was tested with the measured data and using the Wandzura-Wilczek relation for the low $x$ unmeasured region. A small deviation was observed at $Q^2$ values between 0.5 and 1.2 (GeV/c)$^2$ for themore »neutron.« less

  5. $Q^2$ Dependence of Quadrupole Strength in the $?^*p\\to?^+(1232)\\to p ?^0$ Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLAS Collaboration; K. Joo; L. C. Smith

    2002-02-11

    Models of baryon structure predict a small quadrupole deformation of the nucleon due to residual tensor forces between quarks or distortions from the pion cloud. Sensitivity to quark versus pion degrees of freedom occurs through the $Q^2$ dependence of the magnetic ($M_{1+}$), electric ($E_{1+}$), and scalar ($S_{1+}$) multipoles in the $\\gamma^* p \\to \\Delta^+ \\to p \\pi^0$ transition. We report new experimental values for the ratios $E_{1+}/M_{1+}$ and $S_{1+}/M_{1+}$ over the range $Q^2$= 0.4-1.8 GeV$^2$, extracted from precision $p(e,e 'p)\\pi^{\\circ}$ data using a truncated multipole expansion. Results are best described by recent unitary models in which the pion cloud plays a dominant role.

  6. Moments of the neutron $g_2$ structure function at intermediate $Q^2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Solvignon; N. Liyanage; J. -P. Chen; Seonho Choi; K. Slifer; K. Aniol; T. Averett; W. Boeglin; A. Camsonne; G. D. Cates; C. C. Chang; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; R. Ent; R. Feuerbach; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; V. Gorbenko; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; H. Ibrahim; X. Jiang; M. Jones; A. Kelleher; J. Kelly; C. Keppel; W. Kim; W. Korsch; K. Kramer; G. Kumbartzki; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; B. Ma; D. J. Margazioti; P. Markowitz; K. McCormick; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; C. Munoz Camacho; K. Paschke; B. Reitz; A. Saha; R. Shneor; J. Singh; V. Sulkosky; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; S. Woo; J. -C. Yang; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2015-06-29

    We present new experimental results of the $^3$He spin structure function $g_2$ in the resonance region at $Q^2$ values between 1.2 and 3.0 (GeV/c)$^2$. Spin dependent moments of the neutron were then extracted. Our main result, the resonance contribution to the neutron $d_2$ matrix element, was found to be small at $$=2.4 (GeV/c)$^2$ and in agreement with the Lattice QCD calculation. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule for $^3$He and the neutron was tested with the measured data and using the Wandzura-Wilczek relation for the low $x$ unmeasured region. A small deviation was observed at $Q^2$ values between 0.5 and 1.2 (GeV/c)$^2$ for the neutron.

  7. Jet production in high Q 2 deepinelastic ep scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jet production in high Q 2 deep­inelastic ep scattering at HERA ZEUS Collaboration Abstract Two­jet:01 ! x ! 0:1 and 0:04 ! y ! 0:95 with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The kinematic properties of the jets and the jet production rates are presented. The partonic scaling variables of the two­jet system and the rate

  8. Low-$Q^2$ partons in p-p and Au-Au collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas A. Trainor

    2005-10-11

    We describe correlations of low-$Q^2$ parton fragments on transverse rapidity $y_t$ and angles $(\\eta,\\phi)$ from p-p and Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 130 and 200 GeV. Evolution of correlations on $y_t$ from p-p to more-central Au-Au collisions shows evidence for parton dissipation. Cuts on $y_t$ isolate angular correlations on $(\\eta,\\phi)$ for low-$Q^2$ partons which reveal a large asymmetry about the jet thrust axis in p-p collisions favoring the azimuth direction. Evolution of angular correlations with increasing Au-Au centrality reveals a rotation of the asymmetry to favor pseudorapidity. Angular correlations of transverse momentum $p_t$ in Au-Au collisions access temperature/velocity structure resulting from low-$Q^2$ parton scattering. $p_t$ autocorrelations on $(\\eta,\\phi)$, obtained from the scale dependence of $$ fluctuations, reveal a complex parton dissipation process in heavy ion collisions which includes the possibility of collective bulk-medium recoil in response to parton stopping.

  9. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site: City ofNovelQ3:

  10. A concept for the experimental determination of the nucleon electric to magnetic form factor ratio at very low $Q^2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ron; E. Piasetzky; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2009-04-29

    Stationary target measurements of the nucleon form factors have been performed with high precision down to $Q^2$ of $\\sim$ 0.01 GeV$^2$ for protons ($G_E^p$) and down to $\\sim$ 0.1 GeV$^2$ for neutrons ($G_M^n$). Conventional extraction using cross section and polarization measurement cannot be extended to very low values of $Q^2$ due to inherent experimental limitations. We present a proposal for a new approach to a measurement, using colliding beams, which will extend the range of possible measurement at low $Q^2$ by several orders of magnitude over stationary target limits.

  11. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S.Leadership onProtonConcentrators FY13 Q2 Low-Cost,

  12. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2010-01-31

    Experiment E08-007 measured the proton elastic form factor ratio ?pGE/GM in the range of Q2 = 0.3?0.7(GeV/c)2 by recoil polarimetry. Data were taken in 2008 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. A 1.2 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton was detected in the left HRS in coincidence with the elasticly scattered electrons tagged by the BigBite spectrometer. The proton polarization was measured by the focal plane polarimeter (FPP). In this low Q2 region, previous measurement from Jefferson Lab Hall A (LEDEX) along with various fits and calculations indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. For this new measurement, the proposed statistical uncertainty (< 1%) was achieved. These new results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, which indicate a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the new results also have implications in determining the proton Zemach radius and the strangeness form factors from parity violation experiments.

  13. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Resonance Region at High $Q^2$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villano, A N; Bosted, P E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Jones, M K; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Cui, Y; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Elliot, B; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Grullon, S; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E R; Kubarovsky, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Lu, M; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchhyan, H; Napolitano, J; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Pamela, P; Potterveld, D H; Reimer, Paul E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C

    2009-09-01

    The process $ep \\to e^{\\prime}p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$ has been measured at $Q^2$ = 6.4 and 7.7 \\ufourmomts in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center of mass frame considering the process $\\gamma^{\\ast}p \\to p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well known $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios $R_{EM}$ and $R_{SM}$ along with the magnetic transition form factor $G_M^{\\ast}$. It is found that the rapid fall off of the $\\Delta(1232)$ contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances

  14. FORMATION CONDITIONS OF ICY MATERIALS IN COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ). I. MIXING RATIOS OF ORGANIC VOLATILES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Hitomi; Kawakita, Hideyo, E-mail: h_kobayashi@cc.kyoto-su.ac.j [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2009-09-20

    We observed comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) with the Keck II telescope in late 2005 January and we obtained the spectra of C/2004 Q2 including many emission lines of volatile species such as H{sub 2}O, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, and H{sub 2}CO with high-signal-to-noise ratios. Based on our observations, we determined the mixing ratios of the molecules relative to H{sub 2}O in C/2004 Q2. Since C/2004 Q2 is one of Oort Cloud comets, it is interesting to compare our results with other Oort Cloud comets. The mixing ratios of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/H{sub 2}O in C/2004 Q2 are lower than typical Oort Cloud comets. Especially, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio in C/2004 Q2 is as lower as Jupiter Family comets. However, mixing ratios of other molecules in C/2004 Q2 are similar to typical Oort Cloud comets. C/2004 Q2 might be the intermediate type between Oort Cloud and Jupiter Family comets. To investigate the formation conditions of such intermediate type comet, we focused on the (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+C{sub 2}H{sub 6})/H{sub 2}O ratios and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ratios in comets from the viewpoint of conversion from C{sub 2}H{sub 2} to C{sub 2}H{sub 6} in the precometary ices. We found that (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+C{sub 2}H{sub 6})/H{sub 2}O ratio in C/2004 Q2 is lower than the ratio in typical Oort Cloud comets while C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ratio in C/2004 Q2 is consistent with the ratio of the typical Oort Cloud comets and Jupiter family comets. If we assume that the cometary volatiles such as H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} formed similar environment, the C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ratio might not be sensitive in the temperature range where hydrogen-addition reactions occurred and cometesimals formed ({approx}30 K). We employed the dynamical-evolutional model and the chemical-evolutional model to determine the formation region of C/2004 Q2 more precisely. We found that comet C/2004 Q2 might have formed in relatively inner region of the solar nebula than the typical Oort Cloud comet (but slightly further than 5 AU from the proto-Sun).

  15. Measurements of the Generalized Electric and Magnetic Polarizabilities of the Proton at Low Q2 Using the VCS Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bourgeois; Y. Sato; J. Shaw; R. Alarcon; A. M. Bernstein; W. Bertozzi; T. Botto; J. Calarco; F. Casagrande; M. O. Distler; K. Dow; M. Farkondeh; S. Georgakopoulos; S. Gilad; R. Hicks; M. Holtrop; A. Hotta; X. Jiang; A. Karabarbounis; J. Kirkpatrick; S. Kowalski; R. Milner; R. Miskimen; I. Nakagawa; C. N. Papanicolas; A. J. Sarty; S. Sirca; E. Six; N. F. Sparveris; S. Stave; E. Stiliaris; T. Tamae; G. Tsentalovich; C. Tschalaer; W. Turchinetz; Z. -L. Zhou; T. Zwart

    2006-05-10

    The mean square polarizability radii of the proton have been measured for the first time in a virtual Compton scattering experiment performed at the MIT-Bates out-of-plane scattering facility. Response functions and polarizabilities obtained from a dispersion analysis of the data at Q2=0.06 GeV2/c2 are in agreement with O(p3) heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. The data support the dominance of mesonic effects in the polarizabilities, and the increase of beta with increasing Q2 is evidence for the cancellation of long-range diamagnetism by short-range paramagnetism from the pion cloud.

  16. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. R. Puckett; E. J. Brash; M. K. Jones; W. Luo; M. Meziane; L. Pentchev; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; F. R. Wesselmann; A. Ahmidouch; I. Albayrak; K. A. Aniol; J. Arrington; A. Asaturyan; H. Baghdasaryan; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; P. Bosted; W. Boeglin; C. Butuceanu; P. Carter; S. Chernenko; E. Christy; M. Commisso; J. C. Cornejo; S. Covrig; S. Danagoulian; A. Daniel; A. Davidenko; D. Day; S. Dhamija; D. Dutta; R. Ent; S. Frullani; H. Fenker; E. Frlez; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; Y. Goncharenko; K. Hafidi; D. Hamilton; D. W. Higinbotham; W. Hinton; T. Horn; B. Hu; J. Huang; G. M. Huber; E. Jensen; C. Keppel; M. Khandaker; P. King; D. Kirillov; M. Kohl; V. Kravtsov; G. Kumbartzki; Y. Li; V. Mamyan; D. J. Margaziotis; A. Marsh; Y. Matulenko; J. Maxwell; G. Mbianda; D. Meekins; Y. Melnik; J. Miller; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; B. Moffit; O. Moreno; J. Mulholland; A. Narayan; S. Nedev; Nuruzzaman; E. Piasetzky; W. Pierce; N. M. Piskunov; Y. Prok; R. D. Ransome; D. S. Razin; P. Reimer; J. Reinhold; O. Rondon; M. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; K. Shestermanov; S. Sirca; I. Sitnik; L. Smykov; G. Smith; L. Solovyev; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; A. Vasiliev; M. Veilleux; B. B. Wojtsekhowski; S. Wood; Z. Ye; Y. Zanevsky; X. Zhang; Y. Zhang; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2010-05-28

    Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon's quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the non-perturbative regime.

  17. Inclusive D*-meson production in ep scattering at low Q2 in the GM-VFN scheme at NLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Kramer; H. Spiesberger

    2009-06-15

    We have calculated the next-to-leading order cross sections for the inclusive production of D*-mesons in ep collisions at HERA for finite, although very small Q2. In this Q2-range, the same approximations as for photoproduction can be used. Our calculation is performed in the general-mass variable-flavour-number scheme. In this approach, large logarithms of the charm transverse momentum are resummed and finite terms depending on m^2/p_T^2 are kept in the hard scattering cross sections. The theoretical results are compared with recent data from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA. On average, we find good agreement.

  18. Open Season in Sacramento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brosnan, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    egislative Open Season in Sacramento Douglas Brosnan, MD, JDs open season again in Sacramento: The legislative session

  19. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio $?_pG_E/G_M$ at low $Q^2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Zhan; K. Allada; D. S. Armstrong; J. Arrington; W. Bertozzi; W. Boeglin; J. -P. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; P. Decowski; C. Dutta; S. Frullani; E. Fuchey; F. Garibaldi; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; J. Glister; K. Hafidi; B. Hahn; J. -O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; R. J. Holt; J. Huang; G. M. Huber; F. Itard; C. W. de Jager; X. Jiang; J. Johnson; J. Katich; R. de Leo; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; E. Long; D. J. Margaziotis; S. May-Tal Beck; D. Meekins; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; B. E. Norum; M. Olson; E. Piasetzky; I. Pomerantz; D. Protopopescu; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. D. Ransome; P. E. Reimer; J. Reinhold; S. Riordan; G. Ron; A. Saha; A. J. Sarty; B. Sawatzky; E. C. Schulte; M. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; S. Sirca; P. Solvignon; N. F. Sparveris; S. Strauch; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; I. Vilardi; Y. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; Z. Ye; Y. Zhang

    2011-08-31

    We report a new, high-precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio \\mu_p G_E/G_M for the four-momentum transfer squared Q^2 = 0.3-0.7 (GeV/c)^2. The measurement was performed at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in Hall A using recoil polarimetry. With a total uncertainty of approximately 1%, the new data clearly show that the deviation of the ratio \\mu_p G_E/G_M from unity observed in previous polarization measurements at high Q^2 continues down to the lowest Q^2 value of this measurement. The updated global fit that includes the new results yields an electric (magnetic) form factor roughly 2% smaller (1% larger) than the previous global fit in this Q^2 range. We obtain new extractions of the proton electric and magnetic radii, which are ^(1/2)=0.875+/-0.010 fm and ^(1/2)=0.867+/-0.020 fm. The charge radius is consistent with other recent extractions based on the electron-proton interaction, including the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements, which suggests a missing correction in the comparison of measurements of the proton charge radius using electron probes and the recent extraction from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift.

  20. Charge fraction measurements for 2.4-35 keV Arq+ (q=2-13) projectiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charge fraction measurements for 2.4-35 keV Arq+ (q=2-13) projectiles backscattered from Au(110) with incident energies in the range 2.4-35 keV, that have been 120 degrees backscattered from Au(110) in quasi

  1. The Spin Structure of 3He and the Neutron at Low Q^2: A Measurement of the Generalized GDH Integrand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent Sulkosky

    2007-08-01

    Since the 1980's, the study of nucleon (proton or neutron) spin structure has been an active field both experimentally and theoretically. One of the primary goals of this work is to test our understanding of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. In the high energy region of asymptotically free quarks, QCD has been verified. However, verifiable predictions in the low energy region are harder to obtain due to the complex interactions between the nucleon's constituents: quarks and gluons. In the non-pertubative regime, low-energy effective field theories such as chiral perturbation theory provide predictions for the spin structure functions in the form of sum rules. Spin-dependent sum rules such as the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule are important tools available to study nucleon spin structure. Originally derived for real photon absorption, the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule was first extended for virtual photon absorption in 1989. The extension of the sum rule provides a unique relation, valid at any momentum transfer ($Q^{2}$), that can be used to study the nucleon spin structure and make comparisons between theoretical predictions and experimental data. Experiment E97-110 was performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) to examine the spin structure of the neutron and $^{3}$He. The Jefferson Lab longitudinally-polarized electron beam with incident energies between 1.1 and 4.4 GeV was scattered from a longitudinally or transversely polarized $^{3}$He gas target in the Hall A end station. Asymmetries and polarized cross-section differences were measured in the quasielastic and resonance regions to extract the spin structure functions $g_{1}(x,Q^{2})$ and $g_{2}(x,Q^{2})$ at low momentum transfers (0.02 $< Q^{2} <$ 0.3 GeV$^{2}$). The goal of the experiment was to perform a precise measurement of the $Q^{2}$ dependence of the extended GDH integral and of the moments of the neutron and $^{3}$He spin structure functions at low $Q^{2}$. This $Q^{2}$ range allows us to test predictions of chiral perturbation theory and check the GDH sum rule by extrapolating the integral to the real photon point. This thesis will discuss preliminary results from the E97-110 data analysis.

  2. Seasonal Run Distribution Seasonal Run Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The term "total run" defines the number of adult sockeye salmon that home to the Karluk River before197 Seasonal Run Distribution CHAPTER 6 Seasonal Run Distribution They arrived from the sea in one, what was the seasonal run distribution of its sockeye salmon? Was the original run distribution which

  3. 2014_Q3.indd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 of 8 3 ofRuleWe We We el lc lc lc

  4. The Gell-Mann-Okubo and Colemann-Glashow relations for octet and decuplet baryons in the $SU_q(3)$ quantum algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Carcamo

    2006-08-10

    The q-deformed Clebsch-Gordan coefficients corresponding to the $\\lrpy{3}\\times\\lrpy{21}$ reduction of the $SU_q(3)$ quantum algebra are computed. From these results and using the quantum Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for the $\\lrpy{21}\\times\\lrpy{21}$ reduction found by Zhong Qi Ma, the q-deformed Gell-Mann-Okubo mass relations for octet and decuplet baryons are determined by generalizing the procedure used for the SU(3) algebra. We also determine the Coleman-Glashow relations for octet and decuplet baryons in the $SU_q(3)$ algebra. Finally, by using the experimental particle masses of the octet and decuplet baryons, two values of the $q$-parameter are found and adjusted for the predicted masses expressions (one for the Gell-Mann-Okubo mass relations and the other for the Coleman-Glashow relations) and a possible physical interpretation is given.

  5. QCD predictions for spin dependent photonic structure function $g_1^?(x,Q^2)$ in the low x region of future linear colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kwiecinski; B. Ziaja

    2000-11-21

    Spin dependent structure function $g_1^{\\gamma}(x,Q^2)$ of the polarised photon is analysed within the formalism based upon the unintegrated spin dependent parton distributions incorporating the LO Altarelli-Parisi evolution and the double $ln^2(1/x)$ resummation at low values of Bjorken parameter x. We analyse the effects of the double $ln^2(1/x)$ resummation on the behaviour of $g_1^{\\gamma}(x,Q^2)$ in the low x region which may be accessible in future linear $e^+e^-$ and $e\\gamma$ colliders. Sensitivity of the predictions on the possible nonperturbative gluon content of the polarised photons is analysed. Predictions for spin dependent gluon distribution $\\Delta g^{\\gamma} (x,Q^2)$ are also given.

  6. Q^2 Dependence of the S_{11}(1535) Photocoupling and Evidence for a P-wave resonance in eta electroproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haluk Denizli; James Mueller; Steven Dytman; M.L. Leber; R.D. Levine; J. Miles; Kui Kim; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Catalina Cetina; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Laurent Farhi; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Tony Forest; Valera Frolov; Herbert Funsten; Sally Gaff; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Pascal Girard; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; David Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Jingliang Hu; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; J.H. Kelley; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; K. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; K. Lukashin; Marion MacCormick; Joseph Manak; Nikolai Markov; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; Valeria Muccifora; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Steve Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Gerald Peterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Ermanno Polli; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Konstantin Sabourov; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; Jeremiah Shaw; Nikolay Shvedunov; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Kebin Wang; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Junho Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction $ep \\to e'\\eta p$ are reported for total center of mass energy $W$=1.5--2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer $Q^2$=0.13--3.3 GeV$^2$. This large kinematic range allows extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and $\\eta N$ coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at $W\\sim$ 1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a $P$-wave resonance that persists to high $Q^2$. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the $S_{11}$(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expands the $Q^2$ range covered and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parameterization is provided.

  7. Copyright 1996-1998, 2000, 2004-2011 ARM Limited. All rights reserved. ARM DDI 0406B_errata_2011_Q2 (ID053111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whaley, R. Clint

    Copyright © 1996-1998, 2000, 2004-2011 ARM Limited. All rights reserved. ARM DDI 0406B_errata_2011_Q2 (ID053111) ARM ® Architecture Reference Manual ARM® v7-A and ARM® v7-R edition Errata markup #12;ii Copyright © 1996-1998, 2000, 2004-2011 ARM Limited. All rights reserved. ARM DDI 0406B_errata_2011

  8. A new family of $N$ dimensional superintegrable double singular oscillators and quadratic algebra $Q(3)\\oplus so(n) \\oplus so(N-n)$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Md Fazlul Hoque; Ian Marquette; Yao-Zhong Zhang

    2015-04-20

    We introduce a new family of $N$-dimensional quantum superintegrable model consisting of double singular oscillators of type $(n,N-n)$. The special cases $(2,2)$ and $(4,4)$ were previously identified as the duals of 3- and 5-dimensional deformed Kepler-Coulomb systems with $u(1)$ and $su(2)$ monopoles respectively. The models are multiseparable and their wave functions are obtained in $(n,N-n)$ double-hyperspherical coordinates. We obtain the integrals of motion and construct the finitely generated polynomial algebra that is the direct sum of a quadratic algebra $Q(3)$ involving three generators, $so(n)$, $so(N-n)$ (i.e. $Q(3)\\oplus so(n) \\oplus so(N-n)$ ). The structure constants of the quadratic algebra themselves involve the Casimir operators of the two Lie algebras $so(n)$ and $so(N-n)$. Moreover, we obtain the finite dimensional unitary representations (unirreps) of the quadratic algebra and present an algebraic derivation of the degenerate energy spectrum of the superintegrable model.

  9. The Third Season of Rape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ali Jimale

    1988-01-01

    UFAHAMU THE THIRD SEASON OF RAPE by Ali Jimale Ahmed Andin the third season of rape. ·Somali for blood-sucking

  10. The Second Season of Rape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keynan, Hassan A.

    1988-01-01

    POETRY THE SECOND SEASON OF RAPE by Hassan A Keynan I datedFor the second season of Rape. Then, in her womb, did I

  11. Genetic and physical mapping of the Treacher Collins syndrome locus with respect to loci in the chromosome 5q3 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang; Coss, C.; Taylor, E. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Lovett, M. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)); Yamaoka, L.H.; Speer, M.C. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Cadle, R.; Hall, B. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)); Brown, K. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)) (and others)

    1993-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant, craniofacial developmental disorder, and its locus (TCOF1) has been mapped to chromosome 5q3. To refine the location of the gene within this region, linkage analysis was performed among the TCOF1 locus and 12 loci (IL9, FGFA, GRL, D5S207, D5S210, D5S376, CSF1R, SPARC, D5S119, D5S209, D5S527, FGFR4) in 13 Treacher Collins syndrome families. The highest maximum lod score was obtained between loci TCOF1 and D5S210 (Z = 10.52; [theta] = 0.02 [+-] 0.07). The best order, IL9-GRL-D5S207/D5S210-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119, and genetic distances among these loci were determined in the 40 CEPH families by multipoint linkage analysis. YAC clones were used to establish the order of loci, centromere-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5S207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-telomere. By combining known physical mapping data with ours, the order of chromosome 5q3 markers is centomere-IL9-FGFA-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5s207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-D5S209-FGFR4-telomere. Based on this order, haplotype analysis suggests that the TCOF1 locus resides distal CSF1R and proximal to SPARC within a region less than 1 Mb in size. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Final analysis of proton form factor ratio data at Q2 = 4.0, 4.8, and 5.6 GeV2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Puckett, A. J. R.; Brash, E. J.; Gayou, O.; Jones, M. K.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Punjabi, V.; Aniol, K. A.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; et al

    2012-04-11

    Recently published measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio R = ?p GEp/GMp at momentum transfers Q2 up to 8.5 GeV2 in Jefferson Lab Hall C deviate from the linear trend of previous measurements in Jefferson Lab Hall A, favoring a slower rate of decrease of R with Q2. While statistically compatible in the region of overlap with Hall A, the Hall C data hint at a systematic difference between the two experiments. This possibility was investigated in a reanalysis of the Hall A data. We find that the original analysis underestimated the background in the selection of elasticmore »events. The application of an additional cut to further suppress the background increases the results for R, improving the consistency between Halls A and C.« less

  13. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton in the high-lying resonances at Q2 < 5 GeV2 from CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Kijun

    2014-09-01

    The differential cross sections and structure functions for the exclusive electroproduction process ep --> e'n pi+ were measured in the range of the invariantmass for the np+ system 1.6 GeV lte W lte 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV2 lte Q2 lte 4.0 GeV2 using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in the exclusive p+ production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the np+ center-of-mass system. In this analysis, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points in terms of W, Q2, cosq theta* _ pi, and phi?_p-, were obtained. The preliminary differential cross section and structure function analyses are carried out, which allow us to extract the helicity amplitudes in high-lying resonances.

  14. CI2525 ESTRUCTURAS DISCRETAS I f-m 2014 P 1/35 P 2/35 Q 1/15 Q 2/15 TOTAL/5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meza, Oscar J.

    CI2525 ESTRUCTURAS DISCRETAS I f-m 2014 Sección 1 P 1/35 P 2/35 Q 1/15 Q 2/15 TOTAL/5 0740951 Fernandez Luis Ely 1110969 Silva Rodriguez Erick Gabriel 34 35 15 15 1111391 Lupo Loyo Pablo Francisco 6 12 Colmenares Salamanca Bruno 35 11 8 10 1210613 Duque Contreras Lalezka Isabel 28 20 5 15 1210627 Salerno

  15. CI2525 ESTRUCTURAS DISCRETAS I oct-ene 2014 P 1/35 P 2/35 Q 1/15 Q 2/15 Tarea TOTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meza, Oscar J.

    CI2525 ESTRUCTURAS DISCRETAS I oct-ene 2014 P 1/35 P 2/35 Q 1/15 Q 2/15 Tarea TOTAL 0740913 Franco Alejandro 10 27 7 15 3,5 3 1110798 Portillo Rodriguez Ysmar Yoleth 10 2 1 1110883 Rodríguez Fernández Luis 1210848 Alexander Lacour Jean Paul 20 24 15 1 3 3 1210967 Fanghella Valero Alfredo José 35 32 15 15 3,5 5

  16. Q3 1997 STEO, Final

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product: TotalCoalbed7 (Released July 8,

  17. Seasonality in air transportation demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichard Megwinoff, H?tor Nicolas

    1988-01-01

    This thesis investigates the seasonality of demand in air transportation. It presents three methods for computing seasonal indices. One of these methods, the Periodic Average Method, is selected as the most appropriate for ...

  18. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio GEn/GMn via the ^2H(\\vec{e},e'\\vec{n})^1H reaction to Q^2 = 1.45 (GeV/c)^2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jefferson Laboratory E93-038 Collaboration; :; B. Plaster; A. Yu. Semenov

    2005-11-13

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, GEn/GMn, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic 2H(\\vec{e},e'\\vec{n})1H reaction, at three Q^2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c)^2. The data at Q^2 = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c)^2 are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q^2 > 1 (GeV/c)^2 region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q^2.

  19. Measurement of high-Q^2 neutral current deep inelastic e^- p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZEUS Collaboration

    2009-01-16

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e^- p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dsigma/dQ^2, dsigma/dx and dsigma/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q^2 and x are measured in the kinematic region y 185 GeV^2 for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 169.9 pb^-1 taken with the ZEUS detector in 2005 and 2006 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions xF_3 and xF_3^{\\gamma Z} are determined by combining the e^- p results presented in this paper with previously measured e^+ p neutral current data. The asymmetry parameter A^- is used to demonstrate the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large spacelike photon virtuality. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  20. Precise Determination of the Deuteron Spin Structure at Low to Moderate $Q^2$ with CLAS and Extraction of the Neutron Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Guler; R. G. Fersch; S. E. Kuhn; P. Bosted; K. A. Griffioen; C. Keith; R. Minehart; Y. Prok; K. P. Adhikari; D. Adikaram; M. J. Amaryan; M. D. Anderson; S. Anefalos Pereira; J. Ball; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; I. Bedlinskiy; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; S. Bultmann; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; G. Charles; L. Colaneri; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; D. Crabb; V. Crede; A. D Angelo; N. Dashyan; A. Deur; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; R. Dupre; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; A. Filippi; J. A. Fleming; T. A. Forest; B. Garillon; M. Garcon; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; S. M. Hughes; C. E. Hyde; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; S. Joosten; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; K. Livingston; H. Y. Lu; I. J. D. MacGregor; B. McKinnon; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; A Movsisyan; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; L. A. Net; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; M. Ripani; A. Rizzo; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; P. Roy; F. Sabatie; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; A. Simonyan; Iu. Skorodumina; D. Sokhan; N. Sparveris; I. I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; V. Sytnik; Ye Tian; S. Tkachenko; M. Ungaro; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; X. Wei; L. B. Weinstein; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta

    2015-06-01

    We present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron ($^{15}$ND$_3$) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry $A_1^d$ and the polarized structure function $g_1^d$ were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 5 GeV$^2$ and 0.9 GeV $< W <$ 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure and a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions $A_1^n$ and $g_1^n$ of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, $W < 2$ GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as parametrizations of the world data. The unprecedented precision and dense kinematic coverage of these data can aid in future extractions of polarized parton distributions, tests of perturbative QCD predictions for the quark polarization at large $x$, a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and more precise values for higher-twist matrix elements in the framework of the Operator Product Expansion.

  1. Alcator C-MOD Quarterly Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports Reports for 1997 Q1 (HTML) Q2 (HTML) Q3 (HTML) Q4 (HTML) Reports for 1998 Q1 (HTML) Q2 (HTML) Q3 (HTML) Q4 (HTML) Reports for 1999 Q1 (HTML) Q2 (HTML) Q3 (HTML) Q4 (HTML)...

  2. FINAL REPORT A HIGH SEASONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;'I MTI 79TR68 FINAL REPORT A HIGH SEASONAL PERFORMANCE FACTOR GAS HEAT PUMP FOR THE NORTH Model Gas Heat Pump ......... 11-4 11.4 CNG Typical Weather Year Selection Method. . . . 11-5 11 of the subject gas-fueled heat pump under development in comparison with other equipment which

  3. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Better Buildings Neighborhood Program...

  4. Seasonal Tips | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4 » Search results SearchMiddle SchoolDownloadSeasonal Tips

  5. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report that captures quarterly FOIA data at the DOE level. Through the use of an Applied Programming Interface (or API), the information will display on www.FOIA.gov.

  6. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  7. Q3 1996 STEO TEXT/TABLES

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product: TotalCoalbed

  8. Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies Article Published Version Fioletov, V. E. and Shepherd, T. G. (2003) Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies. Geophysical Research persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies Vitali E. Fioletov Meteorological Service of Canada, Toronto

  9. Seasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 Protected Areas Seasonally Flooded Grasslands V.A.1.N.g. #12;Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity

  10. Measurement of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio at Q2 = 1.58 GeV2 using the reaction 3He(e,e'n)pp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Schlimme; P. Achenbach; C. A. Ayerbe Gayoso; J. C. Bernauer; R. Böhm; D. Bosnar; Th. Challand; M. O. Distler; L. Doria; F. Fellenberger; H. Fonvieille; M. Gómez Rodríguez; P. Grabmayr; T. Hehl; W. Heil; D. Kiselev; J. Krimmer; M. Makek; H. Merkel; D. G. Middleton; U. Müller; L. Nungesser; B. A. Ott; J. Pochodzalla; M. Potokar; S. Sánchez Majos; M. M. Sargsian; I. Sick; S. Širca; M. Weinriefer; M. Wendel; C. J. Yoon

    2013-08-29

    A measurement of beam helicity asymmetries in the reaction 3He(e,e'n)pp has been performed at the Mainz Microtron in quasielastic kinematics in order to determine the electric to magnetic form factor ratio of the neutron, GEn/GMn, at a four momentum transfer Q2 = 1.58 GeV2. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered on a highly polarized 3He gas target. The scattered electrons were detected with a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer, and the ejected neutrons with a dedicated neutron detector composed of scintillator bars. To reduce systematic errors data were taken for four different target polarization orientations allowing the determination of GEn/GMn from a double ratio. We find mu_n GEn/GMn = 0.250 +/- 0.058(stat.) +/- 0.017 (sys.).

  11. Energy Resources for Tornado Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tornado Season Energy Resources for Tornado Season The aftermath of a tornado in Greensburg, Kansas. | Photo courtesy of Federal Emergency Mgmt. Agency, NREL 16290 The aftermath of...

  12. Vegetation Dynamics in Seasonally Grazed Upland Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Meg L

    This thesis addresses the effects of seasonality of grazing on vegetation dynamics. Background to the thesis is provided by the Hill Sheep and Native Woodland (HSNW) project, a system-scale experiment with the long-term ...

  13. Potential Economic Value of Seasonal Hurricane Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    This paper explores the potential utility of seasonal Atlantic hurricane forecasts to a hypothetical property insurance firm whose insured properties are broadly distributed along the U.S. Gulf and East Coasts. Using a ...

  14. Table of Contents Our Season Page 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    1 #12;2 Table of Contents 2011-2012 Our Season Page 3 People Page 8 Outreach Page 11 Curricular-Curtain 546 $3,631.16 Hell In High Water-Rand 1252 $7,102.47 Solstice-Curtain 506 $2,583.42 Urinetown - Rand-stage season this spring. Hell in High Water by Marcus Gardley The Rand Theater Nov. 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19

  15. NOVA Making Stuff Season 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leombruni, Lisa; Paulsen, Christine Andrews

    2014-12-12

    Over the course of four weeks in fall 2013, 11.7 million Americans tuned in to PBS to follow host David Pogue as he led them in search of engineering and scientific breakthroughs poised to change our world. Levitating trains, quantum computers, robotic bees, and bomb-detecting plants—these were just a few of the cutting-edge innovations brought into the living rooms of families across the country in NOVA’s four-part series, Making Stuff: Faster, Wilder, Colder, and Safer. Each of the four one-hour programs gave viewers a behind-the-scenes look at novel technologies poised to change our world—showing them how basic research and scientific discovery can hold the keys to transforming how we live. Making Stuff Season 2 (MS2) combined true entertainment with educational value, creating a popular and engaging series that brought accessible science into the homes of millions. NOVA’s goal to engage the public with such technological innovation and basic research extended beyond the broadcast series, including a variety of online, educational, and promotional activities: original online science reporting, web-only short-form videos, a new online quiz-game, social media engagement and promotion, an educational outreach “toolkit” for science educators to create their own “makerspaces,” an online community of practice, a series of nationwide Innovation Cafés, educator professional development, a suite of teacher resources, an “Idealab,” participation in national conferences, and specialized station relation and marketing. A summative evaluation of the MS2 project indicates that overall, these activities helped make a significant impact on the viewers, users, and participants that NOVA reached. The final evaluation conducted by Concord Evaluation Group (CEG) confidently concluded that the broadcast, website, and outreach activities were successful at achieving the project’s intended impacts. CEG reported that the MS2 series and website content were successful in raising awareness and sparking interest in innovation, and increased public awareness that basic research leads to technological innovation; this interest was also sustained over a six month period. Efforts to create an online community of practice were also successful: the quality of collaboration increased, and community members felt supported while using Maker pedagogy. These findings provide clear evidence that large-scale science media projects like MS2 are an effective means of “moving the needle” on attitudes about and excitement for science. NOVA’s broadcast audience and ratings have always indicated that a large portion of the population is interested in and engages with educational science media on a weekly basis. Yet these evaluation results provide the empirical evidence that beyond being capable of attracting, maintaining, and growing a dedicated group of citizens interested in science, these shows—with their diverse content provided on a variety of media channels—are capable of sparking new interest in science, raising public awareness of the importance of science, and maintaining and growing that interest over time. In a country where approximately a quarter of the population doesn’t know the earth rotates around the sun,1 roughly half still don’t accept evolution,2 and about 20% don’t think climate change is happening,3 the importance of these findings cannot be overstated. The success of MS2 suggests that large-scale media projects dedicated to and linked by coverage of scientific “big ideas” are an effective means of shifting public opinion on—and improving understanding of—science. REFERENCES 1, 2 National Science Foundation, Science and Engineering Indicators (2014). Chapter 7: Science and Technology: Public Attitudes and Understanding. 3 Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., Feinberg, G., & Rosenthal, S. (2014) Climate change in the American mind: April, 2014. Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Project on Climate Change Communication.

  16. Technology Performance Exchange

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Q3 Deliverable: Develop Site Workflows and Design Website Layout Q3 GoNo-Go DOE Decision Point: Passed Q1 Milestone: Develop Data Entry Forms Q2 Milestone: Release Technology...

  17. FOIA QUARTERLY REPORTS (Q2-2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  18. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  19. Microchannel Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this OSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  20. Q2 External Package.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProteinTotal natural gasPurchase,PyFEHM PyFEHMQ&A:87,

  1. fu-q(2)-99.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001 >News from the ARM7

  2. The SM8 Universal Solvation Model Christopher J. Cramer and Donald G. Truhlar, University of Minnesota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    constants, redox potentials, solubilities, temperature-dependent absolute free energies of solvation pollutants, and the thermodynamics of processes taking place in electrochemical fuel cells. q1 q2 q3 q2 q1 q

  3. Seasonal ozone variations in the upper mesosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, R.J. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1990-05-20

    The global daytime ozone was measured by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite (SME) for 5 years. The measurements extend through the mesosphere, covering from 50 km to over 90 km. The ozone in the upper mesosphere varies annually by up to a factor of 3. The observed seasonal variations may be summarized in several different ways. From year to year there is a great deal of repeatability of these variations. This repeatability occurs in most of the upper mesosphere outside the tropics. Near 0.01 mbar (80 km) the mid- and high-latitude mixing ratio peaks each year in mid-April. A secondary maximum in the altitude profile of ozone density usually occurs near 85 km. Changes in this structure are directly related to the April maximum and other seasonal changes seen at 0.01 mbar. The changing seasonal structure produces a bump at the ozone mixing ratio minimum that is largest just after spring equinox. This perturbation to the mixing ratio profile seems to move upward during the first half of the year. The seasonal changes of ozone were analyzed in terms of annual and semiannual structure. The variations generally have both an annual and semiannual component depending on altitude and latitude. The phases of the variations change quickly with both altitude and latitude. The semiannual component peaks in April, over most of the upper mesosphere.

  4. 2005 Season Review Small Fruit and Grapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    1 INDEX 2005 Season Review Small Fruit and Grapes Tree Fruit Plant Pathology Entomology Indiana Horticultural Congress Horticultural Therapy FFF05-09 December, 2005 Small Fruit and Grapes: Blueberries Large, especially on flowers of Arkan- sas Primocane Fruiters. ·Potato leafhoppers, very severe damage this year

  5. Mammalian Seasonal Rhythms: Behavior and Neuroendocrine Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zucker, Irving

    . The amount and intensity of solar radiation varies with latitude; the greater the distance from the equator, the more pronounced the interseasonal differences in ambient temperature and solar radiation. Plant growth to melatonin in mammals to date." (Arendt, 2000) I. INTRODUCTION Seasonal phenotypes in behavior and physiology

  6. Minor League Fan Satisfaction with the Season Ticket Selling Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Jason D.

    2011-08-08

    The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with the season ticket selling process administered by a minor league baseball franchise. Minor league sport organizations rely heavily on season ticket sales and retention, therefore, knowing...

  7. Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season This presentation is from a DOE-NASEO webinar held June 23, 2015, on...

  8. St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but has a high tolerance for shade-season grass. It does best in full sun and high temperatures. Goes dormant and turns brown in winter. Very

  9. The Dhiban Excavation and Development Project's 2005 Season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    The Dh?bån Excavation and Development Project’s 2005 SeasonThe Dh?bån Excavation and Development Project’s 2005 SeasonDh?bån Excavation and Development Project (DEDP hereafter)

  10. Seasonal climatology of winddriven circulation on the New Jersey Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    season and more to the right of the wind during the stratified season. During the stratified summer et al., 2008], river dis- charge [Fong and Geyer, 2001; ByoungJu and Wilkin, 2007; Chant et al., 2008

  11. Seasonal sand level changes on southern california beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Marissa L.

    2009-01-01

    Guza, R. Gutierrez, and R. Seymour, 2008: A Technique forW.C. O’ Reilly, and R.J. Seymour, 2009: Overview of SeasonalW.C. O’Reilly, and R.J. Seymour, 2009: Seasonal Persis-

  12. Seasonal Sand Level Changes on Southern California Beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Marissa L

    2009-01-01

    Guza, R. Gutierrez, and R. Seymour, 2008: A Technique forW.C. O’ Reilly, and R.J. Seymour, 2009: Overview of SeasonalW.C. O’Reilly, and R.J. Seymour, 2009: Seasonal Persis-

  13. Warm-Season (C4) Grasses Lowell E. Moser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -season perennial grasses as biomass feedstock candidates (Table II-I). Most of this research has focused

  14. Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Reduce waste and save energy this holiday season whether you're shopping, eating, partying, decorating, or wrapping.

  15. AT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    an important role in an area's local vertical temperature distribution. Below, Figure 1 shows the verticalAT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3) Question #1: Seasons (20 pts) A. In your own words, describe the cause of the seasons. B. In the Northern Hemisphere we are closer to the sun during

  16. Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the case of the North. (2015) Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the case of the North;Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging:1 the case of the North Atlantic jet

  17. Large seasonal swings in leaf area of Amazon rainforests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    tropical forests stud- ied to date display seasonal variations in the presence of new leaves, flowers of 25% in a majority of the Amazon rainforests. This seasonal cycle is timed to the seasonality of solar radiation in a manner that is suggestive of anticipatory and opportunistic pat- terns of net leaf flushing

  18. Part 1. Energy and Mass Solar Radiation and the Seasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    Part 1. Energy and Mass Chapter 2. Solar Radiation and the Seasons #12;Introduction Solar Radiation radiation = 10 m peak #12;#12;The Solar Constant Energy intensity decreases in proportion to the distance of the Earth's Seasons Orbital alignment to the Sun = seasonal variations in solar energy Revolution

  19. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~began working on seasonal thermal energy storage in aquifers

  20. Seasonal demand and supply analysis of turkeys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blomo, Vito James

    1972-01-01

    (percentage) responsiveness of price to changes (usually one percent) in quantity. Assuming a linear demand function, flexibility is shown to be less than one in the upper half of the function, equal to one (unitary) at the midpoint, and greater than one...SEASONAL DEMAND AND SUPPLY ANALYSIS OF TURKEYS A Thesis by VITO JAMES BLOMO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1972 Ma)or Sub...

  1. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 265.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 265.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probable of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecendented rate. The average change in phase is not coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration.

  2. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S SURFACE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Tokano, T., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Institut fuer Geophysik und Meteorologie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Koeln (Germany)

    2011-08-10

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer measured surface radiances at 19 {mu}m in two time periods: one in late northern winter (LNW; L{sub s} = 335 deg.) and another centered on northern spring equinox (NSE; L{sub s} = 0 deg.). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between LNW and NSE a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of {approx}0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was at 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of {Delta}L{sub S} {approx} 9{sup 0} in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65{sup 0} S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  3. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, D.J. [AT& T Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1995-04-07

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 365.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 365.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probably of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecedented rate. The average change in phase is now coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. 80 refs., 13 figs.

  4. Seasonal changes in Titan's meteorology E. P. Turtle,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during the approach to the northern spring equinox in August 2009. Recent observations have shown, Titan's seasons have progressed from southern summer to early southern autumn, and changes

  5. BPA revises policy for managing seasonal power oversupply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    policy-for-managing-seasonal-power-oversupply Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  6. Sandia Energy - Understanding Seasonal Effects of WEC Operation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding Seasonal Effects of WEC Operation using the SNL-SWAN Wave Model Application Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events Systems Analysis Computational...

  7. Seasonal mass balance gradients in Norway L. A. Rasmussen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, L.A.

    16 Aug 05 Seasonal mass balance gradients in Norway L. A. Rasmussen1 and L. M. Andreassen2 1 Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) P. O. Box 5091 Majorstua, N-0301 Oslo, Norway in Norway exists in their profiles of both seasonal balances, winter bw(z) and summer bs(z). Unlike many

  8. A global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    A global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies Article Published persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies. Journal of Geophysical Research, 115. D18119. ISSN 0148-0227 doi global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies S. Tegtmeier,1,2 V. E

  9. Environmental Patterns Associated with Active and Inactive Caribbean Hurricane Seasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Patterns Associated with Active and Inactive Caribbean Hurricane Seasons MARK R. JURY of hurricanes passing through the Caribbean in the 1950­2005 period reveals that seasons with more intense hurricanes occur with the onset of Pacific La Nin~a events and when Atlantic SSTs west of Africa are above

  10. NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell Lead Seasonal Forecaster Climate Prediction Center NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Collaboration With National Hurricane Center/ NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Hurricane Research Division/ NOAA/ OAR/ AOML/ HRD www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/hurricane #12;Outline 1. Features

  11. AVIAN NEST DENSITIES AND SUCCESS IN INTRODUCED COOL-SEASON GRASS-LEGUME PLANTINGS VERSUS WARM-SEASON NATIVE GRASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of prairie and idle grassland. Studies indicate that warm-season native grass plantings (WSN) generally provide good winter cover. Recently a trend favoring WSN has emerged, but limited information exists on nesting density and success of cool-season grass-legume plantings (dense nesting cover [DNC]) versus WSN

  12. BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q 2 ti||i4Mhi 2ff2 +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L . T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||LcUL? . i H t CDOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q 2#12; ti||i4Mhi 2ff2 +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L . T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||LcUL? . i H t CDOD u@hi *hi *hi _@|L _@**i i^@3L? % n + &5 ' c &% n + n 5 ' & c &% n + ' UL? & T@h@4i|hL hi@*i E@ AhL@hi @*Lh _ & Tih U

  13. BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q 2 ti||i4Mhi 2fff +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L SD T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||Lc |h@ SD i H t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q 2 ti||i4Mhi 2fff +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L SD T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||Lc |h@ SD i H t ghyh u@hi *hi *hi _@ U#12; @ AhL@hi ?@ M@ti _i* ?U*iL i ?@ M@ti _i**hi sff E i s!E _Li ' e 2e2 n e#12

  14. BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q 2 6iMMh@L 2fff +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L SD T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||Lc |h@ SD i H t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q 2 6iMMh@L 2fff +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L SD T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||Lc |h@ SD i H t ghyh u@hi *hi *hi _@|L _@**i i^@3L? E|%n2+|5 ' | c %|+n25 ' UL? | T@h@4i|hL hi@*i E@ AhL@hi ? @*Lhi _ | Tih U * tt|i4@ ?L? @ tL*3L

  15. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. Observations from The EV Project in Q3 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2013-12-01

    This is a brief report that summarizes results published in numerous other reports. It describes the usage of electric vehicles and charging units in the EV Project over the past 3 months. There is no new data or information provided in this report, only summarizing of information published in other reports (which have all been approved for unlimited distribution publication). This report will be posted to the INL/AVTA website for viewing by the general public.

  17. Microsoft Word - DOE_ANNUAL_METRICS_2009Q3.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal March 3, 2015CMMarchDOEER-0670T14404 Third

  18. South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20,...

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Social dominance, seasonal movements, and spatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getz, Wayne M.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Social dominance, seasonal movements, and spatial segregation in African elephants system radio telemetry provide data to evaluate the influence of social relationships on population elephant social groups despite the infrequent occur- rence of contests over resources and lack

  20. Vitamin D (25OHD) Serum Seasonality in the United States.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasahara, Amy K; Singh, Ravinder J; Noymer, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    on the interaction of vitamin D with the immune system.8 | Issue 6 | e65785 Vitamin D (25OHD) Serum Seasonality inn F, Aujla SJ, et al. (2012) Vitamin D and asthma. American

  1. Oxygen isotope records of carboniferous seasonality on the Russian platform 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Huayu

    1998-01-01

    Seven isotopic and eight trace element (TE) profiles across shell growth lines are presented, based on over 1000 stable isotope and electron microprobe analyses on six brachiopod shells (Gigantoproductus), to quantify seasonal temperature change...

  2. Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory I'm sure you've noticed the change in seasons by now. Fall brings cooler weather, and with it my thoughts turn to warm things like putting blankets on the couch,...

  3. The seasonality of aerosol properties in Big Bend National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Lee

    2007-04-25

    ), to characterize the seasonal variability of the Big Bend regions aerosol optical properties. Mass extinction efficiencies and relative humidity scattering enhancement factors were calculated for both externally and internally mixed aerosol populations for all size...

  4. 28 CITRUS INDUSTRY February 2012 he season for fungal foliar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    28 CITRUS INDUSTRY · February 2012 T he season for fungal foliar diseases is just around the corner-Drive · Heavy duty Stainless Steel Pump ­ handles virtually any tank mix · Multi-Directional, Adjustable Nozzles

  5. Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for the ENERGY STAR label to find energy-efficient appliances. It's the holiday season, which is a perfect time...

  6. Mexico's Second City: The 1971-72 Season.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leinaweaver, Richard E.

    1972-10-01

    was excellent, the music fit the word and the deed, and indeed it was the season's highpoint. Unión Nacional de Autores brought Felipe Santander's Luna de miel para . . . diez from Mexico and somewhat dishonestly attempted to capitalize on Zara tustra... was excellent, the music fit the word and the deed, and indeed it was the season's highpoint. Unión Nacional de Autores brought Felipe Santander's Luna de miel para . . . diez from Mexico and somewhat dishonestly attempted to capitalize on Zara tustra...

  7. Influences on seasonal ski worker intention to return and indicators and standards of quality for seasonal ski jobs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismert, Matthew D

    2002-01-01

    in the job experience; (6) the level of personal job satisfaction perceived by the seasonal employee. The relationship between these factors and intention to return was examined. Results revealed that more money and more job challenge have a significant...

  8. Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01

    This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

  9. A laboratory study of the seasonal life history and seasonal abundance of the black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham, Elwin Eugene

    1973-01-01

    . Seasonal History of Agrotis ~l allen (Hufnagel) Development of Artificial Diets for Laboratory Use Laboratory Rearing of ~rotis ~l silon. Head Capsule Measurements . Seasonal Abundance of ~A retie ~i ellen in Texas MATERIALS AND METHODS Establishment.... 40 40 CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES CITED. 50 53 VITA. 57 f Table 1 LIST OF TABLES Ingredients of the artificial diet used for rearing black cutworm larvae Page . 21 Life history of black cutworm moths maintained in the laboratory at College...

  10. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    summer and probably until late fall. Stafford (1912) gives the spawning season in Malpeque, Prince Edward

  11. Effects of the seasonal cycle on superrotation in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Vallis, Geoffrey K. [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Science, Exeter University, Exeter (United Kingdom); Potter, Samuel F. [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    The dynamics of dry atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by seasonally varying Newtonian relaxation are explored over a wide range of two control parameters and are compared with the large-scale circulation of Earth, Mars, and Titan in their relevant parameter regimes. Of the parameters that govern the behavior of the system, the thermal Rossby number (Ro) has previously been found to be important in governing the spontaneous transition from an Earth-like climatology of winds to a superrotating one with prograde equatorial winds, in the absence of a seasonal cycle. This case is somewhat unrealistic as it applies only if the planet has zero obliquity or if surface thermal inertia is very large. While Venus has nearly vanishing obliquity, Earth, Mars, and Titan (Saturn) all have obliquities of ?25° and varying degrees of seasonality due to their differing thermal inertias and orbital periods. Motivated by this, we introduce a time-dependent Newtonian cooling to drive a seasonal cycle using idealized model forcing, and we define a second control parameter that mimics non-dimensional thermal inertia of planetary surfaces. We then perform and analyze simulations across the parameter range bracketed by Earth-like and Titan-like regimes, assess the impact on the spontaneous transition to superrotation, and compare Earth, Mars, and Titan to the model simulations in the relevant parameter regime. We find that a large seasonal cycle (small thermal inertia) prevents model atmospheres with large thermal Rossby numbers from developing superrotation by the influences of (1) cross-equatorial momentum advection by the Hadley circulation and (2) hemispherically asymmetric zonal-mean zonal winds that suppress instabilities leading to equatorial momentum convergence. We also demonstrate that baroclinic instabilities must be sufficiently weak to allow superrotation to develop. In the relevant parameter regimes, our seasonal model simulations compare favorably to large-scale, seasonal phenomena observed on Earth and Mars. In the Titan-like regime the seasonal cycle in our model acts to prevent superrotation from developing, and it is necessary to increase the value of a third parameter—the atmospheric Newtonian cooling time—to achieve a superrotating climatology.

  12. SEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    these concerns? Waste Water Treatment Facilities treat water to Waste Water Treatment Facilities treat water and disinfect anyy microorganisms that may be present The majority of Recycled water produced in ArizonaSEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY

  13. Composting Successes and Failures Extending the Growing Season Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    3/18/2014 1 Composting Successes and Failures Extending the Growing Season Workshop LaMoine Nickel University of MN SWROC March 12, 2014 Beginning of compost process 9/6/2013 Finished compost product 11/19/2013 What is Composting Composting is a biological process in which microorganisms convert organic

  14. Seasonal migrations of morphometrically mature male snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for specific reproductive stages. Depth variation associated with this migration was examined to deter- mine in cara- pace width (CW), this migration is assumed to culminate on the outer shelf (depths of 100­200 m313 Seasonal migrations of morphometrically mature male snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio

  15. Heating Season Has Ended An Update On The Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An Update On The Numbers The attached graphics illustrate electricity consumption over a number of years. As a reference point, electricity comprises 2/3rds of our total fuel costs. Consumption will vary from year)/May and September/October time-frames represent seasonal transition and an opportunity to save on fuel consumption

  16. The seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, Bridget Frances

    1994-01-01

    differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter. 40 years of monthly mean surface data and 25 years of monthly mean 700mb and 500mb data is averaged over the seasons. The spatial correlation of four northern hemisphere midlatitude test sites...

  17. Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons #12;Learning Objective One: The Solar System #12;Milky Aphelion ­ farthest, on July 4 152,083,000 km #12;Learning Objective Two: The Solar Energy #12;What is Solar Energy? Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work. The unit is Joule (J). Solar

  18. Research Article Seasonal TOC export from seven boreal catchments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffam, Ishi

    Research Article Seasonal TOC export from seven boreal catchments in northern Sweden Hjalmar Laudon and its relationship with catchment characteristics. The annual average export of TOC ranged between 36, the four week long spring pe- riod contributed between 50% and 68% of the annual TOC export from the seven

  19. Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Power Plant with Seasonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    hours for periods with high electricity tariff Sasolburg Gas Engine Power Plant 18 Wärtsila 34 SG statement · Gas engine power plant ­ 18 identical engines with generation capacity = 10 MW ­ Only 1Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Power Plant with Seasonal Electricity Tariffs Pedro M. Castro

  20. Radiative forcing from aircraft NOx emissions: mechanisms and seasonal dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, David

    Radiative forcing from aircraft NOx emissions: mechanisms and seasonal dependence David Stevenson aircraft NOx emissions in January, April, July and October of the 1st year. Figure 1 shows perturbations that the initial NOx anomaly mirrors the aircraft emissions distribution, with only limited transport and mixing

  1. Radiative forcing from surface NOx emissions: spatial and seasonal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, David

    Radiative forcing from surface NOx emissions: spatial and seasonal variations R. G. Derwent & D. S distributions of methane CH4 and ozone O3 following the emission of pulses of the oxides of nitrogen NOx. Month-long emission pulses of NOx produce deficits in CH4 mixing ratios that bring about negative radiative forcing

  2. Brain Awareness Season OHSU Brain Awareness Lecture Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Brain Awareness Season OHSU Brain Awareness Lecture Series Fascinating lectures by nationally is an opportunity for educators to learn about brain-related issues. Expert speakers familiar with current for the workshop is available on-line in January at http://seo.ohsu.edu. OHSU Brain Fair The Brain Fair features

  3. Seismicity induced by seasonal groundwater recharge at Mt. Hood, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    and narrow-width pore-fluid pressure signal. Time delays between this seasonal groundwater recharge-fluid pressure fraction, PP/P0W0.1, of the applied near-surface pore-fluid pressure perturbation, P0W0.1 MPa Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: hydroseismicity; groundwater; pore-£uid pressure; permeability

  4. Incorporating Seasonality into Search Suggestions Derived from Intranet Query Logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruschwitz, Udo

    Incorporating Seasonality into Search Suggestions Derived from Intranet Query Logs Stephen Dignum performed on query logs collected for major Web search engines, query log analysis to enhance search search engine can be enhanced by adapting the search system to real users' search behaviour through

  5. Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio Tracking of Mars Pathfinder. Analysis of radio tracking measurements from the Vi- king landers has determined the normal- ized polar. The precession is driven by the gravita- tional torque of the sun acting on Mars' oblate figure

  6. QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2012 We are discontinuing our early December quantitative hurricane forecast for the next year and giving a more qualitative discussion of the factors which will determine next year's Atlantic basin hurricane activity. Our early

  7. Before the Hurricane Season Determine safe evacuation routes inland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Before the Hurricane Season Determine safe evacuation routes inland. Learn location of official. Live in a high-rise. Hurricane winds can knock out electricity to elevators, break windows and more bulletins. Hurricane Watch: Hurricane conditions are possible within the specified coastal area. Because

  8. QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    1 QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2015 We discontinued our early December quantitative hurricane forecast in 2012 and are now giving a more qualitative discussion of the factors which will determine next year's Atlantic basin hurricane activity. One of the big uncertainties

  9. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are appliedmore »to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.« less

  10. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are applied to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.

  11. Snow cover and precipitation impacts on dry season streamflow in the Lower Mekong Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­October) and lowest discharge at the tail end of the dry season (March­ May). The wet season flood pulse is controlled in the region, including deforestation [Costa-Cabral et al., 2008] and dam construction [Campbell, 2007

  12. Water quality as affected by season and prescribed burning, Post Oak Savannah, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landry, Mark S

    1998-01-01

    . For example, total phosphorus (TP) concentration in first post-bum runoff averaged about 500 jig L-1 compared with 100 [tg L-1 TP concentration typical of winter season runoff. Relatively low standard deviations associated with mean seasonal concentrations...

  13. Assessment of Expert Opinion: Seasonal Sheep Preference and Plant Response to Grazing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Meg L; Legg, Colin J; Holland, John P; Theobald, Chris M

    2007-01-01

    Expert opinion was sought on two issues relating to herbivory: seasonal sheep preferences for plant species and seasonal plant response to grazing. Expert opinion is commonly used to parameterize models: it is therefore ...

  14. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  15. 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this National Renewable Energy Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. NBB Enclosed Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  17. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - 1Q - 2Q 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification (TSE) sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved. the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  18. The strong coupling constant at low Q^2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre Deur

    2005-06-06

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant using low-Q{sup 2} data and sum rules. Its behavior is established over the full Q{sup 2}-range and is compared to calculations based on lattice QCD, Schwinger-Dyson equations and a quark model. Although the connection between all these quantities is not known yet, the results are surprisingly alike. Such a similitude may be related to quark-hadron duality.

  19. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating- FY13 Q2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCSD project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  20. SU{sub {ital q}}(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bimonte, G.; Stern, A.; Vitale, P.

    1996-07-01

    We reformulate the Hamiltonian approach to lattice gauge theories such that, at the classical level, the gauge group does not act canonically, but instead as a Poisson-Lie group. At the quantum level, the symmetry gets promoted to a quantum group gauge symmetry. The theory depends on two parameters: the deformation parameter {lambda} and the lattice spacing {ital a}. We show that the system of Kogut and Susskind is recovered when {lambda}{r_arrow}0, while QCD is recovered in the continuum limit (for any {lambda}). We, thus, have the possibility of having a two-parameter regularization of QCD. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic43,728 243,242Consumers (Dollars

  2. Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguided wavesLone Star I (4Q07)

  3. THE COLEOPTERISTS BULLETIN 34(3), 1980 305 SEASONAL AND SIZE PATTERNS, TROPHIC STRUCTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    obtained by fogging trees (Lueheaseeman- nii Triana and Planch) in a moist seasonal forest in the Canal

  4. Impact of the 2008 Hurricane Season on the Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season and its impacts on the natural gas industry

  5. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identified, End Q2 3. 500g of 2 New Pigments, End Q3 4. ESR Measured on New Cool Roof Coating, End Q4 Budget: Total DOE to date: 474,132 Total future DOE : 0 Key Partners:...

  6. SEASONAL MIGRATION, SPECIATION, AND MORPHOLOGICAL CONVERGENCE IN THE GENUS CATHARUS (TURDIDAE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winker, Kevin

    of North American bird species north of Mexico are Nearctic­Neotropic migrants, migrating seasonally1052 SEASONAL MIGRATION, SPECIATION, AND MORPHOLOGICAL CONVERGENCE IN THE GENUS CATHARUS (TURDIDAE effects of seasonal migration on evolutionary change within lin- eages is poorly understood, in terms

  7. Seasonal persistence of northern low-and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases) Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases outputs online #12;Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other

  8. On the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    On the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes LAURA M. CIASTO fluxes, and Ekman currents on the persistence of cold-season extratropical sea surface temperature (SST. Observational analysis reveals that during the cold season, SST anomalies associated with the southern annular

  9. Seasonal mixed layer salinity balance of the tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), seasonal variations of precipitation are more significant and drive a pronounced seasonal cycle of mixed; published 15 February 2008. [1] In this study the causes of the seasonal cycle of mixed layer salinity cycle in sea surface salinity (SSS) with significant spatial inhomogeneity. For example, horizontal

  10. Holocene precipitation seasonality captured by a dual hydrogen and oxygen isotope approach at Steel Lake, Minnesota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Feng Sheng

    Holocene precipitation seasonality captured by a dual hydrogen and oxygen isotope approach at SteelMenocal Keywords: seasonal precipitation middle Holocene oxygen isotopes hydrogen isotopes forest­prairie boundary midcontinental North America. However, neither the climatic driver nor the seasonal character of precipitation

  11. Extendedrange seasonal hurricane forecasts for the North Atlantic with a hybrid dynamicalstatistical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    Extendedrange seasonal hurricane forecasts for the North Atlantic with a hybrid 20 September 2010; published 9 November 2010. [1] A hybrid forecast model for seasonal hurricane between the number of seasonal hurricane and the large scale variables from ECMWF hindcasts. The increase

  12. 5/19/2014 Pulley Radwan 1 Hurricane Season Q&A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    5/19/2014 Pulley Radwan 1 Hurricane Season Q&A When is hurricane season? Hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30, although hurricanes sometimes can develop at other times of the year time the Tampa Bay area was hit by a hurricane or tropical storm? The last named storm hit on September

  13. Energy Resources for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyInformation FormManufacturingEnergy |OctoberHurricane Season

  14. Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

  15. Two Strain Dengue Model with Temporary Cross Immunity and Seasonality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguiar, Maira; Ballesteros, Sebastien; Stollenwerk, Nico [Centro de Matematica e Aplicacoes Fundamentais CMAF, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-30

    Models on dengue fever epidemiology have previously shown critical fluctuations with power law distributions and also deterministic chaos in some parameter regions due to the multi-strain structure of the disease pathogen. In our first model including well known biological features, we found a rich dynamical structure including limit cycles, symmetry breaking bifurcations, torus bifurcations, coexisting attractors including isola solutions and deterministic chaos (as indicated by positive Lyapunov exponents) in a much larger parameter region, which is also biologically more plausible than the previous results of other researches. Based on these findings we will investigate the model structures further including seasonality.

  16. "Season of Giving" launches

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXuRod Hunt (208) 386-52542Devices"Princeton"Season

  17. Laboratory's Season of Giving was a big success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and masthead BerkeleySiteSeason of Giving big

  18. Adjustment patterns to commodity terms of trade shocks: the role of exchange rate and international reserves policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Edwards, Sebastian; Riera-Crichton, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Q3 1997 Q3 2003 Uruguay Q2 2004 Q4 2009 Venezuela, Rep. Bol.Q1 1989 Q1 1989 Venezuela, Rep. Bol. Q4 1990 Q1 1992 End Q4Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. The data in this table show

  19. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q2 and Q6 2. 500g of 2 New Pigments, End Q3 and Q7 3. ESR Measured on New Cool Roof Coating, End Q4 and Q8 4. Potential Manufacturing Partner, Q3 and ongoing 5. Update BTO...

  20. Seasonal variations in the subauroral electron temperature enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fok, M.C.; Kozyra, J.U.; Warren, M.F. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)); Brace, L.H. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The subauroral nightside electron temperature peak is one of the phenomena showing the response of the subauroral ionosphere to the influx of magnetic storm energy in the vicinity of the plasmapause. A statistical study of the seasonal variations of the subauroral electron temperature enhancement was undertaken using data from the Langmuir probe experiment on the DE 2 satellite throughout most of the mission (1981-1982). In the winter hemisphere the nighttime background electron temperature is the highest and the magnitude of the peak T{sub e} responds most weakly to the geomagnetic activity. This behavior can be explained by seasonal trends in the nighttime downward heat flux due to conjugate photoelectrons. Moreover, model results indicate that a factor of {approximately}3 increase in heat inflow during equinox relative to solstice is required to raise the electron temperature to a given level. This is a consequence of the higher electron densities at the T{sub e} peak near equinox. The T{sub e} peak occurs on field lines which thread the outer plasmasphere in the vicinity of the plasmapause and thus can be used as a tracer of the plasmapause position. Correlating the position of the T{sub e} peak with K{sub p} (the highest value of 3-hour K{sub p} in the preceding 12 hours) indicates a trend toward a more expanded quiet time plasmasphere and one which is more easily compressed by magnetic storms at equinox than during the solstice period.

  1. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  2. Diversity, abundance, seasonality and interactions of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in pecans in Mumford, Robertson Co., Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calixto Sanchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2005-02-17

    of ants/8 trees) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments ??? 52 22. Dorymyrmex flavus relative nest abundance (number of nests/4 transects) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments..., in three different treatments ??? 56 25. Forelius pruinosus relative abundance (number of ants/8 trees) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments ??? 57 26. Forelius pruinosus relative nest abundance (number of nests/4...

  3. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  4. State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, Betsy

    2002-05-22

    This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

  5. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  6. Research Papers Seasonal variability of chlorophyll a in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably replenishes nutrients to the surface waters on the MAB shelf. Thermal stratification re). In temperate seas, seasonal phytoplankton variability has been related to stratification, destratification

  7. Extending the Growing Season Workshop Registration Form. Preregister by Wednesday, March 5, 2014.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    the Growing Season Workshop Wednesday, March 12, 2014 from 9:00 to 2:30 ChuckDahn 1804Broadway Emmetsburg

  8. North Pacific carbon cycle response to climate variability on seasonal to decadal timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    in the subarctic North Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.of the tropical Pacific Ocean: I. Seasonal and interannualthe subtropical North Pacific Ocean, Nature, 424, 754 – 757.

  9. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    seasons lead to less carbon sequestration by a subalpineboreal forests to global carbon sequestration (Kurz et al. ,off- set point when carbon sequestration equals carbon loss

  10. Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly.

  11. Oceanic stochastic parametrizations in a seasonal forecast system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrejczuk, M; Juricke, S; Palmer, T N; Weisheimer, A; Zanna, L

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of three stochastic parametrizations in the ocean component of a coupled model, on forecast reliability over seasonal timescales. The relative impacts of these schemes upon the ocean mean state and ensemble spread are analyzed. The oceanic variability induced by the atmospheric forcing of the coupled system is, in most regions, the major source of ensemble spread. The largest impact on spread and bias came from the Stochastically Perturbed Parametrization Tendency (SPPT) scheme - which has proven particularly effective in the atmosphere. The key regions affected are eddy-active regions, namely the western boundary currents and the Southern Ocean. However, unlike its impact in the atmosphere, SPPT in the ocean did not result in a significant decrease in forecast error. Whilst there are good grounds for implementing stochastic schemes in ocean models, our results suggest that they will have to be more sophisticated. Some suggestions for next-generation stochastic schemes are made.

  12. Patches in the polar ionosphere: UT and seasonal dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sojka, J.J.; Bowline, M.D.; Schunk, R.W. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)] [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The seasonal and UT dependencies of patches in the polar ionosphere are simulated using the Utah State University time dependent ionospheric model (TDIM). Patch formation is achieved by changing the plasma convection pattern in response to temporal changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub y} component during periods of southward IMF. This mechanism redirects the plasma flow from the dayside high-density region, which is the source of the tongue of ionization (TOI) density feature, through the throat and leads to patches, rather than a continuous TOI. The model predicts that the patches are absent at winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800 and 1200 UT and that they have their largest seasonal intensity at winter solstice between 2000 and 2400 UT. Between winter solstice and equinox, patches are strong and present all day. Patches are present in summer as well, although their intensity is only tens of percent above the background density. These winter-to-equinox findings are also shown to be consistent with observations. The model was also used to predict times at which patch observations could be performed to determine the contributions from other patch mechanisms. This observational window is {+-} 20 days about winter solstice between 0800 and 1200 UT in the northern hemisphere. In this observational window the TOI is either absent or reduced to a very low density. Hence the time dependent electric field mechanism considered in this study does not produce patches, and if they are observed, then they must be due to some other mechanism. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  13. VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND KU for submission to the university library. Date Dr. David Long Chair, Graduate Committee Accepted of Engineering and Technology #12;ABSTRACT VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER

  14. 8-14 Day Outlook 30-Day and 90-Day Seasonal Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8-14 Day Outlook 30-Day and 90-Day Seasonal Outlook ENSO Advisory Climate Diagnostics and Prediction Workshop Monthly Climate Bulletin Drought Advisory Drought Outlook Ozone Winter Summary UV Index Forecast Seasonal Hurricane Outlook CDAS Reanalysis NATIONAL CENTERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PREDICTION

  15. Sex Differences, but No Seasonal Variations in the Hippocampus of Food-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    - onstrated in food-caching animals. Such results suggest that sexually dimorphic spatial learning (sex in the structure of the hippocampus; however, this sexual dimorphism does not vary seasonally in adulthood; sexual dimorphism; spatial learning; seasonal behavior; wild adult eastern gray squirrels A number

  16. Seasonal and Radial Trends in Saturn's Thermal Plasma Between the Main Rings1 and Enceladus2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Seasonal and Radial Trends in Saturn's Thermal Plasma Between the Main Rings1 and Enceladus2 that the16 magnetospheric plasma between the main rings and Enceladus exhibited a time17 dependence that we attributed to a seasonally variable source of oxygen from the main18 rings (Elrod et al., 2012

  17. Seasonal Mean Circulation in the Yellow Sea A ModelGenerated Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Data in­ puts include seasonal hydrography, seasonal mean wind and river input, and oceanic tides pattern. The Changjiang discharge is driven offshore toward the Korean Strait by the summer wind. Results for winter and summer exhibit two distinct circulation modes. In winter, strong northerly wind

  18. Assessing Seasonal Transport and Deposition of Agricultural Emissions in Eastern North Carolina, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    Assessing Seasonal Transport and Deposition of Agricultural Emissions in Eastern North Carolina, U strategies. The eastern portion of North Carolina is used as a case example due to its high, localized eastern North Carolina. Diurnal and seasonal patterns were identified for dispersion and concentration

  19. Seasonal Mesoscale and Submesoscale Eddy Variability along the North Pacific Subtropical Countercurrent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Seasonal Mesoscale and Submesoscale Eddy Variability along the North Pacific Subtropical abundant in mesoscale eddies, but also exhibits prominent submesoscale eddy features. Output from a 1 the seasonal STCC variability in the mesoscale versus submesoscale ranges. Resolving the eddy scales of .150 km

  20. Preliminary Analysis of a Solar Heat Pump System with Seasonal Storage for Heating and Cooling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, G.; Chen, P.; Dalenback, J.

    2006-01-01

    For higher solar fraction and suitability for both heating and cooling, a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage was studied in this paper. The system scheme and control strategy of a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage for heating...

  1. Seasonal Sensitivity on COBEL-ISBA Local Forecast System for Fog and Low Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seasonal Sensitivity on COBEL-ISBA Local Forecast System for Fog and Low Clouds STEVIE ROQUELAURE of uncertainty that lead to dispersion. Key words: Local numerical forecast system, fog and low clouds, seasonal prediction system. 1. Introduction Accurate prediction of fog and low clouds is one of the main issues

  2. Spatial coherence and seasonal predictability of monsoon onset over Indonesia1 Vincent Moron*,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Andrew W.

    1 Spatial coherence and seasonal predictability of monsoon onset over Indonesia1 2 3, Bogor, Indonesia9 10 11 submitted to Journal of Climate12 13 revised version14 15 May 200816 17 predictability of monsoon onset during the August­December season over Indonesia is19 studied through analysis

  3. Cattle grazing behavior with season-long free-choice access to four forage types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

    Cattle grazing behavior with season-long free-choice access to four forage types Jeffrey S. Fehmi Abstract This experiment investigated how season-long, free-choice grazing affected weekly cattle grazing pastures was uneven and negatively correlated with salt and water sites. Cattle can rotate themselves among

  4. Transport pathways for Asian pollution outflow over the Pacific: Interannual and seasonal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    is frontal lifting ahead of southeastward-moving cold fronts (the leading edge of cold surges) and transport with the cold fronts to promote the transport of Chinese pollution to the free troposphere. Outflow of seasonalTransport pathways for Asian pollution outflow over the Pacific: Interannual and seasonal

  5. Monitoring groundwater storage changes in the highly1 seasonal humid tropics: validation of GRACE measurements2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Monitoring groundwater storage changes in the highly1 seasonal humid tropics: validation of GRACE the seasonality and trend in groundwater storage associated with intensive groundwater19 abstraction for dry to 2007) groundwater storage changes21 (GWS) correlate well (r=0.77 to 0.93, p-value

  6. Multi-year SeaSonal Sex-allocation PatternS in red-winged BlackBirdS (AgelAius phoeniceus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherhead, Patrick J.

    Multi-year SeaSonal Sex-allocation PatternS in red-winged BlackBirdS (AgelAius phoeniceus) Patrick had been proposed. Instead, seasonal sex-allocation patterns interacted with season length. Early late in the season and those earlier (early plus midseason) was a strong function of season length

  7. Assessing seasonal greenhouse gas emissions and belowground C anAssessing seasonal greenhouse gas emissions and belowground C and N processes under different fired N processes under different fire frequencies in soils of Sierra Nevada chaparral shrublands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    Assessing seasonal greenhouse gas emissions and belowground C anAssessing seasonal greenhouse gas of greenhouse gases (GHG) to the atmosphere is lacking. ·Historically, fire played a critical role in shaping

  8. Seasonal Evolution of Saturn's Polar Temperatures and Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Sinclair, J A; Orton, G S; Giles, R S; Hurley, J; Gorius, N; Achterberg, R K; Hesman, B E; Bjoraker, G L

    2014-01-01

    The seasonal evolution of Saturn's polar atmospheric temperatures and hydrocarbon composition is derived from a decade of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) 7-16 $\\mu$m thermal infrared spectroscopy. We construct a near-continuous record of atmospheric variability poleward of 60$^\\circ$ from northern winter/southern summer (2004, $L_s=293^\\circ$) through the equinox (2009, $L_s=0^\\circ$) to northern spring/southern autumn (2014, $L_s=56^\\circ$). The hot tropospheric polar cyclones and the hexagonal shape of the north polar belt are both persistent features throughout the decade of observations. The hexagon vertices rotated westward by $\\approx30^\\circ$ longitude between March 2007 and April 2013, confirming that they are not stationary in the Voyager-defined System III longitude system as previously thought. The extended region of south polar stratospheric emission has cooled dramatically poleward of the sharp temperature gradient near 75$^\\circ$S, coinciding with a depletion in the abundances of ...

  9. Influence of hydrological seasonality on sandbank benthos: algal biomass and shrimp abundance in a large neotropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoya Ceballos, Jose Vicente

    2009-05-15

    In this study, I examined the influence of hydrological seasonality on spatiotemporal variation of algal biomass and shrimp abundance on sandbanks of the Cinaruco River in southwestern Venezuela. Seasonal variations of ...

  10. De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar growing seasons and quantified their LFMC, relative water content (RWC) and dry matter chemistry. LFMC a stronger control on seasonal LFMC dynamics than actual changes in water content, and they challenge

  11. Implications of the variable availability of seasonal foods on the home ranges of black bears, Ursus americanus, in the Sierra Nevada of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Rachel; Klimley, A P; Folger, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Implications of the variable availability of seasonal foodsImplications of the variable availability of seasonal foodsexamine how a change in availability of seed and acorn crops

  12. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    physical properties alter water and energy fluxes of an oak-The model simulates the energy, water, carbon, and momentumSeasonal variation of energy and water vapor exchange rates

  13. Dynamic retail assortment models with demand learning for seasonal consumer goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, Felipe

    2005-01-01

    The main research question we explore in this dissertation is: How should a retailer modify its product assortment over time in order to maximize overall profits for a given selling season? Historically, long development, ...

  14. Bedding and Seasonal Effects on Chemical and Bacterial Properties of Feedlot Cattle Manure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selinger, Brent

    cattle (Bos wood-chip bedding in their operations. Wood chips gen-taurus) feedlot in southern Alberta whereas season affected all four groups. Num- in straw and wood-chip bedding suggest there is a poten

  15. Design and evaluation of seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oloyede, Isaiah Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system (SSHPESS) is a gigawatt-year hydrogen storage system which stores excess electricity produced as hydrogen during off-peak periods and consumes the stored hydrogen ...

  16. Role of the seasonally-oscillating Hadley Cell in interhemispheric mixing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Peter J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of the seasonally-oscillating Hadley cell to the interhemispheric mixing of trace chemical species is studied using a zonally-symmetric kinematic model of the Hadley cell flow based upon the first steady-state ...

  17. Study of Applications of Solar Heating Systems with Seasonal Storage in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Chen, P.

    2006-01-01

    In most northern parts of China, it is cold in winter and needs space heating in winter. This paper studies applications of solar heating systems with seasonal storage in China. A typical residential district was selected, ...

  18. Seasonal variations of high-latitude field-aligned currents inferred from rsted and Magsat observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    equinox. The decrease in the size of the summer polar cap is caused by a shift of both daytime the pairs of downward/upward currents for all seasons as well as between hemispheres during equinox. We were

  19. Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myoung, Boksoon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate seasonal and interannual statistics of troughs associated with the Pacific storm track and quantify the influence of deformation on trough development upstream of the western ...

  20. Inventory optimization model for NIKE's long lifecycle highly seasonal replenishment products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, John H. (John Hyun-June)

    2015-01-01

    Currently, demand and inventory planners at NIKE Always Available (NIKE's replenishment business) experience difficulty in managing long-lifecycle highly-seasonal products like soccer equipment and fleece apparel. Very ...

  1. Timing and duration of European larch growing season along altitudinal gradients in the Swiss Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esper, Jan

    and matura- tion of the stem wood. Needles appeared ~3­4 weeks earlier than stem growth. The duration of ring growth throughout the entire growing season. Exceptions include a limited number of stud- ies that showed

  2. Citrus limonoids: seasonal changes and their potential in glutathione S-transferase induction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiaxing

    2002-01-01

    Seasonal changes of citrus limonids in 'Rio Red' grapefruit were investigated using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Several citrus limonoids, limonoid mixtures and a flavonone were evaluated for their ability to induce...

  3. Potato Late blight Update and Late Season Recommendations Willie Kirk. PLP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Potato Late blight Update and Late Season Recommendations Willie Kirk. PLP Potato late blight has this year. Growers should sample symptomatic tubers and send them for diagnosis to the Kirk lab

  4. Improving Groundwater Predictions Utilizing Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts from General Circulation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    Improving Groundwater Predictions Utilizing Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts from General. The research reported in this paper evaluates the potential in developing 6-month-ahead groundwater Surface Temperature forecasts. Ten groundwater wells and nine streamgauges from the USGS Groundwater

  5. Food webs of two Venezuelan clear-water streams with seasonal fluctuations in hydrology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Christopher Chase

    1997-01-01

    Two Venezuelan clear-water streams were sampled to describe resource use by fishes, community interactions, and the effects of seasonal environmental change and resource availability on food web structure. Previous studies ...

  6. The role of seasonal wetlands in the ecology of the American alligator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subalusky, Amanda Lee

    2009-05-15

    populations to determine the most effective method of studying alligators in seasonal wetlands. I then used systematic trapping, nest surveys and radio telemetry to determine habitat use and overland movement rates by different sex and size classes. I found...

  7. Supporting Online Material for: Carbon in Amazon forests: Unexpected seasonal fluxes and disturbance-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seasonal variations in important climatic variables at this site: solar radiation, net radiation, air; measurements at Km 83 after that date are not included here, since we focus on the dynamics of primary forests

  8. Seasonal patterns of forest canopy and their relevance for the global carbon cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizunuma, Toshie

    2015-06-30

    In the terrestrial biosphere forests have a significant role as a carbon sink. Under recent climate change, it is increasingly important to detect seasonal change or ‘phenology’ that can influence the global carbon cycle. ...

  9. Nonlinear equilibration of baroclinic eddies : the role of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the influence of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing on baroclinic eddy equilibration is studied to understand how the baroclinic adjustment is modified when taking into account these two factors. ...

  10. Climate effects of seasonally varying Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Gill-Ran

    The climate impact of the seasonality of Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA) is studied using an aerosol-climate model coupled with a slab ocean model in a set of 60-year long simulations, driven by BBCA ...

  11. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970, suggesting that human land use and management contribute to seasonal changes in the CO2 exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere.

  12. BEMS-Assisted Seasonal Functional Performance Testing in the Initial Commissioning of Kista Entre and Katsan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isakson, P.; Wetterstrom, P.; Carling, P.

    2004-01-01

    detect and diagnose energy and other performance problems with building operations [1]. However, in Sweden the assessment of seasonal performance in commissioning typically uses trend-data from only a few days. Our hypothesis is that monitoring...-ASSISTED SEASONAL FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE TESTING IN THE INITIAL COMMISSIONING OF KISTA ENTRÉ AND KATSAN Per Isakson*, Per Wetterström** and Pär Carling*** * Building Sciences KTH, Stockholm SWEDEN. per.isakson@byv.kth.se ** Vasakronan, Stockholm, SWEDEN...

  13. Anthropogenic emissions of nonmethane hydrocarbons in the northeastern United States: Measured seasonal variations from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    in relative emissions for this series of trace gases. Seasonal changes in n-butane and i-butane emissions may [Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998]. [3] In this study, we present the seasonality of C2-C6 (ethane, propane, n-butane, i-butane, n-pentane, i-pentane and n-hexane) hydrocarbons, NOy and CO as measured at Harvard Forest

  14. Experiments with a time-dependent, zonally averaged, seasonal, enery balance climatic model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Starley Lee

    1977-01-01

    EXPERIMENTS WITH A TI&E-DEPENDENT, ZONALLY AVERAGED, SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the decree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EXPERIMENTS WITH A TIME DEPENDENT~ ZONALLY AVERAGED~ SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee...

  15. Photoperiodic Regulation of the Seasonal Pattern of Photosynthetic Capacity and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauerle, William L. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Way, Danielle A. [Duke University; Qian, Song S. [Duke University; Stoy, Paul C. [Montana State University; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bowden, Joseph D. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Reynolds, Robert F. [Clemson University

    2012-01-01

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO{sub 2} cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% ({approx}4 PgC y{sup -1}), resulting in a >3% ({approx}2 PgC y{sup -1}) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  16. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  17. Interactive crop management in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal influences on land-atmosphere fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levis, S.

    2014-01-01

    will likely improve earth system model simulations withABSTRACT The Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1)in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal

  18. Intercomparison of the seasonal cycle in 200 hPa kinetic energy in AMIP GCM simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The 200 hPa kinetic energy is represented by means of the spherical harmonic components for the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations, the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA). The data used are the monthly mean wind fields from 1979 to 1988. The kinetic energy is decomposed into the divergent (DKE) and rotational (RKE) components and emphasis is placed on examining the former. The two reanalysis data sets show reasonable agreement that is best for the rotational kinetic energy. The largest difference in the divergent kinetic energy occurs during the northern summer. As might be expected, the two analyses are closet in regions where there are sufficient observations such that the effect of the model used in the assimilation cycle are minimized. The observed RKE show only a slight seasonal cycle with a maximum occuring during the northern winter. The DKE, on the other hand, has a very pronounced seasonal cycle with maxima at the solsticial seasons and minima during the equinoctial seasons. The model results show a very large spread in the magnitudes of the RKE and DKE although the models all evince a seasonal variation in phase with that observed. The median values of the seasonal cycle of RKE and DKE for the models are usually superior to those of any individual model. Results are also presented for simulation following the AMIP protocol but using updated versions of the original AMIP entries. In most cases these new integrations show better agreement with the observations.

  19. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  20. More Than Smart Overview of Discussions Q3 2014 thru Q1 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Resources (DERs) · DERs include distributed renewable generation, energy efficiency, energy storage California's vision for making Distributed Energy Resources (DER) significant contributors to resource Resources Plan Requirements · Identifies optimal locations for the deployment of Distributed Energy

  1. More Than Smart Overview of Discussions Q3 2014 thru Q1 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desbrun, Mathieu

    and energy policy targets regarding renewable and distributed energy resources. · Participants: · Caltech to scale adoption of renewables and distributed energy resources. · Identified key issues that needed and distributed resources in California began at Caltech-Resnick Institute Grid2020 workshop in Fall 2011

  2. Research Snapshot Third Quarter, Fiscal Year 2015 Proposals by Quarter Proposals Submitted Q3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    ,827; MCECS Cal Santiago, Raul B; Collaborative Research: Advantages and Impacts of a Multi-scale Wind Farm To Sediment Transfer Across Continental Margins And The Construction Of Delta Stratigraphic Architecture

  3. Research Snapshot Third Quarter, Fiscal Year 2015 Awards by Quarter Awards Received Q3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Decision Making; Department of Health and Human Services; $500,000; SSW; Renewal Cahn, Katharine; Leadership Academy for Middle Managers; Department of Health and Human Services; $428,351; SSW; Renewal Models in Variational Data Assimilation; Naval Research Laboratory; $163,284; CLAS; Amendment Daim

  4. Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  5. Microsoft Word - Q3 MDA 8_11_2015 Update of $172M for Reposting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver on its mission. BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

  6. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storge- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  7. High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this ANL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. FY 2014 Q3 RCA CAP Performance Metrics Report 2014-09-05.xlsx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    no later than CD-3. ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY12-FY14: 52 completions through 3rd Qtr. CD-4: Critical Decision-4, Approve Start of OperationsProject...

  9. Advanced Low-Cost Recievers for Parabolic Troughs- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  10. A Small Particle Solar Receiver for High Temperature Brayton Power Cycles- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this San Diego State University project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  11. Enclosure - FY 2015 Q3 Metrics Report 2015-08-12.xlsx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofAprilofEnergyEnSys Energy communities depend

  12. High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles - FY13 Q3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartmentHigh-Efficiency Parking Lighting||

  13. FY 2014 Q3 RCA CAP Performance Metrics Report 2014-09-05.xlsx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederal Realin TargetEnergy4

  14. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory | National

  15. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart (Technical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory | National(Technical Report) | SciTechReport) | SciTech

  16. SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q3 FY15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 Page 1NEWS MEDIA16,3 rd Quarter FY 2015

  17. Movements of Palearctic and Afrotropical bird species during the dry season (NovemberFebruary) within Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    ­February) within Nigeria WILL CRESSWELL1, MARK BOYD2 & MATT STEVENS1 1AP Leventis Ornithological Research Institute, Jos, Nigeria & School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. wrlc@st-and.ac.uk 2Afrotropical bird species during the dry season (November­February) within Nigeria. pp. 18­28. In: Harebottle, D

  18. Flood quantiles in a changing climate: Seasonal forecasts and causal relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    Flood quantiles in a changing climate: Seasonal forecasts and causal relations A maximum floods at a given location may change over time in response to interannual and longer climate fluctuations, we compare two approaches for the estimation of flood quantiles conditional on selected ``climate

  19. Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using Positive and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using July 15, 1999 #12;Abstract Much of the evidence for health e ects of particulate air pollution has come standards for ambient air pollutants to protect the public from adverse e ects. Much of the evidence for air

  20. Blue Oak Canopy Effect On Seasonal Forage Production and Quality1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blue Oak Canopy Effect On Seasonal Forage Production and Quality1 William E. Frost Neil K. Mc the canopy of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) and in open grassland at the San Joaquin Experimental Range blue oak compared to open grassland. At most sampling dates, the protein content was greater

  1. XI. DIFFUSEGLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    39 XI. DIFFUSE­GLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system requires an accurate assessment of incident solar radiation. Ordinarily, solar radiation-9]. In the previous section we presented a one- parameter correlation study using direct and global data from our

  2. RESEARCH ARTICLE A seasonal cycle of terrestrial inputs in Lake Van, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    RESEARCH ARTICLE A seasonal cycle of terrestrial inputs in Lake Van, Turkey C. Huguet & S. Fietz Van in Turkey is the world's largest soda lake (607 km3 ). The lake's catchment area is estimated the environmental status of a lake today and in the recent history. Lake Van in Eastern Anatolia (Turkey

  3. Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar in the subsidence and rebound occurring over stressed aquifer systems, in conjunction with measurements, generally permanent aquifer system compaction and land subsidence at yearly and longer timescales, caused

  4. Vocal Control Region Sizes of an Adult Female Songbird Change Seasonally in the Absence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deviche, Pierre

    ­211, 2000 Keywords: junco; androgen; HVc; sexual dimorphism; plasticity In oscine birds, song is a learned birds, brain areas [vocal control regions (VCRs)] that control vocal behavior learning and expression. In behaviorally dimorphic species, VCRs are larger in males than females and change seasonally also in females

  5. Reproductive Seasonality in Female Capuchins (Cebus capucinus) in Santa Rosa (Area de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedigan, Linda M.

    The income-capital breeding model was developed to explain birth seasonality and reproductive strategies in female animals in relation to the abundance of food energy in the environment. An income breeder uses currently available energy and acts so as to maximize either maternal survival or weanling survival

  6. Seasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal and meridional winds above

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to conserve wave energy. When propagating into the MLT region, the horizontal wind tidal amplitude can reachSeasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal, Colorado (40.6°N, 105.1°W). The observed monthly results are in good agreement with MF radar tidal

  7. Seasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their metabolic activities, microbial populations mediate the impact of high gradient regions on ecologicalSeasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in nitrogen and carbon metabolism in the CRCM. Initial experiments with the environmental microarrays were

  8. Simulating cold season snowpack: Impacts of snow albedo and multi-layer snow physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Simulating cold season snowpack: Impacts of snow albedo and multi-layer snow physics D. Waliser & J of the alterations of snow albedo due to anthropogenic aerosol deposition on snowpack and the treatment of snow physics using a multi-layer snow model. The snow albedo component considered qualitatively future changes

  9. Wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 1999 upwelling season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 1999 upwelling season R. Samelson, P November 2001; published 1 May 2002. [1] The wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during June hypothesis that systematic variations in local wind stress may contribute to the observed offshore

  10. Biogeography and phenology of satellite-measured phytoplankton seasonality in the California current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    to be influenced by changes in the seasonality of the wind mixing power offshore, coastal upwelling in the near of the ocean offshore, upwelling cold, nutrient-rich, subsurface water near the coast (Hill et al., 1998 the northern and southern coastal upwelling zones, one with a summer minimum offshore in mid

  11. Atmospheric forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 2001 upwelling season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    by nonlinear internal ocean tides. The diurnal cycle of wind stress was similar for both southwardAtmospheric forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 2001 upwelling season J. M. Bane,1 M. D. Southward wind stresses of 0.05À0.1 N mÀ2 occurred roughly 75% of the time, with a sustained period

  12. Local time, substorm, and seasonal dependence of electron precipitation at Lapprox. =4 inferred from riometer measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Dudeney, J.R.

    1986-11-01

    We have examined the variations of electron precipitation at Lapprox. =4 as inferred from riometer measurements of cosmic radio noise absorption made during 1975 at Siple Station and Halley Bay, Antarctica. The results are presented in the form of annual and seasonal averages of 1/2-hourly values for two geomagnetic activity subsets, AE>140 nT (disturbed) and AEless than or equal to 140 nT (quiet). Monthly quiet day curves were used to remove the diurnal and seasonal variations in the background noise levels. Generally, the local time characteristics of the absorption were the same at both stations; the highest absorption occurred in the 0400--1600 MLT sector during disturbed conditions and in the 1200--2000 MLT sector during quiet conditions. For high AE, the highest correlation was obtained at a lag equal to the magnetic local time difference (1.5 hours) between the two stations. On the other hand, for low AE, the highest correlation occurred for a lag of 3.0 hours, nearer the local solar time difference (3.8 hours). Consistently higher absorption was measured at Halley on the average during both levels of magnetic disturbance and in all seasons. At both locations, and for both geomagnetic activity subsets, more absorption was observed in summer and equinox than in winter. This is in contrast to earlier studies for Lgreater than or equal to6, and suggests that a meridional reversal of seasonal behavior occurs between L = 4 and L = 6.

  13. Seasonal Maize Forecasting for South Africa and Zimbabwe Derived from an Agroclimatological Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    ) and sea level pressure (SLP) readings to anticipate water-stress six months prior to harvest-economic variability. Explored within is a new approach to seasonal crop forecasting, one derived from crop water, and other climatic factors over the period 1961-1994 are compared with calculated available water from

  14. Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    further demonstrates that existing precautionary allowances for climate change used for flood managementClick Here for Full Article Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood risk H. J. Fowler1 and R. L. Wilby2

  15. Seasonal Prevalence of Hematodinium sp. Infections of Blue Crabs in Three South Carolina (USA) Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael J.

    Seasonal Prevalence of Hematodinium sp. Infections of Blue Crabs in Three South Carolina (USA at an alarming rate. In South Carolina, these declines are significantly correlated with years of decreased (Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission 2004). In South Carolina, annual fishery landings of blue crabs

  16. FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    Hurricanes (MH) (2.0) 4 4 0 3 3 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (3.9) 9 9 0 7 7 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE Coast Including Peninsula Florida - 40% (full-season average for last century is 31%) 3) Gulf Coast from%) New Jersey 2% (1%) New York 10% (8%) 4% (3%) Connecticut 10% (7%) 3% (2%) Rhode

  17. Variable ecological effects of hurricanes: The importance of seasonal timing for survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losos, Jonathan B.

    Variable ecological effects of hurricanes: The importance of seasonal timing for survival University, St. Louis, MO 63130 Contributed by Thomas W. Schoener, October 24, 2003 Two recent hurricanes populations inhabiting exactly the same islands. The hurricanes differed in two ways: one struck during

  18. Phytologia (April 2012) 94(1) 91 SEASONAL VARIATION IN THE LEAF ESSENTIAL OIL OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    Phytologia (April 2012) 94(1) 91 SEASONAL VARIATION IN THE LEAF ESSENTIAL OIL OF TAXODIUM DISTICHUM Robert_Adams@baylor.edu ABSTRACT The leaf essential oil of Taxodium distichum is dominated by -pinene (63-69%) with moderate amounts of limonene, - phellandrene, myrcene and -pinene. Oil yield increased from April (3.45 mg

  19. Seasonal Variations of Yellow Sea Fog: Observations and Mechanisms* SU-PING ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Seasonal Variations of Yellow Sea Fog: Observations and Mechanisms* SU-PING ZHANG Physical of China, Qingdao, China (Manuscript received 27 August 2008, in final form 26 April 2009) ABSTRACT Sea fog is frequently observed over the Yellow Sea, with an average of 50 fog days on the Chinese coast during April

  20. Projected Future Seasonal Changes in Tropical Summer Climate ADAM H. SOBEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    is marked by relative warming in the Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern Hemisphere, the seasonal that are robust, meaning that most or all models simulate them (albeit with differ- ences in detail) when a common in response to increased green- house gases, it is sufficient reason to study that change carefully. Our

  1. FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    1 FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2014 We are higher than normal, and vertical wind shear throughout the Atlantic basin has been much stronger than-period average values. (as of 31 July 2014) By Philip J. Klotzbach1 and William M. Gray2 This forecast as well

  2. Seasonal mass-balance gradients in Norway L.A. RASMUSSEN,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, L.A.

    Seasonal mass-balance gradients in Norway L.A. RASMUSSEN,1 L.M. ANDREASSEN2,3 1 Department of Earth, Norway 3 Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway ABSTRACT. Previously discovered regularity in vertical profiles of net balance, bnðzÞ, on ten glaciers in Norway also

  3. European Finance Review, 6,3, 291-319. 1 Seasoned Equity Issues in a Closely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    European Finance Review, 6,3, 291-319. 1 Seasoned Equity Issues in a Closely Held Market: Evidence of the European Financal Management Association in Lisbon, at the 1998 conference of the French Finance Association in Lille, at the 1998 conference of the Northern Finance Association in Toronto and at the 1998

  4. Seasonal and interannual changes in particulate organic carbon export and deposition in the Chukchi Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    Seasonal and interannual changes in particulate organic carbon export and deposition in the Chukchi) export fluxes were estimated in the shelf-slope region of the Chukchi Sea using measurements of 234 ThÀ238 U disequilibria and the POC/234 Th ratio in large (>53-mm) particles. These export fluxes were

  5. Seasonal Export of South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic Bight Shelf Waters at Cape Hatteras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savidge, Dana

    Seasonal Export of South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic Bight Shelf Waters at Cape Hatteras Dana K 31411 Abstract Studies of Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf water export to the open ocean at Cape SAB shelf water to the Cape Hatteras, which must also be exported to the open ocean. In the following

  6. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  7. SEASONAL AND INSHORE-OFFSHORE VARIATIONS IN THE STANDING STOCKS OF MICRONEKTON AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEASONAL AND INSHORE-OFFSHORE VARIATIONS IN THE STANDING STOCKS OF MICRONEKTON AND MACROZOOPLANKTON OFF OREGON WILLIAM G. PEARCyl ABSTRACT Dry weights of pelagic animals captured along an inshore-offshore, shrimps, and squids) were largest inshore (28 and 46 km offshore) in the winter (November

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Climatic-driven seasonality of emerging dengue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choisy, Marc

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Climatic-driven seasonality of emerging dengue fever in Hanoi, Vietnam Background: Dengue fever (DF) has been emerging in Hanoi over the last decade. Both DF epidemiology serotypes interactions, knowledge of prime importance for vaccine development. Keywords: Dengue fever

  9. 20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stott, Lowell

    20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18 O composition (18 O) of sub- annual tree cellulose samples of Pinus kesiya growing at 1,500 m elevation on Doi Chiang Dao in northern Thailand. The cellulose 18 O values exhibit a distinctive annual cycle

  10. Non-stationarity of the signal and noise characteristics of seasonal precipitation anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    seasonal SST variability (r S,PCi ) are shown in Fig. 5, andand magnitudes of PCs (r N,PCi ) are shown in Fig. 6. Valuesthe a = 0.05 level (H o : r h,PCi B P 95 {r h,PCiMC }, for r

  11. Seasonality in Community Water Demand Ronald C. Griffin and Chan Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald

    in residential water demand stems fundamentally from the potential ofprice as a rationing mechanism and the use demand is impor- tant in two respects. First, available evidence that summer residential water demandsSeasonality in Community Water Demand Ronald C. Griffin and Chan Chang Secondary data and survey

  12. Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 26982714 Mechanisms regulating large-scale seasonal fluctuations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    2005-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 2698­2714 Mechanisms regulating large-scale seasonal fluctuations Hole, MA 02543, USA b Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA c School by ocean currents. Third, the organism is capable of directed motion through the water by virtue of its

  13. Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

  14. Seasonal Variation in Volatile Compound Profiles of Preen Gland Secretions of the Dark-eyed Junco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketterson, Ellen D.

    (Junco hyemalis) Helena A. Soini & Sara E. Schrock & Kevin E. Bruce & Donald Wiesler & Ellen D. Ketterson (AED) were utilized to analyze seasonal changes in volatile components of preen oil secretions in Junco . Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry J Chem Ecol DOI 10.1007/s10886-006-9210-0 H. A. Soini :K. E

  15. Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa related to monsoon of aerosol emissions from the wet surface. 1. Introduction The main aerosol types occurring over Africa Africa can be characterized using Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from Global Ozone Monitoring

  16. Seasonal Distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta Douglas M. Collister1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seasonal Distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta Douglas M in the foothills of Alberta from 1986 to 1996. Thirty-six adult owls have been banded: 16 males, 16 females and 4. The Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) breeds in northern and western Alberta south to Waterton Lakes National

  17. Exchange of groundwater and surfacewater mediated by permafrost response to seasonal and long term air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Exchange of groundwater and surfacewater mediated by permafrost response to seasonal and long term impact hydrologic cycle processes by promoting or impeding groundwater and surface water exchange. Under between groundwater and surface water. A coupled heat transport and groundwater flow model, SUTRA

  18. Carbon limitation of soil respiration under winter snowpacks: potential feedbacks between growing season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon limitation of soil respiration under winter snowpacks: potential feedbacks between growing season and winter carbon fluxes PA U L D . B R O O K S *, D I A N E M C K N I G H T w and K E L LY E L D- latitude and high-elevation ecosystems may increase soil carbon availability both through increased litter

  19. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  20. Diurnal and seasonal cycles of trends of surface air temperature Konstantin Y. Vinnikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA Alan Basist National Climate Data Center for every day and hour of the period of observation. INDEX TERMS: 1620 Global Change: Climate dynamics (3309, seasonal cycle, climate change, climate variability, trends, temperature Citation: Vinnikov, K. Y., A

  1. Remote sensing of seasonal stratification dynamics in the southern Irish Sea Claire Neil a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polton, Jeff

    Remote sensing of seasonal stratification dynamics in the southern Irish Sea Claire Neil a , Alex Sea mixing Tidal front Optical remote sensing In early summer, a well-defined front forms resolution achievable by remote sensing in a single year was limited by the high incidence of cloud cover

  2. Diurnal-seasonal and weather-related variations of land surface temperature observed from geostationary satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinnikov, Konstantin

    Surface Temperature (SST) monitoring using infrared observations from NOAA satellites is relatively easy temperature from a satellite is possible only for cloudless sky, such monitoring is an important componentDiurnal-seasonal and weather-related variations of land surface temperature observed from

  3. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic ...

  4. Seasonal patterns and environmental control of carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the equivalent of up to 40% of fossil fuel carbon emissions (Tans et al. 1990; Conway et al. 1994; Ciais et al and of great potential concern as CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions continue to alter the climateSeasonal patterns and environmental control of carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange

  5. Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest Lucy R. Hutyra,1 controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J. Geophys. Res., 112, G03008 response to climate and weather. This study presents 4 years of eddy covariance data for CO2 and water

  6. Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric atmospheric entry of NASA's Phoenix Mars probe using Phoenix Atmospheric Structure Experiment (ASE) data atmospheric entry, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L24204, doi:10.1029/2010GL045382. 1. Introduction [2] Phoenix

  7. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):182194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 7(2):182­194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of two the factors affecting the vital rates in these isolated populations. Livestock grazing by domestic cattle higher for both populations in 2005 than 2006. We attributed these annual differences in vital rates

  8. Cloud frequency climatology at the Andes/Amazon transition: 1. Seasonal and diurnal cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Cloud frequency climatology at the Andes/Amazon transition: 1. Seasonal and diurnal cycles Kate-scale cloud patterns. We examine the cloud climatology of a tropical Andean montane region in the context Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) DX cloud product (1983­2008), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging

  9. Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications for terrestrial vegetation uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) to interpret observations at a network of surface sites. We aim to identify, and D. J. Jacob (2008), Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

  10. Extreme seasonality of litter breakdown in an arctic spring-fed stream is driven by shredder phenology, not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benstead, Jon

    regimes. We used an alternative approach to investigate the importance of temperature by quantifying seasonal patterns in litter breakdown in an arctic spring-fed stream (Ivishak Spring, North Slope, Alaska) that experiences extreme seasonality in light availability and energy inputs while fluctuations in water

  11. SUMMARY OF 2013 ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONE ACTIVITY AND VERIFICATION OF AUTHORS' SEASONAL AND TWO-WEEK FORECASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    -WEEK FORECASTS The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season was much quieter than predicted in our seasonal outlooks. While as past forecasts and verifications are available via the World Wide Web at http Cyclone Energy (ACE) (92) 165 165 142 30 32% Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (103%) 175 175 150 43 42

  12. Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate model over the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System (NCEP CFS), winter season predictions over the contiguous in the study. CFS over-predicts the precipitation in eastern and western US by as much as 45 and 90

  13. Seasonal and interannual variability of primary and export production in the South China Sea: a three-dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    Seasonal and interannual variability of primary and export production in the South China Sea. Seasonal and interannual variability of primary and export production in the South China Sea: a three­biogeochemical model has been developed and used to estimate the biological productivity and export flux in the SCS

  14. Sex-specific recruitment and brood sex ratios of Eurasian kestrels in a seasonally and annually fluctuating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Sex-specific recruitment and brood sex ratios of Eurasian kestrels in a seasonally and annually-ordinating editor: J. Tuomi Abstract. Timing of birth and food availability may select for biased offspring sex in brood sex ratio during the breeding season in a long-term data from 8 years. As far as we know

  15. An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2 D. J. Erickson III,1,2 R. T. Mills,1 J. Gregg,3 T. J. Blasing,4 F. M. Hoffman,1 R. J. Andres,4 of anthropogenic CO2 are presented. Approximating the seasonal CO2 emission cycle using a 2-harmonic Fourier series

  16. Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

    2008-04-23

    We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

  17. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

  18. Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean color and composition of phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic, Equatorial Pacific and South Pacific.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean color and composition of phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic, Equatorial Pacific and South Pacific. By : Yves Dandonneaua , Pierre-Yves Deschampsb ­ Picoplankton ­ Seasonal variations ­ Variability ­ Oceanic provinces ) Contact : Yves DANDONNEAU LODYC

  19. Interannual Changes in Seasonal Ground Freezing and Near-surface Heat Flow Beneath Bottom-fast Ice in the Near-shore Zone, Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorman, Brian

    Interannual Changes in Seasonal Ground Freezing and Near-surface Heat Flow Beneath Bottom-fast Ice Resources Canada, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada ABSTRACT Interannual changes in seasonal ground freezing. KEY WORDS: seasonal ground freezing; permafrost; bottom-fast ice; Mackenzie Delta INTRODUCTION Arctic

  20. Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    industry has installed a total of 46,919 megawatts (MW) of capac- ity, making it second in the world behind are located. Seasonal anomalies are created from MODIS Terra (*10:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m. local solar time) and Aqua (*1:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. local solar time) LSTs, and their spatiotemporal variability is analyzed

  1. 320 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2000 SEASONAL RISK ANALYSIS FOR FLOODPLAINS IN THE DELAWARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    320 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2000 SEASONAL RISK ANALYSIS FOR FLOODPLAINS IN THE DELAWARE RIVER BASIN By Kirk Weiler,1 M. Todd Walter,2 Michael F. Walter,3

  2. SEASONAL SNOWMELT VERSUS IMPACT-TRIGGERED RUNOFF IN MARS' GEOLOGIC RECORD OF SURFACE LIQUID WATER. E. S. Kite1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Early Mars is retreat of water ice to planetary cold traps. (Melt- ing is also suppressed at low, forcing seasonal melting (Fig. 1b). Strong sensitivity to orbital forcing, plus the knowledge

  3. Seasonal and Diurnal Variations of Ozone near the Mesopause from Observations of the 11.072-GHz Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratap, P.

    Ground-based observations of the 11.072-GHz line of ozone were made from January 2008 through January 2009. These observations provide an estimate of the diurnal and seasonal variations of ozone in the mesopause region. ...

  4. Seasonal and interannual differences in surface chlorophyll stocks and integrated water column chlorophyll stocks in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, William Wallerich

    2005-11-01

    During the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico Chemical and Hydrography study (NEGOM-COH), nine oceanographic cruises were fielded during the spring, summer and fall seasons from November 1997 to August ...

  5. To the Graduate Council: I am submitting herewith a thesis written by Star Loar entitled "Seasonal Variation in Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    basin of Lake Erie is the result of thermal stratification and lake morphology. Limnetic physics can members in the central basin of Lake Erie during summer stratification and the winter season to see how

  6. Lagoon of Venice ecosystem: Seasonal dynamics and environmental guidance with uncertainty analyses and error subspace data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossarini, G.

    An ensemble data assimilation scheme, Error Subspace Statistical Estimation (ESSE), is utilized to investigate the seasonal ecosystem dynamics of the Lagoon of Venice and provide guidance on the monitoring and management ...

  7. Molecular Weight of Condensed Tannins from Warm-season Perennial Legumes and Its Effect on Condensed Tannin Biological Activity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naumann, Harley Dean

    2013-05-21

    North American native warm-season perennial legumes: Leucaena retusa Benth. (littleleaf leadtree), Desmanthus illinoensis (Michx.) MacMill. Ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald (Illinois bundleflower), Lespedeza stuevei Nutt. (tall lespedeza), Mimosa strigillosa Torr...

  8. Seasonal isotope and trace-metal profiles of serially-sampled Conus gastropods: proxies for paleoenvironmental change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentry, David Keith

    2006-08-16

    in this area. These effects are augmented by summer stratification and productivity minima that further decrease seawater ?13C. Sr/Ca ratios increase through ontogeny, most likely due to decreasing metabolic efficiency. However, seasonal variations in Sr...

  9. A Methodology to Develop Monthly Energy Use Models From Utility Billing Data For Seasonally Scheduled Buildings: Application to Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, W.

    1998-01-01

    TO DEVELOP MONTHLY ENERGY USE MODELS FROM UTILITY BILLING DATA FOR SEASONALLY SCHEDULED BUILDINGS: APPLICATION TO SCHOOLS A Thesis by WENYAN WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1998 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A METHODOLOGY TO DEVELOP MONTHLY ENERGY USE MODELS FROM UTILITY BILLING DATA FOR SEASONALLY SCHEDULED BUILDINGS: APPLICATION TO SCHOOLS A Thesis by WENYAN WANG Submitted...

  10. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part I: Seasonal variation of atmospheric composition without meridional transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hue, Vincent; Dobrijevic, Michel; Hersant, Franck; Greathouse, Thomas K

    2015-01-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7{\\deg} produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. A new time dependent 2D photochemical model is presented to study the seasonal evolution of Saturn's stratospheric composition. This study focuses on the impact of the seasonally variable thermal field on the main stratospheric C2 hydrocarbon chemistry (C2H2 and C2H6) using a realistic radiative climate model. Meridional mixing and advective processes are implemented in the model but turned off in the present study for the sake of simplicity. The results are compared to a simple study case where a latitudinally and temporally steady thermal field is assumed. Our simulations suggest that, when the seasonally variable thermal field is accounted for, the downward diffusion of the seasonally produced hydrocarbons is faster due to the seasonal compression of the atmospheric column during winter. This ef...

  11. DOE/EIA-0202(89/2Q)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101CompanyProduct:5/4Q)2Q) Energy4Q)2Q)3Q)2Q)

  12. Mercury speciation driven by seasonal changes in a contaminated estuarine environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratki?, Arne, E-mail: arne.bratkic@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc, Nives, E-mail: nives.orginc@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kotnik, Jože, E-mail: joze.kotnik@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faganeli, Jadran, E-mail: faganeli@mbss.org [Marine Biology Station, Forna?e 41, 6330 Piran (Slovenia)] [Marine Biology Station, Forna?e 41, 6330 Piran (Slovenia); Žagar, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.zagar@fgg.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Yano, Shinichiro [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Tada, Akihide, E-mail: tada@civil.nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Nagasaki University, Bunkyo-machi 1-14, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Nagasaki University, Bunkyo-machi 1-14, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Horvat, Milena, E-mail: milena.horvat@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-08-15

    In this study, seasonal changes of mercury (Hg) species in the highly variable estuary of So?a/Isonzo River (northern Adriatic Sea) were investigated. Samplings were performed on a seasonal basis (September 2009, May, August and October 2010) and Hg species (total Hg, methylmercury (MeHg), dissolved gaseous Hg (DGM)) in waters, sediments and pore waters were determined. In addition, a range of ancillary parameters were measured (salinity, nutrients, organic carbon (OC), nitrogen species). Hg values were interpreted using these parameters and hydrological conditions (river flow, wave height) around the time of sampling. There were no significant changes in Hg load from river to the gulf, compared to previous studies. The load was temporarily higher in May 2010 due to higher river flow. Wave height, through changing hydrostatic pressure, was most likely to cause resuspension of already deposited Hg from the bottom (August 2010). The estuary is a net source of DGM to the atmosphere as suggested by DGM profiles, with salinity, redox potential and organic matter as the most probable controls over its production. MeHg is produced in situ in sediment or in water column, rather than transported by river, as indicated by its correlation with OC of the marine origin. Calculated fluxes for THg and MeHg showed sediment as a source for both the water column. In pore waters, OC in part affects partitioning of both THg and MeHg; however other factors (e.g. sulphide and/or oxyhydroxides precipitation and dissolution) are also probably important. -- Highlights: ? Water, sediment and pore water mercury species in front of So?a River estuary were measured. ? Seasonally variable hydrological conditions were shown to influence water column Hg speciation. ? Fluxes for total Hg and MeHg from sediment to water were calculated. ? Sediment is a source of total Hg and MeHg to the water column. ? Correlation of MeHg with organic carbon of marine origin suggests in situ formation.

  13. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  14. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore »new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying ?13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and ?18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (?18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on ?13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for fossil algae.« less

  15. Cultural Control of the Boll Weevil: A Four Season Approach - Texas Rolling Plains. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slosser, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    weevil control program of the Texas High Plains. Tex. Agric. Exp. Sta. Prog. Rep. 2766. Bottrell, D. G., J. R. White, D. S. Moody, and D. D. Hardee. 1972. Overwintering habitats of the boll weevil in the Rolling Plains of Texas. Environ. Entomol. 1... of the Boll Weevil A Four Season Approach - Texas Rolling Plains J. E. Slosser1 1Professor, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station LIBRARY TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY JUN 21 1995 TEXAS STATE DOCUMENTS Key Words: boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman...

  16. Cooling season study and economic analysis of a desiccant cooling system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, James Howard

    1992-01-01

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Gas Cost (3/GJ) Figure 4. 4 Gas Price vs DINC Cycle Payback Period at Various Electricity Prices SEER = 12 35 20 18 16 ~ 14 ~ 12 D o 10 8 6 o 4 $0. 06/Kwh $0. 09/Kwh $0. 12/Kwh $0. 15/Kwh $0. 'I 8/Kwh 10 20... IV ECONOMIC ANALYSIS V CONCLUSIONS 28 36 NOMENCLATURE 39 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A - HOUSE CONSTRUCTION DATA . . APPENDIX B - SECOND LAW COMPARISON 48 53 APPENDIX C - COOLING SEASON AND DINC CYCLE PROGRAM LISTING 72 APPENDIX D - ECONOMIC...

  17. The role of endogenous opioid peptides in seasonal and postpartum anestrus in Bos indicus cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahringer, Rodolfo C

    1989-01-01

    acknowledgments also go to D. A. Neuendorff, M. J. Guthrie and D. Byerly who assisted me during this period. To my fellow graduate students P. Bastidas, R. Del Vecchio, C. Chase, M. Menendez, A. Rocha, J. J, Bonavera, J. French and R. Spoon. I express my... in autumn and winter. They hypothesized that the lower LH pulse frequency found in autumn and winter could be related to the higher P4 levels that were presem at that time (ll). Harrison ~l (21) saw a seasonal difference in the serum LH profile from...

  18. The effects of preemergence herbicides on the root morphology of two warm-season turfgrasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillman, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    . 44 0. 56 1. 12 2. 24 3. 36 1. 12 3. 36 1. 68 125 aklk 122 ab 122 ab 122 ab 122 ab 121 ab 118 abc 117 abc 116 abc 114 abc 112 bc 109 c 12 7. 16 130 a 121 ab 109 b 113 ab 121 ab 116 ab 116 ab 110 b 110 b 114 ab 120 ab... of Comrntttee) Marshall I. McFarland (Member) Morris G. Merkle (Member) . C. A. u (Ikad of Department) Nay. 1992 sax ABSTRACT The Effects of Six Preemergence Herbicides on the Root Morphology of Two Warm-Season Turfgrasses. May 1992 Paul H. Tillman B...

  19. Seasonal tolerance in the boll weevil: Anthonomus grandis, BOH., to several insecticides. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pate, Travis Leon

    1961-01-01

    . Seasonal Response of Square Reared and Field Collected Doll Weevils to Topically Applied Toxaphene. Date Number Weevils Dosage Ra e LD 0 mg)gm LD90 mg/gm Square reared boll weevils June 1- June 20 June 21- July 10 July 11- Aug. 1 Aug. 2...%. 31 2. 36 7. 92 4. 91 50. 7 Aug. 1- Aug'. 20 Field collected boll weevils 360 . 069-3. 3 0. 31''. 21 44 . 0 Aug. 21- Sept. 23 480 . 041-4. 1 OI74+e 30 19. 1 no 70 k 50 \\I 30 )0 . 1 5 0001% rIfgm 10 . "0 Figure 3. The dosage...

  20. Seasonal and multiannual roost use by Rafinesque's Big-eared Bats in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about factors affecting year-round use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) or the long-term fidelity of this species to anthropogenic or natural roosts. The objectives of this study were to test whether seasonal use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats varied with roost type and environmental conditions within and among seasons and to document multiannual use of natural and anthropogenic structures by this species. We inspected 4 bridges, 1 building, and 59 tree roosts possessing basal cavity openings; roosts were inspected at least once per week from May through October in every year from 2005 through 2008 and once a month from November through April in every year from 2005 through 2009. We found that use of anthropogenic roosts was significantly greater than the use of tree roosts in summer but that the use of structure types did not differ in other seasons. There was significant seasonal variation in use of anthropogenic and tree roosts. Anthropogenic roost use was higher in summer than in all other seasons. There was no significant difference in tree use among spring, summer, and fall, but use in winter was significantly lower in 2 years of the study. Overall use of anthropogenic and tree roosts was positively related to minimum temperature, but the relationship between use of roosts and minimum temperature varied among seasons. Bats showed multiannual fidelity ({ge} 4 years) to all anthropogenic roosts and to some tree roosts, but fidelity of bats to anthropogenic roosts was greater and more consistent than to tree roosts. Our data indicate that Rafinesque's big-eared bats responded differently to environmental conditions among seasons; thus, a variety of structure types and characteristics are necessary for conservation of these bats. We suggest long-term protection of roost structures of all types is necessary for conservation of Rafinesque's big-eared bats in the southeast Coastal Plain.

  1. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Sandia National Laboratories project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  2. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich Technologies project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  3. High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production- FY12 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this LANL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  4. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCLA project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  5. Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP- FY13 Q2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this 3M project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  6. Self-Cleaning CSP Optics with EDS- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Boston University project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  7. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storage- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. Measurement of the $x$- and $Q^2$-Dependence of the Asymmetry $A_1$ on the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Sebastian Kuhn; Peter Bosted; Yelena Prok

    2006-05-23

    We report results for the virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 1} on the nucleon from new Jefferson Lab measurements. The experiment, which used the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer and longitudinally polarized proton ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) and deuteron ({sup 15}ND{sub 3}) targets, collected data with a longitudinally polarized electron beam at energies between 1.6 GeV and 5.7 GeV. In the present paper, we concentrate on our results for A{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) and the related ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) in the resonance and the deep inelastic regions for our lowest and highest beam energies, covering a range in momentum transfer Q{sup 2} from 0.05 to 5.0 GeV{sup 2} and in final-state invariant mass W up to about 3 GeV. Our data show detailed structure in the resonance region, which leads to a strong Q{sup 2}--dependence of A{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) for W below 2 GeV. At higher W, a smooth approach to the scaling limit, established by earlier experiments, can be seen, but A{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) is not strictly Q{sup 2}--independent. We add significantly to the world data set at high x, up to x = 0.6. Our data exceed the SU(6)-symmetric quark model expectation for both the proton and the deuteron while being consistent with a negative d-quark polarization up to our highest x. This data set should improve next-to-leading order (NLO) pQCD fits of the parton polarization distributions.

  9. Inclusive Electron Scattering From Nuclei at x >1 and High Q^2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Arrington

    1998-06-02

    CEBAF experiment e89-008 measured inclusive electron scattering from nuclei in a Q{sup 2} range between 0.8 and 7.3 (GeV/c){sup 2} for x{sub Bjorken} approximately greater than 1. The cross sections for scattering from D C, Fe, and Au were measured. The C, Fe, and Au data have been analyzed in terms of F(y) to examine y-scaling of the quasielastic scattering, and to study the momentum distribution of the nucleons in the nucleus. The data have also been analyzed in terms of the structure function vW{sub 2} to examine scaling of the inelastic scattering in x and xi and to study the momentum distribution of the quarks. In the regions where quasielastic scattering dominates the cross section (low Q{sup 2} or large negative values of y), the data are shown to exhibit y-scaling. However, the y-scaling breaks down once the inelastic contributions become large. The data do not exhibit x-scaling, except at the lowest values of x, while the structure function does appear to scale in the Nachtmann variable, xi.

  10. Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Stanford/SLAC project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  11. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  12. High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Argonne National Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  13. Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  14. state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    17627215,4881361,5460677,4947015,15289053,5762846,5401692,5104549,16269087,66178091 "Anthracite",138012,121208,146605,405825,116603,127501,125028,369132,124431,140171,115125,379727...

  15. state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16264924,5089471,5057952,5110136,15257559,6034905,5163897,5598759,16797561,65454926 "Anthracite",131036,126151,127417,384604,159864,161567,103152,424583,147423,145690,148093,441206...

  16. state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16184747,5164431,5730421,5531484,16426336,5787538,6030423,5550719,17368680,67555716 "Anthracite",133480,129360,149128,411968,137000,135432,156673,429105,125414,140118,135144,400676...

  17. state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16614387,4935905,5546763,4807458,15290126,5422409,5298727,4998875,15720011,65189594 "Anthracite",141165,124979,139183,405327,124628,132527,133537,390692,119571,134819,115911,370301...

  18. Direct s-CO2 Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  19. GFNMS Superintendent's Report -Q2FY2015, January ~ March, 2015 Sanctuaries' Expansion Becomes Final

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the most intense and productive upwelling systems in North America, important habitats and subsea features

  20. High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers- FY13 Q2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  1. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors- FY13 Q2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this ORNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  2. Coulomb distortion in high-Q^2 elastic e-p scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Arrington; Ingo Sick

    2004-06-11

    Recently, there has been a significant amount of activity to try and understand the discrepancy between Rosenbluth and polarization transfer measurements of the proton form factors. It has been suggested that the standard use of plane-wave Born approximation in extracting the form factors is insufficient, and that higher-order terms must also be included. Of the corrections missing in standard prescriptions, Coulomb distortion is the most well understood. In this paper, we examine the effect of Coulomb distortion on the extraction of the proton form factors.

  3. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2 (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackPropertiesfully coupled experiments(Journal Article)

  4. Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIAL TECHNICAL8-02 InspectionCONFERENCEChampionsControl

  5. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart (Technical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory | National(Technical Report) | SciTech

  6. SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q2, FY 15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 Page 1NEWS MEDIA16,3 rd Quarter FY

  7. Communication and Control for Quantum Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Yatish

    2010-01-01

    to Output. Classical bits cx and cz are trans- mitted to thePure Quantum h x y z s t cx yes yes yes yes yes yes yes czH q3 q4 zmeasure Correct c3 X cx q1, q0; cx q1, q2; correct

  8. Alcator C-Mod FY2007 Research Totals by Quarter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Research Operations as of 83107 Research Days Research Weeks Total FY07 Research Weeks Q1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Q2 1.06 0.27 0.27 Q3 36.20 9.05 9.32 Q4 21.50 5.37 14.69 Detailed run run...

  9. Alcator C-Mod FY2008 Research Totals by Quarter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Research Operations as of 52708 Research Days Research Weeks Total FY08 Research Weeks Q1 4.25 1.06 1.06 Q2 34.5 8.6 9.7 Q3 24.2 6.1 15.7 Q4 Detailed run descriptions can be...

  10. "Table HC12.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Midwest Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "1.",26.3,5.8,4.3,1.5 "2.",3.6,0.9,0.6,"Q" "3 or More",0.6,"Q","Q","Q" "Plasma Television Sets",3.6,0.7,0.6,"Q" "1.",2.7,0.6,0.5,"Q" "2 or More",0.9,"Q","Q","Q"...

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "2.",3.6,2.9,0.2,"Q",0.2,"Q" "3 or More",0.6,0.4,"Q","N","Q","N" "Plasma Television Sets",3.6,2.6,0.3,"Q",0.4,"Q" "1.",2.7,2.1,0.2,"Q","Q","Q" "2 or...

  12. "Table HC4.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Renter-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "2.",3.6,0.7,0.3,"Q","Q",0.2,"Q" "3 or More",0.6,"Q","N","N","N","Q","N" "Plasma Television Sets",3.6,0.8,0.4,"Q","Q",0.3,"Q" "1.",2.7,0.6,0.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "2 or...

  13. "Table HC11.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Northeast...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "1.",26.3,4,3,1.1 "2.",3.6,0.6,0.5,"Q" "3 or More",0.6,"Q","Q","N" "Plasma Television Sets",3.6,0.7,0.5,0.2 "1.",2.7,0.5,0.3,"Q" "2 or More",0.9,0.2,"Q","Q"...

  14. Second Quarter 2014 Volume 7, number 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5% in Q2, 4.1% in Q3, and 2.6% in Q4. March projections for annual average real GDP provided, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers rose 1.1% year- over-year in February, while core inflation was up 1.6% for the same period. Consumer prices

  15. Twisting Toroidal Magnetic Fields and the Seasonal Oscillation of the Solar Neutrino Flux II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiro Kubota; Takeshi Kurimoto; Eiichi Takasugi

    1993-07-19

    An intriguing possibility is explored that the solar neutrino data could be used as a probe to the magnetic field structure in the sun. Various cyclic phenomena occurring on the surface of the sun have been accounted for by the so-called dynamo-mechanism. According to this, a self-generating mechanism of solar cyclic activities gives rise to twisting toroidal magnetic fields in the convective zone. Although its magnitude is not known, the orientation of the twist is certainly opposite in northern and southern hemispheres of the sun. We show by numerical calculation that the solar neutrino flux, being sensitive to the twist, could exhibit observable seasonal oscillation, provided that the twist is sizable in magnitude and the neutrinos have reasonably large magnetic moments. This oscillation is ascribed to the fact that the earth's orbit is slightly inclined to the sun's equator, and that solar neutrinos pass through the northern (southern) hemisphere of the sun around September (March). We also argue that similar seasonal oscillation could be exhibited in the azimuthal asymmetry of recoiling electrons scattered by the solar neutrinos which are expected to be observed in the super-Kamiokande detector.

  16. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S POLAR TRACE GAS ABUNDANCE OBSERVED BY CASSINI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teanby, N. A. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); De Kok, R. [SRON, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Nixon, C. A., E-mail: n.teanby@bristol.ac.u [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-11-20

    We use a six-year data set (2004-2010) of mid-infrared spectra measured by Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer to search for seasonal variations in Titan's atmospheric temperature and composition. During most of Cassini's mission Titan's northern hemisphere has been in winter, with an intense stratospheric polar vortex highly enriched in trace gases, and a single south-to-north circulation cell. Following northern spring equinox in mid-2009, dramatic changes in atmospheric temperature and composition were expected, but until now the temporal coverage of polar latitudes has been too sparse to discern trends. Here, we show that during equinox and post-equinox periods, abundances of trace gases at both poles have begun to increase. We propose that increases in north polar trace gases are due to a seasonal reduction in gas depletion by horizontal mixing across the vortex boundary. A simultaneous south polar abundance increase suggests that Titan is now entering, or is about to enter, a transitional circulation regime with two branches, rather than the single branch circulation pattern previously observed.

  17. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-12-31

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  18. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  19. Seasonality of soil CO2 efflux in a temperate forest: Biophysical effects of snowpack and spring freeze–thaw cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuankuan; Han, Yi; Chen, Jiquan; Wang, Xingchang; Zhang, Quanzhi; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-08-15

    Changes in characteristics of snowfall and spring freeze–thaw-cycle (FTC) events under the warming climate make it critical to understand biophysical controls on soil CO2 efflux (RS) in seasonally snow-covered ecosystems. We conducted a snow removal experiment and took year-round continuous automated measurements of RS, soil temperature (T5) and soil volumetric water content at the 5 cm depth (W5) with a half-hour interval in a Chinese temperate forest in 2010–2011. Our objectives were to: (1) develop statistical models to describe the seasonality of RS in this forest; (2) quantify the contribution of seasonal RS to the annual budget; (3) examine biophysical effects of snowpack on RS; and (4) test the hypothesis that an FTC-induced enhancement of RS is jointly driven by biological and physical processes.

  20. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation thatmore »peaks in the winter.« less

  1. Seasonal and latitudinal variability of troposphere ?14CO2: Post bomb contributions from fossil fuels, oceans, the stratosphere, and the terrestrial biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, J. T; Enting, I. G; Schuur, E. A. G; Caldeira, K.; Fung, I. Y

    2002-01-01

    CO 2 Emissions From Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cementof seasonal variation in fossil fuel CO 2 emissions, Tellus,contributions from fossil fuels, oceans, the stratosphere,

  2. Sensitive response of a model of symbiotic ecosystem to seasonal periodic drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rekker, A.; Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-12

    A symbiotic ecosysytem (metapopulation) is studied by means of the stochastic Lotka-Volterra model with generalized Verhulst self-regulation. The effect of variable environment on the carrying capacities of populations is taken into account as an asymmetric dichotomous noise and as a deterministic periodic stimulus. In the framework of the mean-field theory an explicit self-consistency equation for the system in the long-time limit is presented. Also, expressions for the probability distribution and for the moments of the population size are found. In certain cases the mean population size exhibits large oscillations in time, even if the amplitude of the seasonal environmental drive is small. Particularly, it is shown that the occurrence of large oscillations of the mean population size can be controlled by noise parameters (such as amplitude and correlation time) and by the coupling strength of the symbiotic interaction between species.

  3. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  4. Seasonal and solar cycle variations in high-latitude thermospheric winds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aruliah, A.L.; Rees, D. (University Coll., London (United Kingdom)); Steen, A. (Inst. for Rymdfysik, Kiruna (Sweden))

    1991-11-01

    Thermospheric wind measurements have been collected systematically every winter for over nine years from a high-latitude site at Kiruna, Sweden (67.8{degree}N, 20.4{degree}E). The database contains 1,242 nights of data collected with a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI), perhaps the largest single-site database of thermospheric winds. This analysis shows a marked seasonal and solar cycle variation. Particularly at high solar activity, sunward winds of the evening period (16-20 UT) are more than 50% stronger at Spring than at Autumn equinox. This large asymmetry in the behavior of high-latitude thermospheric winds at spring and autumn equinox has not yet been predicted by model simulations.

  5. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  6. Solar cycle and seasonal variations in F region electrodynamics at Millstone Hill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonsanto, M.J.; Hagan, M.E.; Salah, J.E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Westford, MA (United States); Fejer, B.G. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Incoherent scatter radar observations of ion drifts taken at Millstone Hill (42.6{degrees}N, 288.5{degrees}E) during 73 experiments in the period February 1984 to February 1992 are used to construct, for the first time at this station, average quiet-time ExB drift patterns for both solar cycle maximum and minimum, for the summer, winter, and equinox seasons. The daily variation of V{sub {perpendicular}N} shows a reversal from northward to southward drifts near noon, and a return to northward drifts in the premidnight hours. The weaker southward drift in the afternoon in summer noted by Wand and Evans is shown to occur only at sunspot minimum. The daily variation of V{sub {perpendicular}E} shows daytime eastward drifts and nighttime westward drifts, except in summer when the usual daytime eastward maximum near 1200 LT is suppressed. The daily mean drift is westward for all seasons, and is largest in summer. The daytime eastward drift and nighttime westward drift tend to be stronger at solar maximum than at solar minimum. Average drift patterns are also constructed for equinox for both extremely quiet and geomagnetically disturbed periods. V{sub {perpendicular}N} is appreciably more northward under extremely quiet than under disturbed conditions in the postmidnight and morning periods. During extremely quiet periods, V{sub {perpendicular}E} turns slightly eastward in the evening hours, while it is strongly westward for disturbed conditions. This result contrasts with the strong eastward drifts in the evening in summer reported for extremely quiet conditions at Millstone Hill by Gonzalez et al. A strong anticorrelation is seen at Millstone Hill between V{sub {perpendicular}N} and V{sub {parallel}}, as is found at lower latitude stations. The quiet-time patterns are discussed in terms of the causative E and F region dynamo mechanisms. 39 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Edwards, Nelson T [ORNL; Walker, Ashley V [ORNL; O'Hara, Keiran H [ORNL; Campion, Christina M [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have related current and historical temperatures to phenological shifts, but experimental evidence is sparse, particularly for autumn responses. A five-year field experiment exposed four deciduous forest species from contrasting climates (Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Populus grandidentata, and Betula alleghaniensis) to air temperatures 2 and 4 C above ambient controls. Impacts of year-round warming on bud burst (BB), senescence and abscission were evaluated in relation to thermal provenance. Leaves emerged earlier in all species, by an average of 6-9 days at +2 and +4 C. Magnitude of advance varied with species and year, but was larger for the first 2 C increment than the second. The effect of warming increased with early BB, favoring Liquidambar, from the warmest climate, but even BB in northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. Treatment differences in BB were poorly explained by temperature sums, which increased with treatment. In autumn, chlorophyll was retained an average of 4 and 7 days longer in +2 and +4 C treatments, and abscission delayed by 8 and 13 days. Species differences in autumn responses were marginally significant. Growing seasons in the warmer atmospheres were 6 - 28 days longer, with the least impact in Quercus. Results are compared with a 16-year record of canopy onset and offset in a nearby upland deciduous forest, where BB showed similar responsiveness to spring temperatures (2 - 4 days C-1). Offset dates in the stand tracked August-September temperatures, except when late summer drought caused premature senescence. The common garden-like experimental approach provides evidence that warming alone extends the growing season, at both ends, even if stand-level impacts are complicated by other environmental factors.

  8. Summary Many seasonally flooded habitats in the tropics are dominated by one or a few tree species. We tested the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    Summary Many seasonally flooded habitats in the tropics are dominated by one or a few tree species. We tested the hypothesis that the inability to tolerate flooding restricts most species from becoming established in flood-prone habitats. We comparedmorphologicalandphysiologicalresponsestoflood- ing

  9. Seasonal steroid hormone levels and their relation to reproduction in the Western Diamond-backed Rattlesnake, Crotalus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Emily

    Seasonal steroid hormone levels and their relation to reproduction in the Western Diamond-backed levels in blood samples from free-ranging Western Diamond-backed Rattle- snakes (Crotalus atrox physiology, from under- standing basic mechanisms to designing treatments for reproductive dysfunction

  10. Long-term-average, solar cycle, and seasonal response of magnetospheric energetic electrons to the solar wind speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . [1] Among the interplanetary activity parameters the solar wind speed is the one best correlatedLong-term-average, solar cycle, and seasonal response of magnetospheric energetic electrons to the solar wind speed D. Vassiliadis,1 A. J. Klimas,2 S. G. Kanekal,3 D. N. Baker,3 and R. S. Weigel4

  11. Seasonal dynamics of bacterial biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay, western Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    Seasonal dynamics of bacterial biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay 2008. [1] The Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study (CASES) included the overwintering deployment biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay, western Canadian Arctic, J. Geophys

  12. Ecological Entomology (2014), 39, 589594 DOI: 10.1111/een.12136 Seasonal decline in plant defence is associated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    ), exploitation of plant parts with low secondary metabolites (Strauss et al., 2004), and preference for sitesEcological Entomology (2014), 39, 589­594 DOI: 10.1111/een.12136 Seasonal decline in plant defence, Switzerland and 3 Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, U.S.A. Abstract. 1. Plant

  13. Seasonal and sexual dimorphisms in expression of androgen receptor and its coactivators in brain and peripheral copulatory tissues of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    Seasonal and sexual dimorphisms in expression of androgen receptor and its coactivators in brain) being the primary activator of male sexual behaviors. Responsiveness to T is decreased in the non differences in the motivation or physical ability to engage in sexual behavior. Ó 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Grant Reference Stephanie Henson National Oceanography Centre SEASONAL VARIABILITY IN THE EFFICIENCY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Grant Reference Stephanie Henson National Oceanography Centre SEASONAL VARIABILITY IN THE EFFICIENCY OF UPPER OCEAN CARBON EXPORT NE/J004383/1 Philip/1 Ciaran Beggan NERC British Geological Survey Geophysical Modelling of Geomagnetically Induced Currents

  15. //integras/jou/Pagination/Oup/OUP-UK/PLANKT/27(10)/3B2/fbi095 Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chrzanowski, Thomas H.

    //integras/jou/Pagination/Oup/OUP-UK/PLANKT/27(10)/3B2/fbi095 Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton 27 j NUMBER 10 j PAGES 1­17 j 2005 doi:10.1093/plankt/fbi095, available online at www

  16. Bull. Chicago Herp. Soc. 41(8):149-153, 2006 The "False Breeding Season" of the Eastern Newt, Notophthalmus viridescens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sever, David M.

    season. In populations in which the adults are permanently aquatic or migrate to breeding ponds in fall of this interest was sparked by the discovery that many popula- tions have pond-dwelling, aquatic adults and larvae, 1998). The adult animals are a shade of green dorsally, and have compressed tails. In N. v. viridescens

  17. Spatial and temporal variability of Alexandrium cyst fluxes in the Gulf of Maine: Relationship to seasonal particle export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    to seasonal particle export and resuspension C.H. Pilskaln a,* , D.M. Anderson b , D.J. McGillicuddy b , B in the total mass export of particulate material indicating that cyst delivery was primarily via individually observed in the eastern gulf, suggesting greater resuspension energy and BNL cyst inventories

  18. Evaluating IPCC AR4 cool-season precipitation simulations and projections for impacts assessment over North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Joellen

    Evaluating IPCC AR4 cool-season precipitation simulations and projections for impacts assessment to assess model bias and evaluate whether assumptions about the independence of model projections and error is currently being used in a variety of ways for regional impacts projection. However, more work is required

  19. Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great by symptoms of foliar ozone injury. Abstract The goals of this study were to document the development of ozone-induced foliar injury, on a leaf-by-leaf basis, and to develop ozone exposure relationships for leaf cohorts

  20. Optical and physical variability on timescales from minutes to the seasonal cycle on the New England shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Optical and physical variability on timescales from minutes to the seasonal cycle on the New of California, Santa Barbara Abstract. High-resolution time series of physical and bio-optical data were the Coastal Mixing and Optics experiment (CMO) from July 1996 through June 1997. The most prominent physical

  1. Effects of the seasonal cycle on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Effects of the seasonal cycle on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole of atmospheric surface forcings on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole Mode (IOZDM) are studied using a nonlinear, 4-1/2 layer ocean model partially coupled to an advective atmospheric mixed

  2. Evaluation of an 18-year CMAQ simulation: Seasonal variations and long-term temporal changes in sulfate and nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    largely captures the seasonal and long-term changes in sulfur compounds. The modeling system generally and measured concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen compounds in wet and dry deposition over an 18-year period resulted in large decreases in sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions by 1995, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) trading

  3. The Assessment and Calibration of Ensemble Seasonal Forecasts of Equatorial Pacific Ocean Temperature and the Predictability of Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewson, S; Hagedorn, Rolf; Jewson, Stephen; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Hagedorn, Renate

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate the performance of two 44 year ensemble seasonal hindcast time series for the Nino3 index produced as part of the DEMETER project. We show that the ensemble mean carries useful information out to six months. The ensemble spread, however, only carries useful information out to four months in one of the models, and two months in the other.

  4. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  5. Holocene climate and seasonality of shell collection at the Dundas Islands Group, northern British Columbia, Canada--A bivalve sclerochronological approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    Holocene climate and seasonality of shell collection at the Dundas Islands Group, northern British. In addition to the climate information outline above, details about the season of shell collection by the occu and historical events occur. People respond to climate changes through adaptations in technology, or changes

  6. P3.1 The Relationship of Cool Season Significant Tornado Events and Buoy Data in the Western Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P3.1 The Relationship of Cool Season Significant Tornado Events and Buoy Data in the Western GulfM during the cool season from 1993- 2004. Hourly data from gulf buoy 42002 (located at 25.17 N, 94.42 W buoy 42002 was chosen as a focus for this study due to its location away from the shallower shelf

  7. Cool-Season Turfgrass Responses to DroughtStressI L. J. Aronson, A. J. Gold, and R. J. Hull2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    Cool-Season Turfgrass Responses to DroughtStressI L. J. Aronson, A. J. Gold, and R. J. Hull2 practices for both warm- and cool-season turfgrasses. Responses of turfgrass to drought can be viewed in a number of ways. Drought stress will affect visual quality, growth rate, evapo- transpiration (ET) rate

  8. Population Characteristics and Seasonal Movement Patterns of the Rattlesnake Hills Elk Herd - Status Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiller, Brett L; Cadwell, Larry L; Zufelt, Rhett K; Turner, Scott D; Turner, Gerald K

    2000-10-10

    Wildlife biologists documented an isolated elk population in 1972 on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Since then the herd has grown, exceeding 800 animals in 1999. Limited harvests on adjacent private lands have occurred since 1986. The large herd size coupled with limited annual harvest have increased concerns about private land crop damages, vehicle collisions, degradation of the native environment, and the herd's use of radiologically controlled areas on the Hanford Site. As a result, in 1999, a decision was made by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) (animal management), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) (land management), and DOE (landowner) to conduct a large-scale animal roundup to remove elk from the DOE-owned lands and relocate them to distant areas within Washington State. The interagency roundup and relocation occurred in spring 2000. This report presents the current status of the herd size and composition, annual removal estimates, and some limited seasonal area-use patterns by several radio-collared elk subsequent to the large-scale elk roundup. The elk herd maintained an approximate 25% annual increase until 2000. A large harvest offsite in 1999 coupled with the large-scale roundup in spring 2000 reduced herd size to the current estimate of 660 animals. As of August 2000, the herd consisted of 287 (43%) males, 282 (42%) females, and 91 (13%) calves. There has been a notable cycling of calf recruitment rates throughout the 1990s and in 2000. Elk home-range estimates revealed a substantial decrease in summer home ranges in 2000, presumably, in part, as a result of the summer 2000 Hanford Site wildfire. Movement analysis also determined that, as population size increased, so has the frequency and extent of the animals' offsite movements, particularly on private lands adjacent to the Hanford Site in both spring and summer seasons. The frequency and duration of movements by male elk onto the central portions of the Hanford Site has increased substantially as the population increased.

  9. State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunton, G.

    1998-06-01

    The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

  10. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  11. The Short-Season Effect in Cotton and Escape From the Boll Weevil. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, R.D.; Walker, J.K.; Niles, G.A.; Mulkey, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    . THE 'SHORT-SEASON EFFECT' I N COTTON AND R. D. P a r k e r , J. K. Walker, G. A. N i l e s and J. R. Mulkey* The t e n u r e o f F r e d r i c k Wil l iam Mally w i t h t h e A g r i c u l t u r a l and Mechanical Col lege of Texas i n Col... lege S t a t i o n was a b r i e f one of 3 112 y e a r s ; b u t he l e f t a c o r n e r s t o n e o f r e s e a r c h f o r v i a b l & c o t t o n p roduc t ion t h a t now ex tends over a s i g n i f i c a n t amount of t o...

  12. Seasonal variations in the equatorial thermospheric wind measured at Arequipa, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biondi, M.A.; Merriwether, J.W.; Fejer, B.G.; Gonzalez, S.A.

    1990-08-01

    Studies have been carried out Arequipa, Peru, of the seasonal variations in the thermospheric winds at moderate solar flux levels and geomagnetic activity. Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements of the doppler shifts in the 630.0 nm nightglow emission line from March to August 1983 and from April to October 1988 have yielded monthly-average meridional winds that are nearly zero (<50 m/s) and possible fluctuating in direction through much of the night but develop a southward flow at 50 - 100 m/s in the early and the late night from May onward. The average zonal winds are eastward throughout the night, reaching peak velocities before local midnight and then decreasing. The peak velocities increase to a maximum around the June solstice. The winds are generally stronger in 1988 than in 1983, even thought the solar EUV fluxes are comparable fro both years. Comparison of the present results with earlier satellite measurements, as embodied in the Horizontal Wind Model of Hedin et al., reveals generally satisfactory agreement at the equinox and June solstice, except for the June 1988 period. NCAR Therospheric General Circulation Model, calculated for similar solar flux levels, yields meridional and zonal wind variations which exhibit the same temporal behaviors but generally smaller values than the present measurements.

  13. Seasonal changes in the composition of passively ventilated waste tank headspaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Hayes, J.C.; Buckley, L.L.; Jensen, L.; Pennington, L.D.; Wilmarth, S.R.

    1997-08-01

    The headspaces of four passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks were sampled five times over a one-year period to evaluate seasonal changes in composition. Tanks BX-104, BY-108, C-107, and SX-102 were selected for the study on the bases of their widely varying headspace compositions, waste types, and physical headspace conditions. Samples were collected and analyzed for inorganic vapors, permanent gases, and organic vapors. Data from the 20 sampling events were compiled and reviewed. Raw mass spectral data for organic vapors were reprocessed by a single analyst. Measurement precision for results within individual sampling events, which includes both sampling and analytical random errors, was generally within the requirement of a 25% relative standard deviation. Data were fit to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) model and tested for correlation with headspace temperature. The ANOVA results indicate that the majority of headspace constituents studied were at relatively constant levels during the year-long study. The percent relative standard deviation (RSD{sub TIME}) of analyte means obtained for the five sampling events were generally low; only 15 of the 152 analytes had RSD{sub TIME} values above 60%. These highest RSD{sub TIME} values were obtained for 13 organic vapors in Tank BX-104 and two permanent gases in Tank C-107.

  14. Variability of North Atlantic hurricanes: seasonal versus individual-event features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corral, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Tropical cyclones are affected by a large number of climatic factors, which translates into complex patterns of occurrence. The variability of annual metrics of tropical-cyclone activity has been intensively studied, in particular since the sudden activation of the N Atl in the mid 1990's. We provide first a swift overview on previous work by diverse authors about these annual metrics for the NAtl basin, where the natural variability of the phenomenon, the existence of trends, the drawbacks of the records, and the influence of global warming have been the subject of interesting debates. Next, we present an alternative approach that does not focus on seasonal features but on the characteristics of single events [Corral et al Nature Phys 6, 693, 2010]. It is argued that the individual-storm power dissipation index (PDI) constitutes a natural way to describe each event, and further, that the PDI statistics yields a robust law for the occurrence of tropical cyclones in terms of a power law. In this context, metho...

  15. Seasonal Price Change and Costs of Storing Grain Sorghum in the Coastal Bend. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, Howard S.; Moore, Clarence A.

    1957-01-01

    .369 14,532 2,302 2,858 3.386 4,740 1,382 2,992 14.355 33,574 10.660 9,905 7,181 8,224 7,295 24,161 95,410 132,506 8,379 11,726 65,763 68,048 2.957 7,261 227,679 321,262 Coastal Bend, the marketing season in this study begins in June and ends....19 2.30 2.38 2.42 2.48 2.54 2.48 2.64 2.61 2.66 Range: high 3.41 3.17 2.82 3.12 3.21 3.36 3.68 3.79 3.09 3.60 3.68 3.58 low 1.99 1.71 1.52 1.66 1.47 1.72 1.86 1.93 2.04 2.00 2.05 2.09 Absolute range 1.42 1.46 1.30 1.46 1.74 1.64 1.82 1.86 - 1.05 1...

  16. Passive solar/earth sheltered office/dormitory cooling season thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.

    1984-01-01

    Continuous detailed hourly thermal performance measurements have been taken since February 1982 in and around an occupied, underground, 4000 ft/sup 2/ office/dormitory building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This building has a number of energy saving features which have been analyzed relative to their performance in a southeastern US climate and with respect to overall commercial building performance. This analysis documents cooling season performance, as well as effects of earth contact, interior thermal mass, an economizer cycle and interface of an efficient building envelope with a central three-ton heat pump. The Joint Institute Dormitory obtains a cooling energy savings of about 30% compared with an energy-efficient, above-grade structure and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The proper installation of the overhand, interior thermal mass, massive supply duct system, and earth contact team up to prevent summertime overheating. From May through September, this building cost a total of $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate 24 hours per day. Besides thermal performance of the building envelope, extensive comfort data was taken illustrating that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time according to the PMV measurements.

  17. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming.

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  18. Population Characteristics and Seasonal Movement Patterns of the Rattlesnake Hills Elk Herd - Status Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiller, B.L.; Zufelt, R.K.; Turner, S.; Cadwell, L.L.; Bender, L.; Turner, G.K.

    2000-10-10

    Population characteristics of the Rattlesnake Hills elk herd indicate reduced herd growth rates from the 1980s compared to the 1990s (McCorquodale 1988; Eberhardt 1996). However, the population continued to grow approximately 25% annually through the 1990s, reaching a high of 838 animals in summer 1999. Calf recruitment rates appear to be cyclic and are likely related to reduced calf survival during the first weeks of life; however, late-term abortions may also have occurred. The cause(s) could be predator-related and/or a function of shifts in nutritional condition (age-class distributions, assuming older-age cows are less likely to recruit calves, major climate shifts) or changes in the human-related disturbances during gestation, and/or calf rearing periods. In fall 1999 and spring 2000, the population was reduced from 838 individuals to 660 individuals. The primary controlling factors were modified hunting seasons on private and state lands and the large-scale roundup conducted in spring 2000. Continued removal of animals (particularly females) within the population will be pivotal to maintain the population at a level that minimizes land damage complaints, animal-vehicle collisions, use of central Hanford areas, and deterioration of natural resources.

  19. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Le Roy, L.

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  20. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-12-08

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore »annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  1. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-07-15

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore »annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  2. Seasonal trend of photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, L; Baldocchi, DD

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Understanding seasonal changes in photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance is crucial for modeling long-term carbon uptake and energy fluxes of ecosystems. Gas exchange measurements of CO{sub 2} and light response curves on blue oak leaves (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) were conducted weekly throughout the growing season to study the seasonality of photosynthetic capacity (V{sub cmax}) and Ball-Berry slope (m) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature. A leaf photosynthetic model was used to determine V{sub cmax}. There was a pronounced seasonal pattern in V{sub cmax}. The maximum value of V{sub cmax}, 127 {micro}molm{sup -2} s{sup -1},was reached shortly after leaf expansion in early summer, when air temperature was moderate and soil water availability was high. Thereafter, V{sub cmax} declined as the soil water profile became depleted and the trees experienced extreme air temperatures, exceeding 40 C. The decline in V{sub cmax} was gradual in midsummer, however, despite extremely low predawn leaf water potentials ({Psi}{sub pd}, {approx} -4.0 MPa). Overall, temporal changes in V{sub cmax} were well correlated with changes in leaf nitrogen content. During spring leaf development, high rates of leaf dark respiration (R{sub d}, 5-6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were observed. Once a leaf reached maturity, R{sub d} remained low, around 0.5 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. In contrast to the strong seasonality of V{sub cmax}, m and marginal water cost per unit carbon gain ({partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A) were relatively constant over the season, even when leaf {Psi}{sub pd} dropped to -6.8 MPa. The constancy of {partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A suggests that stomata behaved optimally under severe water-stress conditions. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of modeling carbon and water vapor exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  3. Cool-and Warm-Season Precipitation Reconstructions over Western New Mexico D. W. STAHLE,* M. K. CLEAVELAND,* H. D. GRISSINO-MAYER,1 R. D. GRIFFIN,# F. K. FYE,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Cool- and Warm-Season Precipitation Reconstructions over Western New Mexico D. W. STAHLE,* M. K) ABSTRACT Precipitation over the southwestern United States exhibits distinctive seasonality are well correlated with accumulated precipitation and have previously been used to reconstruct cool

  4. Microsoft Word - Q3 MDA 8_11_2015 Update of $172M for Reposting Final 4pm.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7 Assessment ofLana Cox (803) TO:1 of 51Proposal FormThis

  5. Seasonal and diurnal dependence of Pc 3-5 magnetic pulsation power at geomagnetically conjugate stations in the auroral zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Hiroaki (Univ. of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan) National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo (Japan)); Sato, Natsuo (National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo (Japan)); Tonegawa, Yutaka (Tokai Univ., Hiratsuka (Japan)); Yoshino, Takeo (Univ. of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan)); Saemundsson, T. (Univ. of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland))

    1989-06-01

    Seasonal and diurnal variations of Pc 3-5 magnetic pulsation powers have been examined using 2 years of magnetic data from geomagnetically conjugate stations, Syowa in Antarctica and Husafell and Tjoernes in Iceland. The magnetic pulsation powers are found to be relatively higher at the winter hemisphere station than at the summer station. The pulsations observed during equinox show a diurnal dependence, i.e., that the power density is higher in the geomagnetic morning at the stations in Iceland than at Syowa, and this relationship is reversed in the afternoon. The power density ratio of Pc 3 pulsations between the conjugate stations, which is associated with the seasons and with local time, is higher than that of Pc 5. These characteristics can be attributed to the effects of sunlight in the ionosphere, i.e., Pc 3-5 pulsations are shielded when the waves propagate from the magnetosphere to the ground through the sunlit ionosphere.

  6. Seasonal Variation of Indoor Radon Concentration in the Tropics: Comparative studies between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Kerala, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahat, R. H.; Amin, Y. M. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jojo, P. J. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India); Pereira, C. E. [CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India)

    2011-03-30

    The radiation dose received by man from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest at more than 50% of total dose received. The seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration in Kerala, India and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were studied. The Southwest coast of the Kerala state in India is known to have very high levels of natural background radiation owing to the rare earths rich monazite sand available in large amount. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia used to be a famous tin mining area where it was done using open cast system. One-year measurements of radon concentration in houses were done for these two regions. It was found that there is considerable seasonal variation in the levels of radon in Kerala but the variation in Kuala Lumpur is only less than 10%.

  7. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliqueivis, T.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Karl, Thomas G.; Guenther, Alex B.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Poeschl, U.; Jiminez, J. L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time mass spectra of non-refractory component of submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon basin during the wet season of 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic components accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. Ammonium was present in sufficient quantities to halfway neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-dominated, low-NOx environment the high-resolution mass spectra as well as mass closures with ion chromatography measurements did not provide evidence for significant contributions of organosulfate species, at least at concentrations above uncertainty levels. Positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the variance of the signal intensities of the organic constituents: a factor HOA having a hydrocarbon-like signature and identified as regional emissions of primary organic material, a factor OOA-1 associated with fresh production of secondary organic material by a mechanism of BVOC oxidation followed by gas-to-particle conversion, a factor OOA-2 consistent with reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially epoxydiols by acidic particles, and a factor OOA-3 associated with long range transport and atmospheric aging. The OOA-1, -2, and -3 factors had progressively more oxidized signatures. Diameter-resolved mass spectral markers also suggested enhanced reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products to the accumulation mode for the OOA-2 factor, and such size partitioning can be indicative of in-cloud process. The campaign-average factor loadings were in a ratio of 1.1:1.0 for the OOA-1 compared to the OOA-2 pathway, suggesting the comparable importance of gas-phase compared to particle-phase (including cloud waters) production pathways of secondary organic material during the study period.

  8. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

    2010-04-16

    This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

  9. Cooling season performance of an earth-sheltered office/dormitory building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Detailed hourly measurements taken in and around an underground office-dormitory building for two summers document energy savings; whole building-component interface problems; and specific cooling contributions from earth contact, interior thermal mass, and an economizer. The Joint Institute Dormitory (JID) saves about 30% compared with well-built above-grade buildings in a climate typical of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The detailed measurements, which include extensive thermal comfort data, indicate that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time. The thermal performance measurements and analysis determine that the peak cooling requirement of this building is 50% less than that of well-built above-grade structures, permitting a cost savings on installed cooling capacity. The dominant building components contributing to the good thermal performance are the structural thermal mass, the earth-covered roof, and the earth contact provided by the bermed walls and slab floor. The 372-m/sup 2/ (4000 gross ft/sup 2/) building used about $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate from May through September. Eliminating a number of building design and construction anomalies could improve the whole-building performance and reduce the seasonal cooling cost another $85. Close examination of the thermal performance of this building revealed that a very efficient heat pump and thermally sound envelope do not necessarily produce otpimum performance without careful attention given to component interface details. 8 references, 24 figures, 12 tables.

  10. Value of medium range weather forecasts in the improvement of seasonal hydrologic prediction skill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; Voisin, Nathalie; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-08-15

    We investigated the contribution of medium range weather forecasts with lead times up to 14 days to seasonal hydrologic prediction skill over the Conterminous United States (CONUS). Three different Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP)-based experiments were performed for the period 1980-2003 using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model to generate forecasts of monthly runoff and soil moisture (SM) at lead-1 (first month of the forecast period) to lead-3. The first experiment (ESP) used a resampling from the retrospective period 1980-2003 and represented full climatological uncertainty for the entire forecast period. In the second and third experiments, the first 14 days of each ESP ensemble member were replaced by either observations (perfect 14-day forecast) or by a deterministic 14-day weather forecast. We used Spearman rank correlations of forecasts and observations as the forecast skill score. We estimated the potential and actual improvement in baseline skill as the difference between the skill of experiments 2 and 3 relative to ESP, respectively. We found that useful runoff and SM forecast skill at lead-1 to -3 months can be obtained by exploiting medium range weather forecast skill in conjunction with the skill derived by the knowledge of initial hydrologic conditions. Potential improvement in baseline skill by using medium range weather forecasts, for runoff (SM) forecasts generally varies from 0 to 0.8 (0 to 0.5) as measured by differences in correlations, with actual improvement generally from 0 to 0.8 of the potential improvement. With some exceptions, most of the improvement in runoff is for lead-1 forecasts, although some improvement in SM was achieved at lead-2.

  11. Effects of continuous treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone during the anovulatory season on gonadotropin secretion, follicular dynamics and ovulation in the mare 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, Stephanie

    2005-02-17

    Objectives were to determine if low-dose, continuous infusion of GnRH from Fall to Spring, would prevent seasonal anovulation in mares. Twenty Quarter Horse mares, ages 18 mo to 24 yrs, were stratified by age and body ...

  12. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, Vol. 36, No. 4, 2004, pp. 456463 Growing-Season Carbon Dioxide Flux in a Dry Subarctic Heath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    ecosystem production (NEP). Diurnal NEP through a day with clear skies at peak growing season was consistently negative through all treatments the first year of measurement, and day-time NEP varied around zero

  13. in this issuewe offer commentary on MIT's regular-season undefeated football team and the continuing discussion of the need for more grad student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    in this issuewe offer commentary on MIT's regular-season undefeated football team, and simultane- ously to mitigate the escalation of housing costs for the general Cambridge 2014 MIT Football

  14. The Influence of Individuality, Age, and Season Upon the Weights of Fleeces Produced by Angora Goats Under Range Conditions. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lush, Jay L. (Jay Laurence); Jones, J. M. (John McKinley)

    1924-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Correlations Involving Grade Does 1-51 and Grade Does 52-154 in Separate Groups and Correlations Involving All grad^ Does 1-154 in One Group (Table 7) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Part 111. The Influence of Age and Season upon the Weight of Mohaj... of the goat, now known officially as "chevon", does not bring in a very large part of the total revenue derived from goats. When properly prepared it is really a very nutritious and palatable meat and deserves much wider use as a part of the average...

  15. Effects of season, plane of nutrition, and levels of protein and energy on reproductive phenomena in gilts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gossett, John Warren

    1957-01-01

    invaluable. Sincere appreciation is also expressed to Dr. R. 0. Berry of the Animal Husbandry Department and Dr. H. 0. Kunkel of the Animal Husbandry and Biocliemistry and Nutrition Departments for their continued encouragement and inspiration during.... SUMMARY OF EFFECTS OF ENERGY ON REPRODUCTIVE PHENOMENA (STUDIES I AND I I ) .....................52 TA BLEESab le PeePgRB le PIPa1b lI aP.alCLgRNGP .OPIlEPIS MBRLCNPB NNN FIC N G H AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA X2 PART III 8. SUMMARY OF EFFECTS OF SEASONS...

  16. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  17. A Seasonal Perspective on Regional Air Quality in CentralCalifornia - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.; Tonse, Shaheen R.; Jin, Ling

    2006-12-01

    Central California spans a wide variety of urban, agricultural, and natural terrain, including the San Francisco Bay area, the Central Valley, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Population within this region is growing rapidly, and there are persistent, serious air pollution problems including fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and ozone. Summertime photochemical air pollution is the focus of the present study, which represents a first phase in the development and application of a modeling capability to assess formation and transport of ozone and its precursors within Central California over an entire summer season. This contrasts with past studies that have examined pollutant dynamics for a few selected high-ozone episodes each lasting 3-5 days. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) has been applied to predict air pollutant formation and transport in Central California for a 15-day period beginning on July 24, 2000. This period includes a 5-day intensive operating period (July 29 to August 2) from the Central California Ozone Study (CCOS). Day-specific meteorological conditions were modeled by research collaborators at NOAA using a mesoscale meteorological model (MM5). Pollutant emissions within the study domain were based on CARB emission inventory estimates, with additional efforts conducted as part of this research to capture relevant emissions variability including (1) temperature and sunlight-driven changes in biogenic VOC, (2) weekday/weekend and diurnal differences in light-duty (LD) and heavy-duty (HD) motor vehicle emissions, (3) effects of day-specific meteorological conditions on plume rise from point sources such as power plants. We also studied the effects of using cleaner pollutant inflow boundary conditions, lower than indicated during CCOS aircraft flights over the Pacific Ocean, but supported by other surface, ship-based, balloon and aircraft sampling studies along the west coast. Model predictions were compared with measured concentrations for O{sub 3}, NO{sub x}, NO{sub y}, and CO at about 100 ground observation stations within the CCOS domain. Comparisons were made both for time series and for statistically aggregated metrics, to assess model performance over the whole modeling domain and for the individual air basins within the domain. The model tends to over-predict ozone levels along the coast where observed levels are generally low. Inland performance in the San Joaquin Valley is generally better. Model-measurement agreement for night-time ozone is improved by evaluating the sum of predicted O{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} against observations; this removes from the comparison the effect of any ozone titration that may occur. A variety of diagnostic simulations were conducted to investigate the causes for differences between predictions and observations. These included (1) enhanced deposition of O{sub 3} to the ocean, (2) reduced vertical mixing over the ocean, (3) attenuation of sunlight by coastal stratus, (4) the influence of surface albedo on photochemistry, and (5) the effects of observation nudging on wind fields. Use of advanced model probing tools such as process analysis and sensitivity analysis is demonstrated by diagnosing model sensitivity to boundary conditions and to weekday-weekend emission changes.

  18. DOE/EIA-0202(88/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101CompanyProduct:5/4Q)2Q) Energy4Q)2Q)3Q)

  19. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  20. Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

  1. Emergency Diesel Generation System Surveillance Test Policy Optimization Through Genetic Algorithms Using Non-Periodic Intervention Frequencies and Seasonal Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapa, Celso M.F.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [CNEN, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rua General Severiano 90, Rio de Janeiro, RJ-22-294-900 (Brazil); Frutuoso e Melo, P.F. [COPPE/UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco G, sala 101, Ilha do Fundao, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    Nuclear standby safety systems must frequently, be submitted to periodic surveillance tests. The main reason is to detect, as soon as possible, the occurrence of unrevealed failure states. Such interventions may, however, affect the overall system availability due to component outages. Besides, as the components are demanded, deterioration by aging may occur, penalizing again the system performance. By these reasons, planning a good surveillance test policy implies in a trade-off between gains and overheads due to the surveillance test interventions. In order maximize the systems average availability during a given period of time, it has recently been developed a non-periodic surveillance test optimization methodology based on genetic algorithms (GA). The fact of allowing non-periodic tests turns the solution space much more flexible and schedules can be better adjusted, providing gains in the overall system average availability, when compared to those obtained by an optimized periodic tests scheme. The optimization problem becomes, however, more complex. Hence, the use of a powerful optimization technique, such as GAs, is required. Some particular features of certain systems can turn it advisable to introduce other specific constraints in the optimization problem. The Emergency Diesel Generation System (EDGS) of a Nuclear Power Plant (N-PP) is a good example for demonstrating the introduction of seasonal constraints in the optimization problem. This system is responsible for power supply during an external blackout. Therefore, it is desirable during periods of high blackout probability to maintain the system availability as high as possible. Previous applications have demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of the methodology. However, no seasonal constraints have ever been imposed. This work aims at investigating the application of such methodology in the Angra-II Brazilian NPP EDGS surveillance test policy optimization, considering the blackout probability growth during summer, due to the electrical power demand increase. Here, the model used penalizes test interventions by a continuous modulating function, which depends on the instantaneous blackout probability. Results have demonstrated the ability of the method in adapting the surveillance tests policy to seasonal behaviors. The knowledge acquired by the GA during the searching process has lead to test schedules that drastically minimize the test interventions at periods of high blackout probability. It is compensated by more frequent tests redistributed through the periods of low blackout probability, in order to provide improvement on the overall average availability at the system level. (authors)

  2. Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for Next-Generation CSP Systems- FY13 Q2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  3. Quarterly Report for LANL Activities: FY12-Q2 National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawar, Rajesh J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-17

    This report summarizes progress of LANL activities related to the tasks performed under the LANL FWP FE102-002-FY10, National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program. This FWP is funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Overall, the NRAP activities are focused on understanding and evaluating risks associated with large-scale injection and long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in deep geological formations. One of the primary risks during large-scale injection is due to changes in geomechanical stresses to the storage reservoir, to the caprock/seals and to the wellbores. These changes may have the potential to cause CO{sub 2} and brine leakage and geochemical impacts to the groundwater systems. While the importance of these stresses is well recognized, there have been relatively few quantitative studies (laboratory, field or theoretical) of geomechanical processes in sequestration systems. In addition, there are no integrated studies that allow evaluation of risks to groundwater quality in the context of CO{sub 2} injection-induced stresses. The work performed under this project is focused on better understanding these effects. LANL approach will develop laboratory and computational tools to understand the impact of CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical stress by creating a geomechanical test bed using inputs from laboratory experiments, field data, and conceptual approaches. The Geomechanical Test Bed will be used for conducting sensitivity and scenario analyses of the impacts of CO{sub 2} injection. The specific types of questions will relate to fault stimulation and fracture inducing stress on caprock, changes in wellbore leakage due to evolution of stress in the reservoir and caprock, and the potential for induced seismicity. In addition, the Geomechanical Test Bed will be used to investigate the coupling of stress-induced leakage pathways with impacts on groundwater quality. LANL activities are performed under two tasks: (1) develop laboratory and computational tools to understand CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical impacts and (2) use natural analog sites to determine potential groundwater impacts. We are using the Springerville-St. John Dome as a field site for collecting field data on CO{sub 2} migration through faults and groundwater impacts as well as developing and validating computational models. During the FY12 second quarter we have been working with New England Research Company to construct a tri-axial core-holder. We have built fluid control system for the coreflood system that can be ported to perform in-situ imaging of core. We have performed numerical simulations for groundwater impacts of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage using the reservoir model for Springerville-St John's Dome site. We have analyzed groundwater samples collected from Springerville site for major ion chemistry and isotopic composition. We are currently analyzing subsurface core and chip samples acquired for mineralogical composition.

  4. A Small-Particle Solar Receiver for High-Temperature Brayton Power Cycles- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SDSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  5. Experimental study of exclusive $^2$H$(e,e^\\prime p)n$ reaction mechanisms at high $Q^2$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim Egiyan; Gegham Asryan; Nerses Gevorgyan; Keith Griffioen; Jean Laget; Sebastian Kuhn; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Gerard Audit; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; Vitaly Baturin; Marco Battaglieri; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Angela Biselli; Lukasz Blaszczyk; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Antoine Cazes; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Rita De Masi; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Haluk Denizli; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Steven Dytman; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Robert Fersch; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Christopher Gordon; Ralf Gothe; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Hayko Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; Charles Hanretty; John Hardie; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Ji Li; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; Marion MacCormick; Claude Marchand; Nikolai Markov; Paul Mattione; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Surik Mehrabyan; Joseph Melone; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; Maryam Moteabbed; James Mueller; Edwin Munevar Espitia; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Sergio Pereira; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-06-01

    The reaction {sup 2}H(e,e{prime} p)n has been studied with full kinematic coverage for photon virtuality 1.75 < 5.5 {approx} GeV{sup 2}. Comparisons of experimental data with theory indicate that for very low values of neutron recoil momentum (p{sub n} < 100 MeV/c) the neutron is primarily a spectator and the reaction can be described by the plane-wave impulse approximation. For 100 < 750 MeV/c proton-neutron rescattering dominates the cross section, while {Delta} production followed by the N{Delta} {yields} NN transition is the primary contribution at higher momenta.

  6. Measurement of th eta and etaprime Transition Form Factors at q^2 = 112 GeV^2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-05-16

    The authors report a study of the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}'{gamma} at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV, using a 232 fb{sup -1} data sample collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider at SLAC.

  7. Querying quantitative logic models (Q2LM) to study intracellular signaling networks and cell-cytokine interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Melody K.

    Mathematical models have substantially improved our ability to predict the response of a complex biological system to perturbation, but their use is typically limited by difficulties in specifying model topology and parameter ...

  8. Measurement of the Neutron electric form factor at Q2=0.8 2(GeV\\\\c)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Glazier

    2007-09-30

    Nucleon form factors allow a sensitive test for models of the nucleon. Recent experiments utilising polarisation observables have resulted, for the first time, in a model-independent determination of the neutron electric form factor GnE. This method employed an 80% longitudinally polarised, high intensity (10 uA) electon beam (883 MeV) that was quasi-elastically scattered off a liquid deuterium target in the reaction D (e, en)p. A neutron polarimeter was designed and installed to measure the ratio of transverse-to-longitudinal polarisation using neutron scattering asymmetries. This ratio allowed a determination of the neutron elastic form factor, GnE, free of the previous large systematic uncertainties associated with the deuterium wave function. The experiment took place in the A1 experimental hall at MAMI taking advantage of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer. A detailed investigation was carried out into the performance of the neutron polarimeter.

  9. What does the proton look like inside? Measurement of highQ 2 e -p neutral current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Alternatively, instead of a function of angle and energy, the cross section can be determined for di other. The energies reached are 27.5 GeV for electrons and 920 GeV for protons yielding a centre­of­mass energy (the energy available for the reaction) of 318 GeV (1 GeV is the kinetic energy of an electron

  10. Discovery of oscillatory dynamics of city-size distributions in world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    of pdf thru Skype you can ask questions, thru Humberto he will have a chat box to relay questions I test) China leads by 50 years in its Q values ­ up to 1850 PART III: Scaling Examples: Chinese-results are very similar, as reported for the 1- factor test. Q1 Q3 Q5 Q2 Q4 Q6 #12;7 Multiple measures of Q

  11. Asymmetric rotor analysis of DSOD spectra up to the r

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesen, Thomas

    West, Onagawa l6-1, Tsukuba 305-8569, Japan Received 17 January 2005; revised 18 January 2005; accepted, the a-type transitions are expected to appear at most only in the microwave and in the longer millimeter-wave of discharge-generated DSOD. At that time we had observed the r Q0 and r Q2 branches. The r Q3 branch

  12. LITERATURE FORMING THE BASIS FOR WHERE RIVERS ARE BORN Adams, S.B., and C.A. Frissell. 2001. Thermal habitat use and evidence of seasonal migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    . Thermal habitat use and evidence of seasonal migration by Rocky Mountain tailed frogs, Ascaphus montanus 76: 129-140. Bilby, R. E. and G. E. Likens. 1980. Importance of organic debris dams in the structure and function of stream ecosystems. Ecology 61:1107-1113. Bilby, R. E. 1981. Role of organic debris dams

  13. Dong, S., G. Goni, and R. Lumpkin. 2015. Mixed-layer salinity budget in the SPURS region on seasonal to interannual time scales. Oceanography 28(1):7885,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on seasonal to interannual time scales. Oceanography 28(1):78­85, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2015 in Oceanography, Volume 28, Number 1, a quarterly journal of The Oceanography Society. Copyright 2015 by The Oceanography Society. All rights reserved. USAGE Permission is granted to copy this article for use in teaching

  14. Tillage and seasonal emissions of CO2, N2O and NO across a seed bed and at the field scale in a Mediterranean climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Tillage and seasonal emissions of CO2, N2O and NO across a seed bed and at the field scale tillage may increase N2O emissions under certain circumstances, thereby offsetting C sequestration manage- ment accounted for almost 94% of total US N2O emissions from 1990 to 2004 (USEPA, 2006). In 2004

  15. Seasonal variations in N and O isotopes of nitrate in snow at Summit, Greenland: Implications for the study of nitrate in snow and ice cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Seasonal variations in N and O isotopes of nitrate in snow at Summit, Greenland: Implications for the study of nitrate in snow and ice cores Meredith G. Hastings Department of Geosciences, Princeton measured in snow and firn from Summit, Greenland. The 15 N/14 N and 18 O/16 O ratios of NO3 À in recently

  16. REVIEWS OF GEOPHYSICS: U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS COOL SEASON CYCLOGENESIS AND ASSOCIATED MESOSCALE WEATHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Businger, Steven

    -1994 COOL SEASON CYCLOGENESIS AND ASSOCIATED MESOSCALE WEATHER Steven Businger Department of Meteorology (NWS) and a profusion of recent field experiments1 are bringing an explosion of mesoscale2 observations to probe the mesoscale structure and evolution of winter cyclones in recent years. Many recent advances

  17. Evapotranspiration of Cool-Season Turfgrasses in the Humid Northeast' L. J. Aronson, A. J. Gold, R. J. Hull, and J. L. Cisar2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    Evapotranspiration of Cool-Season Turfgrasses in the Humid Northeast' L. J. Aronson, A. J. Gold, R that will lower water requirements as competition for water use increases. Transpiration accounts for most of the water lost from a dense turfgrass canopy (Beard, 1973). It has been established that transpiration rate

  18. Contribution of Ocean, Fossil Fuel, Land Biosphere and Biomass Burning Carbon1 Fluxes to Seasonal and Interannual Variability in Atmospheric CO22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    1 Contribution of Ocean, Fossil Fuel, Land Biosphere and Biomass Burning Carbon1 Fluxes to Seasonal et al., 1989].18 Anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion and cement manufacture drive most of the recent by deforestation, discussed below) over the last 50 years. The fossil fuel plus4 cement input, in contrast

  19. 4.2 COOL SEASON SIGNIFICANT (F2-F5) TORNADOES IN THE GULF COAST STATES Jared L. Guyer and David A. Imy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) found that 68% of all December through February tornadoes in the United States occur in the Gulf Coast4.2 COOL SEASON SIGNIFICANT (F2-F5) TORNADOES IN THE GULF COAST STATES Jared L. Guyer and David A, Wisconsin Kar'retta Venable Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 1. INTRODUCTION Tornadoes pose

  20. ANNUALISED SALARY APPLICATION This form is to be completed by `Seasonal' or `Part-time' staff wishing to have their salary spread over 52

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    ANNUALISED SALARY APPLICATION This form is to be completed by `Seasonal' or `Part-time' staff wishing to have their salary spread over 52 weeks on a pro-rata basis. The form can be completed on Salary Scheme Guidelines: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000414.html Signature

  1. Bio-Optical Variability in Mayaguez Bay during the Rainy Season Joel A. Quiones Rivera, ja23_degrees@hotmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Bio-Optical Variability in Mayaguez Bay during the Rainy Season Joel A. Quiñones Rivera, ja23 by suspending particles in the water that affects light penetration. This is critical for the bio-optical from different stations collected with an bio-optical rosette along the Mayagüez Bay and considering

  2. et al. 2003). Seasonal drought and extreme wind events make the WUI especially susceptible to fire. In late October, 2003, Southern California experienced the worst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    . The Wildland-Urban Interface Evacuation (WUIVAC) model is designed to help decision-makers set fire evacu#12;et al. 2003). Seasonal drought and extreme wind events make the WUI especially susceptible. Multiple large wildfires driven by Santa Ana winds consumed more than 300,000 ha. These fires were

  3. Annual Report: 2011-2012 Storm Season Sampling, Non-Dry Dock Stormwater Monitoring for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Rupert, Brian; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhart, Christine

    2013-07-03

    Annual PSNS non-dry dock storm water monitoring results for 2011-2012 storm season. Included are a brief description of the sampling procedures, storm event information, laboratory methods and data collection, a results and discussion section, and the conclusions and recommendations.

  4. Mesoscale Predictability of an Extreme Warm-Season Precipitation Event FUQING ZHANG, ANDREW M. ODINS, AND JOHN W. NIELSEN-GAMMON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale Predictability of an Extreme Warm-Season Precipitation Event FUQING ZHANG, ANDREW M Station, Texas (Manuscript received 22 November 2004, in final form 28 August 2005) ABSTRACT A mesoscale model is used to investigate the mesoscale predictability of an extreme precipitation event over central

  5. Canonical factorization and diagonalization of Baxterized braid matrices: Explicit constructions and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chakrabarti

    2003-05-07

    Braid matrices $\\hat{R}(\\theta)$, corresponding to vector representations, are spectrally decomposed obtaining a ratio $f_{i}(\\theta)/f_{i}(-\\theta)$ for the coefficient of each projector $P_{i}$ appearing in the decomposition. This directly yields a factorization $(F(-\\theta))^{-1}F(\\theta)$ for the braid matrix, implying also the relation $\\hat{R}(-\\theta)\\hat{R}(\\theta)=I$.This is achieved for $GL_{q}(n),SO_{q}(2n+1),SO_{q}(2n),Sp_{q}(2n)$ for all $n$ and also for various other interesting cases including the 8-vertex matrix.We explain how the limits $\\theta \\to \\pm \\infty$ can be interpreted to provide factorizations of the standard (non-Baxterized) braid matrices. A systematic approach to diagonalization of projectors and hence of braid matrices is presented with explicit constructions for $GL_{q}(2),GL_{q}(3),SO_{q}(3),SO_{q}(4),Sp_{q}(4)$ and various other cases such as the 8-vertex one. For a specific nested sequence of projectors diagonalization is obtained for all dimensions. In each factor $F(\\theta)$ our diagonalization again factors out all dependence on the spectral parameter $\\theta$ as a diagonal matrix. The canonical property implemented in the diagonalizers is mutual orthogonality of the rows. Applications of our formalism to the construction of $L-$operators and transfer matrices are indicated. In an Appendix our type of factorization is compared to another one proposed by other authors.

  6. Standard Guide for Irradiation of Dried Spices, Herbs, and Vegetable Seasonings to Control Pathogens and Other Microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for irradiation of dried spices, herbs, and vegetable seasonings for microbiological control. Generally, these items have moisture content of 4.5 to 12 % and are available in whole, ground, chopped, or other finely divided forms, or as blends. The blends may contain sodium chloride and minor amounts of dry food materials ordinarily used in such blends. 1.2 This guide covers absorbed doses ranging from 3 to 30 kiloGray (kGy). Note 1—U.S. regulations permit a maximum dose of 30 kGy. (See 21CFR 179.26 Irradiation in the Production, Processing and Handling of Food.) 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. A Distributed Modeling System for Short-Term to Seasonal Ensemble Streamflow Forecasting in Snowmelt Dominated Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Gill, Muhammad K.; Coleman, Andre M.; Prasad, Rajiv; Vail, Lance W.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a distributed modeling system for short-term to seasonal water supply forecasts with the ability to utilize remotely-sensed snow cover products and real-time streamflow measurements. Spatial variability in basin characteristics and meteorology is represented using a raster-based computational grid. Canopy interception, snow accumulation and melt, and simplified soil water movement are simulated in each computational unit. The model is run at a daily time step with surface runoff and subsurface flow aggregated at the basin scale. This approach allows the model to be updated with spatial snow cover and measured streamflow using an Ensemble Kalman-based data assimilation strategy that accounts for uncertainty in weather forecasts, model parameters, and observations used for updating. Model inflow forecasts for the Dworshak Reservoir in northern Idaho are compared to observations and to April-July volumetric forecasts issued by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) for Water Years 2000 – 2006. October 1 volumetric forecasts are superior to those issued by the NRCS, while March 1 forecasts are comparable. The ensemble spread brackets the observed April-July volumetric inflows in all years. Short-term (one and three day) forecasts also show excellent agreement with observations.

  8. Observations of traveling ionospheric disturbances with a satellite-beacon radio interferometer: Seasonal and local time behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, A.R.; Carlos, R.C.; Massey, R.S.; Wui, Guanghui [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The authors have operated a very long baseline interferometer array at a northern midlatitude site, illuminated by VHF radio beacons from two geosynchronous satellites, quasi-continuously for over a year. The array can detect and measure the trace velocity of traveling ionosphere disturbances (TIDs) via their signatures in the line-of-sight total electron content (TEC). The system noise level is of the order of 10{sup 13} m{sup {minus}2} in the TEC, so that even very weak perturbations can be studied. They have used the year-long TID detection/velocimetry data set to describe local time and seasonal dependences of the wave parameters. The most striking finding is that the preferred azimuths of TIDs in the data set tend to belong to either of two modes: The first mode, strongest at midday and in the early afternoon, particularly around winter equinox, propagates southward. The second mode, strongest in the evening, especially during summer solstice through autumn equinox, propagates west-northwestward. The two modes are disposed in local time such as to suggest the agency of clockwise rotation of the TID preferred azimuths versus time, as expected by wind filtering in the thermospheric diurnal tide. However, there is a gap between the two modes` azimuth bands. Moreover, the two modes exist in all trace-speed quartiles of the data set TIDs, a finding which is at variance with the hypothesis of wind filtering being the primary explanation of these modes. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  10. Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

  11. Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

  12. Robust Spring Drying in the Southwestern U.S. and Seasonal Migration of Wet/Dry Patterns in a Warmer Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lu, Jian; Liu, Ying; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun

    2014-03-16

    This study compares climate simulations over the United States produced by a regional climate model with the driving global climate simulations as well as a large multi-model ensemble of global climate simulations to investigate robust changes in water availability (precipitation (P) – evapotranspiration (E)). A robust spring dry signal across multiple models is identified in the Southwest that results from a decrease in P and an increase in E in the future. In the boreal winter and summer, the prominent changes in P – E are associated with a north – south dipole pattern, while in spring, the prominent changes in P – E appear as an east – west dipole pattern. The progression of the north – south and east – west dipole patterns through the seasons manifests clearly as a seasonal “clockwise” migration of wet/dry patterns, which is shown to be a robust feature of water availability changes in the US consistent across regional and global climate simulations.

  13. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  14. Theatre Seasons and Festivals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1969-10-01

    desarrollo; a la vez que su función en escala nacional, cosas estas que fueron tomadas como pretexto para enfrentar el funcionamiento actual del Centro Venezolano de Teatro y lo que debe ser su verdadero papel en cuanto entidad comprometida con todo el... tituido por 3 personas: Eduardo Moreno, Armando Gota, Miguel Tor- rence. 13. Incorporar a la Asociación Venezolana de Periodistas, en escala nacional, al Centro Venezolano de Teatro. 14. Promover un curso de Dirección Teatral con la participación de...

  15. Open Season in Sacramento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brosnan, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Douglas Brosnan, MD, JD CAL/ACEP Policy & Advocacy FellowOvercrowding Sponsored by Cal/ACEP, this bill strives to

  16. Theatre Seasons and Festivals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1971-04-01

    to be largely unconscious of the writing on the wall. This should be particularly important in view of Chile's current political evolution, which is already ex pressing itself in film and in popular song. Chil e — Temporad a Teatra l — Santiag o d e Chil e... r Puntil a y su criad o Matt i Canció n par a u n crepúscul o Extranjer a po r viaj e vend e Do n Jua n Aprobad o e n castida d AUTO R Jorg e Día z Arthu r Schnitzle r (fre e adaptio n b y Asunció n Requen a & Raú l Rivera ) Ionesc o...

  17. OPEN SEASON CHECK LIST

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew2008Group, Inc.Acquisition Guides OPAMAcquisition

  18. Four seasons of giving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming Upgrades to the ARM MMCRs:FoundriesKurt's Column

  19. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, M.S.; Biraud, S.; Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Berry, J.A.

    2010-09-22

    The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of terrestrial carbon fluxes ({delta}{sub bio}) provides an important constraint for inverse models of CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, insight into vegetation physiology, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} vegetation productivity, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and {delta}{sup 13}C-CO{sub 2} at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed {delta}{sub bio} weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C{sub 3} winter wheat) and C{sub 4} pasture grasses. {delta}{sub bio} had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8{per_thousand}. Ensemble monthly mean {delta}{sub bio} ranged from -25.8 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} ({+-}SE) in March to -20.1 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} in July. Thus, C{sub 3} vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil {delta}{sub 13}C values were about -15{per_thousand}, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C{sub 4} vegetation and had more positive {delta}{sub bio} values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes ({delta}{sub bio} x NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because {delta}{sub bio} and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in {delta}{sub bio} and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes.

  20. Incomplete cooling down of Saturn's A ring at solar equinox: Implication for seasonal thermal inertia and internal structure of ring particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morishima, Ryuji; Brooks, Shawn; Deau, Estelle; Pilorz, Stu

    2015-01-01

    At the solar equinox in August 2009, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini showed the lowest Saturn's ring temperatures ever observed. Detailed radiative transfer models show that the observed equinox temperatures of Saturn's A ring are much higher than model predictions as long as only the flux from Saturn is taken into account. This indicates that the A ring was not completely cooled down at the equinox. We develop a simple seasonal model for ring temperatures and first assume that the internal density and the thermal inertia of a ring particle are uniform with depth. The particle size is estimated to be 1-2 m. The seasonal thermal inertia is found to be 30-50 Jm$^{-2}$K$^{-1}$s$^{-1/2}$ in the middle A ring whereas it is $\\sim$ 10 Jm$^{-2}$K$^{-1}$s$^{-1/2}$ or as low as the diurnal thermal inertia in the inner and outermost regions of the A ring. An additional internal structure model, in which a particle has a high density core surrounded by a fluffy regolith mantle, shows that the c...

  1. Seasonal cycle of Precipitation over Major River Basins in South and Southeast Asia: A Review of the CMIP5 climate models data for present climate and future climate projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio; Böhner, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We review the skill of thirty coupled climate models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 in terms of reproducing properties of the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the major river basins of South and Southeast Asia (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for historical period (1961-2000). We also present projected changes by these models by end of century (2061-2100) under extreme scenario RCP8.5. First, we assess their ability to reproduce observed timings of the monsoon onset and the rate of rapid fractional accumulation (RFA slope) - a measure of seasonality within active monsoon period. Secondly, we apply a threshold-independent seasonality index (SI) - a multiplicative measure of precipitation and extent of its concentration relative to the uniform distribution (relative entropy - RE). We apply SI distinctly for monsoonal precipitation regime (MPR), westerly precipitation regime (WPR) and annual precipitation regime. For present climate, neither any single model nor the multi-mod...

  2. Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

    2009-10-01

    Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

  3. Model for the low-latitude ionosphere with coefficients for different seasonal and solar cycle conditions. Final report, 1 October 1981-30 June 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendillo, M.; Herniter, B.

    1986-11-01

    A new ionospheric model for the low-latitude ionosphere was constructed to provide easy access to electron density profiles (Ne(h)), total electron content (TEC) and 6300A airglow under a variety of conditions. Results from the rigorous theoretical calculations for ionospheric structure at a given time and a site were parameterized to a set of six coefficients that reproduce the individual Ne(h) profiles using a simple algebraic formula. This report summarizes the rationale for such a model, describes the input parameters and methods used to generate the coefficients, and provides a comprehensive set of coefficients. The model covers the low-latitude ionosphere (24 N to 24 S every 4 deg of dip latitude), over the altitude range 180 to 1000km, for every hour of local time. The tabulated coefficients, TEC and 6300 airglow are presented for three seasons (Equinox, June solstice, and December solstice) and two solar cycles (solar maximum and solar minimum).

  4. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station. Interim report, 1992 cooling season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  5. Recent forecasts from the National Weather Service and other Hurricane watchers predict an active Hurricane Season for the U.S. Connecticut has been severely affected many times by Hurricanes. Individuals, businesses and communities can take some basic st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, David M.

    Recent forecasts from the National Weather Service and other Hurricane watchers predict an active Hurricane Season for the U.S. Connecticut has been severely affected many times by Hurricanes. Individuals, businesses and communities can take some basic steps to be better informed about and prepared for Hurricanes

  6. Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  7. Virtual Compton scattering and the generalized polarizabilities of the proton at Q2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, William

    Virtual Compton scattering (VCS) on the proton has been studied at the Jefferson Laboratory using the exclusive photon electroproduction reaction ep?ep?. This paper gives a detailed account of the analysis which has led ...

  8. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; et al

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry Ad1 and the polarized structure function gd1 were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2 more »a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions An1 and g1n of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, W « less

  9. Search for an additional heavy Higgs boson in the H->ZZ->2l2q/2v2q decay channel with ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In July 2012, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC reported the observation of a new particle with a mass of about 125GeV and with properties consistent with the expected SM Higgs boson. It's important to verify whether this new particle is part of an extended scalar sector as populated by various extensions to the SM such as 2HDM and EWS model, and searching for the additional Higgs can help us to better understand EWSB process, as well as precision measurement of the 125GeV resonance. The additional heavy Higgs search with centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV with an integrated luminosity of 20.3$fb^{-1}$ data collected by ATLAS detector is presented here, the mass range in this search is from 200GeV(llqq)/400GeV(vvqq) to 1TeV.

  10. Measured Lifetimes of Selected Metastable Levels of Arq+ Ions (Q=2, 3, 9, and 10) Stored in an Electrostatic Ion-Trap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, L. S.; Church, David A.; Tu, S. G.; Jin, J.

    1994-01-01

    to the cylinder. The ions were selected on a charge-to-mass ratio basis before capture. Photons emitted in magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole transitions from levels with lifetimes exceeding 5 ms were selected by wavelength and recorded vs ion storage time...

  11. Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry in $e+p^\\uparrow \\to e+J/?+X $ and $Q^2$ -evolution of Sivers Function-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohini M. Godbole; Abhiram Kaushik; Anuradha Misra; Vaibhav S. Rawoot

    2014-08-30

    We present estimates of Single Spin Asymmetry(SSA) in the electroproduction of J/{\\psi} taking into account the transverse momentum dependent(TMD) evolution of the Sivers function. We estimate SSA for JLab, HERMES, COMPASS and eRHIC energies using color evaporation model of J/{\\psi}. We have calculated the asymmetry using recent parameters extracted by Echevarria et al. using the CSS approach to TMD evolution. These recent TMD evolution fits are based on the evolution kernel in which the perturbative part is resummed up to NLL accuracy. We have also estimated the asymmetry by using parameters which had been obtained by a fit by Anselmino et al., using both an exact numerical and an approximate analytical solution of the TMD evolution equations. We find that the variation among the different estimates obtained using TMD evolution is much smaller than between these on one hand and the estimates obtained using DGLAP evolution on the other. Even though the use of TMD evolution causes an overall reduction in asymmetries compared to the ones obtained without it, they remain sizable. Overall, upon use of TMD evolution, predictions for asymmetries stabilize.

  12. Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry in $e+p^\\uparrow \\to e+J/\\psi +X $ and $Q^2$ -evolution of Sivers Function-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godbole, Rohini M; Misra, Anuradha; Rawoot, Vaibhav S

    2014-01-01

    We present estimates of Single Spin Asymmetry(SSA) in the electroproduction of J/{\\psi} taking into account the transverse momentum dependent(TMD) evolution of the Sivers function. We estimate SSA for JLab, HERMES, COMPASS and eRHIC energies using color evaporation model of J/{\\psi}. We have calculated the asymmetry using recent parameters extracted by Echevarria et al. using the CSS approach to TMD evolution. These recent TMD evolution fits are based on the evolution kernel in which the perturbative part is resummed up to NLL accuracy. We have also estimated the asymmetry by using parameters which had been obtained by a fit by Anselmino et al., using both an exact numerical and an approximate analytical solution of the TMD evolution equations. We find that the variation among the different estimates obtained using TMD evolution is much smaller than between these on one hand and the estimates obtained using DGLAP evolution on the other. Even though the use of TMD evolution causes an overall reduction in asymm...

  13. Study of the ¹²C(e,e'p) reaction in a correlations dominant regime with Q² = 2.0 (GeV/c)² and XB? > 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monaghan, Peter (Peter Andrew)

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was motivated by studying short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations via multinucleon knockout reactions -- (e, e'pN). The data were taken in Hall A at Jefferson Lab using the pair of high resolution spectrometers ...

  14. CI2525 ESTRUCTURAS DISCRETAS I d-m 2015 P 1/35 P 2/35 Q 1/15 Q 2/15 TOTAL/5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meza, Oscar J.

    Edinson 21 17 12 7 3 1110502 Lago Ibañez, Giancarlo Stephan 1 1111274 Di Zio Castillo, Ricardo Andres 5 4,5 3 1110883 Rodriguez Fernandez, Luis Ely 12 13,5 0 2 1111391 Lupo Loyo, Pablo Francisco 13,5 1

  15. Quiz # 7, STAT 383, Prof. Suman Sanyal, April 8, 2009 (Q2, Page 354) To decide whether the pipe welds in a nuclear power plant meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    welds in a nuclear power plant meet specifications, a random sample of welds is to be selected : µ nuclear power plants is to determine if welds

  16. Measurement of the D* Meson Production Cross Section and F_2^{ccbar}, at High Q^2, in ep Scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The H1 Collaboration

    2009-11-20

    The inclusive production of D*(2010) mesons in deep-inelastic ep scattering is measured in the kinematic region of photon virtuality 100 production are measured in the visible range defined by |eta(D*)| 1.5 GeV. The data were collected by the H1 experiment during the period from 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 351 pb^{-1}. The charm contribution, F_2^{ccbar}, to the proton structure function F_2 is determined. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions.

  17. ACBEDGF1DIH P Q2R§STDVU@DVW RYX1`bacSedVagf ShFiSpaqSTr1H£s)t

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01) (NotAdvanced ABSTRACTS FOR3

  18. Suction recirculation and its effects upon axial-flow pump power consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prince, Tony M.

    1983-01-01

    1 Test Procedure Outline 2 Section and Pump Critical Flowrates and Speeds. 63 91 3 Power Coefficient and Reynolds Number Based on Cone Radius. 100 4 Power Coefficient and Reynolds Number Based on Surface Area. 101 5 Power Coefficient... Variation with NPSH with Q rl 54 Head Variation with NPSH with Q 2 . r2 55 Head Variation with NPSH with Q 3. r3' 120 128 129 130 131 134 135 136 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Pumps of different types are used to displace liquids from one location...

  19. Fabrication of triangular nanobeam waveguide networks in bulk diamond using single-crystal silicon hard masks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayn, I.; Mouradian, S.; Li, L.; Goldstein, J. A.; Schröder, T.; Zheng, J.; Chen, E. H.; Gaathon, O.; Englund, Dirk; Lu, M.; Stein, A.; Ruggiero, C. A.; Salzman, J.; Kalish, R.

    2014-11-24

    A scalable approach for integrated photonic networks in single-crystal diamond using triangular etching of bulk samples is presented. We describe designs of high quality factor (Q?=?2.51?×?10{sup 6}) photonic crystal cavities with low mode volume (V{sub m}?=?1.062?×?(?/n){sup 3}), which are connected via waveguides supported by suspension structures with predicted transmission loss of only 0.05?dB. We demonstrate the fabrication of these structures using transferred single-crystal silicon hard masks and angular dry etching, yielding photonic crystal cavities in the visible spectrum with measured quality factors in excess of Q?=?3?×?10{sup 3}.

  20. BULLETIN (New Series) OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kantor, William M.

    (/, Z[l/p]) denote the intersection PSO(/, Qp)'nPGL(n, Z[l/p]) within PGL(n,Qp), and similarly PGO(/, Z- (i) Let = eg, &7,ci6,66*^6* or as, and let A be the affine building of PSO(/,Q2). Here T can be any and reflections. (ii) Let = &5,e6, or b'e = Xax ? + ^x h a n ( l let A be the building of PSO(/,Q3). The group rm