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  1. Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Nominal Prices (dollars per gallon) WTI Crude Oil (Spot) a 1.38 1.11 1.24 1.08 1.06 1.07 -21.4 -4.5 -13.7 Brent Crude Oil Price (Spot) 1.47 1.20 1.33 1.08 1.08 1.08 -26.1 -10.2 -18.8 U.S. Refiner Average Crude Oil Cost 1.37 1.14 1.25 1.00 1.03 1.02 -26.6 -8.8 -18.5 Wholesale Gasoline Price b 2.01 1.84 1.93 1.58 1.46 1.52 -21.6 -20.6 -21.1 Wholesale Diesel Fuel Price b 1.89 1.61 1.75 1.41 1.43 1.42 -25.4 -11.4 -18.8 Regular Gasoline Retail Price c 2.67 2.60

  2. Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Q3) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q3) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  3. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2016)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE FOIA Quarterly Reports for Q2 2016. This information will be displayed on the DOJ http://www.foia.gov

  4. Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Q2) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q2) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  5. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity...

  6. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons)...

  7. Q3dComms Version 0.9

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-01-05

    Q3dComms provides an interface to the commercial package Quest30 . Quest30 connectors called "channels" can be directly mapped to Umbra connectors using this tool. Furthermore, virtual 30 worlds created in Quest30 can be connected to Umbra with this tool.

  8. Electrolux: ENERGY STAR Referral (GAH105Q2T1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE referred the matter of Electrolux room air conditioner model GAH105Q2T1 to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification.

  9. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  10. Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 This document summarizes the progress of this PNNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013. progress_report_sunshot_pnnl_fy13_q2.pdf (274.11 KB) More Documents & Publications Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System for High Efficiency Production of Electricity Highly Efficient Solar Thermochemical Reaction Systems Integrated

  11. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart. Abstract not provided. Authors: Andraka, Charles E. Publication Date: 2014-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1171437 Report Number(s): SAND2014-15691R 533649 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM

  12. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart Abstract not provided. Authors: Andraka, Charles E. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States) Publication Date: 2015-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1211552 Report Number(s): SAND2015--6472R 598782 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type:

  13. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart Abstract not provided. Authors: Andraka, Charles E. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States) Publication Date: 2015-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1178621 Report Number(s): SAND2015-2914R 583301 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000

  14. SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q3 FY15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 rd Quarter FY 2015 *Data does not include MOX, Parsons and some small subcontractors SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q3 FY15 GA County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Burke 34 3 4 0 0 41 Columbia 777 260 100 6 42 1185 Jefferson 2 2 0 0 0 4 Lincoln 8 1 2 0 0 11 McDuffie 8 6 0 0 2 16 Richmond 548 160 102 4 29 843 Screven 23 6 1 0 0 30 Other 35 8 3 0 0 46 GA TOTAL 1435 446 212 10 73 2176 SC County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Aiken 2613 852 353 9 158

  15. TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls (14.26 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program Homes Weatherized By State through 06/30/2010 (Calendar Year) Homes Weatherized by State March 2010 ARRA Homes Weatherized by Grantee

  16. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2009-12-01

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio µpGEp/GMp in the range Q2 = 0.3–0.7 GeV2/c2 was performed using recoil polarimetry in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low Q2 range, previous data from LEDEX [5] along with many fits and calculations [2, 3, 4] indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. In this new measurement, with 80% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve <1% statistical uncertainty. Preliminary results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, indicating a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and strangeness form factors through parity violation experiments.

  17. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2010-01-31

    Experiment E08-007 measured the proton elastic form factor ratio ?pGE/GM in the range of Q2 = 0.3?0.7(GeV/c)2 by recoil polarimetry. Data were taken in 2008 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. A 1.2 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton was detected in the left HRS in coincidence with the elasticly scattered electrons tagged by the BigBite spectrometer. The proton polarization was measured by the focal plane polarimeter (FPP). In this low Q2 region, previous measurement from Jefferson Lab Hall A (LEDEX) along with various fits and calculations indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. For this new measurement, the proposed statistical uncertainty (< 1%) was achieved. These new results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, which indicate a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the new results also have implications in determining the proton Zemach radius and the strangeness form factors from parity violation experiments.

  18. SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q2, FY 15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 nd Quarter, FY 2015 *Data does not include MOX, Parsons and some small subcontractors SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q2, FY 15 GA County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Burke 34 3 4 0 0 41 Columbia 769 249 102 7 45 1172 Jefferson 2 2 0 0 0 4 Lincoln 9 1 2 0 0 12 McDuffie 9 6 0 0 2 17 Richmond 558 146 103 3 29 839 Screven 23 6 1 0 0 30 Other 36 1 3 0 0 40 GA TOTAL 1440 414 215 10 76 2155 SC County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Aiken 2597 829 360 9

  19. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Resonance Region at High $Q^2$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villano, A N; Bosted, P E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Jones, M K; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Cui, Y; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Elliot, B; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Grullon, S; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E R; Kubarovsky, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Lu, M; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchhyan, H; Napolitano, J; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Pamela, P; Potterveld, D H; Reimer, Paul E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R

    2009-09-01

    The process $ep \\to e^{\\prime}p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$ has been measured at $Q^2$ = 6.4 and 7.7 \\ufourmomts in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center of mass frame considering the process $\\gamma^{\\ast}p \\to p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well known $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios $R_{EM}$ and $R_{SM}$ along with the magnetic transition form factor $G_M^{\\ast}$. It is found that the rapid fall off of the $\\Delta(1232)$ contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances

  20. High-precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM at low Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhan, X.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bertozzi, W.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J. -P.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2011-10-06

    Here, we report a new high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM for the four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 0.3-0.7 (GeV/c)2. The measurement was performed at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in Hall A using recoil polarimetry. With the achieved ~1% total uncertainty, the new data clearly show that the deviation of the ratio μpGE/GM from unity observed in previous polarization measurements at high Q2 continues down to the lowest Q2 value of this measurement. The updated global fit that includes the new results yields in this Q2 range an electric (magnetic) form factor ~2% smaller (~1% larger)more » than the previous global fit. We obtain new extractions of the proton electric and magnetic radii, which are (rE2)1/2 = 0.875 ± 0.010 fm and (rM2)1/2 = 0.867 ± 0.020 fm. Moreover, the charge radius is consistent with other recent extractions based on the electron-proton interaction, including the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift measruements, which suggests a missing correction in the comparison of measurements of the proton charge radius using electron probes and the recent extraction from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift.« less

  1. On the determination of the polarized parton distribution in the (x,Q2)-plane: a relativistic quark exchange approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazdanpanah, M.M.; Modarres, M.

    2005-05-06

    We perform a next-to-leading order QCD analysis of polarized distribution functions of proton in the (x,Q2)-plane within the scheme of the radiative parton model. The flavor-broken light sea quark distributions is investigated and a comparison is made with the corresponding available experimental data.

  2. The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Task Name ID 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Mine and Construct the Test Commit to Major Procurements...

  3. 2014_Q3.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July-September 2014 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy Offce of Legacy Management Quarterly Program Update. This publication is designed to provide a status of activities within LM. Please direct all comments and inquiries to lm@hq.doe.gov. July-September 2014 Visit us at http://energy.gov/lm/ Goal 5 2014 LM All-Hands Training The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offce of Legacy Management (LM) 2014 All-Hands Training was held the week of July 28, 2014, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The week

  4. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via γ*p → nπ+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the nπ+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4π CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the π-N multipole E0+/GD were measuredmore »using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.« less

  5. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via γ*p → nπ+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the nπ+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4π CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the π-N multipole E0+/GD were measuredmore » using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.« less

  6. Theoretical investigations of the IO,{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions: Metastability, characterization and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammami, H.; Yazidi, O.; Ben El Hadj Rhouma, M.; Al Mogren, M. M.; Hochlaf, M.

    2014-07-07

    Using ab initio methodology, we studied the IO{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions. Benchmark computations on the IO(X{sup 2}Π) neutral species allow validate the current procedure. For IO{sup 2+}, several potential wells were found on the ground and the electronic excited states potentials with potential barriers with respect to dissociation, where this dication can exist in the gas phase as long-lived metastable molecules. We confirm hence the recent observation of the dication by mass spectrometry. Moreover, we predict the existence of the metastable IO{sup 3+} trication, where a shallow potential well along the IO internuclear distance is computed. This potential well supports more than 10 vibrational levels. The IO{sup 3+} excited states are repulsive in nature, as well as the computed potentials for the IO{sup 4+} tetracation. For the bound states, we give a set of spectroscopic parameters including excitation transition energies, equilibrium distances, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational terms, and rotational constants. At the MRCI + Q/aug-cc-pV5Z(-PP) level, the adiabatic double and triple ionization energies of IO are computed to be ∼28.1 eV and ∼55.0 eV, respectively.

  7. Final analysis of proton form factor ratio data at Q2 = 4.0, 4.8, and 5.6 GeV2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Puckett, A. J. R.; Brash, E. J.; Gayou, O.; Jones, M. K.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Punjabi, V.; Aniol, K. A.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; et al

    2012-04-11

    Recently published measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio R = μp GEp/GMp at momentum transfers Q2 up to 8.5 GeV2 in Jefferson Lab Hall C deviate from the linear trend of previous measurements in Jefferson Lab Hall A, favoring a slower rate of decrease of R with Q2. While statistically compatible in the region of overlap with Hall A, the Hall C data hint at a systematic difference between the two experiments. This possibility was investigated in a reanalysis of the Hall A data. We find that the original analysis underestimated the background in the selection of elasticmore » events. The application of an additional cut to further suppress the background increases the results for R, improving the consistency between Halls A and C.« less

  8. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton in the high-lying resonances at Q2 < 5 GeV2 from CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Kijun

    2014-09-01

    The differential cross sections and structure functions for the exclusive electroproduction process ep --> e'n pi+ were measured in the range of the invariantmass for the np+ system 1.6 GeV lte W lte 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV2 lte Q2 lte 4.0 GeV2 using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in the exclusive p+ production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the np+ center-of-mass system. In this analysis, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points in terms of W, Q2, cosq theta* _ pi, and phi?_p-, were obtained. The preliminary differential cross section and structure function analyses are carried out, which allow us to extract the helicity amplitudes in high-lying resonances.

  9. 2015 Open Season

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Open Season which will run from Monday, November 9, 2015 through Monday, December 14, 2015.  During the annual Open Season period employees can enroll, change, or cancel an existing enrollment in...

  10. Q3 1997 STEO, Final

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 (Released July 8, 1997) Energy Information Administration DOE/EIA-0202(97/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections Third Quarter 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed

  11. Measurement of the Neutron (3He) Spin Structure at Low Q2 and the Extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn Sum Rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioannis Kominis

    2001-01-31

    This thesis presents the results of E-94010, an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) designed to study the spin structure of the neutron at low momentum transfer, and to test the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule. The first experiment of its kind, it was performed in experimental Hall-A of TJNAF using a new polarized 3He facility. It has recently been shown that the GDH sum rule and the Bjorken sum rule are both special examples of a more general sum rule that applies to polarized electron scattering off nucleons. This generalized sum rule, due to Ji and Osborne, reduces to the GDH sum rule at Q2 = 0 and to the Bjorken sum rule at Q2 >> 1 GeV2. By studying the Q2 evolution of the extended GDH sum, one learns about the transition from quark-like behavior to hadronic-like behavior. We measured inclusive polarized cross sections by scattering high energy polarized electrons off the new TJNAF polarized 3He target with both longitudinal and transverse target orientations. The high density 3He target, based on optical pumping and spin exchange, was used as an effective neutron target. The target maintained a polarization of about 35% at beam currents as high as 151tA. We describe the precision 3He polarimetry leading to a systematic uncertainty of the target polarization of 4% (relative). A strained GaAs photocathode was utilized in the polarized electron gun, which provided an electron beam with a polarization of about 70%, known to 3% (relative). By using six different beam energies (between 0.86 and 5.06 GeV) and a fixed scattering angle of 15.5, a wide kinematic coverage was achieved, with 0.02 GeV2< Q2 <1 GcV2 and 0.5 GeV< W < 2.5 GeV for the squared momentum transfer and invariant mass, respectively. From the measured cross sections we extract the 3He spin structure functions He and g1e Finally, we determine the extended GDH sum for the range 0.1 GeV2< Q2 <1 GeV2 for 3He and the neutron.

  12. Four seasons of giving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 all issues All Issues submit Four seasons of giving We value a culture of giving and appreciate our employees' on-going volunteerism throughout Northern New...

  13. OPEN SEASON CHECK LIST

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FSAFEDS brochure https:www.fsafeds.comGEMFSAFEDSFormsOPM- FSA-OVTF-10-031.pdf Talk to an FSAFEDS representative Open Season benefits fair Contact your agency HR staff...

  14. ACBEDGF1DIH P Q2R§STDVU@DVW RYX1`bacSedVagf ShFiSpaqSTr1H£s)t

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ¢¤¥§¦©¨ ¥! ¥ " ¥#¢ $ %¡'&( $ %&()0&1%234 ¥5¨  6§!7580 9 @&1¢2 ACBEDGF1DIH P Q2R§STDVU@DVW RYX1`bacSedVagf ShFiSpaqSTr1H£s)t Wvuwr1HxHbD y €B‚Sƒr„Hx€†…0‡ˆ€†‰@rW‘€’B‚rwWq` “•”!–˜—w™edgfih j rkD Pl€†Wv…eacr1H£sm‡r„ant …o€p r1a q DrH y rw…ƒ…TDGBcBIsmt Wvuwr„H¤HbD s

  15. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; et al

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry Ad1 and the polarized structure function gd1 were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2 < Q2 < 5 GeV2 and 0.9 GeV < W < 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure andmore » a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions An1 and g1n of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, W < 2 GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as parametrizations of the world data. The unprecedented precision and dense kinematic coverage of these data can aid in future extractions of polarized parton distributions, tests of perturbative QCD predictions for the quark polarization at large x, a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and more precise values for higher-twist matrix elements in the framework of the Operator Product Expansion.« less

  16. Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call ...

  17. Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron up to Q2 = 3.4 GeV2 using the Reaction He-3(e,e'n)pp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riordan, Seamus; Craver, Brandon; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Miller, Jonathan; Cates, Gordon; Liyanage, Nilanga; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Quimper, Armando Acha; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Byron; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Averett, Todd; Beck, Arie; Bellis, Matthew; Boeglin, Werner; Breuer, Herbert; Calarco, John; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chudakov, Eugene; Coman, Luminita; Crowe, Benjamin; Cusanno, Francesco; Day, Donal; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Dolph, P.A.M.; Dutta, Chiranjib; Ferdi, Catherine; Fernandez-Ramirez, Cezar; Feuerbach, Robert; Fraile Prieto, Luis; Franklin, Gregg; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuchs, Sabine; Garibaldi, Franco; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilman, Ronald; Glazmazdin, Oleksandr; Gomez, Javier; Grimm, Klaus; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Herraiz, Joaquin Lopez; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmes, Richard; Holmstrom, Timothy; Howell, David; De Jager, Cornelis; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, Mark; Katich, Joseph; Kaufman, Lisa; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kelly, James; Kiselev, Daniela; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Markowitz, Pete; Margaziotis, Demetrius; May-Tal Beck, Sharon; Mayilyan, Samvel; McCormick, Kathy; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Nanda, Sirish; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Ngo, Tim; Nikolenko, Dmitri; Norum, Blaine; Pentchev, Lubomir; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Protopoescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Punjabi, Vina; Qian, XIn; Qiang, Yi; Quinn, Brian; Rachek, Igor; Ransome, Ronald; Reimer, Paul; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Julie; Ron, Guy; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sargsian, Misak; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Shabestari, Mitra Hashemi; Shahinyan, Albert; Singh, Jaideep; Sirca, Simon; Souder, Paul; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stibunov, Victor; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Tobias, William; Moinelo, Jose Udias; Urciuoli, Guido; Vlahovic, Branislav; Voskanyan, Hakob; Wang, Kebin; Wesselmann, Frank; Vignote, Javier Rodriguez; Wood, Stephen; Wright, Justin; Yao, Huan

    2010-12-01

    The electric form factor of the neutron was determined from studies of the reaction \\rea{} in quasi-elastic kinematics in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered off a polarized target in which the nuclear polarization was oriented perpendicular to the momentum transfer. The scattered electrons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer in coincidence with neutrons that were registered in a large-solid-angle detector. More than doubling the $Q^2$-range over which it is known, we find \\GEn{}$ = 0.0225 \\pm 0.0017 (stat) \\pm 0.0024 (syst)$, $0.0200 \\pm 0.0023 \\pm 0.0018$, and $0.0142 \\pm 0.0019 \\pm 0.0013$ for $Q^2$ = 1.72, 2.48, and 3.41~\\gevsq, respectively.

  18. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  19. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report that captures quarterly FOIA data at the DOE level. Through the use of an Applied Programming Interface (or API), the information will display on www.FOIA.gov.

  20. Q3 1996 STEO TEXT/TABLES

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... are based on annual data for coal-fired generation at nonutilities reported on Form EIA-867. Data for 1994 and 1995 are estimates. d Synfuels plant demand in 1993 was 1.7 million ...

  1. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2016)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA’s exemptions to protect information that is: •classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; •proprietary; •personal; and •pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of individuals, and open and frank discussion.

  2. A Woman of All Seasons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Woman of All Seasons Pittsburgh, Pa. - Lilas Soukup, a 35-year employee at NETL, has been recognized by the Pittsburgh Federal Executive Board (FEB) as the 2013 Woman of the Year....

  3. The season of giving begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The season of giving begins Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit The season of giving begins Lab employees encouraged to donate to area communities. September 1, 2016 Los Alamos employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Los Alamos employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Director, Community Partnerships Office Kathy Keith Email Editor Whitney

  4. Four Seasons Windpower, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seasons Windpower, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Four Seasons Windpower, LLC Address: 1697 Wilbur Road Place: Medina, Ohio Zip: 44256 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product:...

  5. Beam-Target Double-Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized He3 Target at 1.4<Q2<2.7 GeV2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, J.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Katich, J.; Qian, X.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; et al

    2012-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 < x < 0.35 with 1.4 < Q2 < 2.7 GeV2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function g1Tq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for π- production on 3Hemore » and the neutron, while our π+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.« less

  6. fu-q(2)-99.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FDTD Scheme for Light Scattering by Dielectric Particles with Large Complex Refractive Index Q. Fu and W. B. Sun Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Numerical solution for light scattering by highly refractive dielectric particles is examined with the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) technique. In the FDTD, the computational domain is truncated using the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition (Sun et al. 1999). It is found that for dielectric particles with

  7. Q2 External Package.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    376,031 285,072 76% 214,494 57% Interest Expense and (Income) 33 Interest Expense 352,982 351,730 331,697 94% 158,351 45% 34 AFUDC (43,062) (43,204) (45,230) 105% (26,819)...

  8. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  9. FOIA QUARTERLY REPORTS (Q2-2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  10. Microchannel Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this OSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  11. Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Milestones & Deliverables (Actual) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q1 (Oct-Dec) Legend Summary Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q1 (Oct-Dec) Q2 (Jan-Mar) FY2012 FY2013 ...

  12. ARM - Lesson Plans: Reason for the Seasons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reason for the Seasons Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Reason for the Seasons Objective The objective of this activity is to understand the reasons for the seasons and to study the motion of the earth. Materials Each student or group of students will need the

  13. Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency, call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (2.92 MB) More Documents & Publications Hit the Road: Applying Lessons from National Campaigns to a Local Context (201) Strengthening the Front

  14. Microsoft Word - S08364_SeasonalVariation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site February 2012 LMS/RVT/S08364 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation, Riverton, Wyoming February 2012 Doc. No. S08364 Page 1 Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Executive Summary Historical groundwater monitoring at the Riverton site included collecting

  15. Preparing for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preparing for Hurricane Season Preparing for Hurricane Season June 1, 2015 - 9:49am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins today and will last through November 30. As the lead Federal agency responsible for coordinating the response to major energy disruptions, the Department of Energy works closely with other Federal agencies, State, local and tribal governments, and our

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Seasonal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the seasonal variation of land cover which is dominated by the agricultural land use, primarily winter wheat production. http:gi.ssec.wisc.eduairsknutesonindex.html...

  17. Microsoft Word - Heating Oil Season.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4-2015 Heating Oil Season Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Trigger Mechanism (Cents per Gallon, Except Where Noted) Week Residential Heating Oil Price Average Brent Spot Price ...

  18. compare_tables.xlsx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2014 2015 2016 2017 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 U.S. Petroleum WTI spot (barrel) Current 48.48 57.85 46.55 41.94 33.35 44.52 46.00 47.00 ...

  19. Final Meeting Summary Page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    committee and introductions were made. The committee approved the June meeting summary. ... Assessment, Q2 * Natural Gas Pipeline Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), Q3 ...

  20. Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China...

  1. Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land cover ... Title: Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land ...

  2. Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern Ocean Cloud Albedo Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial ...

  3. NOVA Making Stuff Season 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leombruni, Lisa; Paulsen, Christine Andrews

    2014-12-12

    Over the course of four weeks in fall 2013, 11.7 million Americans tuned in to PBS to follow host David Pogue as he led them in search of engineering and scientific breakthroughs poised to change our world. Levitating trains, quantum computers, robotic bees, and bomb-detecting plants—these were just a few of the cutting-edge innovations brought into the living rooms of families across the country in NOVA’s four-part series, Making Stuff: Faster, Wilder, Colder, and Safer. Each of the four one-hour programs gave viewers a behind-the-scenes look at novel technologies poised to change our world—showing them how basic research and scientific discovery can hold the keys to transforming how we live. Making Stuff Season 2 (MS2) combined true entertainment with educational value, creating a popular and engaging series that brought accessible science into the homes of millions. NOVA’s goal to engage the public with such technological innovation and basic research extended beyond the broadcast series, including a variety of online, educational, and promotional activities: original online science reporting, web-only short-form videos, a new online quiz-game, social media engagement and promotion, an educational outreach “toolkit” for science educators to create their own “makerspaces,” an online community of practice, a series of nationwide Innovation Cafés, educator professional development, a suite of teacher resources, an “Idealab,” participation in national conferences, and specialized station relation and marketing. A summative evaluation of the MS2 project indicates that overall, these activities helped make a significant impact on the viewers, users, and participants that NOVA reached. The final evaluation conducted by Concord Evaluation Group (CEG) confidently concluded that the broadcast, website, and outreach activities were successful at achieving the project’s intended impacts. CEG reported that the MS2 series and website content were

  4. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Nigeria - 2.9 Trinidad &Tobago - 2.1 Equitorial Guinea - 0.5 Oman - 1.5 UAE - 0.8 USA - 0.2 Peru - 0.6 Source: Waterborne, Cheniere Research 26 Q4 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q2 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q2 ...

  5. Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) This presentation is from a DOE-NASEO webinar held June 23, 2015, on forecasting energy infrastructure risk for the 2015 hurricane season. A variety of sources predict a below-normal season, with hurricane intensity lower than the 1981-2010 averages. The presentation includes an overview of hurricane season classification, historic impacts, and

  6. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  7. FY 2014 Q3 Metric Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FY 2014 Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets FY 2015 Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and ...

  8. Microsoft Word - DOE_ANNUAL_METRICS_2009Q3.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14404 Third Quarter 2009 Modeling Program Metric: Coupled model comparison with observations using improved dynamics at coarse resolution Quantifying the impact of a finite volume dynamical core in CCSM3 on simulated precipitation over major catchment areas July 2009 Peter J. Gleckler and Karl E. Taylor Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research 
 2
 Disclaimer This

  9. FY 2016 Q3 Metrics Summary.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY 2016 Target 95% 95% 90% 85% 90% 90% FY 2016 3rd Qtr Actual Comment FY 2016 Forecast ... Schedule Compliance, Projects Less Than 5 Years Duration: Projects will meet the project ...

  10. Observations from The EV Project in Q3 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2013-12-01

    This is a brief report that summarizes results published in numerous other reports. It describes the usage of electric vehicles and charging units in the EV Project over the past 3 months. There is no new data or information provided in this report, only summarizing of information published in other reports (which have all been approved for unlimited distribution publication). This report will be posted to the INL/AVTA website for viewing by the general public.

  11. Central solar heating plants with seasonal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, D.S.; Sunderland, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    The University of Massachusetts has recently started a two year effort to identify and design a significant Central Solar Heating Plant with Seasonal Storage (CSHPSS) in Massachusetts. The work is closely associated with the U.S. participation in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on CSHPSS. The University is working closely with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to assist in identifying State facilities as potential sites and to explore and secure State support which will be essential for product development after the design phase. Currently, the primary site is the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus with particular interest in several large buildings which are funded for construction over the next 4-5 years. Seasonal thermal energy storage will utilize one of several geological formations.

  12. Retrofitting Doors on Open Refrigerated Cases

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Q2 (Jan-Mar) FY2012 FY2013 Legend Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q1 (Octt-Dec) * Met all original project milestones to date * Original project ...

  13. Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season ... reduce standby heat losses by 25%-45% and save you around 4%-9% in water heating costs. ...

  14. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid ...

  15. Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season December 5, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce ...

  16. February most likely month for flu season to peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February most likely month for flu season to peak February most likely month for flu season to peak The Los Alamos team's model is an ongoing research project that forecasts the current flu season probabilistically, similar to best-practice forecasts of weather, presidential elections, and sporting events. December 20, 2015 The Los Alamos team's model is an ongoing research project that forecasts the current flu season probabilistically, similar to best-practice forecasts of weather,

  17. Nebraska Preparing for the Upcoming Heating Season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    N E B R A S K A Nebraska "Preparing for the Upcoming Heating Season" E N E R G Y O F F I C E State Heating Oil and Propane Conference October 8, 2014 Profile of Nebraska Population - 1,868,516 Occupied Housing Units - 733,570 Occupied Housing by Fuel Used for Home Heating in 2012 Natural Gas 63% Fuel Oil and Kerosene 0.50% Electricity 26% Propane 8% Wood 1.60% All Other Fuels 0.09% Coal or Coke 0.01% Solar Energy 0.04% No Fuel Used 0.20% http://www.neo.ne.gov/statshtml/75.html History

  18. Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corrective Measures Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Released: June 4, 2010 Download Full Report (PDF) This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly. Research finds that a significant portion of data collected on EIA’s primary monthly natural gas

  19. Department of Energy Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is taking to prepare for hurricane season in the United States. ... the Gulf of Mexico and refineries along the shore. ... oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve available for ...

  20. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor’s Seasonal Fluctuations, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, June 7, 2012.

  1. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program ...

  2. BPA revises policy for managing seasonal power oversupply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    policy-for-managing-seasonal-power-oversupply Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  3. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  4. SU{sub {ital q}}(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bimonte, G.; Stern, A.; Vitale, P.

    1996-07-01

    We reformulate the Hamiltonian approach to lattice gauge theories such that, at the classical level, the gauge group does not act canonically, but instead as a Poisson-Lie group. At the quantum level, the symmetry gets promoted to a quantum group gauge symmetry. The theory depends on two parameters: the deformation parameter {lambda} and the lattice spacing {ital a}. We show that the system of Kogut and Susskind is recovered when {lambda}{r_arrow}0, while QCD is recovered in the continuum limit (for any {lambda}). We, thus, have the possibility of having a two-parameter regularization of QCD. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this National Renewable Energy Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  6. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Jet Propulsion Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  7. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCSD project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - 1Q - 2Q 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification (TSE) sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved. the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  9. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  10. NBB Enclosed Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  11. Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    gathered in Washington, D.C. for the last in a series of first-responder training sessions, preparing for the rest of the season and other potential energy-sector emergencies. ...

  12. Energy Resources for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hurricane Season Energy Resources for Hurricane Season This aerial photo of New Orleans from August 29, 2005, shows a flooded neighborhood with a roadway going down into flood waters. Photo courtesy of FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino This aerial photo of New Orleans from August 29, 2005, shows a flooded neighborhood with a roadway going down into flood waters. Photo courtesy of FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino Find helpful resources for incorporating energy into disaster planning, response, and rebuilding.

  13. Energy Resources for Tornado Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tornado Season Energy Resources for Tornado Season The aftermath of a tornado in Greensburg, Kansas. | Photo courtesy of Federal Emergency Mgmt. Agency, NREL 16290 The aftermath of a tornado in Greensburg, Kansas. | Photo courtesy of Federal Emergency Mgmt. Agency, NREL 16290 Find helpful resources for incorporating energy into disaster planning, response, and rebuilding. Sustainable Transportation Alternative Fueling Station Locator U.S. Department of Energy Find alternative fueling stations

  14. DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season May 30, 2007 - 1:25pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today outlined a number of steps that the Department is taking to strengthen its hurricane response system in the United States. Since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, DOE has made operational and administrative improvements, including coordination between federal, state and local leaders, deployment of trained staff, and

  15. Cloud and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season P. T. May Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, 3001, Victoria, Australia Introduction An interesting, and very relevant question, for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is how cloud characteristics and their seasonal and diurnal variation changes across the tropics. In particular, how does he cloud field around the new SRCS site compare with nearby regions. Thus, the aim of this study is to look at the

  16. Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01

    This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

  17. Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the PEM Stack Transport Studies Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell ... 11 Q1 12 Q2 12 Q3 12 1. Systems Analysis NFC 2. Test ...

  18. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to continued declines in profits. * Capital expenditure per barrel produced was the ... Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Capital expenditure decreased 11 billion since ...

  19. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are appliedmore » to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.« less

  20. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are applied to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.

  1. Successional trajectories of rhizosphere bacterial communities over consecutive seasons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Shengjing; Nuccio, Erin; Herman, Donald J.; Rijkers, Ruud; Estera, Katerina; Li, Jiabao; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; He, Zhili; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Brodie, Eoin L.; et al

    2015-08-04

    It is well known that rhizosphere microbiomes differ from those of surrounding soil, and yet we know little about how these root-associated microbial communities change through the growing season and between seasons. We analyzed the response of soil bacteria to roots of the common annual grass Avena fatua over two growing seasons using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Over the two periods of growth, the rhizosphere bacterial communities followed consistent successional patterns as plants grew, although the starting communities were distinct. Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative tomore » background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities. Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Taxa that increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere soil displayed phylogenetic clustering, suggesting some conservation and an evolutionary basis for the response of complex soil bacterial communities to the presence of plant roots. The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence. We document the successional patterns of rhizosphere bacterial communities associated with a “wild” annual grass, Avena fatua, which is commonly a dominant plant in Mediterranean-type annual grasslands around the world; the plant was grown in its grassland soil. Most studies documenting rhizosphere microbiomes address “domesticated” plants growing in soils to which they are introduced. Rhizosphere bacterial communities exhibited a pattern of temporal succession that was consistent and repeatable

  2. Successional trajectories of rhizosphere bacterial communities over consecutive seasons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Shengjing; Nuccio, Erin; Herman, Donald J.; Rijkers, Ruud; Estera, Katerina; Li, Jiabao; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; He, Zhili; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Brodie, Eoin L.; Zhou, Jizhong; Firestone, Mary

    2015-08-04

    It is well known that rhizosphere microbiomes differ from those of surrounding soil, and yet we know little about how these root-associated microbial communities change through the growing season and between seasons. We analyzed the response of soil bacteria to roots of the common annual grass Avena fatua over two growing seasons using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Over the two periods of growth, the rhizosphere bacterial communities followed consistent successional patterns as plants grew, although the starting communities were distinct. Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative to background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities. Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Taxa that increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere soil displayed phylogenetic clustering, suggesting some conservation and an evolutionary basis for the response of complex soil bacterial communities to the presence of plant roots. The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence. We document the successional patterns of rhizosphere bacterial communities associated with a “wild” annual grass, Avena fatua, which is commonly a dominant plant in Mediterranean-type annual grasslands around the world; the plant was grown in its grassland soil. Most studies documenting rhizosphere microbiomes address “domesticated” plants growing in soils to which they are introduced. Rhizosphere bacterial communities exhibited a pattern of temporal

  3. New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory By Raphael Rosen September 15, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The new colloquium committee. From left to right: Mike Mardenfeld, David Mikkelsen, Committee Administrator Carol Ann Austin, Brent Stratton (Photo by Elle Starkman) The new colloquium committee. From left to right: Mike Mardenfeld, David Mikkelsen, Committee Administrator Carol Ann Austin, Brent Stratton Just as

  4. South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm ...

  5. Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of ...

  6. Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm June 5, 2012 - 4:01pm Addthis Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the ninth named storm, first hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 2011 hurricane season. | Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a

  7. Impact of the 2008 Hurricane Season on the Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season and its impacts on the natural gas industry

  8. Rooftop Unit Campaign

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Future work Report on first year's impact Final achievement recognitions (November 2014) Q1 (Octt-Dec) Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q1 (Octt-Dec) Legend Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q4 ...

  9. Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

  10. Attachment 1 - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting Summary Page 12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting Summary Page 12 Public Involvement Committee September 4, 2013 Strategic Planning: Quarters by month * Q1: Oct. - Dec. * Q2: Jan - March * Q3: April - June * Q4: July - Sept. Page 1 Strategic Planning: 2014 Topics (Interactive activity) * = priority topic for discussion at meeting; �= priority for future discussion | Quarter prioritized for discussion (Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4) * 100-F Proposed Plan | *** Q2 * 100 D-H Proposed Plan * Draft Land

  11. Response of mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) populations to seasonally unpredictable perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, M.J.; Stewart, A.J.

    1990-07-01

    Many questions remain unresolved about the linkages between life history attributes of fishes and the tactics that these organisms employ in response to environmental uncertainty. Such questions include (1). If a perturbation affects the entire ecosystem, what are the consequences for a given population of fish (2) What tactics can a fish employ to increase its chances of leaving offspring (3) Do fish respond differently to such perturbations depending on the season (4) How do these changes relate to the overall resilience of the population The research reported here was designed to address such questions. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) populations in thirteen experimental ponds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were sampled ten times between June 1988, and July 1989 in response to a series of chemical disturbances. During each sampling period the population size and total biomass of Gambusia in each pond was estimated using photographs and a length weight regression. Size-frequency histograms were used to examine seasonal and dose-related changes in population structure. Lipid content and reproductive allotment were measured for a series of fish from each pond on all dates to explore the energy allocation patterns at the individual. 106 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  13. FY 2014 Q3 RCA CAP Performance Metrics Report 2014-09-05.xlsx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2014 Target FY 2014 Pre- & Post- CAP* ... TPC is Total Project Cost. No. FY 2014 Target FY 2014 3rd Qtr Actual 2 95% 92% 3 95% ...

  14. Microsoft Word - Q3 MDA 8_11_2015 Update of $172M for Reposting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver on its mission. BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

  15. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  16. Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  17. High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this ANL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  18. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storge- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  19. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): SAND2014-15691R 533649 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM ...

  20. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY14Q3 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coatings to short-term test initiated * Enhanced powder screening method initiated * Heat pipe advanced wick development * Two heat pipe wicks assembled into bench scale devices...

  1. High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Brayton Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  2. TOTAL_ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_thru_Q3_2010_11_9_10.pdf | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy (73.65 KB) More Documents & Publications TOTAL_ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_thru_Q4_2010_3.7.11.pdf ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_by_State_for_February_4.14.11.pdf Homes_Weatherized_State_July_10.15.10.pdf

  3. Enclosure - FY 2015 Q3 Metrics Report 2015-08-12.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2015 Target FY 2015 Pre- & Post- CAP* Forecast Comment 1 Capital Asset Project Management Success: Complete 90% of capital asset ...

  4. bbnp_bb_an_0003578_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  5. bbnp_bb_an_0004442_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  6. bbnp_bb_an_0003562_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3_0.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  7. bbnp_bb_an_0003576_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  8. connecticut_bb_an_0003806_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  9. bbnp_bb_an_0003566_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  10. bbnp_bb_an_0003572_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  11. bbnp_bb_an_0003809_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  12. bbnp_bb_an_0003569_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  13. bbnp_bb_an_0003580_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Number Of Tenants Tenancy Assessed Value Down Payment First Trust Deed Balance First Trust Deed Lender First Trust Deed Payment First Trust Deed Terms Second Trust Deed Balance ...

  14. Advanced Low-Cost Recievers for Parabolic Troughs- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  15. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. A Small Particle Solar Receiver for High Temperature Brayton Power Cycles- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this San Diego State University project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  17. State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, Betsy

    2002-05-22

    This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

  18. Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly.

  19. Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data D. A. ... over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. ...

  20. Copper smelters and atmospheric visibility in the southwest, seasonal analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nochumson, D.H.; Williams, M.D.

    1984-07-01

    Seasonal results from a study which evaluated the effects of sulfur oxides (SO/sub x/) emitted from 11 copper smelters on atmospheric visibility in 14 national parks and wilderness areas are presented. In addition two alternative strategies for controlling SO/sub x/ are compared. They are supplementary control systems (SCS) and continuous emission controls (CEC). The objective of each strategy is not to improve visibility but is to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). SCS is a strategy that has been used by almost all of the 11 copper smelters. It reduces SO/sub x/ emissions during adverse meteorological conditions through production curtailment. SCS has not been successful at eliminating NAAQS violations. The emissions used for the SCS control alternative are based upon actual copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions and operating conditions during 1979. The year 1979 was selected because it is fairly representative of production levels, though highly variable, from 1965 to 1978 and copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions during the latter half of the 1970s. In more recent years, the copper industry has been economically depressed and copper smelter production and SO/sub x/ emissions have been lower. The southwestern states are implementing the CEC strategy to control SO/sub x/ emissions from copper smelters as part of their state implementation plans. For production levels typical of 1979, the CEC regulations would require about a two-thirds reduction in SO/sub x/ emissions from that allowed under SCS. The study estimates the effect of this reduction upon the improvement of visibility in southwestern national parks and wilderness areas.

  1. Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons- August 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In an effort to better understand what actions the energy industry has taken in response to the 2005 and 2008 hurricane seasons, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and...

  2. Program listing for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM). [CNHSPM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30

    The computer program CNHSPM is listed which predicts heat pump seasonal energy consumption (including defrost, cyclic degradation, and supplementary heat) using steady state rating point performance and binned weather data. (LEW)

  3. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  4. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970

  5. Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season U.S. natural gas inventories are expected to be at record levels to start the winter heating season. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the amount of natural gas stored underground should total almost 4 trillion cubic feet by the beginning of November, reflecting record high natural gas production. Inventories could go even higher if heating demand is not strong during October

  6. Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season April 15, 2013 - 2:28pm Addthis Solar energy systems are among the renewable and efficiency purchases that are eligible for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Industrial Solar Technology Corp. Solar energy systems are among the renewable and efficiency purchases that are eligible for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Industrial Solar Technology Corp. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations

  7. Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP- FY13 Q2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this 3M project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  9. High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Argonne National Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  10. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Andraka, Charles E. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), ... Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), ...

  11. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    storage module * Module design complete * Major elements ordered and in fabrication Heat pipe advanced wick development * Complete 5000 hours of wick operation at...

  12. Self-Cleaning CSP Optics with EDS- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Boston University project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  13. Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  14. High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  15. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this ORNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storage- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  17. Direct s-CO2 Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  18. Enclosure - FY 2016 Q2 Metrics Report 2016-05-03.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY 2016 Target 95% 95% 90% 85% 90% 90% FY 2016 2nd Qtr Actual Comment FY 2016 Forecast ... Schedule Compliance, Projects Less Than 5 Years Duration: Projects will meet the project ...

  19. Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Stanford/SLAC project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  20. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich Technologies project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  1. Lowest Q2 Measurement of the gamma*p-> Delta Reaction: Probing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    While there is qualitative agreement with the models, there is no quantitative agreement thus indicating the need for further improvement of the models. Temp HTML Storage 2: Stave, ...

  2. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Lorenzon, Wolfgang ; Mammei, Juliette ; Martin, J W ; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet ; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana more ; Piercey, Rodney ; Potterveld, David ; Smith, Gregory ; Spurlock, Kurt ; ...

  3. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCLA project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  4. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Sandia National Laboratories project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  5. New parton distributions from large-x and low-Q2 data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alberto Accardi; Christy, M. Eric; Keppel, Cynthia E.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Monaghan, Peter A.; Morfin, Jorge G.; Owens, Joseph F.

    2010-02-11

    We report results of a new global next-to-leading order fit of parton distribution functions in which cuts on W and Q are relaxed, thereby including more data at high values of x. Effects of target mass corrections (TMCs), higher twist contributions, and nuclear corrections for deuterium data are significant in the large-x region. The leading twist parton distributions are found to be stable to TMC model variations as long as higher twist contributions are also included. Furthermore, the behavior of the d quark as x → 1 is particularly sensitive to the deuterium corrections, and using realistic nuclear smearing modelsmore » the d-quark distribution at large x is found to be softer than in previous fits performed with more restrictive cuts.« less

  6. Microsoft Word - EE0003005-2016Q2-Final Technical Report FTR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    005 RiverHeath: Neighborhood Loop Geothermal Exchange System RiverHeath LLC Final Technical Report (FTR) for DOE/EERE Project Title: RiverHeath: Neighborhood Loop Geothermal Exchange System Covering Period: January 29, 2010 - June 30, 2015 Approved Project Period: 1/29/2010 - 6/30/2015 Submission Date: Recipient: Website (if available) Award Number: 07/11/2016 RiverHeath LLC 201 S RiverHeath Way, Suite 1800 Appleton Wl 54915 www.riverheath.com DE-EE0003005 PI: Submitted by: (if other than PI)

  7. High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production- FY12 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this LANL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Advisory Board Meeting May 11, 2016 1 We do the right thing. Nuclear Workforce Initiative Larry Ling Chief of Staff Acting Director of Administrative Services Savannah River Remediation Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting May 11, 2016 2 We do the right thing. SRR Contract Headcount 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Q4-09 Q2-10 Q4-10 Q2-11 Q4-11 Q2-12 Q4-12 Q2-13 Q4-13 Q2-14 Q4-14 Q1-15 Q2-15 Q3-15 Q4-15 Q1-16 SRR Headcount (December 31, 2009 through March 2016) All data at

  9. Photoperiodic Regulation of the Seasonal Pattern of Photosynthetic Capacity and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauerle, William L.; Oren, Ram; Way, Danielle A.; Qian, Song S.; Stoy, Paul C.; Thornton, Peter E; Bowden, Joseph D.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Reynolds, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO{sub 2} cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% ({approx}4 PgC y{sup -1}), resulting in a >3% ({approx}2 PgC y{sup -1}) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  10. Directives Quarterly Updates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Quarterly Updates by Diane Johnson Listings of new Justification Memoranda and new or revised Directives that have been posted to the DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Portal. Updated quarterly. FY2016 FY 16, Q2 - January through March 2016 FY2015 FY15, Q1 - October through December 2014 FY15, Q3 - April through June 2015 FY15, Q4 - July through September 2015 FY 2014 FY14, Q1 - October through December 2013 FY14, Q2 - January through March 2014 FY14, Q3 - April

  11. Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

    1981-01-01

    Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

  12. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  13. Intercomparison of the seasonal cycle in 200 hPa kinetic energy in AMIP GCM simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The 200 hPa kinetic energy is represented by means of the spherical harmonic components for the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations, the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA). The data used are the monthly mean wind fields from 1979 to 1988. The kinetic energy is decomposed into the divergent (DKE) and rotational (RKE) components and emphasis is placed on examining the former. The two reanalysis data sets show reasonable agreement that is best for the rotational kinetic energy. The largest difference in the divergent kinetic energy occurs during the northern summer. As might be expected, the two analyses are closet in regions where there are sufficient observations such that the effect of the model used in the assimilation cycle are minimized. The observed RKE show only a slight seasonal cycle with a maximum occuring during the northern winter. The DKE, on the other hand, has a very pronounced seasonal cycle with maxima at the solsticial seasons and minima during the equinoctial seasons. The model results show a very large spread in the magnitudes of the RKE and DKE although the models all evince a seasonal variation in phase with that observed. The median values of the seasonal cycle of RKE and DKE for the models are usually superior to those of any individual model. Results are also presented for simulation following the AMIP protocol but using updated versions of the original AMIP entries. In most cases these new integrations show better agreement with the observations.

  14. EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide April 3, 2009 - 5:47pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL If you're a regular visitor to EERE's Consumer's Guide to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, you may have noticed some changes this week. The site has moved to EnergySavers.gov and is now called "Energy Savers." The same in-depth information is still

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsWarm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test 1993.06.01 - 1993.06.30 Lead Scientist : Dave Parsons Data Availability Complete output from a 10-day simulation using a high resolution mesoscale model is available at 1-hr intervals. Verification of June 1993 IOP Assimilation Dataset and its use in Driving a

  16. Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season May 15, 2013 - 1:16pm Addthis President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. The group met to discuss lessons learned during the response to Hurricane Sandy, as well as the

  17. Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason

  18. 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings November 27, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Weatherization and Intergovernmental

  19. Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating season Despite the jump in natural gas use to meet heating demand during the recent winter storm that walloped the East Coast, total U.S. natural gas inventories remain near 3 trillion cubic feet. That's about 20 percent higher than at this time last year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said that by the end of the winter heating season at the close of March, it expects natural gas inventories

  20. Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Money and Energy All Year! | Department of Energy an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! December 12, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. When shopping for appliances or electronics for the

  1. The magic school bus TV project. Final technical performance report, July 1, 1992--July 31, 1995. Season III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    For Season III, our goal has been to produce 13 new episodes that can optimally benefit from our research and experience in developing this unique series. With a total of 39 episodes, MSB`s third season will move the production from a weekly to a daily series, airing Monday to Friday and Sundays on PBS. As we delivered the 13 Season II episodes to PBS during fall of 1995, we also completed 13 more scripts for Season III production. During the remaining portion of Season III, these 13 scripts are being animated and prepared for delivery to PBS for an October 7th, 1996 launch date. Based on staggered phases of production used since the project`s inception, the development of science topics and show scripting for Season IV occurs at the same time that Season III shows are in animation and post-production. Thus, topics for Season IV shows are being selected, and science research and scripting have also begun during this time period. Both the National Science Foundation and PBS have made a commitment to Season IV, and a proposal has been submitted to Microsoft for consideration.

  2. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  3. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I foundmore » that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.« less

  4. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  5. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This

  6. Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hardening and Resiliency U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy August 2010 OE/ISER Final Report 8/16/10 i For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about

  7. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern formore » sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.« less

  8. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.

  9. Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Guadalupe; Meneses, Montserrat; Ballinas, Lourdes; Castells, Francesc

    2009-07-15

    Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city's urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%)

  10. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  11. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore » new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for

  12. Diagnosis of extratropical variability in seasonal integrations of the ECMWF model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferranti, L.; Molteni, F.; Brankovic, C.; Palmer, T.N. )

    1994-06-01

    Properties of the general circulation simulated by the ECMWF model are discussed using a set of seasonal integrations at T63 resolution. For each season, over the period of 5 years, 1986-1990, three integrations initiated on consecutive days were run with prescribed observed sea surface temperature (SST). This paper presents a series of diagnostics of extratropical variability in the model, with particular emphasis on the northern winter. Time-filtered maps of variability indicate that in this season there is insufficient storm track activity penetrating into the Eurasian continent. Related to this the maximum of lower-frequency variability for northern spring are more realistic. Blocking is defined objectively in terms of the geostrophic wind at 500 mb. Consistent with the low-frequency transience, in the Euro-Atlantic sector the position of maximum blocking in the model is displaced eastward. The composite structure of blocks over the Pacific is realistic, though their frequency is severely underestimated at all times of year. Shortcomings in the simulated wintertime general circulation were also revealed by studying the projection of 5-day mean fields onto empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of the observed flow. The largest differences were apparent for statistics of EOFs of the zonal mean flow. Analysis of weather regime activity, defined from the EOFs, suggested that regimes with positive PNA index were overpopulated, while the negative PNA regimes were underpopulated. A further comparison between observed and modeled low-frequency variance revealed that underestimation of low-frequency variability occurs along the same axes that explain most of the spatial structure of the error in the mean field, suggesting a common dynamical origin for these two aspects of the systematic error. 17 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a

  14. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation

  15. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-12-31

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  16. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  17. Preliminary survey and evaluation of nonaquifer thermal energy storage concepts for seasonal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1980-11-01

    Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The main energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)

  18. Seasonal and multiannual roost use by Rafinesque's Big-eared Bats in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about factors affecting year-round use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) or the long-term fidelity of this species to anthropogenic or natural roosts. The objectives of this study were to test whether seasonal use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats varied with roost type and environmental conditions within and among seasons and to document multiannual use of natural and anthropogenic structures by this species. We inspected 4 bridges, 1 building, and 59 tree roosts possessing basal cavity openings; roosts were inspected at least once per week from May through October in every year from 2005 through 2008 and once a month from November through April in every year from 2005 through 2009. We found that use of anthropogenic roosts was significantly greater than the use of tree roosts in summer but that the use of structure types did not differ in other seasons. There was significant seasonal variation in use of anthropogenic and tree roosts. Anthropogenic roost use was higher in summer than in all other seasons. There was no significant difference in tree use among spring, summer, and fall, but use in winter was significantly lower in 2 years of the study. Overall use of anthropogenic and tree roosts was positively related to minimum temperature, but the relationship between use of roosts and minimum temperature varied among seasons. Bats showed multiannual fidelity ({ge} 4 years) to all anthropogenic roosts and to some tree roosts, but fidelity of bats to anthropogenic roosts was greater and more consistent than to tree roosts. Our data indicate that Rafinesque's big-eared bats responded differently to environmental conditions among seasons; thus, a variety of structure types and characteristics are necessary for conservation of these bats. We suggest long-term protection of roost structures of all types is necessary for conservation of Rafinesque's big-eared bats in the southeast Coastal Plain.

  19. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  20. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS near and far detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. Thus, at the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. In contrast and unexpectedly, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  1. Seasonality of soil CO2 efflux in a temperate forest: Biophysical effects of snowpack and spring freezethaw cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuankuan; Han, Yi; Chen, Jiquan; Wang, Xingchang; Zhang, Quanzhi; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-08-15

    Changes in characteristics of snowfall and spring freezethaw-cycle (FTC) events under the warming climate make it critical to understand biophysical controls on soil CO2 efflux (RS) in seasonally snow-covered ecosystems. We conducted a snow removal experiment and took year-round continuous automated measurements of RS, soil temperature (T5) and soil volumetric water content at the 5 cm depth (W5) with a half-hour interval in a Chinese temperate forest in 20102011. Our objectives were to: (1) develop statistical models to describe the seasonality of RS in this forest; (2) quantify the contribution of seasonal RS to the annual budget; (3) examine biophysical effects of snowpack on RS; and (4) test the hypothesis that an FTC-induced enhancement of RS is jointly driven by biological and physical processes.

  2. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 58 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  3. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation thatmore » peaks in the winter.« less

  4. Sensitive response of a model of symbiotic ecosystem to seasonal periodic drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rekker, A.; Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-12

    A symbiotic ecosysytem (metapopulation) is studied by means of the stochastic Lotka-Volterra model with generalized Verhulst self-regulation. The effect of variable environment on the carrying capacities of populations is taken into account as an asymmetric dichotomous noise and as a deterministic periodic stimulus. In the framework of the mean-field theory an explicit self-consistency equation for the system in the long-time limit is presented. Also, expressions for the probability distribution and for the moments of the population size are found. In certain cases the mean population size exhibits large oscillations in time, even if the amplitude of the seasonal environmental drive is small. Particularly, it is shown that the occurrence of large oscillations of the mean population size can be controlled by noise parameters (such as amplitude and correlation time) and by the coupling strength of the symbiotic interaction between species.

  5. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrecengost, J. D.; Kilgo, J. C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H. Scott; Miller, K. V.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  6. PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA: RESULTS FROM THE 2010 OBSERVING SEASON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingzhi; Zhu, Zonghong; Macri, Lucas M.; Wang, Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V.; Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Liu, Qiang; Shang, Zhaohui; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Zhenxi; Pennypacker, Carl R.; York, Donald G.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a season of observations with the Chinese Small Telescope ARray, obtained over 183 days of the 2010 Antarctic winter. We carried out high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 9125 stars with i ∼< 15.3 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. We identified 188 variable stars, including 67 new objects relative to our 2008 observations, thanks to broader synoptic coverage, a deeper magnitude limit, and a larger field of view. We used the photometric data set to derive site statistics from Dome A. Based on two years of observations, we find that extinction due to clouds at this site is less than 0.1 and 0.4 mag during 45% and 75% of the dark time, respectively.

  7. Seasonal thermal energy storage in unsaturated soils: Model development and field validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.; Nir, Aharon, Tsang, Chin-Fu

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes ten years of activity carried out at the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBI) in the subject of seasonal storage of thermal energy in unsaturated soils. The objectives of the work were to make a conceptual study of this type of storage, to offer guidelines for planning and evaluation of the method, to produce models and simulation for an actual field experiment, to participate in an on-line data analysis of experimental results. and to evaluate the results in terms of the validation of the concept, models and the experimental techniques. The actual field experiments were performed in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Details of engineering and field operations are not included in this report.

  8. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  9. Seasonal Variability in Clouds and Radiation at the Manus ARM Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, Jim H.

    2005-07-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates three climate observation stations in the tropical western Pacific region. Two of these sites, located on Manus island in Papua New Guinea and on the island republic of Nauru, have been operating for over five years. This data set provides an opportunity to examine variability in tropical cloudiness on a wide range of time scales. The focus of this study is on the annual cycle. The most obvious manifestation of the annual cycle in this region is the oscillation of monsoon convection between Asia and Australia. The impact of the annual cycle on Manus and Nauru is more subtle; however, analysis of radiation and cloud observations from the Manus and Nauru ARM sites reveals links to the annual monsoon cycle. One such link relates to the proximity of Manus to the Maritime Continent, the collection of islands separating the Pacific and Indian oceans. Convection over the large islands in the maritime continent exhibits a distinct annual cycle. Outflow from large-island convection is shown to modulate the cirrus population over Manus. During neutral or cool ENSO periods, convection over Nauru is relatively suppressed. During such periods, Nauru is shown to exhibit an annual cycle in local convective activity. During the inactive season, cirrus are often found near the tropopause over Nauru. These clouds are not formed directly by the outflow from convection. The seasonality and source of these clouds is also examined. Identifying the source of cirrus observed at Manus and Nauru is important because of the potential dependence of cirrus properties on the source of convection.

  10. Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Welch, Ian D.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-04-30

    To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from five years (2004-2008) of acoustic telemetry studies conducted in the Columbia River estuary using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System. For this synthesis, the Columbia River estuary includes the section of the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam at river kilometer (Rkm) 235 downstream to the mouth where it enters the Pacific Ocean. In this report, we summarize the seasonal salmonid presence and migration patterns in the Columbia River estuary based on information from published studies as well as relevant data from acoustic telemetry studies conducted by NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) between 2004 and 2008. Recent acoustic telemetry studies, conducted using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS; developed by the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), provided information on the migratory behavior of juvenile steelhead (O. mykiss) and Chinook salmon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. In this report, Section 2 provides a summary of information from published literature on the seasonal presence and migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary and plume. Section 3 presents a detailed synthesis of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead migratory behavior based on use of the JSATS between 2004 and 2008. Section 4 provides a discussion of the information summarized in the report as well as information drawn from literature reviews on potential effects of channel maintenance activities to juvenile salmonids rearing in

  11. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunderson, Carla A; Edwards, Nelson T; Walker, Ashley V; O'Hara, Keiran H; Campion, Christina M; Hanson, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have related current and historical temperatures to phenological shifts, but experimental evidence is sparse, particularly for autumn responses. A five-year field experiment exposed four deciduous forest species from contrasting climates (Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Populus grandidentata, and Betula alleghaniensis) to air temperatures 2 and 4 C above ambient controls. Impacts of year-round warming on bud burst (BB), senescence and abscission were evaluated in relation to thermal provenance. Leaves emerged earlier in all species, by an average of 6-9 days at +2 and +4 C. Magnitude of advance varied with species and year, but was larger for the first 2 C increment than the second. The effect of warming increased with early BB, favoring Liquidambar, from the warmest climate, but even BB in northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. Treatment differences in BB were poorly explained by temperature sums, which increased with treatment. In autumn, chlorophyll was retained an average of 4 and 7 days longer in +2 and +4 C treatments, and abscission delayed by 8 and 13 days. Species differences in autumn responses were marginally significant. Growing seasons in the warmer atmospheres were 6 - 28 days longer, with the least impact in Quercus. Results are compared with a 16-year record of canopy onset and offset in a nearby upland deciduous forest, where BB showed similar responsiveness to spring temperatures (2 - 4 days C-1). Offset dates in the stand tracked August-September temperatures, except when late summer drought caused premature senescence. The common garden-like experimental approach provides evidence that warming alone extends the growing season, at both ends, even if stand-level impacts are complicated by other environmental factors.

  12. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Paul ; Reinhold, Joerg ; Roche, Julie ; Roos, Philip ; Sarty, Adam ; Shin, Ilkyoung ; Smith, Gregory ; Stepanyan, Stepan ; Tang, Liguang ; Tvaskis, Vladas ; van der Meer, Rob ; ...

  13. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Paul ; Reinhold, Joerg ; Roche, Julie ; Roos, Philip ; Sarty, Adam ; Shin, Ilkyoung ; Smith, Gregory ; Stepanyan, Stepan ; Tang, Liguang ; Tvaskis, Vladas ; van der Meer, Rob ; ...

  14. Measurement of the Neutron electric form factor at Q2=0.8 2(GeV\\\\c)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Glazier

    2007-09-30

    Nucleon form factors allow a sensitive test for models of the nucleon. Recent experiments utilising polarisation observables have resulted, for the first time, in a model-independent determination of the neutron electric form factor GnE. This method employed an 80% longitudinally polarised, high intensity (10 uA) electon beam (883 MeV) that was quasi-elastically scattered off a liquid deuterium target in the reaction D (e, en)p. A neutron polarimeter was designed and installed to measure the ratio of transverse-to-longitudinal polarisation using neutron scattering asymmetries. This ratio allowed a determination of the neutron elastic form factor, GnE, free of the previous large systematic uncertainties associated with the deuterium wave function. The experiment took place in the A1 experimental hall at MAMI taking advantage of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer. A detailed investigation was carried out into the performance of the neutron polarimeter.

  15. Quarterly Report for LANL Activities: FY12-Q2 National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawar, Rajesh J.

    2012-04-17

    This report summarizes progress of LANL activities related to the tasks performed under the LANL FWP FE102-002-FY10, National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program. This FWP is funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Overall, the NRAP activities are focused on understanding and evaluating risks associated with large-scale injection and long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in deep geological formations. One of the primary risks during large-scale injection is due to changes in geomechanical stresses to the storage reservoir, to the caprock/seals and to the wellbores. These changes may have the potential to cause CO{sub 2} and brine leakage and geochemical impacts to the groundwater systems. While the importance of these stresses is well recognized, there have been relatively few quantitative studies (laboratory, field or theoretical) of geomechanical processes in sequestration systems. In addition, there are no integrated studies that allow evaluation of risks to groundwater quality in the context of CO{sub 2} injection-induced stresses. The work performed under this project is focused on better understanding these effects. LANL approach will develop laboratory and computational tools to understand the impact of CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical stress by creating a geomechanical test bed using inputs from laboratory experiments, field data, and conceptual approaches. The Geomechanical Test Bed will be used for conducting sensitivity and scenario analyses of the impacts of CO{sub 2} injection. The specific types of questions will relate to fault stimulation and fracture inducing stress on caprock, changes in wellbore leakage due to evolution of stress in the reservoir and caprock, and the potential for induced seismicity. In addition, the Geomechanical Test Bed will be used to investigate the coupling of stress-induced leakage pathways with impacts on groundwater quality. LANL activities are performed under two tasks: (1) develop laboratory and computational tools to understand CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical impacts and (2) use natural analog sites to determine potential groundwater impacts. We are using the Springerville-St. John Dome as a field site for collecting field data on CO{sub 2} migration through faults and groundwater impacts as well as developing and validating computational models. During the FY12 second quarter we have been working with New England Research Company to construct a tri-axial core-holder. We have built fluid control system for the coreflood system that can be ported to perform in-situ imaging of core. We have performed numerical simulations for groundwater impacts of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage using the reservoir model for Springerville-St John's Dome site. We have analyzed groundwater samples collected from Springerville site for major ion chemistry and isotopic composition. We are currently analyzing subsurface core and chip samples acquired for mineralogical composition.

  16. Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for Next-Generation CSP Systems- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  17. A Small-Particle Solar Receiver for High-Temperature Brayton Power Cycles- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SDSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  18. Semi volatile organic compounds in ambient PM2.5. Seasonal trends and daily resolved source contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juergen Schnelle-Kreis; Martin Sklorz; Juergen Orasche; Matthias Stoelzel; Annette Peters; Ralf Zimmermann

    2007-06-01

    Concentrations of ambient semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the PM2.5 fraction of Augsburg, Germany, have been monitored on a daily basis from January 2003 through December 2004. Samples were taken in a large garden in the city center. Quantitative analysis of n-alkanes, alkanones, alkanoic acid methylesters, long chain linear alkyl benzenes and toluenes, hopanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and oxidized PAH, and some abietan type diterpenes was done. All compounds showed distinct seasonal variations in concentration. Most compounds showed highest concentrations during the cold seasons, but some n-alkanones and 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecanone showed maximum concentration during summer. Changes in patterns between and within compound classes were obvious, e.g., the hopane pattern exhibited a strong seasonal variation. The main source related contributions to changes observed were discussed. Using positive matrix factorization (PMF) for the statistical investigation of the data set, five factors have been separated. These factors are dominated by the pattern of single sources or groups of similar sources: factor 1, lubricating oil; factor 2, emissions of unburned diesel and heating oil consumption; factor 3, wood combustion; factor 4, brown coal combustion; and factor 5, biogenic emissions and transport components. Like the SVOC, the factors showed strong seasonality with highest values in winter for factors 1-4 and in summer for factor 5. 56 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Passive solar/earth sheltered office/dormitory cooling season thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.

    1984-01-01

    Continuous detailed hourly thermal performance measurements have been taken since February 1982 in and around an occupied, underground, 4000 ft/sup 2/ office/dormitory building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This building has a number of energy saving features which have been analyzed relative to their performance in a southeastern US climate and with respect to overall commercial building performance. This analysis documents cooling season performance, as well as effects of earth contact, interior thermal mass, an economizer cycle and interface of an efficient building envelope with a central three-ton heat pump. The Joint Institute Dormitory obtains a cooling energy savings of about 30% compared with an energy-efficient, above-grade structure and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The proper installation of the overhand, interior thermal mass, massive supply duct system, and earth contact team up to prevent summertime overheating. From May through September, this building cost a total of $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate 24 hours per day. Besides thermal performance of the building envelope, extensive comfort data was taken illustrating that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time according to the PMV measurements.

  20. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N. W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  1. State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunton, G.

    1998-06-01

    The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

  2. Michigan residential heating oil and propane price survey: 1995--1996 heating season. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, C.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of residential No. 2 distillate fuel (home heating oil) and liquefied petroleum gas (propane) prices over the 1995--1996 heating season in Michigan. The Michigan`s Public Service Commission (MPSC) conducted the survey under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). This survey was funded in part by a grant from the DOE. From October 1995 through March 1996, the MPSC surveyed participating distributors by telephone for current residential retail home heating oil and propane prices. The MPSC transmitted the data via a computer modem to the EIA using the Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). Survey results were published in aggregate on the MPSC World Wide Web site at http://ermisweb.state.mi.us/shopp. The page was updated with both residential and wholesale prices immediately following the transmission of the data to the EIA. The EIA constructed the survey using a sample of Michigan home heating oil and propane retailers. The sample accounts for different sales volumes, geographic location, and sources of primary supply.

  3. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming.

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  4. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-12-08

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore » annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  5. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-07-15

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore » annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  6. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Le Roy, L.

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  7. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for Elcam Tempe Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The analysis used is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for at least one full season of operation. The objective of the analysis is to report the long-term field performance of the installed system and to make technical contributions to the definition of techniques and requirements for solar energy system design. The solar system, Elcam-Tempe, was designed to supply commercial domestic hot water heating systems that utilize two, four by eight foot flat plate collectors to heat water in a fifty-two gallon preheat tank or a fifty-two gallon domestic hot water (DHW) tank. The DHW tank provides hot water to the Agriculture Department residence at Arizona State University. The system uses an automatic cascade control system to control three independent actuators, the coolant circulation pump, the cascade valve, and the electric heating element. The system provides freeze protection by automatically circulating hot water from the hot water tank through the collectors when the collector outlet temperature is below a specified value. The building is a single story residence located at the agriculture experiment farm of the Arizona State University. The Elcam-Tempe Solar Energy System has four modes of operation.

  8. Effect of seasonal changes in quantities of biowaste on full scale anaerobic digester performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illmer, P. Gstraunthaler, G.

    2009-01-15

    A 750,000 l digester located in Roppen/Austria was studied over a 2-year period. The concentrations and amounts of CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S and several other process parameters like temperature, retention time, dry weight and input of substrate were registered continuously. On a weekly scale the pH and the concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N and volatile fatty acids (acetic, butyric, iso-butyric, propionic, valeric and iso-valeric acid) were measured. The data show a similar pattern of seasonal gas production over 2 years of monitoring. The consumption of VFA and not the hydrogenotrophic CH{sub 4} production appeared to be the limiting factor for the investigated digestion process. Whereas the changes in pH and the concentrations of most VFA did not correspond with changes in biogas production, the ratio of acetic to propionic acid and the concentration of H{sub 2} appeared to be useful indicators for reactor performance. However, the most influential factors for the anaerobic digestion process were the amount and the quality of input material, which distinctly changed throughout the year.

  9. Seasonal trend of photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, L; Baldocchi, DD

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Understanding seasonal changes in photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance is crucial for modeling long-term carbon uptake and energy fluxes of ecosystems. Gas exchange measurements of CO{sub 2} and light response curves on blue oak leaves (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) were conducted weekly throughout the growing season to study the seasonality of photosynthetic capacity (V{sub cmax}) and Ball-Berry slope (m) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature. A leaf photosynthetic model was used to determine V{sub cmax}. There was a pronounced seasonal pattern in V{sub cmax}. The maximum value of V{sub cmax}, 127 {micro}molm{sup -2} s{sup -1},was reached shortly after leaf expansion in early summer, when air temperature was moderate and soil water availability was high. Thereafter, V{sub cmax} declined as the soil water profile became depleted and the trees experienced extreme air temperatures, exceeding 40 C. The decline in V{sub cmax} was gradual in midsummer, however, despite extremely low predawn leaf water potentials ({Psi}{sub pd}, {approx} -4.0 MPa). Overall, temporal changes in V{sub cmax} were well correlated with changes in leaf nitrogen content. During spring leaf development, high rates of leaf dark respiration (R{sub d}, 5-6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were observed. Once a leaf reached maturity, R{sub d} remained low, around 0.5 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. In contrast to the strong seasonality of V{sub cmax}, m and marginal water cost per unit carbon gain ({partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A) were relatively constant over the season, even when leaf {Psi}{sub pd} dropped to -6.8 MPa. The constancy of {partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A suggests that stomata behaved optimally under severe water-stress conditions. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of modeling carbon and water vapor exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  10. Low-Cost, Highly Transparent Flexible low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Berland, bberland@itnes.com ITN Energy Systems Low-Cost, Highly Transparent Flexible low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: October 1, 2013 Planned end date: September 30, 2014 Key Milestones 1.Low-e Film: 90% T,vis & R,ir (100 cm 2 ) (Q2) 2.Low-e Film: 90% T,vis & R,ir (2m long, %T,%R variation < 2% cross web) (Q3) 3.Demonstrate Low-e/EC Film (Q3) Budget:

  11. Cooling season performance of an earth-sheltered office/dormitory building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Detailed hourly measurements taken in and around an underground office-dormitory building for two summers document energy savings; whole building-component interface problems; and specific cooling contributions from earth contact, interior thermal mass, and an economizer. The Joint Institute Dormitory (JID) saves about 30% compared with well-built above-grade buildings in a climate typical of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The detailed measurements, which include extensive thermal comfort data, indicate that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time. The thermal performance measurements and analysis determine that the peak cooling requirement of this building is 50% less than that of well-built above-grade structures, permitting a cost savings on installed cooling capacity. The dominant building components contributing to the good thermal performance are the structural thermal mass, the earth-covered roof, and the earth contact provided by the bermed walls and slab floor. The 372-m/sup 2/ (4000 gross ft/sup 2/) building used about $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate from May through September. Eliminating a number of building design and construction anomalies could improve the whole-building performance and reduce the seasonal cooling cost another $85. Close examination of the thermal performance of this building revealed that a very efficient heat pump and thermally sound envelope do not necessarily produce otpimum performance without careful attention given to component interface details. 8 references, 24 figures, 12 tables.

  12. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliqueivis, T.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Karl, Thomas G.; Guenther, Alex B.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Poeschl, U.; Jiminez, J. L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time mass spectra of non-refractory component of submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon basin during the wet season of 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic components accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. Ammonium was present in sufficient quantities to halfway neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-dominated, low-NOx environment the high-resolution mass spectra as well as mass closures with ion chromatography measurements did not provide evidence for significant contributions of organosulfate species, at least at concentrations above uncertainty levels. Positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the variance of the signal intensities of the organic constituents: a factor HOA having a hydrocarbon-like signature and identified as regional emissions of primary organic material, a factor OOA-1 associated with fresh production of secondary organic material by a mechanism of BVOC oxidation followed by gas-to-particle conversion, a factor OOA-2 consistent with reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially epoxydiols by acidic particles, and a factor OOA-3 associated with long range transport and atmospheric aging. The OOA-1, -2, and -3 factors had progressively more oxidized signatures. Diameter-resolved mass spectral markers also suggested enhanced reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products to the accumulation mode for the OOA-2 factor, and such size partitioning can be indicative of in-cloud process. The campaign-average factor loadings were in a ratio of 1.1:1.0 for the OOA-1 compared to the OOA-2 pathway, suggesting the comparable importance of gas-phase compared to particle-phase (including cloud waters) production pathways of secondary organic material during

  13. Studies of Annual and Seasonal Variations in Four Species of Reptiles and Amphibians at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, D.C.; Nelson, E.I.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S.; Haarmann, T.K.

    1998-07-01

    Baseline studies of reptiles and amphibians of the Pajarito wetlands at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been conducted by the Ecology group since 1990. With the data gathered from 1990-1997 (excluding 1992), we examined the annual and seasonal population changes of four species of reptiles and amphibians over the past seven years. The four species studied are the Woodhouse toad (Bufo woodhousii), the western chorus frog (Pseudacris triseriata), the many-lined skink (Eunzeces nudtivirgatus), and the plateau striped whiptail lizard (Cnemidophorus velox). Statistical analyses indicate a significant change on a seasonal basis for the western chorus frog and the many-lined skink. Results indicate a significant difference in the annual population of the Woodhouse toad.

  14. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-01-01

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7,more » 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.« less

  15. Seasonal trends in photosynthesis and electron transport during the Mediterranean summer drought in leaves of deciduous oaks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Osuna, Jessica L.; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Kobayashi, Hideki; Dawson, Todd E.

    2015-04-08

    The California Mediterranean savanna has harsh summer conditions with minimal soil moisture, high temperature, high incoming solar radiation and little or no precipitation. Deciduous blue oaks, Quercus douglasii Hook. and Arn., are winter-deciduous obligate phreatophytes, transpiring mostly groundwater throughout the summer drought. Our objective for this work is to fully characterize the seasonal trends of photosynthesis in blue oaks as well as the mechanistic relationships between leaf structure and function.

  16. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-07-28

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7, 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.

  17. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: cosmological parameters from three seasons of data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sievers, Jonathan L.; Appel, John William; Hlozek, Renée A.; Nolta, Michael R.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Acquaviva, Viviana; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Battistelli, Elia S.; Burger, Bryce; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Brown, Ben; Calabrese, Erminia; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; and others

    2013-10-01

    We present constraints on cosmological and astrophysical parameters from high-resolution microwave background maps at 148 GHz and 218 GHz made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) in three seasons of observations from 2008 to 2010. A model of primary cosmological and secondary foreground parameters is fit to the map power spectra and lensing deflection power spectrum, including contributions from both the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect, Poisson and correlated anisotropy from unresolved infrared sources, radio sources, and the correlation between the tSZ effect and infrared sources. The power ℓ{sup 2}C{sub ℓ}/2π of the thermal SZ power spectrum at 148 GHz is measured to be 3.4±1.4  μK{sup 2} at ℓ = 3000, while the corresponding amplitude of the kinematic SZ power spectrum has a 95% confidence level upper limit of 8.6  μK{sup 2}. Combining ACT power spectra with the WMAP 7-year temperature and polarization power spectra, we find excellent consistency with the LCDM model. We constrain the number of effective relativistic degrees of freedom in the early universe to be N{sub eff} = 2.79±0.56, in agreement with the canonical value of N{sub eff} = 3.046 for three massless neutrinos. We constrain the sum of the neutrino masses to be Σm{sub ν} < 0.39 eV at 95% confidence when combining ACT and WMAP 7-year data with BAO and Hubble constant measurements. We constrain the amount of primordial helium to be Y{sub p} = 0.225±0.034, and measure no variation in the fine structure constant α since recombination, with α/α{sub 0} = 1.004±0.005. We also find no evidence for any running of the scalar spectral index, dn{sub s}/dln k = −0.004±0.012.

  18. Quantification of massive seasonal aggregations of blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus) in Southeast Florida

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kajiura, Stephen M.; Tellman, Shari L.; Patterson, Heather M.

    2016-03-30

    Southeast Florida witnesses an enormous seasonal influx of upper trophic level marine predators each year as massive aggregations of migrating blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus) overwinter in nearshore waters. The narrow shelf and close proximity of the Gulf Stream current to the Palm Beach County shoreline drive tens of thousands of sharks to the shallow, coastal environment. This natural bottleneck provides a unique opportunity to estimate relative abundance. Over a four year period from 2011–2014, an aerial survey was flown approximately biweekly along the length of Palm Beach County. A high definition video camera and digital still camera mounted out ofmore » the airplane window provided a continuous record of the belt transect which extended 200 m seaward from the shoreline between Boca Raton Inlet and Jupiter Inlet. The number of sharks within the survey transect was directly counted from the video. Shark abundance peaked in the winter (January-March) with a maximum in 2011 of 12,128 individuals counted within the 75.6 km-2 belt transect. This resulted in a maximum density of 803.2 sharks km-2. By the late spring (April-May), shark abundance had sharply declined to 1.1% of its peak, where it remained until spiking again in January of the following year. Shark abundance was inversely correlated with water temperature and large numbers of sharks were found only when water temperatures were less than 25°C. Shark abundance was also correlated with day of the year but not with barometric pressure. Although shark abundance was not correlated with photoperiod, the departure of the sharks from southeast Florida occurred around the vernal equinox. The shark migration along the United States eastern seaboard corresponds spatially and temporally with the spawning aggregations of various baitfish species. As a result, these baseline abundance data can be compared to future studies to determine if shark population size is changing and if sharks are restricting

  19. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractors Seasonal Fluctuations Call Slides and Discussion Summary, June 7, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  What strategies has your program been thinking about or implemented to align program demand with seasonal fluctuation? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Rutland County, VT: Mary Cohen, NeighborWorks of Western Vermont  Austin, TX: Jill Maness, Austin Energy *

  20. Potential for savings in compliance costs for reducing ground-level ozone possible by instituting seasonal versus annual nitric oxide emission limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lookman, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    Ground-level ozone is formed in the atmosphere from its precursor emissions, namely nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and volatile organic compounds (VOC), with its rate of formation dependent on atmospheric conditions. Since ozone levels tend to be highest during the summer months, seasonal controls of precursors have been suggested as a means of reducing the costs of decreasing ozone concentrations to acceptable levels. This paper attempts to quantify what the potential savings if seasonal control were instituted for coal-fired power plants, assuming that only commercially available NO{sub x} control technologies are used. Cost savings through seasonal control is measured by calculating the total annualized cost of NO{sub x} removal at a given amount of seasonal control for different target levels of annual control. For this study, it is assumed that trading of NO{sub x} emissions will be allowed, as has been proposed by the Ozone Transportation Commission (OTC). The problem has been posed as a binary integer linear programming problem, with decision variables being which control to use at each power plant. The results indicate that requiring annual limits which are lower than seasonal limits can substantially reduce compliance costs. These savings occur because requiring stringent compliance only on a seasonal basis allows power plants to use control methods for which the variable costs are paid for only part of the year, and through the use of gas-based controls, which are much cheaper to operate in the summer months.

  1. A Seasonal Perspective on Regional Air Quality in CentralCalifornia - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.; Tonse, Shaheen R.; Jin, Ling

    2006-12-01

    Central California spans a wide variety of urban, agricultural, and natural terrain, including the San Francisco Bay area, the Central Valley, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Population within this region is growing rapidly, and there are persistent, serious air pollution problems including fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and ozone. Summertime photochemical air pollution is the focus of the present study, which represents a first phase in the development and application of a modeling capability to assess formation and transport of ozone and its precursors within Central California over an entire summer season. This contrasts with past studies that have examined pollutant dynamics for a few selected high-ozone episodes each lasting 3-5 days. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) has been applied to predict air pollutant formation and transport in Central California for a 15-day period beginning on July 24, 2000. This period includes a 5-day intensive operating period (July 29 to August 2) from the Central California Ozone Study (CCOS). Day-specific meteorological conditions were modeled by research collaborators at NOAA using a mesoscale meteorological model (MM5). Pollutant emissions within the study domain were based on CARB emission inventory estimates, with additional efforts conducted as part of this research to capture relevant emissions variability including (1) temperature and sunlight-driven changes in biogenic VOC, (2) weekday/weekend and diurnal differences in light-duty (LD) and heavy-duty (HD) motor vehicle emissions, (3) effects of day-specific meteorological conditions on plume rise from point sources such as power plants. We also studied the effects of using cleaner pollutant inflow boundary conditions, lower than indicated during CCOS aircraft flights over the Pacific Ocean, but supported by other surface, ship-based, balloon and aircraft sampling studies along the west coast. Model predictions were compared with measured

  2. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  3. Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

  4. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  5. completed_td_projects | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forecast: August 9, 2016; Previous Forecast: July 12, 2016 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2014 2015 2016 2017 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 U.S. Energy Supply U.S. Crude Oil Production (million barrels per day) Current 9.48 9.50 9.43 9.32 9.17 8.87 8.45 8.44 8.42 8.36 8.16 8.29 8.71 9.43 8.73 8.31 8.3% -7.4% -4.9% Previous 9.48 9.50 9.43 9.32 9.17 8.79 8.26 8.23 8.24 8.21 8.09 8.27 8.71 9.43 8.61 8.20 8.3% -8.7% -4.8% Percent Change 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.2% 1.8% 0.9%

  6. Quarterly Research Performance Progress Report (2015 Q3). Ultrasonic Phased Arrays and Interactive Reflectivity Tomography for Nondestructive Inspection of Injection and Production Wells in Geothermal Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Polsky, Yarom; Kisner, Roger A; Johnson, Christi R; Collins, Case; Bouman, Charles; Abdulrahman, Hani; Foster, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    For the past quarter, we have placed our effort in implementing the first version of the ModelBased Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, assembling and testing the electronics, designing transducers mounts, and defining our laboratory test samples. We have successfully developed the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasound imaging. The current algorithm was tested with synthetic data and we are currently making new modifications for the reconstruction of real ultrasound data. Beside assembling and testing the electronics, we developed a LabView graphic user interface (GUI) to fully control the ultrasonic phased array, adjust the time-delays of the transducers, and store the measured reflections. As part of preparing for a laboratory-scale demonstration, the design and fabrication of the laboratory samples has begun. Three cement blocks with embedded objects will be fabricated, characterized, and used to demonstrate the capabilities of the system. During the next quarter, we will continue to improve the current MBIR forward model and integrate the reconstruction code with the LabView GUI. In addition, we will define focal laws for the ultrasonic phased array and perform the laboratory demonstration. We expect to perform laboratory demonstration by the end of October 2015.

  7. Emergency Diesel Generation System Surveillance Test Policy Optimization Through Genetic Algorithms Using Non-Periodic Intervention Frequencies and Seasonal Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapa, Celso M.F.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [CNEN, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rua General Severiano 90, Rio de Janeiro, RJ-22-294-900 (Brazil); Frutuoso e Melo, P.F. [COPPE/UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco G, sala 101, Ilha do Fundao, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    Nuclear standby safety systems must frequently, be submitted to periodic surveillance tests. The main reason is to detect, as soon as possible, the occurrence of unrevealed failure states. Such interventions may, however, affect the overall system availability due to component outages. Besides, as the components are demanded, deterioration by aging may occur, penalizing again the system performance. By these reasons, planning a good surveillance test policy implies in a trade-off between gains and overheads due to the surveillance test interventions. In order maximize the systems average availability during a given period of time, it has recently been developed a non-periodic surveillance test optimization methodology based on genetic algorithms (GA). The fact of allowing non-periodic tests turns the solution space much more flexible and schedules can be better adjusted, providing gains in the overall system average availability, when compared to those obtained by an optimized periodic tests scheme. The optimization problem becomes, however, more complex. Hence, the use of a powerful optimization technique, such as GAs, is required. Some particular features of certain systems can turn it advisable to introduce other specific constraints in the optimization problem. The Emergency Diesel Generation System (EDGS) of a Nuclear Power Plant (N-PP) is a good example for demonstrating the introduction of seasonal constraints in the optimization problem. This system is responsible for power supply during an external blackout. Therefore, it is desirable during periods of high blackout probability to maintain the system availability as high as possible. Previous applications have demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of the methodology. However, no seasonal constraints have ever been imposed. This work aims at investigating the application of such methodology in the Angra-II Brazilian NPP EDGS surveillance test policy optimization, considering the blackout probability

  8. Annual Report: 2011-2012 Storm Season Sampling, Non-Dry Dock Stormwater Monitoring for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Rupert, Brian; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhart, Christine

    2013-07-03

    Annual PSNS non-dry dock storm water monitoring results for 2011-2012 storm season. Included are a brief description of the sampling procedures, storm event information, laboratory methods and data collection, a results and discussion section, and the conclusions and recommendations.

  9. How do rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations behave under seasonal water stress in northeastern Thailand and central Cambodia?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Mudd, Ryan G.; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Kobayashi, Nakako; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Lim, Tiva Khan; Liu, Wen; Huang, Maoyi; Fox, Jefferson M.; Ziegler, Alan D.; Yin, Song; Mak, Sophea Veasna; Kasemsap, Poonpipope

    2015-11-01

    Plantation rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Mll. Arg.) is a viable economic resource for Southeast Asian countries. Consequently, rubber plantations are rapidly expanding into both climatically optimal and sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia, potentially changing the partitioning of water, energy, and carbon at multiple scales, compared with the traditional land covers they are replacing. Delineating the characteristics of biosphere-atmosphere exchange in rubber plantations is therefore important to understanding the impacts of such land use change on environmental processes. We have conducted eddy flux measurements in two rubber plantation sites: (1) Som Sanuk (SS), located northern Thailand; and (2) Cambodian Rubber Research Institute (CRRI), central Cambodia. Both sites have a distinct dry season. Measurements were made over a 3-year period. We used combination of actual evapotranspiration (ET) flux measurements and an inversed version of a simple 2-layer ET model for estimating the mean canopy stomatal conductances (gs), which is among the most effective measures for describing water and energy exchanges and tree water use characteristics. A main novelty in this analysis is that the rubber canopy conductance can be extracted from total surface conductance (including the canopy and the vegetation floor effects) and hence environmental and biological controls on rubber tree gs are explicitly compared at each site in different seasons and years. It is demonstrated how each studied rubber plantation copes with each strong seasonal drought via tree water use strategies. Potential tree water use deficit (precipitation (P) potential evaporation (ET_POT)) for each season (i.e., December-February: DJF, March-May: MAM, June-August: JJA, and September-November: SON) revealed in which season and how the water use should be controlled. We found that in seasons when actual tree water use deficit (P E

  10. Evaluation of the accuracy of an offline seasonally-varying matrix transport model for simulating ideal age

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardin, Ann; Primeau, Francois; Lindsay, Keith; Bradley, Andrew

    2016-07-21

    Newton-Krylov solvers for ocean tracers have the potential to greatly decrease the computational costs of spinning up deep-ocean tracers, which can take several thousand model years to reach equilibrium with surface processes. One version of the algorithm uses offline tracer transport matrices to simulate an annual cycle of tracer concentrations and applies Newton’s method to find concentrations that are periodic in time. Here we present the impact of time-averaging the transport matrices on the equilibrium values of an ideal-age tracer. We compared annually-averaged, monthly-averaged, and 5-day-averaged transport matrices to an online simulation using the ocean component of the Community Earthmore » System Model (CESM) with a nominal horizontal resolution of 1° × 1° and 60 vertical levels. We found that increasing the time resolution of the offline transport model reduced a low age bias from 12% for the annually-averaged transport matrices, to 4% for the monthly-averaged transport matrices, and to less than 2% for the transport matrices constructed from 5-day averages. The largest differences were in areas with strong seasonal changes in the circulation, such as the Northern Indian Ocean. As a result, for many applications the relatively small bias obtained using the offline model makes the offline approach attractive because it uses significantly less computer resources and is simpler to set up and run.« less

  11. Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

  12. Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

  13. A Distributed Modeling System for Short-Term to Seasonal Ensemble Streamflow Forecasting in Snowmelt Dominated Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Gill, Muhammad K.; Coleman, Andre M.; Prasad, Rajiv; Vail, Lance W.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a distributed modeling system for short-term to seasonal water supply forecasts with the ability to utilize remotely-sensed snow cover products and real-time streamflow measurements. Spatial variability in basin characteristics and meteorology is represented using a raster-based computational grid. Canopy interception, snow accumulation and melt, and simplified soil water movement are simulated in each computational unit. The model is run at a daily time step with surface runoff and subsurface flow aggregated at the basin scale. This approach allows the model to be updated with spatial snow cover and measured streamflow using an Ensemble Kalman-based data assimilation strategy that accounts for uncertainty in weather forecasts, model parameters, and observations used for updating. Model inflow forecasts for the Dworshak Reservoir in northern Idaho are compared to observations and to April-July volumetric forecasts issued by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) for Water Years 2000 2006. October 1 volumetric forecasts are superior to those issued by the NRCS, while March 1 forecasts are comparable. The ensemble spread brackets the observed April-July volumetric inflows in all years. Short-term (one and three day) forecasts also show excellent agreement with observations.

  14. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  15. "Season of Giving" launches

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to make a monetary donation, contribute non-perishable food items, or donate a frozen turkey to complete holiday meals for families in our communities. The Laboratory's annual...

  16. Seasonal succession leads to habitat-dependent differentiation in ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios among freshwater lake bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-04-29

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA genemore » sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. Furthermore, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors.« less

  17. Evaluation of Steelhead Kelt Passage into the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse Corner Collector Prior to the Juvenile Migration Seasons, 2007 and 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Kim, Jina; Nagy, William T.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents the results of a steelhead kelt passage study conducted by the PNNL for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Bonneville Dam in early spring 2007 and 2008. At the Second Powerhouse, a surface flow outlet called the corner collector (B2CC) may be an effective non-turbine passage route for steelhead kelt moving downstream in early spring before the main juvenile emigration season. The goal of this project was to inform management decisions regarding B2CC operations by estimating the number of kelt using the B2CC for downstream passage at Bonneville Dam prior to the juvenile spring migration season. We performed a hydroacoustic study from March 2 to April 10, 2007 and from March 13 to April 15, 2008.

  18. Nuclear Transparency and Single Particle Spectral Functions from Quasielastic A(e,e'p) Reactions up to Q2=8.1 GeV2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David McKee

    2003-05-01

    High statistics elastic and quasielastic scattering measurements were performed on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, and iron at squared momentum transfers up to 8.1 GeV2. Both the nuclear transparency and the single particle spectral functions were extracted by means of comparison with a Plane- Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. Our data provide no evidence of the onset of color transparency within our kinematic range.

  19. A Measurement of the Neutron Electric Form Factor in Dvec (evec,e'n)p Quasielastic Scattering at Q2=0.5(GeV/c)2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongguo Zhu

    2000-08-01

    The form factors of the neutron give information on fundamental properties of the nucleons and provide a critical testing ground for models based on QCD. In late 1998, Jefferson Lab (JLAB) experiment E93-026 measured the spin-dependent part of the exclusive (e, e'n) scattering cross section from a polarized deuterated ammonia ({sup 15}ND{sub 3}) target at a four momentum transfer squared of Q{sup 2} = 0.5 (GeV/c){sub 2}. A longitudinally polarized electron beam was scattered from the polarized target and the quasi-elastically scattered electron was detected in coincidence with the knocked-out neutron. The data have been analyzed in terms of the spin-correlation parameter, or the electron-deuteron vector asymmetry (A{sub ed}{sup V}), of (e, e'n) to determine the neutron electric form factor G{sub E}{sup n}. The result is consistent with data from existing experiments and shows a good agreement with the Galster parameterization of G{sub E}{sup n} within experimental uncertainty.

  20. Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  1. Recoil Polarization Measurements for Neutral Pion Electroproduction at Q^2=1 (GeV/c)^2 Near the Delta Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Kelly; et. Al.

    2005-09-01

    We measured angular distributions of differential cross section, beam analyzing power, and recoil polarization for neutral pion electroproduction at Q{sup 2} = 1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2} in 10 bins of W across the Delta resonance. A total of 16 independent response functions were extracted, of which 12 were observed for the first time. Comparisons with recent model calculations show that response functions governed by real parts of interference products are determined relatively well near 1.232 GeV, but variations among models is large for response functions governed by imaginary parts and for both increases rapidly with W. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis that adjusts complex multipoles with high partial waves constrained by baseline models. Parabolic fits to the W dependence of the multipole analysis around the Delta mass gives values for SMR = (-6.61 +/- 0.18)% and EMR = (-2.87 +/- 0.19)% that are distinctly larger than those from Legendre analysis of the same data. Similarly, the multipole analysis gives Re(S0+/M1+) = (+7.1 +/- 0.8)% at W=1.232 GeV, consistent with recent models, while the traditional Legendre analysis gives the opposite sign because its truncation errors are quite severe. Finally, using a unitary isobar model (UIM), we find that excitation of the Roper resonance is dominantly longitudinal with S1/2 = (0.05 +/- 0.01) GeV{sup (-1/2)} at Q{sup 2}=1. The ReS0+ and ReE0+ multipoles favor pseudovector coupling over pseudoscalar coupling or a recently proposed mixed-coupling scheme, but the UIM does not reproduce the imaginary parts of 0+ multipoles well.

  2. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  3. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

  4. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Schwartz, pschwartz@tm-lift.com DE-FOA-0000823 Grantee The Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review FREE Heat from Ambient (10 kW) Heat from Burner (15 kW) Combined Heat Delivered (25 kW) New Project 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2013 (8/1/2013) Planned end date: 9/30/2014 Key Milestones 1. Concept & CAD model; Q1 FY2014 2. Thermal Simulation; Q2 FY2014 3. 20kW Demonstrator; Q3-Q4 FY2014 4. Testing at Oak Ridge; Q4 FY2014? Budget:

  5. Microsoft Word - 2015_0211_Joint FY2015HABWorkPlan_TWC Issue Managers.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated February 11, 2015; incorporates comments from February 2015 EIC discussion Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2015 Work Plan (FY 2015 Action Overview) - ISSUE MANAGER ASSIGNMENTS Topic Committee Assignment Issue managers (lead in bold) Potential FY 2015 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Deferred Maintenance Plan RAP/HSEP Discussion; sounding board x 2 100 D/H Proposed Plan for ROD RAP Public involvement x 3 Central Plateau Inner Area Principles RAP Policy discussion; advice x x x x 4

  6. Microsoft Word - 2015_0914_FY2016HABWorkPlan_v1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan Updated October 22, 2015 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Project update x 5. ERDF RAP Project update x 6.

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Paul Schwartz, pschwartz@tm-lift.com DE-FOA-0000823 Grantee The Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review FREE Heat from Ambient (10 kW) Heat from Burner (15 kW) Combined Heat Delivered (25 kW) New Project 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2013 (8/1/2013) Planned end date: 9/30/2014 Key Milestones 1. Concept & CAD model; Q1 FY2014 2. Thermal Simulation; Q2 FY2014 3. 20kW Demonstrator; Q3-Q4 FY2014 4. Testing at Oak Ridge; Q4 FY2014?

  8. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated 05.18.16 *Indicates lead committee 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year Draft 2017 Work Plan (FY 2017 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2017 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Advice [X] 2. Critical Infrastructure Updates *RAP/HSEP/TWC Advice [X] 3. PFP Progress *RAP/HSEP Agency briefing X 4. Sludge retrieval RAP Agency briefing X 5. WESF preparations to move capsules to dry storage RAP Agency briefing, advice [X] 6. Risk-based retrieval,

  9. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 24, 2015) 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Informational x x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Informational x x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. 324 Waste Sites RAP Informational 5. 618-10 VPU remediation RAP Informational 6. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Informational x 7. ERDF RAP

  10. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adopted by the Hanford Advisory Board on 11/5/2015, updated 12/21/15 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview and RAP Issue Manager Assignments) Topic Committee Assignment Issue Managers (lead noted in bold) Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Mattson, Suyama x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Engstrom, Mattson, Garnant, Leckband x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Cimon, Mattson x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Cimon, Catrell,

  11. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 19, 2015June 18, 2015) 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Project update x 5. ERDF RAP Project update x 6. Groundwater updates RAP Project update 7.

  12. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated December 21, 2015 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Project update x 5. ERDF RAP Project update x 6. Groundwater updates RAP Project update 7.

  13. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan Working draft - reflects comments received from PIC, HSEP, TWC and RAP committees (updated October 22, 2015) 1 Hanford Advisory Board Draft Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area

  14. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated 8/31/2016 * Indicates lead committee 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year Draft 2017 Work Plan (FY 2017 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2017 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Agency briefing, advice [x] 2. Sludge retrieval RAP Agency briefing x x 3. WESF preparations to move capsules to dry storage RAP Agency briefing, advice [x] 4. River Corridor updates RAP Agency briefing 5. Groundwater updates RAP Agency briefing x x x x 6. Central

  15. request.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advisory Board Draft Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan Adopted March 18, 2016; updated per EIC discussion 01.13.16 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Project update x

  16. Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

    2009-10-01

    Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

  17. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station. Interim report, 1992 cooling season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  18. Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-02-23

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

  19. Annual Report: 2010-2011 Storm Season Sampling For NON-DRY DOCK STORMWATER MONITORING FOR PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhardt, Christine; Hsu, Larry

    2012-09-01

    This interim report summarizes the stormwater monitoring conducted for non-dry dock outfalls in both the confined industrial area and the residential areas of Naval Base Kitsap within the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (referred to as the Shipyard). This includes the collection, analyses, and descriptive statistics for stormwater sampling conducted from November 2010 through April 2011. Seven stormwater basins within the Shipyard were sampled during at least three storm events to characterize non-dry dock stormwater discharges at selected stormwater drains located within the facility. This serves as the Phase I component of the project and Phase II is planned for the 2011-2012 storm season. These data will assist the Navy, USEPA, Ecology and other stakeholders in understanding the nature and condition of stormwater discharges from the Shipyard and inform the permitting process for new outfall discharges. The data from Phase I was compiled with current stormwater data available from the Shipyard, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet watershed, and Puget Sound in order to support technical investigations for the Draft NPDES permit. The permit would require storm event sampling at selected stormwater drains located within the Shipyard. However, the data must be considered on multiple scales to truly understand potential impairments to beneficial uses within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets.

  20. Seasonal Tips | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    where it's 72 degrees and sunny year-round. But unfortunately, most of us don't. And to stay comfortable, we need heat and hot coffee in the winter, and air-conditioning and...

  1. Seasonal Tips | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cammie Croft Cammie Croft Former Senior Advisor and Director of New Media & Citizen Engagement We're always looking for ways to improve Energy.gov and very much appreciate feedback from our users. In fact, after a visitor to our website voiced concerns last week about Energy.gov's search functionality -- indicating trouble finding old, archived documents about Yucca Mountain, we quickly made improvements. Our overall update of Energy.gov was not the root cause of the problem, but it did make

  2. Simulating Black Carbon and Dust and their Radiative Forcing in Seasonal Snow: A Case Study over North China with Field Campaign Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chun; Hu, Zhiyuan; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Jiming; Flanner, M. G.; Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Yan, Huiping; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, D. G.

    2014-10-30

    A state-of-the-art regional model, WRF-Chem, is coupled with the SNICAR model that includes the sophisticated representation of snow metamorphism processes available for climate study. The coupled model is used to simulate the black carbon (BC) and dust concentrations and their radiative forcing in seasonal snow over North China in January-February of 2010, with extensive field measurements used to evaluate the model performance. In general, the model simulated spatial variability of BC and dust mass concentrations in the top snow layer (hereafter BCS and DSTS, respectively) are quantitatively or qualitatively consistent with observations. The model generally moderately underestimates BCS in the clean regions but significantly overestimates BCS in some polluted regions. Most model results fall into the uncertainty ranges of observations. The simulated BCS and DSTS are highest with >5000 ng g-1 and up to 5 mg g-1, respectively, over the source regions and reduce to <50 ng g-1 and <1 ?g g-1, respectively, in the remote regions. BCS and DSTS introduce similar magnitude of radiative warming (~10 W m-2) in snowpack, which is comparable to the magnitude of surface radiative cooling due to BC and dust in the atmosphere. This study represents the first effort in using a regional modeling framework to simulate BC and dust and their direct radiative forcing in snow. Although a variety of observational datasets have been used to attribute model biases, some uncertainties in the results remain, which highlights the need for more observations, particularly concurrent measurements of atmospheric and snow aerosols and the deposition fluxes of aerosols, in future campaigns.

  3. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts

  4. The influence of warm-season precipitation on the diel cycle of the surface energy balance and carbon dioxide at a Colorado subalpine forest site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Hu, J.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-12-15

    Precipitation changes the physical and biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Using a precipitation-based conditional sampling technique and a 14 year data set from a 25 m micrometeorological tower in a high-elevation subalpine forest, we examined how warm-season precipitation affected the above-canopy diel cycle of wind and turbulence, net radiation Rnet, ecosystem eddy covariance fluxes (sensible heat H, latent heat LE, and CO2 net ecosystem exchange NEE) and vertical profiles of scalars (air temperature Ta, specific humidity q, and CO2 dry mole fraction χc). This analysis allowed us to examine how precipitation modified these variables from hourly (i.e., the diel cycle)more » to multi-day time-scales (i.e., typical of a weather-system frontal passage). During mid-day we found the following: (i) even though precipitation caused mean changes on the order of 50–70 % to Rnet, H, and LE, the surface energy balance (SEB) was relatively insensitive to precipitation with mid-day closure values ranging between 90 and 110 %, and (ii) compared to a typical dry day, a day following a rainy day was characterized by increased ecosystem uptake of CO2 (NEE increased by ≈ 10 %), enhanced evaporative cooling (mid-day LE increased by ≈ 30 W m−2), and a smaller amount of sensible heat transfer (mid-day H decreased by ≈ 70 W m−2). Based on the mean diel cycle, the evaporative contribution to total evapotranspiration was, on average, around 6 % in dry conditions and between 15 and 25 % in partially wet conditions. Furthermore, increased LE lasted at least 18 h following a rain event. At night, even though precipitation (and accompanying clouds) reduced the magnitude of Rnet, LE increased from ≈ 10 to over 20 W m−2 due to increased evaporation. Any effect of precipitation on the nocturnal SEB closure and NEE was overshadowed by atmospheric phenomena such as horizontal advection and decoupling that create measurement difficulties. Above

  5. The effect of warm-season precipitation on the diel cycle of the surface energy balance and carbon dioxide at a Colorado subalpine forest site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-06-16

    Precipitation changes the physical and biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Using a precipitation-based conditional sampling technique and a 14 year dataset from a 25 m micrometeorological tower in a high-elevation subalpine forest, we examined how warm-season precipitation affected the above-canopy diel cycle of wind and turbulence, net radiation Rnet, ecosystem eddy covariance fluxes (sensible heat H, latent heat LE, and CO2 net ecosystem exchange NEE) and vertical profiles of scalars (air temperature Ta, specific humidity q, and CO2 dry mole fraction ?c). This analysis allowed us to examine how precipitation modified these variables from hourly (i.e., the diel cycle) tomoremulti-day time-scales (i.e., typical of a weather-system frontal passage). During mid-day we found: (i) even though precipitation caused mean changes on the order of 5070% to Rnet, H, and LE, the surface energy balance (SEB) was relatively insensitive to precipitation with mid-day closure values ranging between 7080%, and (ii) compared to a typical dry day, a day following a rainy day was characterized by increased ecosystem uptake of CO2 (NEE increased by ≈ 10%), enhanced evaporative cooling (mid-day LE increased by ≈ 30 W m-2), and a smaller amount of sensible heat transfer (mid-day H decreased by ≈ 70 W m-2). Based on the mean diel cycle, the evaporative contribution to total evapotranspiration was, on average, around 6% in dry conditions and 20% in wet conditions. Furthermore, increased LE lasted at least 18 h following a rain event. At night, precipitation (and accompanying clouds) reduced Rnet and increased LE. Any effect of precipitation on the nocturnal SEB closure and NEE was overshadowed by atmospheric phenomena such as horizontal advection and decoupling that create measurement difficulties. Above-canopy mean ?c during wet conditions was found to be about 23 ?mol mol-1 larger than ?c on dry days. This difference was fairly constant over the full diel

  6. Systematics of ground-state quadrupole moments of odd-A deformed nuclei determined with muonic M x rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Y.; Steffen, R.M.; Shera, E.B.; Reuter, W.; Hoehn, M.V.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1984-05-01

    The ground-state quadrupole moments of /sup 151/Eu, /sup 153/Eu, /sup 159/Tb, /sup 163/Dy, /sup 167/Er, /sup 177/Hf, /sup 179/Hf, /sup 191/Ir, and /sup 193/Ir were determined by measuring the quadrupole hyperfine-splitting energies of muonic M x rays. The results are Q = 0.903(10) e b for /sup 151/Eu, Q = 2.412(21) e b for /sup 153/Eu, Q = 1.432(8) e b for /sup 159/Tb, Q = 2.648(21) e b for /sup 163/Dy, Q = 3.565(29) e b for /sup 167/Er, Q = 3.365(29) e b for /sup 177/Hf, Q = 3.793(33) e b for /sup 179/Hf, Q = 0.816(9) e b for /sup 191/Ir, and Q = 0.751(9) e b for /sup 193/Ir. The present quadrupole moments, compared with values obtained from electronic-atom hyperfine measurements, show that the Sternheimer correction factors used in the rare-earth electronic-atom analysis are unreliable. Systematics of deformation parameters ..beta../sub 2/ calculated from the present quadrupole moments for odd-A nuclei, and from B(E2) values of Coulomb excitation measurements for even-A nuclei, also indicate that the largest deformation change so far known exists between /sup 151/Eu and /sup 153/Eu. Except at the onset of nuclear deformation, the deformation parameters of the odd-A nuclei are quite consistent with those of the even-A neighbors.

  7. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2008 Draft Season Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roby, Daniel D.; Collis, Ken; Lyons, Donald E.

    2009-07-08

    This report describes investigations into predation by piscivorous colonial waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River basin during 2008. East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary again supported the largest known breeding colony of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in the world (approximately 10,700 breeding pairs) and the largest breeding colony of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in western North America (approximately 10,950 breeding pairs). The Caspian tern colony increased from 2007, but not significantly so, while the double-crested cormorant colony experienced a significant decline (20%) from 2007. Average cormorant nesting success in 2008, however, was down only slightly from 2007, suggesting that food supply during the 2008 nesting season was not the principal cause of the decline in cormorant colony size. Total consumption of juvenile salmonids by East Sand Island Caspian terns in 2008 was approximately 6.7 million smolts (95% c.i. = 5.8-7.5 million). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continued to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony, predation rates were highest on steelhead in 2008; minimum predation rates on steelhead smolts detected passing Bonneville Dam averaged 8.3% for wild smolts and 10.7% for hatchery-raised smolts. In 2007, total smolt consumption by East Sand Island double-crested cormorants was about 9.2 million juvenile salmonids (95% c.i. = 4.4-14.0 million), similar to or greater than that of East Sand Island Caspian terns during that year (5.5 million juvenile salmonids; 95% c.i. = 4.8-6.2 million). The numbers of smolt PIT tags recovered on the cormorant colony in 2008 were roughly proportional to the relative availability of PIT-tagged salmonids released in the Basin, suggesting that cormorant predation on salmonid smolts in the estuary was less selective than tern

  8. 1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-10-24

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

  9. Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio From Elastic e + p -> e + p Scattering at Momentum Transfer Q^2 = 2.5, 5.2, 6.7 and 8.5 (GeV/c)^2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur Mkrtchyan

    2012-05-31

    Among the fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dyna mics of the nucleon's quark constituents. Electromagnetic probes are traditionally preferered to the hadronic beams. The electromagnetic interaction is a powerful tool for investigating the nucleon structure since it is well understood and it reveals observables that can be directly interpreted in terms of the current carried by the quarks. Elastic scattering leads to the form factors that describe the spatial charge a nd current distributions inside the nucleon. The reaction mechanism is assumed to be one photon exchange, the electromagnetic interaction is exactly calculable in QED, and one can safely extract the information on the hadronic vertex. The most important feature of early measurements of proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} with recoil polarization technique at Q{sup 2} up to 5.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} is the sharp decline of the ratio with Q{sup 2} increases, indicating that G{sub E}{sup p} falls much faster than G{sub M}{sup p}. This contradicts to data obtained by Rosenbluth separation method. An intriguing question was whether G{sub E}{sup p} will continue to decrease or become constant when Q{sup 2} increases. New set of measurements of proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} at Q{sup 2} = 2.5, 5.2, 6.7 and 8.5 (GeV/c){sup 2} have been conducted at JLab Hall C using {approx}85% longitudinally polarized electron elastic scattering from unpolarized hydrogen target. Recoil protons were detected in the HMS magnetic spectrometer with the standard detector package, combined with newly installed trigger scintillators and Focal Plane Polarimeter. The BigCal electromagnetic calorimeter (1744 channel) have been used for electron detection. Data obtained in this experiment show that G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} ratio continued to drop with Q{sup 2} and may cross 'zero' at Q{sup 2} > 10-15 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} obtained from cross section and polarization measurements. It was assumed that the two photon exchange contribution might be responsible for difference of G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} ratio obtained by Rosenbluth separation method and recoil polarization technique. The kinematical dependence of polarization transfer observables in elastic electron-proton scattering at Q{sup 2} = 2.5 (GeV/c){sup 2} have been used in search of effects of 2{gamma} contribution. For a wide range of values of the virtual photon polarization {epsilon} ({epsilon} = 0.15, 0.63, and 0.77), the proton form factor ratio and longitudinal polarization transfer component were measured with statistical uncertainties of {+-}0.01 and {+-}0.005, respectively. Our data provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure.

  10. Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Third Quarter of 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-11-08

    This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the third quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010 Q1+Q2+Q3). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $132 billion (in real 2010 US$) invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.4 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first three quarters of 2010 is close to $2.4 billion accounting for slightly less than 15% of all venture capital investments during the first three quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $2.1 billion (11% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first three quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $2.8 billion (18% of all US venture capital investments made during the first three quarters of

  11. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG): Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Kat A.

    2014-01-10

    The Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) brought together a consortium of 14 leading clean energy rural, suburban, and low income communities throughout Connecticut. N2N was awarded $4.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitive BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program on August 10, 2010 to run a two-year pilot program (plus one year of transition and evaluation) (Award No. EMCBC- 00969-10). N2N tested innovative program models and hypotheses for improving Connecticut’s existing residential energy efficiency programs that are overseen by the ratepayer fund board and administered by CT utilities. N2N’s original goal was to engage 10 percent of households in participating communities to reduce their energy usage by 20 percent through energy upgrades and clean energy measures. N2N planned for customers to complete more comprehensive whole-home energy efficiency and clean energy measures and to achieve broader penetration than existing utility-administered regulated programs. Since this was an ARRA award, we report the following figures on job creation in Table 1. Since N2N is not continuing in its current form, we do not provide figures on job retention. Table 1 N2N Job Creation by Quarter Jobs Created 2010 Q4 6.65 2011 Q1 7.13 2011 Q2 4.98 2011 Q3 9.66 2011 Q4 5.43 2012 Q1 11.11 2012 Q2 6.85 2012 Q3 6.29 2012 Q4 6.77 2013 Q1 5.57 2013 Q2 8.35 2013 Q3 6.52 Total 85.31 The N2N team encountered several gaps in the existing efficiency program performance that hindered meeting N2N’s and DOE’s short-term program goals, as well as the State of Connecticut’s long-term energy, efficiency, and carbon reduction goals. However, despite the slow program start, N2N found evidence of increasing upgrade uptake rates over time, due to delayed customer action of one to two years from N2N introduction to completion of deeper household upgrades. Two main social/behavioral principles have contributed to driving deeper upgrades in CT: 1. Word of mouth

  12. A numerical test of KPZ scaling; Potts models coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.F. , 91 - Nozay ); Johnston, D.A. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1992-06-07

    In this paper, the authors perform Monte-Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of the q = 2 (Ising), 3, 4 and q = 10 Potts models on dynamical phi-cubed graphs of spherical topology with up to 5000 nodes. The authors find that the measured critical exponents are in reasonable agreement with those from the exact solution of the Ising model and with those calculated from KPZ scaling for q = 3, 4 where no exact solution is available. Using Binder's cumulant, the authors find that the q = 10 Potts model displays a first order phase transition on a dynamical graph, as it does on a fixed lattice. The authors also examine the internal geometry of the graphs generated in the simulation, finding a linear relationship between ring length probabilities and the central charge of the Potts model.

  13. b35.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .. 67,338 58,474 8,329 9,147 14,276 2,750 12,909 36,527 2,219 1,312 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 4,879 890 700 962 Q Q 2,613 253 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 6,212 1,606 707 1,396 Q Q 3,197 181 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 9,530 1,420 1,270 2,482 Q 307 6,031 207 Q 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 8,116 860 1,304

  14. A=7B (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 7B) 1. 10B(3He, 6He)7B Qm = -18.55 A 6He group corresponding to the unbound ground state of 7B has been identified at E(3He) = 50 MeV: M - A (7B) = 27.94 ± 0.10, Γ = 1.4 ± 0.2 MeV. The isobaric quartet mass law would predict M - A = 27.76 ± 0.17 MeV. 7B is unbound with respect to 6Be + p (Q = 2.27), 5Li + 2p (Q = 1.68), 4He + 3p (Q = 3.65). The expected single-particle width is Γ = 0.64 MeV: it is suggested that the two-proton and three-proton decays make

  15. A=7B (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 7B) GENERAL: See also (1974DA1B, 1974IR04, 1975BE31, 1975BE56, 1976IR1B, 1977SP1B). 1. 10B(3He, 6He)7B Qm = -18.55 A 6He group corresponding to the unbound ground state of 7B has been identified at E(3He) = 50 MeV: M - A (7B) = 27.94 ± 0.10, Γ = 1.4 ± 0.2 MeV. The isobaric quartet mass law would predict M - A = 27.76 ± 0.17 MeV. 7B is unbound with respect to 6Be + p (Q = 2.27), 5Li + 2p (Q = 1.68), 4He + 3p (Q = 3.65). The expected single-particle width is

  16. A=8C (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) 8C has been observed in the 12C(α, 8He)8C reaction at Eα = 156 MeV: M - A = 35.30 ± 0.20 MeV, Γc.m. = 220+80-140 keV [the differential cross section at 2° (lab) is ≈ 20 nb/sr] (R.G.H. Robertson, S. Martin, W.R. Falk, D. Ingham and A. Djaloeis, private communication). 8C is then unstable with respect to 7B + p (Q = 0.1), 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.3), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.8), 4He + 4p (Q = 3.7). See also (1960GO1B, 1966KE16, 1970WA1G).

  17. A=8C (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8C) Mass of 8C: The atomic mass excess of 8C is 35096 ± 26 keV, Γc.m. = 230 ± 50 keV: see (1977TR07). See also (1974AJ01, 1974RO17, 1976TR1B, 1978RO01). 8C is stable with respect to 7B + p (Q = -0.13 MeV) and unstable with respect to 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.143), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.55), 4He + 4p (Q = 3.514). At E(3He) = 76 MeV the differential cross section for formation of 8Cg.s. in the 14N(3He, 9Li) reaction is ≈ 5 nb/sr at θlab = 10° (1976RO04). The 12C(α,

  18. A=8C (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8C) Mass of 8C: The atomic mass excess of 8C is 35095 ± 23 keV (A.H. Wapstra, private communication). Γc.m. = 230 ± 50 keV: see (1979AJ01). 8C is stable with respect to 7B + p (Q = -0.13 MeV) and unstable with respect to 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.14), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.55), 4He + 4p (Q = 3.51). At E(3He) = 76 MeV the differential cross section for formation of 8Cg.s. in the 14N(3He, 9Li) reaction is ~ 5 nb/sr at θlab = 10°. The 12C(α, 8He)8C reaction has been studied

  19. A=8C (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8C) Mass of 8C: The atomic mass excess of 8C is 35094 ± 23 keV (2003AU03); Γcm = 230 ± 50 keV [Jπ = 0+; T = 2]: see (1979AJ01). 8C is stable with respect to 7B + p (Q = -0.07 MeV) and unstable with respect to 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.14), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.55) and 4He + 4p (Q = 3.51). At E(3He) = 76 MeV the differential cross section for formation of 8Cg.s. in the 14N(3He, 9Li) reaction is ~ 5 nb/sr at θlab = 10°. The 12C(α, 8He)8C reaction has been studied at

  20. Season and diurnal variations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in a suburban area of central Italy and their relation with the meteorological conditions and the concentration of other photochemical oxidants and their precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciccioli, P.; Cecinato, A.; Brancaleoni, E.; Brachetti, A. )

    1988-09-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), is a photochemical oxidant formed in the atmosphere when large amounts of hydrocarbons (HC) and NO{sub x} are emitted in air and exposed to the UV radiation coming from the sun. Its formation proceeds through the conversion of HC, mainly olefins, into aldehydes that, after oxidation into peroxyradicals, react with NO{sub 2} to give this gaseous pollutant. Although the amount of PAN in air represents a suitable index for measuring photochemical smog and photochemical episodes can easily be observed in many Italian cities, almost no data have been collected in their country. In this paper the authors present the results obtained during a two years monitoring campaign carried in a suburban area of Central Italy placed downwind to Rome. Seasonal and daily trends of PAN will be reported together with the meteorological parameters and the change in concentration of other photochemical oxidants (ozone), its precursors (HC and aldehydes) and some acidic species. The results indicate that PAN, formed within the city, is transported into site together with other oxidants.

  1. Propane - A Mid-Heating Season Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This report will analyze some of the factors leading up to the rapid increase in propane demand and subsequent deterioration in supply that propelled propane prices to record high levels during December and early January.

  2. Cooling method with automated seasonal freeze protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cambell, Levi; Chu, Richard; David, Milnes; Ellsworth, Jr, Michael; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Simons, Robert; Singh, Prabjit; Zhang, Jing

    2016-05-31

    An automated multi-fluid cooling method is provided for cooling an electronic component(s). The method includes obtaining a coolant loop, and providing a coolant tank, multiple valves, and a controller. The coolant loop is at least partially exposed to outdoor ambient air temperature(s) during normal operation, and the coolant tank includes first and second reservoirs containing first and second fluids, respectively. The first fluid freezes at a lower temperature than the second, the second fluid has superior cooling properties compared with the first, and the two fluids are soluble. The multiple valves are controllable to selectively couple the first or second fluid into the coolant in the coolant loop, wherein the coolant includes at least the second fluid. The controller automatically controls the valves to vary first fluid concentration level in the coolant loop based on historical, current, or anticipated outdoor air ambient temperature(s) for a time of year.

  3. Particle Physics in a Season of Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris

    2012-02-01

    A digest of the authors opening remarks at the 2011 Hadron Collider Physics Symposium. I have chosen my title to reflect the transitions we are living through, in particle physics overall and in hadron collider physics in particular. Data-taking has ended at the Tevatron, with {approx} 12 fb{sup -1} of {bar p}p interactions delivered to CDF and D0 at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The Large Hadron Collider has registered a spectacular first full-year run, with ATLAS and CMS seeing > 5 fb{sup -1}, LHCb recording {approx} 1 fb{sup -1}, and ALICE logging nearly 5 pb{sup -1} of pp data at {radical}s = 7 TeV, plus a healthy dose of Pb-Pb collisions. The transition to a new energy regime and new realms of instantaneous luminosity exceeding 3.5 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} has brought the advantage of enhanced physics reach and the challenge of pile-up reaching {approx} 15 interactions per beam crossing. I am happy to record that what the experiments have (not) found so far has roused some of my theoretical colleagues from years of complacency and stimulated them to think anew about what the TeV scale might hold. We theorists have had plenty of time to explore many proposals for electroweak symmetry breaking and for new physics that might lie beyond established knowledge. With so many different theoretical inventions in circulation, it is in the nature of things that most will be wrong. Keep in mind that we learn from what experiment tells us is not there, even if it is uncommon to throw a party for ruling something out. Some non-observations may be especially telling: the persistent absence of flavor-changing neutral currents, for example, seems to me more and more an important clue that we have not yet deciphered. It is natural that the search for the avatar of electroweak symmetry breaking preoccupies participants and spectators alike. But it is essential to conceive the physics opportunities before us in their full richness. I would advocate a three-fold approach: Explore, Search, Measure! The first phase of running at the LHC has brought us to two new lands - in proton-proton and lead-lead collisions - and we may well enter other new lands with each change of energy or increase of sensitivity. I believe that it will prove very rewarding to spend some time simply exploring each new landscape, without strong preconceptions, to learn what is there and, perhaps, to encounter interesting surprises. Directed searches, for which we have made extensive preparations, are of self-evident interest. Here the challenge will be to broaden the searches over time, so the searches are not too narrowly directed. Our very successful conception of particles and forces is highly idealized. We have a great opportunity to learn just how comprehensive is our network of understanding by making precise measurements and probing for weak spots, or finding more sweeping accord between theory and experiment.

  4. Potential for seasonal power oversupply in 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Columbia Generating Station, and the inclusion of non-Treaty storage in the HYDSIM rate case study. The non-Treaty assumptions reduced regional hydro generation by hundreds of...

  5. Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Marketing Energy Efficiency Call Slides and Discussion Summary June 11, 2015 Agenda Call Logistics and Introductions Opening Poll Residential Network and Peer ...

  6. Slowed demand ushers in summer season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This article is the June 1996 market summary in uranium market. During this reporting period, there were six deals in the U3O8 spot market and three long-term deals for U3O8. There were four deals for UF6 conversion, and the spot market for uranium separation services had no transactions. This was little change from the previous month`s activities, and this slowness was reflected in the price trends of little or no increase.

  7. Save Energy on Appliances this Holiday Season

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Before the holiday shopping mayhem begins, take a look at Energy Saver's tips for finding the most energy efficient appliances.

  8. Nebraska Preparing for the Upcoming Heating Season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heating Oil Propane Residential Propane Price http:www.neo.ne.govstatshtml86.html Residential Heating Oil Price http:www.neo.ne.govstatshtml87.html Weekly Report Using ...

  9. 2008 Network Open Season (NOS) NEPA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process and the preliminary engineering and design work (stage gate 1 of a 2-stage gated project approval process) for the following transmission...

  10. Heating Oil and Propane Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Respondents Q1: What is the purpose of this survey? The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-877, "Winter Heating Fuels Telephone Survey," is designed to collect data on State-level stocks and residential prices of No. 2 heating oil and propane during the heating season. The data are used to monitor the prices of propane and No. 2 heating oil during the heating season, and to report to the Congress and others when requested. Q2: How does the survey work? The EIA-877

  11. All

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87,093 15,952 13,077 4,630 11,330 4,557 12,239 5,559 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 1,520 1,127 1,031 730 572 391 498 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 1,663 1,329 1,051 1,052 790 353 536 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 2,012 2,331 1,253 1,821 1,443 1,212 1,108 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 2,333 1,814 607 1,648 926 1,492 861 50,001 to 100,000 13,918 2,203 1,632 Q 1,909 585 3,363 627 100,001 to 200,000 12,415 2,054 1,946 Q 2,178 Q 3,020 553 200,001 to 500,000 10,724 1,946 1,827 Q 1,264 Q 2,358 748

  12. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form-factor ratio G(En) / G(Mn) via the H-2(polarized-e, e-prime,polarized-n)H-1 reaction to Q**2 = 1.45-(GeV/c)**2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley Plaster; A.Yu. Semenov; A. Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; David Barkhuff; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Eden; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Richard Madey; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Nikolai Savvinov; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Shawn Taylor; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2006-02-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub En}/G{sub Mn}, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic {sup 2}H({rvec e}, e{prime}{rvec n}) {sup 1}H reaction, at three Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data at Q{sup 2} = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2} are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q{sup 2}.

  13. Phonon-roton modes of liquid 4He beyond the roton in MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuah, Richard T; Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Adams, Mark A.; Kirichek, Oleg; Glyde, Henry R

    2013-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements of the phonon-roton (P-R) mode of superfluid 4He confined in 47 A MCM-41 at T = 0.5 K at wave vectors, Q, beyond the roton wave vector (QR = 1.92 A-1). Measurements beyond the roton require access to high wave vectors (up to Q = 4 A-1) with excellent energy resolution and high statistical precision. The present results show for the first time that at T = 0.5 K the P-R mode in MCM-41 extends out to wave-vector Q 3.6 A-1 with the same energy and zero width (within precision) as observed in bulk superfluid 4He. Layer modes in the roton region are also observed. Specifically, the P-R mode energy, !Q, increases with Q for Q > QR and reaches a plateau at a maximum energy !Q = 2 where is the roton energy, = 0.74 0.01 meV in MCM-41. This upper limit means the P-R mode decays to two rotons when its energy exceeds 2 . It also means that the P-R mode does not decay to two layers modes. If the P-R could decay to two layer modes, !Q would plateau at a lower energy, !Q = 2 L where L = 0.60 meV is the energy of the roton like minimum of the layer mode. The observation of the P-R mode with energy up to 2 shows that the P-R mode and the layer modes are independent modes with apparently little interaction between them.

  14. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 8 Q 2 1 Q 2 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education ... 386 Q 21 34 29 87 Q 56 39 97 Food Sales...

  15. Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

  16. Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigerators Freezers Room air conditioners Televisions Clothes washers Dishwashers Battery chargers Water heaters Fluorescent lamp ballasts Incandescent reflector lamps If your ...

  17. Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Weather changes have an impact on the way our nation uses our energy resources, particularly heating fuels.

  18. EECBG Success Story: South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Seniors check out the new energy-efficient fitness facility at the Rockville Senior Center. | Photo courtesy of Chris Galm, Energy Department. ...

  19. Pikeminnow season returns with kick-off event, May 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to capture footagephotos of the pikeminnow, anglers and workshops on how to catch the fish. Staff and participants will be on hand to interview. Anglers earn 4 to 8 for...

  20. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and ... northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. ...

  1. JLab Prepares for 2015 Hurricane Season | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    readyvirginia http:www.vaemergency.govreadyvirginiastayinformedhurricanes Review the information posted to the Jefferson Lab Emergency Management webpage:...

  2. New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... a reason why people work at the Lab - they're interested in science in general." Contact Info PPPL Office of Communications Email: PPPLOOC@pppl.gov Phone: 609-243-2755 Download ...

  3. Saving Money During the Air Conditioning Season | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Keeping your air conditioner maintained can help save you money this summer. | Photo courtesy of iStockphotofiremanYU Keeping your air conditioner maintained can help save you ...

  4. MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is implementing appropriate measures to protect equipment and systems from damage due to the effects of cold weather. The...

  5. Drying Clothes and Saving Money this Fall Season | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    all know to clean the lint screen after every load of laundry (and once in a while a vacuum hose can help get the hard-to-reach residual lint). What I didn't know was that the...

  6. Seasonal control skylight glazing panel with passive solar energy switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.V.

    1983-10-25

    A substantially transparent one-piece glazing panel is provided for generally horizontal mounting in a skylight. The panel is comprised of an repeated pattern of two alternating and contiguous linear optical elements; a first optical element being an upstanding generally right-triangular linear prism, and the second optical element being an upward-facing plano-cylindrical lens in which the planar surface is reflectively opaque and is generally in the same plane as the base of the triangular prism.

  7. Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce waste and save money. | Photo courtesy of istockphotodiane555 Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce waste and save money. |...

  8. Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also...

  9. Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Across the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contrary, much more can be gained, with littleno cost by colocating other instruments (TSI, e g.) with the current RWPs to obtain spatial cloud statistics, including vertical...

  10. The seasonal cycle of satellite chlorophyll fluorescence observations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to vegetation phenology and ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchange Citation ... to vegetation phenology and ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchange Authors: ...

  11. Laboratory's Season of Giving was a big success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25,900 meals) collected during the Laboratory's Community Food Drive and Take a Turkey to Work Day. The food items were donated by Laboratory employees and the Los Alamos...

  12. Pollution solution. From the Landsat -- a satellite for all seasons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The video shows how Landsat`s remote sensing capabilities can aid in resolving environmental quality problems. The satellite can locate and monitor strip mining operations to facilitate land reclamation programs. The satellite helps solve some meteorological mysteries by taking the path of airborne pollution. It can also monitor the course of industrial wastes and garbage dumped into lakes, rivers, and coastal areas.

  13. Get Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The sight of my breath was a reminder that soon I'll be running my heater again and will want to run it as little as possible while staying comfortable.

  14. Saving Energy and Keeping Seniors Warm This Season | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Todd G. Allen Project Officer, Golden Field Office Sallie Glaize Project Officer, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What are the key facts? Energy efficiency upgrades ...

  15. New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Princeton University physics professor Suzanne Staggs, who will present "Probing the History and Dynamics of the Universe with Polarized Signatures in the Cosmic Microwave...

  16. Understanding Seasonal Effects of WEC Operation using the SNL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wave Model Application - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power ...

  17. Cruising to Energy Savings This Summer Driving Season | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    you can sign up to participate in), facts on greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution related to vehicles, and info on so-called "energy impact scores" for gas consumption. ...

  18. Final_report_pub1.pdf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Nicholas

    2014-08-15

    The paper describes Soitecs project to plan,install,qualify and ramp a high volume CPV module manufactruing facility in Southern California. Soitec’s CPV module factory in San Diego was planned with an annual production capacity of 280MWDC. It was scheduled to be operational by the first quarter of 2013, and was expected to create several hundred direct and indirect jobs in the San Diego region. From ground breaking to facility readiness was completed in six months. This enabled the docking of equipment in the Q3’12 time frame. The first 140 MW of capacity was ready for operation in Q4’12. Production of the CX-M500 modules started in Q4 2012. The line yield and factory capacity were ramped in 2013. The annual production capacity demonstration was successfully completed in Q2 2014. The modules manufactured at the plant were used to supply utility scale demand in the US and also world markets.

  19. All

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87,093 67,550 30,637 26,115 8,873 1,925 19,543 1,573 5,539 12,431 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 7,077 3,871 2,526 382 298 964 Q 230 713 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 7,953 4,118 2,932 635 267 947 Q Q 765 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 11,987 6,045 4,149 1,305 488 2,117 Q 621 1,373 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 9,482 4,067 3,656 1,353 Q 2,435 Q 647 1,649 50,001 to 100,000 13,918 9,104 3,712 4,051 1,106 Q 4,814 Q 1,327 3,351 100,001 to 200,000 12,415 8,905 4,306 3,493 1,025 Q 3,510 Q 1,392

  20. Minimally nonlocal nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Δ resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M.; Girlanda, L.; Schiavilla, R.; Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including Δ-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale). The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0–300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$more » and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a Χ2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  1. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Delta resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M; Girlanda, L; Schiavilla, R; Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2015-02-01

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including ?-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale).The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data inmorethis range, we obtain a ?2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.less

  2. CaCl 2 -Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29 Si MAS NMR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Qinfei; Ge, Yong; Geng, Guoqing; Bae, Sungchul; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he effect of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) on tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29 Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system.he Ca L 3,2 -edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C 3 S hydration in the presence of CaCl 2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C 3 S. Based on the Ca L 3,2 -edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl 2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C 3 S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl 2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29 Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl 2 in hydrated C 3 S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups ( Q 2 ) and branch sites ( Q 3 ) in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.« less

  3. Resid-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87,093 79,294 14,765 12,538 12,420 4,608 17,041 45,153 1,918 328 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 6,124 2,350 983 1,027 Q Q 2,154 155 Q 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 7,304 2,968 1,193 972 Q Q 3,082 Q N 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 12,357 3,883 1,457 1,855 145 631 6,557 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 10,813 2,526 1,866 1,606 Q 1,095 6,466 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 13,918 13,069 1,395 2,825 1,956 567 2,724 8,705 441 Q 100,001 to 200,000 12,415 12,152 895 1,718 1,652 1,273 3,211 7,447 Q Q 200,001

  4. Advanced, Low/Zero Emission Boiler Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock Illinois State Geological; Worley Parsons; Parsons Infrastructure /Technology Group

    2007-06-30

    In partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, B&W and Air Liquide are developing and optimizing the oxy-combustion process for retrofitting existing boilers as well as new plants. The main objectives of the project is to: (1) demonstrate the feasibility of the oxy-combustion technology with flue gas recycle in a 5-million Btu/hr coal-fired pilot boiler, (2) measure its performances in terms of emissions and boiler efficiency while selecting the right oxygen injection and flue gas recycle strategies, and (3) perform technical and economic feasibility studies for application of the technology in demonstration and commercial scale boilers. This document summarizes the work performed during the period of performance of the project (Oct 2002 to June 2007). Detailed technical results are reported in corresponding topical reports that are attached as an appendix to this report. Task 1 (Site Preparation) has been completed in 2003. The experimental pilot-scale O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} combustion tests of Task 2 (experimental test performance) has been completed in Q2 2004. Process simulation and cost assessment of Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study) has been completed in Q1 2005. The topical report on Task 3 has been finalized and submitted to DOE in Q3 2005. The calculations of Task 4 (Retrofit Recommendation and Preliminary Design of a New Generation Boiler) has been completed in 2004. In Task 6 (engineering study on retrofit applications), the engineering study on 25MW{sub e} unit has been completed in Q2, 2008 along with the corresponding cost assessment. In Task 7 (evaluation of new oxy-fuel power plants concepts), based on the design basis document prepared in 2005, the design and cost estimate of the Air Separation Units, the boiler islands and the CO{sub 2} compression and trains have been completed, for both super and ultra-supercritical case study. Final report of Task-7 is published by DOE in Oct 2007.

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... detail and add significantly to the DIS data set at low to moderate Q2 and moderate to ... detail and add significantly to the DIS data set at low to moderate Q2 and moderate to ...

  6. EECBG Success Story: South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A South Carolina community is proving that energy efficiency can improve the holidays by reducing energy and maintenance costs, thanks to its new LED holiday lights. Learn more.

  7. Seasonal Production and Emission of Methane from Rice Fields, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, M. Aslam K.; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

    2002-12-03

    B 139 - Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning. The global emissions from these sources are still not well known. In the middle 1980s there were few available data on methane emissions from rice fields leading to estimates of a global source between 100-280 Tg/yr. Extensive worldwide research during the last decade has shown that the global emissions from rice fields are more likely to be in the range of 30-80Tg/yr. While this work has led to a substantial reduction in the estimated emissions, the uncertainty is still quite large, and seriously affects our ability to include methane in integrated assessments for future climate change and environmental management.China dominated estimates of methane emissions from rice fields because it was, and is, the largest producer of rice, and major increases in rice production had taken place in the country over the last several decades. This report summarizes the work in Sichuan Province, China, in each of the following areas: the design of the experiment; the main results on methane emissions from rice fields, delineating the factors controlling emissions; production of methane in the soil; a survey of water management practices in sample of counties in Sichuan province; and results of ambient measurements including data from the background continental site. B139

  8. Miles of Hanford Site Land Near River Restored During Planting Seasons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office (RL) and contractor Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) have cleaned, filled, and planted vegetation over hundreds of formers waste sites along the Columbia River in the past decade.

  9. A Reason to Put Science in the Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    stays in rest or uniform motion in a straight line unless acted on by another force. ... So happy birthday Sir Isaac And if you need to find us for the rest of the week, we'll be ...

  10. Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter; Kalhori, Aram

    2015-12-01

    In order to advance the understanding of the patterns and controls on the carbon budget in the Arctic region, San Diego State University has maintained eddy covariance flux towers at three sites in Arctic Alaska, starting in 1997.

  11. A simulation approach of ozone season emissions to optimize a fossil utility's options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, M.D.; Masoniello, R.; DeNavas, J.; Fasca, T.; Jones, M.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes PREACT--an approach to choose a mix of pollution control that optimizes economic and environmental alternatives for NOx compliance. The Predictive Real (Time) Emission and Allowance Compliance Tool (PREACT) is a computer program that allows the user to predict key emission parameters and optimize the maximization of net profits while managing emissions compliance. The program allows simulations of various compliance scenarios for NOx emission reductions in order to maintain both State and Federal NOx allocation of allowances on the fossil fired generating units in the Pepco system. The program uses real time data that is interfaced through a Local Area Network system to update forecasts of emissions. It also provides the user with an understanding of the production energy net profits that results from the simulation. The BTU used and fuel quantities are also outputs of the simulation. This paper describes the principle of the tool, which is to learn from past history and modify emissions forecasts considering up-to-date information on a unit profile. NOx emissions, operating options, fuel changes, technology retrofits, and any other opportunities for reducing emissions; considering feedback from real time information are used to modify the forecast. Other factors such as the market price of energy and the production costs of energy will also allow the user to modify the forecast through simulation. The last activity, which requires redefinition, is how to make decisions in real time considering the many opportunities to minimize the incremental cost to maintain emission compliance. The necessary management processes have been installed to maintain the risk management levels that the company wishes to maintain.

  12. Second Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of the CMB Polarization Power Spectrum at 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Dumoulin, R.N.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; ss, S.K.N\\ae; Newburgh, L.B.; /Columbia U., CBA /Princeton U. /Caltech

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95GHz. The 43-GHz results have been published in QUIET Collaboration et al. (2011), and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95-GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hours of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx} 1000 square degrees with an effective angular resolution of 12'.8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high-signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C{ell} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB and BB power spectra between {ell} = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = {sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  13. Understanding Seasonal Effects of WEC Operation using the SNL-SWAN Wave

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Understanding Risks Associated with Electromagnetic Pulses Understanding Risks Associated with Electromagnetic Pulses July 18, 2016 - 3:00pm Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability (OE) has long focused on research, preparedness, response, and recovery activities related to potential threats to the nation's critical energy infrastructure

  14. EECBG Success Story: Saving Energy and Keeping Seniors Warm This Season

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Randolph Senior Center in Bexar County, Texas and Rockville Senior Center in Rockville, Maryland received energy efficiency enhancements and retrofits that will help keep seniors warm in the coming months thanks to funding from the Energy Department’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program. Learn more.

  15. Measuring seasonal variations of moisture in a landfill with the partitioning gas tracer test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Byunghyun; Jafarpour, Behnam; Gallagher, Victoria N.; Imhoff, Paul T. . E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu; Chiu, Pei C.; Fluman, Daniel A.

    2006-07-01

    Seven pilot-scale partitioning gas tracer tests (PGTTs) were conducted to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of this method for measuring water in municipal solid waste landfills. Tests were conducted in the same location over a 12-month period, and measured moisture conditions ranged from possible dry waste to refuse with a moisture content of 24.7%. The final moisture content of 24.7% was in reasonable agreement with gravimetric measurements of excavated refuse, where the moisture content was 26.5 {+-} 6.0CI%. Laboratory tests were used to assess the utility of the PGTT for measuring water in small pores, water sorbed to solid surfaces, and the influence of dry waste on PGTTs. These experiments indicated that when refuse surfaces are not completely solvated with water, PGTTs may produce misleading results (negative estimates) of water saturation and moisture content.

  16. 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presents. The catchy advertising jingles are back, sale signs are in every window, and a man with a white beard, hearty laugh, and a stomach that shakes like a bowl full of jelly...

  17. Solar Energy System Performance Evaluation: seasonal report for Wormser, Columbia, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-08-01

    The Wormser Solar Energy System located in a four unit townhouse apartment (5400 square feet) in Columbia, South Carolina was designed to provide 50% of the hot water and 70% of the space heating by the Wormser Scientific Corporation, Stamford, Connecticut. The Solar Energy System consists of 266 ft/sup 2/ of pyramidal optics, flat-plate liquid collectors, a solar window area of 1152 ft/sup 2/, a 2500 gallon thermal water storage tank, an energy transport system (water), heat exchangers, pumps, controls and four domestic hot water (DHW) tanks. Electrical elements in each domestic hot water tank provide necessary auxiliary energy for hot water. Four multifunctional heat pumps, supplied with solar heated water provide space heating energy to the apartments, collector freeze protection is provided through the location of the collectors inside the attic. The system with six modes of operation became oprational in February 1978. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, maintenance, summary and conclusions.

  18. Seasonal and optical characterisation of cirrus clouds over Indian sub-continent using LIDAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayeshlal, G. S. Satyanarayana, Malladi Dhaman, Reji K. Motty, G. S.

    2014-10-15

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is an important remote sensing technique to study about the cirrus clouds. The subject of cirrus clouds and related climate is challenging one. The received scattered signal from Lidar contains information on the physical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. The Lidar profile of the cirrus cloud provides information on the optical characteristics like depolarisation ratio, lidar ratio and optical depth, which give knowledge about possible phase, structure and orientation of cloud particle that affect the radiative budgeting of cirrus clouds. The findings from the study are subjected to generate inputs for better climatic modelling.

  19. Monitoring of Bright Blazars with MAGIC in the 2007/2008 Season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satalecka, Konstancja; Bernardini, Elisa; Majumdar, Pratik; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; Galante, Nicola; Goebel, Florian; Wagner, Robert; Bonnoli, Giacomo; Stamerra, Antonio; Lindfors, Elina

    2009-04-08

    Because of the short duty-cycles and observation-time constraints, studies of bright TeV (E>100 GeV) blazars are mostly restricted to flaring episodes or rather short (days to few weeks) multiwavelength campaigns. At the same time, long-term studies of these objects are essential to gain a more complete understanding of the blazar phenomenon and to constrain theoretical models concerning jet physics. Only unbiased long-term studies are adequate for the determination of flaring state probabilities and for estimating the statistical significance of possible correlations between TeV flaring states and other wavebands or observables, such as neutrino events. Regular observations also provide triggers for multiwavelength ToO observations originating from the TeV waveband. These are particularly needed to identify and study orphan TeV flares, i.e. flares without counterparts in other wavebands. In 2007/8 the MAGIC telescope has monitored three TeV blazars on a regular basis: Mrk 501, Mrk 421, and 1ES 1959+650. We present preliminary results of these observations including the measured light curves and a correlation study for VHE {gamma}-rays and X-rays and VHE {gamma}-rays and optical R-band for Mrk 421.

  20. Shrub-Steppe Seasons A Natural History of the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LE Rogers

    1995-08-01

    This book collects and updates a series of articles about the natural history of the Mid-Columbia region. The articles first appeared as a monthly column titled ''Natural History'' in the Tri-City Herald, beginning in May 1991. My approach has been to condense the best of what is known about the ecology of the region to a manageable length with little in the way of technical language and terms. Admittedly, there is a bias toward those topics and species on which I have either been personally involved or observed as part of the ecology research programs conducted on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. The ALE Reserve is situated on the northeast-facing flank of the Rattlesnake Hills. Rattlesnake Mountain with a crest of over 3,600 feet is visible throughout much of the Mid-Columbia. Shrub-steppe grasslands once covered a large part of the western United States but most have been converted to other uses. The ALE site is the only remaining sizeable acreage (120 square miles) that is in near pristine condition and provides the only clear indication as to what the early trappers, traders, pioneers, and tribal members may have encountered in their day-to-day activities. In this respect, ALE provides a visible touchstone linking the past with the present for all of us.

  1. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for Solaron-Akron, Akron, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The long-term field performance of the installed system and technical contributions to the definition of techniques and requirements for solar energy system design are reported. The Solar Energy System was designed by Solaron Corporation, Denver, Colorado, to provide an 1840 square foot floor area with space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) for a dual-level single family residence in Akron, Ohio. The Solar Energy System uses air as the heat transport medium, has a 546 square foot flat plate collector array subsystem, a 270 cubic foot rock thermal storage bin subsystem, a domestic hot water preheat tank, pumps, controls and transport lines. The auxiliary space heating subsystem is an air to liquid heat pump coupled with a 1000 gallon water storage tank. Electricity provides auxiliary energy for both space heating and DHW subsystems.

  2. Solar energy system performance evaluation seasonal report for Elcam San Diego, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The solar energy system, Elcam San Diego, was designed to supply domestic hot water heating for a single family residence located in Encinitas, California. The contents of this document have been divided into System Description, Performance Assessment, Operating Energy, Energy Savings, Maintenance and Summary and Conclusions. The system is a Sunspot two tank cascade type, where solar energy is supplied to either a 66 gallon preheat tank (solar storage) or a 40 gallon domestic hot water tank. Water is pumped directly from one of the two tanks, through the 65 square feet collector array and back into the same tank. Freeze protection is provided by automatically circulating hot water from the hot water tank through the collectors and exposed plumbing when freezing conditions exist. Auxiliary energy is supplied by natural gas. The Elcam San Diego solar energy system has three modes of operation.

  3. Last Flag of the 2015 Green Racing Season | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... at the Rolex 24 at Daytona event last weekend. | Photo by Natalie Committee, Energy Department Green Flag for a New Era in Green Racing Known as the "race within the race," the ...

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    500,000 ... 8 3 1 Q Q 3 Q Principal Building Activity Education ... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales...

  5. Energy Department Invests $13 Million to Drive Innovative U.S...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of efficient, affordable photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies. ... In Q3 2013, the United States installed 930 megawatts of photovoltaic, up 20 percent over ...

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY10 JFR activities in Q3 focused on data analysis and refurbishment of divertor heat flux instrumentation LH2 launcher installed and operational Progress thus far: * P...

  7. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Q 9 Q 3 Q 6 Central Chillers ... 111 3 6 18 11 31 8 11 6 16 Packaged Air Conditioning Units ... 1,613 42...

  8. Threshold Reflectivity Zc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The black and red colors represent those for 0.33 (q 3) and 1(q 1), respectively. The dependency exhibits two distinct regimes: threshold function ...

  9. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    . Major milestones include identification of syngas cleaning requirements for proposed system design, identification and selection of tar compounds and 2 mixtures for use in CPO tests, and preparation of CPO catalysts for validation. (Q3 2009 ~ Q4 2009) - Task C: Test CPO with biomass gasification product gas. Optimize CPO performance with selected tar compounds. Optimize CPO performance with multi-component mixtures. Milestones include optimizing CPO catalysts design, collecting CPO experimental data for next stage kinetic modeling and understanding the effect of relative reactivities on ultimate tar conversion and syngas yields. (Q1 2010 ~ Q3 2010) - Task D: Develop tar CPO kinetic model with CPO kinetic model and modeling results as deliverables. (Q3 2010 ~ Q2 2011) - Task E: Project management and reporting. Milestone: Quarterly reports and presentations, final report, work presented at national technical conferences (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2011) At the beginning of the program, IP landscaping was conducted to understand the operation of various types of biomass gasifiers, their unique syngas/tar compositions and potential tar mitigation options using the catalytic partial oxidation technology. A process simulation model was developed to quantify the system performance and economics impact of CPO tar removal technology. Biomass gasification product compositions used for performance evaluation tests were identified after literature review and system modeling. A reaction system for tar conversion tests was designed, constructed, with each individual component shaken-down in 2009. In parallel, University of Minnesota built a lab-scale unit and evaluated the tar removal performance using catalytic reforming. Benzene was used as the surrogate compound. The biomass gasification raw syngas composition was provided by GE through system studies. In 2010, GE selected different tar compounds and evaluated the tar removal effectiveness of the CPO catalyst. The catalytic performance was

  10. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct + Diffuse Direct (all sky) Direct (clear sky) Diffuse (all sky) > Diffuse (clear sky) Q2: Reflectance Enhancement Enhancement (3D-1D) depends on cloud...

  11. b26.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    79 Q N Q Q Food Service ...... 297 282 125 171 Q Q 31 Q Health Care ...... 129 124 62 68 Q 2 Q Q Inpatient ...

  12. Implementation of ORR Groundwater Strategy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... modeling * Summary of progress in annual Remediation Effectiveness Report Groundwater Program ... * first sampling event in FY 2015 Q2 was successfully completed ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...circ in the scaled differential cross section, s7 fracdsigmadt. ... The proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio (Gsub Esup pGsub Msup p) at Q2 ...

  14. NREL-BA Team CARB

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Review; Q2 3. Project Execution and Ongoing Evaluation; ... 2 Purpose and Objectives Problem Statement: * Builders , ... cost-effective efficiency strategy - maximize insulation * ...

  15. Building America - IBACOS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Review; Q2 3. Project Execution and Ongoing Evaluation; ... - IBACOS Focus Areas Problem Statement: Support RBI ... in low load homes, regardless of HVAC system strategy. ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of National Environmental Policy Act (United States) USDOE ... F2 and, by including other world data, we studied the Q2 ... phenomenological analysis indicates an excess of the ...

  17. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Heating Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieira, R.; Parker, D.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.

    2013-09-01

    Two identical laboratory homes designed to model existing Florida building stock were sealed and tested to 2.5 ACH50. Then, one was made leaky with 70% leakage through the attic and 30% through windows, to a tested value of 9 ACH50. Reduced energy use was measured in the tighter home (2.5 ACH50) in the range of 15% to 16.5% relative to the leaky (9 ACH50) home. Internal moisture loads resulted in higher dew points inside the tight home than the leaky home. Window condensation and mold growth occurred inside the tight home. Even cutting internal moisture gains in half to 6.05 lbs/day, the dew point of the tight home was more than 15 degrees F higher than the outside dry bulb temperature. The homes have single pane glass representative of older Central Florida homes.

  18. Supplementary Feeding, Plumage Documentation and Early Season Prey of Peregrine Falcons at the New Mexico Alpha Eyrie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponton, David A.

    2015-03-20

    A review of what is known about avian physiology and the biological effects of DDE suggests that some benefit to peregrine falcon egg condition could be attained by artificially feeding DDE free prey to the female from the time of her arrival on the nesting grounds until completion of egg laying; the magnitude of potential benefit is unknown. Sporadic efforts in the past demonstrated the need for precision methods of prey delivery. Two methods were developed and tried; providing dead prey items by dropping them in a day perch, and delivery of live prey by remotely controlled release from compartments positioned at the top of the cliff occupied by the falcons. Maintaining quail in the day perch for 21 days resulted in at least one and probably two meals for the female peregrine. Of 16 live birds released (mostly pigeons) 13 were pursued and three caught. Blinding the pigeons with tape proved to be necessary to enable capture. Also, some reluctance of the male peregrine to attack pigeons was observed, and problems with equipment, visibility, and the proximity of the falcons to the release box were encountered. Manpower was the most significant resource requirement. Baiting of great-horned owls, possibly leading to owl attack on the falcons, is judged to be the largest detrimental effect of supplemental feeding. It is recommended that supplemental feeding be reserved for falcons or eyries where complete reproductive failure is expected. Plumage documentation photography was successfully conducted by a remotely controlled camera as an aid to identification of individual falcons. American robin, red-winged blackbird, starling, white-throated swift, bluebird, and mourning dove were among natural prey consumed by the peregrines before completion of egg laying. All activities in close proximity to the cliff were conducted at night to preclude direct disturbance of the falcons.

  19. Measured Cooling Season Results Relating the Impact of Mechanical Ventilation on Energy, Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality in Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Eric; Amos, Bryan; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Widder, Sarah H.; Fonorow, Ken

    2014-08-22

    Conference Paper for ACEEE Summer Study in Buildings discussing results to date of a project evaluating the impact of ventialtion on energy use, comfort, durability, and cost in the hot humid climate.

  20. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Heating Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    Two identical laboratory homes designed to model existing Florida building stock were sealed and tested to 2.5 ACH50. Then, one was made leaky with 70% leakage through the attic and 30% through windows, to a tested value of 9 ACH50. Reduced energy use was measured in the tighter home (2.5 ACH50) in the range of 15% to 16.5% relative to the leaky (9 ACH50) home. Internal moisture loads resulted in higher dew points inside the tight home than the leaky home. Window condensation and mold growth occurred inside the tight home.

  1. Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 2, Heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.

    1995-11-01

    The Federal Government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US Government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer; Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

  2. Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

  3. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department’s Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Next up in our Smart Grid Week series -- improving electric grid technologies to adequately prepare for emergencies with power outages.

  4. Seasonal Patterns of Melatonin, Cortisol, and Progesterone Secretion in Female Lambs Raised Beneath a 500-kV Transmission Line.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jack M.

    1992-06-01

    Although several kinds of biological effects of electric and magnetic fields have been reported from laboratory studies, few have been independently replicated. When this study was being planned, the suppression of nighttime melatonin in rodents was thought to represent one of the strongest known effects of these fields. The effect had been replicated by a single laboratory for 60-Hz electric fields, and by multiple laboratories for d-c magnetic fields. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the effect of electric and magnetic fields on melatonin would also occur in sheep exposed to a high voltage transmission line. The specific hypothesis tested by this experiment was as follows: The electrical environment produced by a 60-Hz, 500-kV transmission line causes a depression in nocturnal melatonin in chronically exposed female lambs. This may mimic effects of pinealectomy or constant long-day photoperiods, thus delaying the onset of reproductive cycles. Results of the study do not provide evidence to support the hypothesis. Melatonin concentrations in the sheep exposed to the transmission line showed the normal pattern of low daytime and high nighttime serum levels. As compared to the control group, there were no statistically significant group differences in the mean amplitude, phase, or duration of the nighttime melatonin elevation.

  5. Quality site seasonal report, Tucson Job Corps Center, SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) 1751, November 1984 through July 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logee, T.L.

    1987-10-15

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system at the Tucson Job Corps Center was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large Federal buildings. The systems are unique prototypes. Design errors and system faults discovered during the monitoring period could not always be corrected. Therefore, the aggregated overall performance is often considerably below what might be expected had similar systems been constructed consecutively with each repetition incorporating corrections and improvements. The solar collector system is installed on a two story dormitory at the Job Corps Center. The solar system preheats hot water for about two hundred students. The solar system provided about 50% of the energy needed for water heating in the winter and nearly 100% of the water heating needs in the summer. There are about 70,000 gallons of water used per month. There are seventy-nine L.O.F. panels or 1659 square feet of collectors (1764 square feet before freeze damage occurred) mounted in two rows on the south facing roof. Collected solar energy is stored in the 2200-gallon storage tank. The control system is by Johnson Controls. City water is piped directly to the storage tank and is circulated in the collectors. Freeze protection is provided by recirculation of storage water. There is an auxiliary gas fired boiler and 750 gallon DHW storage tank to provide backup for the solar system. Highlights of the performance monitoring from the solar collection system at the Tucson Job Corps Center during the November 1984 through July 1985 monitoring period are presented in this report.

  6. Seasonal changes in dissolved-gas supersaturation in the Sacramento River and possible effects on striped bass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colt, J.

    1984-09-01

    Dissolved-gad supersaturation levels were monitored in the Sacramento River system in central California during 1981-1982. Gas supersaturation was highest in the spring when temperature and flow were increasing rapidly, and was caused primarily by inflows of highly supersaturated water from the American and Feather rivers. During high runoff, air entrained by falls and rapids can produce supersaturation. Rapid heating can produce gas supersaturation because the solubility of gases is reduced at higher temperatures. Entrainment of air at dams does not appear to be responsible for gas supersaturation in these two rivers, although the dams may have an influence on dissolved gas levels in the Sacramento River. Gas supersaturation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River system may adversely affect the eggs and larvae of wild striped bass Morone saxatilis and salmonids in hatcheries. The siting of salmonid hatcheries below large dams insures that hatchery fish will be exposed to high levels of gas supersaturation. Because larval striped bass are positively phototactic, they are at greater risk than fish that are found lower in the water column. 48 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Quality site seasonal report, Eisenhower Museum, SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) 4008, March 1985 through September 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, M.G.

    1987-10-15

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) and space heating system at the Eisenhower Museum was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP slected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. These systems are unique prototypes. Design errors and system faults discovered during the monitoring period could not always be corrected. Therefore, the aggregate, overall performance is often considerably below what might be expected had similar systems been constructed consecutively with each repetition incorporating corrections and improvements. The solar system is a retrofit, designed to supply part of the space heating (and reheating for humidity control) load at the museum, located at President Eisenhower's boyhood home in Abilene, Kansas. The small DHW load is also served by the solar system. The museum and adjacent library entertain approximately 200,000 visitors per year, and require controlled temperature and humidity for preservation of artifacts. The summer reheating load for humidity control is comparable to the space heating load in winter. The solar system has 110 US Solar flat plate collectors with a gross area of 4201 square feet, using ethylene glycol as the collector fluid. The energy from the collector loop is transferred to two 1980 gallon storage tanks via an external heat exchanger. Solar energy is used for DHW preheating and for space heating. Highlights of the performance monitoring at the Eisenhower Museum during the period March 1985 through September 1985 are summarized in this report.

  8. Quality site seasonal report, Fort Devens Launderette, SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) 1751, December 1984 through June 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logee, T.L.

    1987-10-15

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system at the Fort Devens Launderette was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system was one of eight systems selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort was to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal buildings. The launderette is part of the Post Exchange complex at the Fort Devens Army Post in Fort Devens, Massachusetts. The solar system preheats hot water for the coin operated laundry which has an estimated 25,000 customers per year. There are 108 collector panels comprising the 2563-square foot collector array. Collected solar energy is stored in a 3800-gallon tank. Propylene glycol is used to protect the solar array from freezing. Two immersed heat exchangers provide heat transfer from the propylene glycol to directly heat the DHW supply water in the storage tank. Auxiliary energy is supplied by gas and oil boilers. This solar system can be considered one of a kind and as such is a prototype. The lessons learned from building and operating this system should be used to correct design deficiencies and improve the performance of future solar systems for this application. Highlights of the system performance at the Fort Devens Launderette solar system during the December 1984 through June 1985 monitoring period are presented in this report.

  9. A simple correlation to predict the hydrate quadruple point temperature for LPG mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousif, M.H.

    1997-12-31

    A simple correlation to predict the hydrate upper quadruple point temperature, T{sub Q2B} for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) mixtures was developed. It was developed for use as a part of a modeling and control system for a LPG pipeline in Russia. For performance reasons, a simple hydrate prediction correlation was required that could be incorporated into the real-time and predictive pipeline simulation models. The operating company required both real time and predictive simulation tools be developed to assist in preventing hydrate blockages while minimizing the use of methanol. In this particular pipeline, LPG fluid moves through the pipeline as a single phase liquid above its bubble point pressure. Because of the very low flow rates, the trace amount of water present in the LPG drops out and creates water pools at low points in the pipeline. The pipeline pressure and seasonal temperatures are conducive for hydrate formation in these pools. Methanol and monoethylene glycol (MEG) are injected in the pipeline to help prevent hydrate formation. The newly developed correlation predicts the hydrate quadruple point temperature using only the composition and the molecular weight of the LPG mixture while retaining an accuracy comparable to the statistical thermodynamic models throughout the range of normal operating conditions.

  10. Empirical Fit to Precision Inclusive Electron-Proton Cross Sections in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.E. Christy; Peter Bosted

    2010-05-01

    An empirical fit is described to measurements of inclusive inelastic electron-proton cross sections in the kinematic range of four-momentum transfer $0 \\le Q^2<8$ GeV$^2$ and final state invariant mass $1.1<3.1$ GeV. The fit is constrained by the recent high precision longitudinal and transverse (L/T) separated cross section measurements from Jefferson Lab Hall C, un-separated Hall C measurements up to $Q^2$ $\\approx 7.5$ ${\\rm GeV}^2$, and photoproduction data at $Q^2 = 0$. Compared to previous fits, the present fit covers a wider kinematic range, fits both transverse and longitudinal cross sections, and features smooth transitions to the photoproduction data at $Q^2=0$ and DIS data at high $Q^2$ and $W$.

  11. Low-Cost MHTES Systems for CSP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems - FY13 Q3 Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System - FY13 ...

  12. c1.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Q District Heat ... 27 3,088 8,155 4,241 218 Q 3,690 Propane ... 128 1,422 1,871 1,734 Q Q Q Cooking...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 7,660 2,756 800 Q Q 3,274 Q Principal Building Activity Education ... 9,874 8,714 946 Q N N N Food Sales...

  14. Paraquantization and supersymmetric intertwining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morchedi, O.; Mebarki, N.

    2012-06-27

    A two dimensional paraquantum system of order Q=3,5 along one direction is shown to be a supersymetric intertwining. The expressions of the partners pairs of the Hamiltonian and supercharge verifying the intertwining relations are obtained.

  15. State","Jan 2015","Feb 2015","Mar 2015","Q1 2015","Apr 2015"...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Jul 2015","Aug 2015","Sep 2015","Q3 2015" "Alabama",1382932,1141885,1281975,3806792,1067587,1003155,958490,3029232,1120511,1210360,1145913,3476784 "Alaska",135396,111797,125356,3...

  16. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Q Q Q 505 Q Q 22.0 Q Buildings without Cooling ... 2 1 Q 634 623 Q 3.1 2.1 Q Water-Heating Energy Sources Electricity ... 29 126 26...

  17. c15.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    without Cooling ... 7 Q 3 6 1,855 2,232 1,214 1,080 3.6 6.4 2.6 5.8 Water-Heating Energy Sources Electricity ... 57 86...

  18. Southface Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative (ABCI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of Atlanta: Development of Commercial Benchmarking ordinance to include small commercial ... with the Boys and Girls Club. Budget History Q3FY2013 - FY2013 (past) FY2014 (current) ...

  19. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    q 3 THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION ' Suite 4000, 955 L' Enant Plaza, S. W., Warhington, D.C. 20024, Telephone: (202) 488-6000 7117-01.87.sej.16 28 July 1987 . Mr. Andrew Wallo, III,...

  20. The pMSSM10 after LHC run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de Vries, K. J.; Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flächer, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; et al

    2015-09-01

    We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following ten soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale MSUSY ≡ √mmore » $$\\tilde{t}$$1m$$\\tilde{t}$$2 : the gaugino masses M1,2,3 , the first-and second-generation squark masses m$$\\tilde{q}$$1 = m$$\\tilde{q}$$2 , the third-generation squark mass m$$\\tilde{q}$$3, a common slepton mass m$$\\tilde{ℓ}$$ and a common trilinear mixing parameter A , as well as the Higgs mixing parameter μ , the pseudoscalar Higgs mass MA and tanβ , the ratio of the two Higgs vacuum expectation values. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with ∼ 1.2 ×109 points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly interacting sparticle masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons + E-slashT signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for electroweakly interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, our analysis includes Higgs mass and rate measurements using the HiggsSignals code, SUSY Higgs exclusion bounds, the measurements of BR(Bs→μ+μ-) by LHCb and CMS, other B -physics observables, electroweak precision observables, the cold dark matter density and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark matter scattering, assuming that the cold dark matter is mainly provided by the lightest neutralino χ-tilde10 . We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of (g-2)μ , unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum χ2=20.5 with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a χ2 probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with χ2/d.o.f.=32.8/24(31.1/23)(30.3/22) in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2). We

  1. Quercetin 3-O-methyl ether protects FL83B cells from copper induced oxidative stress through the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tseng, Hsiao-Ling; Li, Chia-Jung; Huang, Lin-Huang; Chen, Chun-Yao; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Lin, Chun-Nan; Department of Biological Science and Technology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan ; Hsu, Hsue-Yin

    2012-10-01

    Quercetin is a bioflavonoid that exhibits several biological functions in vitro and in vivo. Quercetin 3-O-methyl ether (Q3) is a natural product reported to have pharmaceutical activities, including antioxidative and anticancer activities. However, little is known about the mechanism by which it protects cells from oxidative stress. This study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which Q3 protects against Cu{sup 2+}-induced cytotoxicity. Exposure to Cu{sup 2+} resulted in the death of mouse liver FL83B cells, characterized by apparent apoptotic features, including DNA fragmentation and increased nuclear condensation. Q3 markedly suppressed Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, characterized by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and PARP cleavage, in Cu{sup 2+}-exposed cells. The involvement of PI3K, Akt, Erk, FOXO3A, and Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was shown to be critical to the survival of Q3-treated FL83B cells. The liver of both larval and adult zebrafish showed severe damage after exposure to Cu{sup 2+} at a concentration of 5 μM. Hepatic damage induced by Cu{sup 2+} was reduced by cotreatment with Q3. Survival of Cu{sup 2+}-exposed larval zebrafish was significantly increased by cotreatment with 15 μM Q3. Our results indicated that Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis in FL83B cells occurred via the generation of ROS, upregulation and phosphorylation of Erk, overexpression of 14-3-3, inactivation of Akt, and the downregulation of FOXO3A and MnSOD. Hence, these results also demonstrated that Q3 plays a protective role against oxidative damage in zebrafish liver and remarked the potential of Q3 to be used as an antioxidant for hepatocytes. Highlights: ► Protective effects of Q3 on Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. ► Cu{sup 2+} induced apoptosis in FL83B cells via ROS and the activation of Erk. ► Q3 abolishes Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis through the PI3K/Akt and MAPK

  2. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2006 Final Season Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roby, Daniel D.; Collis, Ken; Lyons, Donald E.

    2009-06-18

    This study investigates predation by piscivorous waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River Basin. During 2006, study objectives in the Columbia River estuary, work funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, were to (1) monitor and evaluate previous management initiatives to reduce Caspian tern (Hydroprogne caspia) predation on juvenile salmonids (smolts); (2) measure the impact of double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) predation on smolt survival, and assess potential management options to reduce cormorant predation; and (3) monitor large colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds in the estuary (i.e., glaucous-winged/western gulls [Larus glaucescens/occidentalis]) to determine the potential impacts on smolt survival. Study objectives on the mid-Columbia River, work funded by the Walla Walla District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, were to (1) measure the impact of predation by Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants on smolt survival; and (2) monitor large nesting colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds (i.e., California gulls [L. californicus], ring-billed gulls [L. delawarensis], American white pelicans [Pelecanus erythrorhynchos]) on the mid-Columbia River to determine the potential for significant impacts on smolt survival. Our efforts to evaluate system-wide losses of juvenile salmonids to avian predation indicated that Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants were responsible for the vast majority of smolt losses to avian predators in the Columbia Basin, with most losses occurring in the Columbia River estuary. In 2006, East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary supported the largest known breeding colonies of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants in the world. The Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island consisted of about 9,200 breeding pairs in 2006, up slightly (but not significantly so) from the estimate of colony size in 2005 (8,820 pairs). There has not been a statistically significant change in the size of the Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island since 2000. Tern nesting success averaged 0.72 fledglings per breeding pair in 2006, significantly higher than in 2005 (0.37 fledglings per breeding pair), a year of poor ocean conditions. Despite the presumably higher availability of marine forage fishes in 2006, the proportion of juvenile salmonids in diets of Caspian terns (32% of prey items) averaged higher than in 2005 (23% of prey items) and 2004 (18% of prey items). Steelhead smolts were particular vulnerable to predation by East Sand Island terns in 2006, with predation rates as high as 20% on particular groups of PIT-tagged fish reaching the estuary. Consumption of juvenile salmonids by terns nesting at the East Sand Island colony in 2006 was approximately 5.3 million smolts (95% c.i. = 4.4-6.2 million), significantly higher than the estimated 3.6 million smolts consumed in 2005, but still roughly 7 million fewer smolts consumed compared to 1998 (when all terns nested on Rice Island in the upper estuary). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continue to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply, even in 2005 when availability of marine forage fishes declined due to poor ocean conditions. Further management of Caspian terns to reduce losses of juvenile salmonids would be implemented under the Caspian Tern Management Plan for the Columbia River Estuary; the Records of Decision (RODs) authorizing implementation of the plan were signed in November 2006. The ROD lists as the management goal the redistribution of approximately half of the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony to alternative colony sites in interior Oregon and San Francisco Bay, California (USFWS 2006). Implementation of the management plan is stalled, however, because of the lack of appropriated funds.

  3. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

    2011-12-17

    The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

  4. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

    1984-03-01

    This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

  5. Long-term monitoring of fleshy fruit and hard mast production and seasonal bird distribution at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Cathryn, H.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2009-06-15

    A final report of Fruit and hard mast production in five habitat types at SRS with a comparison of fruit consumption by fledgling versus adult birds at SRS and Relative importance of fruit, seeds, and insects in the diets of overwintering birds at SRS.

  6. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Kono, Jamie

    2015-06-24

    A new generation of full variable-capacity air-conditioning (A/C) and heat pump units has come on the market that promises to deliver very high cooling and heating efficiency. The units are controlled differently than standard single-capacity (fixed-capacity) systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, the new units can vary their capacity over a wide range (approximately 40%–118% of nominal full capacity) and stay on for 60%–100% more hours per day than the fixed-capacity systems depending on load-to-capacity ratios. Two-stage systems were not evaluated in this research effort.

  7. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Kono, Jamie

    2015-06-01

    A new generation of central, ducted variable-capacity heat pump systems has come on the market, promising very high cooling and heating efficiency. They are controlled differently than standard fixed-capacity systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and then cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, they vary their cooling and heating output over a wide range (approximately 40% - 118% of nominal full capacity), thus staying 'on' for 60% - 100% more hours per day compared to fixed -capacity systems. Experiments in this research examined the performance of 2-ton and 3-ton fixed- and variable-capacity systems and the impacts of system oversizing.

  8. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Metals 758 646 529 332 Fabricated Metal Products 3 1 1 333 Machinery Q 2 * 334 Computer and Electronic Products * 1 1 335 Electrical Equip., Appliances, and Components 27 69...

  9. Electrolux Gibson Air Conditioner and Equator Clothes Washer Fail DOE Energy Star Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE testing in support of the ENERGY STAR program has revealed that an Electrolux Gibson air conditioner (model GAH105Q2T1) and an Equator clothes washer (model EZ 3720 CEE), both of which claimed...

  10. Stuart R Hudson | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was introduced. After completing his doctorate, Stuart worked as a Research Fellow at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. During this time, he studied the overlap of q2...

  11. MHK Projects/CETO La Reunion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the single, stand-alone unit due in Q2 2012. Stage 1 has been awarded 5M of French Government funding. Project Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Number of Devices Deployed 1...

  12. c21.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Q 14.5 18.7 Buildings without Cooling ... 11 8 Q 2,142 2,757 Q 5.2 2.8 7.7 Water-Heating Energy Sources Electricity ... 88 163...

  13. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 110 52 88 6,834 3,186 6,328 16.1 16.4 13.9 Other Excluding Electricity ... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Buildings without Cooling ... Q 2...

  14. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Q 14.5 18.7 Buildings without Cooling ... 11 8 Q 2,142 2,757 Q 5.2 2.8 7.7 Water-Heating Energy Sources Electricity ... 88 163...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    differential cross section, ssup 7(dsigmadt) and a rapid fall-off in a ... The proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio (Gsub Esup pGsub Msup p) at Q2 ...

  16. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators - FY13 Q1 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KB) More Documents & Publications Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2 Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators

  17. Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    313ganapathi.pdf (6.65 MB) More Documents & Publications Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2

  18. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Budget History April 9, 2015 - FY 2015 (past) FY 2016 (current) FY 2017 - Dec. 31, 2018 ... retail financial calendars 3.1 Program Benchmarking Calls Q1, Q2 Q1 delayed less than a ...

  19. Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Study of Doped NiO Counter Electrode Materials FY12-Q2 Milestone: Synthesize VO2 Nanoparticles and Charcaterize Performance FY12-Q4 Milestone: Demonstration Liquid Phase Spray ...

  20. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Distributed System ... Q 120 244 Q 2,566 5,478 Q 46.9 44.6 Energy-Related Space Functions (more than one may apply) Commercial Food Preparation ... 185 298 483...

  1. PowerPoint Presentation - FY13 Q1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors - FY13 Q2 Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors Self-Cleaning CSP Optics ...

  2. SENDECO2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: SENDECO2 Place: Barcelona, Spain Zip: 11 08034 Sector: Carbon Product: A Spanish exchange for CO2 allowances and carbon credits, intended to go live by the end of Q2...

  3. Electrolux Gibson Air Conditioner and Equator Clothes Washer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ENERGY STAR program has revealed that an Electrolux Gibson air conditioner (model GAH105Q2T1) and an Equator clothes washer (model EZ 3720 CEE), both of which claimed ENERGY STAR...

  4. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Carlin, C. ; Keith, C. D. ; Meekins, D. G. ; et al Full Text Available April 2016, Elsevier Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS...

  5. DOE MURI: Hig-Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids - FY13 Q2 High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal Power Generation FY13 Q1 Corrosion in Very ...

  6. HUD Updated Supplemental Lists - February 18, 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updated Supplemental Lists - February 18, 2016 HUD Updated Supplemental Lists - February 18, 2016 HUD Updated Supplemental Lists - February 18, 2016 Updated_supplemental_lists_1Q_2Q_ 2-18-16.xlsx (23.23 KB) More Documents & Publications updated_supplemental_lists_1n-2n-3m_07-06-2012.xlsx updated_supplemental_lists_1m-2m-3l-04-05-2012.xlsx updated_supplemental_lists_1p_2p_3o_04302013.xlsx

  7. $$B\\to Kl^+l^-$$ decay form factors from three-flavor lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2016-01-27

    We compute the form factors for the B → Kl+l- semileptonic decay process in lattice QCD using gauge-field ensembles with 2+1 flavors of sea quark, generated by the MILC Collaboration. The ensembles span lattice spacings from 0.12 to 0.045 fm and have multiple sea-quark masses to help control the chiral extrapolation. The asqtad improved staggered action is used for the light valence and sea quarks, and the clover action with the Fermilab interpretation is used for the heavy b quark. We present results for the form factors f+(q2), f0(q2), and fT(q2), where q2 is the momentum transfer, together with a comprehensivemore » examination of systematic errors. Lattice QCD determines the form factors for a limited range of q2, and we use the model-independent z expansion to cover the whole kinematically allowed range. We present our final form-factor results as coefficients of the z expansion and the correlations between them, where the errors on the coefficients include statistical and all systematic uncertainties. Lastly, we use this complete description of the form factors to test QCD predictions of the form factors at high and low q2.« less

  8. Clean measurements of the nucleon axial-vector and free-neutron magnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deur, Alexandre P.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the feasibility of a weak charged current experiment using a low energy electron beam. A first goal is to measure the Q^2 dependence of the axial-vector form factor g_a(Q^2). It can be measured model-independently and as robustly as for electromagnetic form factors from typical electron scattering experiments, in contrast to the methods used so far to measure g_a(Q^2). If g_a(Q^2) follows a dipole form, the axial mass can be extracted with a better accuracy than the world data altogether. The most important detection equipment would be a segmented neutron detector with good momentum and angular resolution that is symmetric about the beam direction, and covers a moderate angular range. A high intensity beam (100 uA) is necessary. Beam polarization is highly desirable as it provides a clean measurement of the backgrounds. Beam energies between 70 and 110 MeV are ideal. This range would provide a Q^2 mapping of g_a between 0.01

  9. Precision Measurements of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2010-08-01

    New high precision polarization measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio in the Q^2 from 0.3 to 0.7 [GeV/c]^2 have been made. These elastic H(e,e'p) measurementswere done in Jefferson Lab's Hall A using 80% longitudinally polarized electrons and recoil polarimetry. For Q^2 greater than 1 [GeV/c]^2, previous polarization data indicated a strong deviation of the form factor ratio from unity which sparked renewed theoretical and experimental interest in how two-photon diagrams have been taken into account. The new high precision data indicate that the deviation from unity, while small, persists even at Q^2 less than 1 [GeV/c]^2.

  10. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Accardi, Alberto; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  11. Measurements of $ep \\to e^\\prime π^+n$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive process $e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $\\pi^+ n$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $I = {1\\over 2}$ resonances $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$, $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ and $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ were extracted atmore »different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$ in the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $A_{3/2}$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $A_{1/2}$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $S_{1/2}$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude at $Q^2 « less

  12. Measurements of $ep \\to e^\\prime ?^+n$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Joo, H. S.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J.; Markov, N.; Martinez, D.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati??, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sparveris, N.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive process $e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $\\pi^+ n$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $I = {1\\over 2}$ resonances $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$, $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ and $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ were extracted at different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$ in the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $A_{3/2}$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $A_{1/2}$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $S_{1/2}$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude at $Q^2 < 2.5$ GeV$^2$.

  13. Measurements of $$ep \\to e^\\prime π^+n$$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive processmore » $$e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $$\\pi^+ n$$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $$n\\pi^+$$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $$I = {1\\over 2}$$ resonances $$N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$$, $$N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$$ and $$N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$$ were extracted at different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $$N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$$ in the $$A_{1/2}$$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $$N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $$A_{3/2}$$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $$A_{1/2}$$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $$S_{1/2}$$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $$N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $$A_{1/2}$$ amplitude at $Q^2 < 2.5$ GeV$^2$.« less

  14. table2.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 ... 0 0 0 0 * 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,689 * * * 0 Q * 3,407 324110 Petroleum Refineries 3,307 0 0 0 0 ...

  15. "Table HC12.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Midwest Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "3 or More",0.6,"Q","Q","Q" "Plasma Television Sets",3.6,0.7,0.6,"Q" ... "3 or More",22.3,37.5,49,58.8 "Plasma Television Sets",10.8,29.6,32.8,57.2 ...

  16. "Table HC3.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "3 or More",0.6,0.5,0.4,"Q","N","Q","N" "Plasma Television Sets",3.6,2.8,2.2,"Q","Q","Q",... "3 or More",22.3,24,26.1,96.9,0,75.1,0 "Plasma Television Sets",10.8,11.6,13.3,39.5,54.7...

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "3 or More",0.6,0.4,"Q","N","Q","N" "Plasma Television Sets",3.6,2.6,0.3,"Q",0.4,"Q" ... "3 or More",22.3,26.1,96.8,0,46.6,0 "Plasma Television Sets",10.8,13,32.3,38.4,26.5,5...

  18. Science Headlines

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    -0500 12B69234-E106-461C-B008-1A4F342D3F6Dhttp:1.usa.gov20feQ3S A Respiratory Virus Provides Clues to Possible Treatments Purdue University researchers, working at the...

  19. News

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    glaciers. 12B69234-E106-461C-B008-1A4F342D3F6Dhttp:1.usa.gov20feQ3S A Respiratory Virus Provides Clues to Possible Treatments Purdue University researchers, working at the...

  20. "Table HC1.2.3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...357,2492,2103,1096,"Q","Q","Q" "3,000 or 3,499",6.7,6.6,3014,2175,1438,3047,2079,1108,"N","N","N" "3,500 to 3,999",5.2,5.1,3549,2505,1518,"Q","Q","Q","N","N","N" "4,000 or ...

  1. Observations from The EV Project in Q4 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2014-02-01

    This is a summary report for The EV Project 4th quarter 2013 reports. It describes electric vehicle driver driving and charging behavior observed in Q4. It is the same report as the previously approved/published Q3 2013 report, only the numbers have been updated. It is for public release and does not have limited distribution.

  2. New insight on global QCD fits using Regge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soyez, G.

    2005-06-14

    In global QCD fits, one has to choose an initial parton distribution at Q{sup 2} = Q{sub 0}{sup 2}. I shall argue that the initial condition chosen in usual standard sets is inconsistent with analytic S-matrix theory. I shall show how one can combine these two approaches, leading to a Regge-compatible next-to-leading order global QCD fit. This allows one to extend the parametrisation in the low-Q2 region. Finally, I shall discuss how it it possible to use the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equation to obtain information on Regge models at high Q2.

  3. Unitary constraints on neutral pion electroproduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Laget, J -M

    2011-01-01

    At large virtualitymore » $Q^2$, the coupling to the vector meson production channels provides us with a natural explanation of the surprisingly large cross section of the neutral pion electroproduction recently measured at Jefferson Laboratory, without destroying the good agreement between the Regge pole model and the data at the real photon point. Elastic rescattering of the $$\\pi^0$$ provides us with a way to explain why the node, that appears at $$t\\sim -0.5$$~GeV$^2$ at the real photon point, disappears as soon as $Q^2$ differs from zero.« less

  4. c35.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Water ... 574 40 47 Q 2,577 1,652 2,380 1,081 0.22 0.02 0.02 Q Separate Computer Area ... 560 41 59 35 3,623 1,957 2,916 1,756 0.15 0.02 0.02 Q HVAC...

  5. Hard diffractive production of vector mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschner, R.

    2005-06-14

    The large Q2 behaviour of diffractive electroproduction and the large t behaviour of diffractive photoproduction are considered relying on models of the meson and real photon light-cone wave functions. The large size quark-antiquark dipole contribution to the impact factors of all helicity configurations are discussed.

  6. table2.2_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 ... 0 0 * 0 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,689 * 2 * 0 Q 2 3,407 4.4 324110 Petroleum Refineries 3,307 0 0 0 ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. ... (APS) Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron up to Q2 3.4 GeV2 using ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. ... (APS) Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron up to Q2 3.4 GeV2 using ...

  9. Jefferson Lab Hosts 2012 SPAFOA Members Meeting (Meyer Cryogenic, Vacuum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Pressure Technologies) | Jefferson Lab Hosts 2012 SPAFOA Members Meeting (Meyer Cryogenic, Vacuum and Pressure Technologies) External Link: http://ourmailer.com/Z2U-TRYV-D24Q2F5T0E/cr.aspx?b=32

  10. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- ...Q",2,13,25,15,8,"Q","Q" "District Chilled Water ......",33,33,"Q",1,2,33,"Q",4,"Q","Q" ...

  11. Study of quasielastic scattering using charged-current νμ-iron interactions in the MINOS near detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.

    2015-01-08

    Kinematic distributions from an inclusive sample of 1.41×106 charged-current νμ interactions on iron, obtained using the MINOS near detector exposed to a wide-band beam with peak flux at 3 GeV, are compared to a conventional treatment of neutrino scattering within a Fermi gas nucleus. Results are also used to guide the selection of a subsample enriched in quasielastic νμFe interactions, containing an estimated 123,000 quasielastic events of incident energies 1 < Eν < 8 GeV, with < Eν > = 2.79 GeV. Four additional subsamples representing topological and kinematic sideband regions to quasielastic scattering are also selected for the purposemore » of evaluating backgrounds. Comparisons using subsample distributions in four-momentum transfer Q2 show the Monte Carlo model to be inadequate at low Q2. Its shortcomings are remedied via inclusion of a Q2-dependent suppression function for baryon resonance production, developed from the data. A chi-square fit of the resulting Monte Carlo simulation to the shape of the Q2 distribution for the quasielastic-enriched sample is carried out with the axial-vector mass MA of the dipole axial-vector form factor of the neutron as a free parameter. Furthermore, the effective MA which best describes the data is 1.23+0.13-0.09(fit)+0.12-0.15(syst) GeV.« less

  12. Table 5.14. U.S. Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Vehicle Type, 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or More ... 11.9 7.0 6.6 0.4 0.7 1.4 Q 2.0 Q 23.6 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 6.9 4.9 4.6 0.3 Q Q Q 1.2 Q...

  13. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Vehicle Types

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or More ... 19.1 13.0 12.3 0.7 1.0 1.7 Q 2.7 Q 21.8 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 12.4 9.5 8.9 0.5 Q Q Q 1.8 Q...

  14. Induced polarization of Lambda(1116) in kaon electroproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabrielyan, M.; Raue, B.A.; Carman, D.S.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K.P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M.J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N.A.; Battaglieri, M.; Baturin, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Cao, T.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P.L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; DAngelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; ElFassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J.A.; Forest, T.A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Girod, F.X.; Goetz, J.T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.W.; Griffioen, K.A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S.M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H.S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, F.J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S.E.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W.I.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C.A.; Mestayer, M.D.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moody, C.I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J.J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J.W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.A.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G.D.; Sober, D.I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I.I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A.V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.K.; Watts, D.P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2014-09-01

    We have measured the induced polarization of the ?(1116) in the reaction ep?e?K+?, detecting the scattered e? and K+ in the final state along with the proton from the decay ??p??.The present study used the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), which allowed for a large kinematic acceptance in invariant energy W (1.6?W?2.7 GeV) and covered the full range of the kaon production angle at an average momentum transfer Q2=1.90 GeV2.In this experiment a 5.50 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. We have mapped out the W and kaon production angle dependencies of the induced polarization and found striking differences from photoproduction data over most of the kinematic range studied. However, we also found that the induced polarization is essentially Q2 independent in our kinematic domain, suggesting that somewhere below the Q2 covered here there must be a strong Q2 dependence. Along with previously published photo- and electroproduction cross sections and polarization observables, these data are needed for the development of models, such as effective field theories, and as input to coupled-channel analyses that can provide evidence of previously unobserved s-channel resonances.

  15. Separated response functions in exclusive, forward π± electroproduction on deuterium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huber, G. M.; Blok, H. P.; Butuceanu, C.; Gaskell, D.; Horn, T.; Mack, D. J.; Abbott, D.; Aniol, K.; Anklin, H.; Armstrong, C.; et al

    2015-01-07

    Background: Measurements of forward exclusive meson production at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, Q2, and at different four-momentum transfer, t, can be used to probe QCD's transition from meson-nucleon degrees of freedom at long distances to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at short scales. Ratios of separated response functions in π⁻ and π⁺ electroproduction are particularly informative. Ratio for transverse photons may allow this transition to be more easily observed, while the ratio for longitudinal photons provides a crucial verification of the assumed pole dominance, needed for reliable extraction of the pion form factor from electroproduction data. Method:more » Data were acquired with 2.6-5.2 GeV electron beams and the HMS+SOS spectrometers in Jefferson Lab Hall C, at central Q2 values of 0.6, 1.0, 1.6 GeV2 at W=1.95 GeV, and Q2=2.45 GeV2 at W=2.22 GeV. There was significant coverage in Φ And ϵ, which allowed separation of σL,T,LT,TT. Results: σL shows a clear signature of the pion pole, with a sharp rise at small -t. In contrast, σT is much flatter versus t. The longitudinal/transverse ratios evolve with Q2 and t, and at the highest Q2=2.45 GeV2 show a slight enhancement for π⁻ Production compared to π⁺. The π⁻/π⁺+ ratio for transverse photons exhibits only a small Q2-dependence, following a nearly universal curve with t, with a steep transition to a value of about 0.25, consistent with s-channel quark knockout. The σTT/σT ratio also drops rapidly with Q2, qualitatively consistent with s-channel helicity conservation. The π⁻/π⁺ ratio for longitudinal photons indicates a small isoscalar contamination at W=1.95 GeV, consistent with what was observed in our earlier determination of the pion form factor at these kinematics.« less

  16. 1995 CECS C&E Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15. Season of Peak Electricity Demand, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 16. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Season of Peak Demand, 1995...

  17. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    leaps to mind. When it comes to oil markets, this phrase describes the seasonal nature of inventories. Because the demand for many petroleum products is seasonal over the...

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    winter season is less than half of the percentage through February 20 of the previous winter season, according to calculations with estimates from BENTEK Energy, LLC (Bentek)....

  19. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    soil, and yet we know little about how these root-associated microbial communities change through the growing season and between seasons. We analyzed the response of soil ...

  20. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    use the period between the gasoline season and the heating oil season to perform maintenance on their refineries in order to keep them running efficiently and safely. This...

  1. In Alaska, Weatherization Training Goes Home ...(sort of) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Most of the work in southeast Alaska is seasonal, in fishing, tourism or timber; the area is also suffering from the economic downturn. Weatherization can supplement seasonal ...

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.3 Efficiency Standards for Residential...

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Efficiency Standards for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (1) Type ... prior to January 23, 2010. 3) Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio. 4) Heating Seasonal ...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters ...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters ...

  5. Monthly energy review, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-24

    Energy production during Feb 95 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu (Q), 3.1% over Feb 94. Energy consumption totaled 7.4 Q, 0.7% below Feb 94. Net imports of energy totaled 1.3 Q, 5.6% below Feb 94. This publication is divided into energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  6. NERSC-ScienceHighlightSlidesSeptember2010.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 NERSC Science Highlights NERSC Scientific Accomplishments, Q3CY2010 2 Energy Resources State-of-the-art electronic structure and first-principles molecular- dynamics show why enzymes may be good models for hydrogen production catalysts. (R. Car, Princeton) . Astrophysics A quantum leap in supernova understanding has been obtained by researchers using a 3-D radiation-hydro code on NERSC's Franklin. (Burrows, Princeton; Bell, LBNL) Nuclear Physics NERSC's PDSF and HPSS are the main U.S.

  7. "Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,9.3,8.6,0.5,"Q","Q","Q" "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,6.1,5.8,0.3,"Q","N","N" "3,500 to 3,999",5.2,4.9,4.7,"Q","Q","Q","N" "4,000 or More",13.3,12.6,12,0.5,"Q","Q",...

  8. "Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,9.3,8.6,0.5,"Q","Q","Q" "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,6.1,5.8,0.3,"Q","N","N" "3,500 to 3,999",5.2,4.9,4.7,"Q","Q","Q","N" "4,000 or More",13.3,12.6,12,0.5,"Q","Q",...

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,9.4,0.6,"Q","Q","Q" "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,6.3,0.3,"Q","N","N" "3,500 to 3,999",5.2,4.9,"Q","Q","Q","N" "4,000 or More",13.3,12.7,0.6,"Q","Q","N" ...

  10. Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Kyle Snyder Ezra Zemach Ormat Nevada Inc. Project Officer: Ava Coy Total Project Funding: Maui-$4.9M, GB- $4.4M April 23rd, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Ulupalakua, Maui Glass Buttes, Oregon 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Maui Overview * Timeline * Project start date 10/29/2009 * Project end date Q3 2013 * Well sites permitting:

  11. D::&'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D::&' 325,B CA . q -3 United States Government gjjq Department of Energy JUL 2 3 I!% NE-24 Federal Register Notice Regarding Certification for Unrestricted Use of the Sodium Reactor Experiment Complex (SRE) and Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Chatsworth, California William R. Voigt, Jr. Acting Director Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action I am attaching for your signature the Federal Register Notice of Unrestricted Use and the original DOE-AD-9

  12. Solar Energy Science Projects

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    Science Projects Curriculum: Solar Power -(thermodynamics, lightelectromagnetic, radiation, energy transformation, conductionconvection, seasons, trigonometry) Grade Level: ...

  13. $$B \\to \\pi \\ell \

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Flynn, J. M.; Izubuchi, T.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Soni, A.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2015-04-14

    We calculate the form factors for B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν decay in dynamical lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use the (2+1)-flavor gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations with the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with a relativistic heavy-quark interpretation. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ≈ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ ≈ 290 MeV. We simultaneously extrapolate our numerical results to the physical light-quark masses and tomore » the continuum and interpolate in the pion/kaon energy using SU(2) “hard-pion” chiral perturbation theory for heavy-light meson form factors. We provide complete systematic error budgets for the vector and scalar form factors f + (q2) and f0(q2) for both B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν at three momenta that span the q2 range accessible in our numerical simulations. Next we extrapolate these results to q2 = 0 using a model-independent z-parametrization based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2)as the coefficients of the series in z and the matrix of correlations between them; this provides a parametrization of the form factors valid over the entire allowed kinematic range. Our results agree with other three-flavor lattice-QCD determinations using staggered light quarks, and have comparable precision, thereby providing important independent cross-checks. Both B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν decays enable determinations of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub|. Furthermore, we perform a combined z-fit of our numerical B → πℓν form-factor data with the experimental measurements of the branching fraction from BABAR and Belle leaving the relative normalization as a free parameter; we obtain |Vub| = 3.61(32)×10-3, where the error includes statistical and all

  14. Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Grid Resilience Capabilities- Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season DOE-NASEO Webinar on Forecasting Energy Infrastructure Risk for the 2015 Hurricane Season June 23, 2015 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability US Department of Energy What is a normal Hurricane Season ?  NOAA classifies 13 of the 20 seasons since 1995 as above normal, with eight being very active (i.e., hyperactive defined by ACE > 165% of median). - Only three seasons since 1995 were below normal (1997, 2009, and 2013). - The

  15. Evidence for the onset of color transparency in ρ0 electroproduction off nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holt, R. J.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalker, S. S.; et al

    2012-05-11

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'ρ0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ρA interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). Thus, while the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included themore » color transparency effects.« less

  16. Polarization Transfer in 4He(e-vector,e[prime]p-vector)3H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Paolone

    2007-10-01

    Polarization transfer in quasi-elastic nucleon knockout is sensitive to the properties of the nucleon in the nuclear medium, including possible modification of the nucleon form factor and/or spinor. In our recently completed experiment E03-104 at Jefferson Lab we measured the proton recoil polarization in the 4He(e-vector,e[prime]p-vector)3H reaction at a Q2 of 0.8 (GeV/c)2 and 1.3 (GeV/c)2 with unprecedented precision. These data complement earlier data between 0.4 and 2.6 (GeV/c)2 from both Mainz and Jefferson Lab, in which the measured ratio of polarization-transfer coefficients differs from a fully relativistic DWIA calculation. Preliminary results hint at a possible unexpected Q2 dependence in the polarization transfer coefficient ratio. Final analysis will help constrain FSI models

  17. Comparative study of nuclear effects in polarized electron scattering from 3He

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ethier, Jacob James; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2013-11-04

    We present a detailed analysis of nuclear effects in inclusive electron scattering from polarized 3He nuclei for polarization asymmetries, structure functions and their moments, both in the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions. We compare the results of calculations within the weak binding approximation at finite Q2 with the effective polarization ansatz often used in experimental data analyses, and explore the impact of Δ components in the nuclear wave function and nucleon off-shell corrections on extractions of the free neutron structure. Using the same framework we also make predictions for the Q2 dependence of quasielastic scattering from polarized 3He, data onmore » which can be used to constrain the spin-dependent nuclear smearing functions in 3He.« less

  18. Exclusive pi^0 electroproduction at W > 2 GeV with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K.P.; Anderson, M.D.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N.A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Biselli, A.S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Carman, D.S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J.A.; Forest, T.A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Girod, F.X.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.W.; Griffioen, K.A.; Guegan, B.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ireland, D.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Isupov, E.L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H.S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.J.; Koirala, S.; Kuhn, S.E.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W.I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.Y.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.A.; Moody, C.I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J.J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Procureur, S.; Puckett, A.J.R.; Raue, B.A.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B.G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y.G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G.D.; Sober, D.I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.S.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A.V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yurov, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-08-01

    Exclusive neutral-pion electroproduction (ep-->e'p'pi0) was measured at Jefferson Lab with a 5.75-GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4sigma/dtdQ2dxBdphipi and structure functions sigmaT+epsilonsigmaL,sigmaTT and ?LT as functions of t were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The data are compared with Regge and handbag theoretical calculations. Analyses in both frameworks find that a large dominance of transverse processes is necessary to explain the experimental results. For the Regge analysis it is found that the inclusion of vector meson rescattering processes is necessary to bring the magnitude of the calculated and measured structure functions into rough agreement. In the handbag framework, there are two independent calculations, both of which appear to roughly explain the magnitude of the structure functions in terms of transversity generalized parton distributions.

  19. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sectionsmore » $$\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$$ for the $$ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($Q^2,x_B,t$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.« less

  20. Measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon at $$\\langle E_{\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wolcott, J.

    2016-02-25

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q2 are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q2 for νe with that of similarly selected νμ-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current νe interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, the data are found tomore » be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.« less

  1. Evidence for the onset of color transparency in ρ0 electroproduction off nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holt, R. J.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalker, S. S.; et al

    2012-05-11

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'ρ0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ρA interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). Thus, while the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included themore »color transparency effects.« less

  2. Electroexcitation of the Δ(1232)3/2+ and Δ(1600)3/2+ in a light-front relativistic quark model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-09-30

    The magnetic-dipole form factor and the ratios REM and RSM for the γ* N → Δ(1232)3/2+ transition are predicted within light-front relativistic quark model up to photon virtuality Q2=12 GeV2. Furthermore, we predict the helicity amplitudes of the γ* N → Δ(1600)3/2+ transition assuming the Δ(1600)3/2+ is the first radial excitation of the ground state Delta(1232)3/2+.

  3. Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,657 2,348 1,110 708 257 145 59 23 7 Principal Building Activity Education .................................................... 327 119 61 52 49 30 10 5 Q Food Sales .................................................. 174 138 Q Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ............................................... 349 251 71 23 Q Q Q N N Health Care ................................................. 127 64 Q 10 8 4 2 2 1 Inpatient ..................................................... 11 N N Q Q Q 2 2 1

  4. Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.

    2014-11-01

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 < x < 0.35 and 1.4 < Q < 2.7 GeV. Our results show that both ? on He3 and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  5. New Measurements of High-Momentum Nucleons and Short-Range Structures in Nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fomin, N.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, R.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Bosted, P.; Bruell, A.; Bukhari, M. H. S.; Christy, M. E.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2012-02-01

    We present new, high-Q2 measurements of inclusive electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. This yields an improved extraction of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data extend to the kinematic regime where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate and we observe significantly greater strength in this region than previous measurements.

  6. set3.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,657 2,348 1,110 708 257 145 59 23 7 Principal Building Activity Education .................................................... 327 119 61 52 49 30 10 5 Q Food Sales .................................................. 174 138 Q Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ............................................... 349 251 71 23 Q Q Q N N Health Care ................................................. 127 64 Q 10 8 4 2 2 1 Inpatient ..................................................... 11 N N Q Q Q 2 2 1

  7. Hanford Advisory Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 8-9, 2016 Attachment 7: Transcript of Sounding Board comments The following paragraphs are transcribed member responses from Hanford Advisory Board's (HAB or Board) June Safety Culture Sounding Board. The follow responses do not represent consensus views of the Board. Each Board seat was provided with up to four minutes to respond to two safety culture framing questions: Q1: What does safety culture mean to you? Q2: Given the information provided at the April Board meeting, are there any

  8. S:\\VM3\\RX97\\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 1.3 Q 2.5 Q Q Q 15.3 Steam or Hot-Water System ...... 7.2 9.2 12.8 10.9 Q 1.0 ... 20.2 10.8 18.8 1.1 Q 16.9 Steam or Hot-Water System ...... 5.1 7.0 5.6 13.2 Q Q 18.8 ...

  9. NERSC-ScienceHighlightSlidesJune2011.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 NERSC Science Highlights NERSC Scientific Accomplishments, Q2CY2011 2 Energy Resources NERSC users have explained the cause of LED droop; this may lead to less-expensive higher efficiency LED lighting. (Kioupakis / Van de Walle, UC SB) Fusion Energy Magnetic reconnection simulations done at NERSC along with NASA Voyager probe data help shake up prevailing views of the solar system's outer reaches. (J. Drake, U. Maryland) Nuclear Theory Computations done primarily at NERSC suggest the possible

  10. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Dave Warren, PI Cliff Eberle, Presenter Technology Development Manager Polymer Matrix Composites Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 16, 2012 Project ID # LM003 Status as of March 30, 2012 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF) ARRA CAPITAL Project Overview * Funds received FY10Q2 * Scheduled finish FY13Q4

  11. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    fi.q 2, I: * FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND CONTENTS Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 4 iii ELIMINATION REPORT

  12. High Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver Development with Adaptive Flow

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control | Department of Energy Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver Development with Adaptive Flow Control High Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver Development with Adaptive Flow Control This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042313_drost.pdf (1.81 MB) More Documents & Publications Microchannel Receiver Development - FY12 Q4 Microchannel Receiver Development - FY13 Q2

  13. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosyn, Wim; Melnitchouk, Wally; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-01-16

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~<2 GeV and a continuum contribution for larger W as the relevant set of effective hadron states entering the final-state interaction amplitude. The results show sizeable on-shell FSI contributions for Bjorken x ~> 0.6 andmore » Q2 < 10 GeV2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.« less

  14. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; Amaryan, M.; Anderson, M.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W.; Burkert, V.; Carman, D.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Gilfoyle, G.; Giovanetti, K.; Girod, F.; Goetz, J.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.; Griffioen, K.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D.; Ishkhanov, B.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Kalantarians, N.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M.; Meyer, C.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, E.; Smith, G.; Sober, D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Wood, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Zonta, I.

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentum transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ε at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.

  15. Measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in quasielastic scattering from the reaction He3↑(e,e')

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y. -W.; Long, E.; Mihovilovič, M.; Jin, G.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Ayerbe-Gayoso, C.; Boeglin, W.; et al

    2015-10-22

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry, Ay, in quasi-elastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He↑ (e,e') on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton scattering plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero for one-photon exchange. A non-zero Ay can arise from the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange processes which is sensitive to the details of the sub-structure of the nucleon. An experiment recently completed at Jefferson Lab yielded asymmetries with high statistical precision at Q2= 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV2. These measurements demonstrate, for the first time, that the 3Hemore » asymmetry is clearly non-zero and negative with a statistical significance of (8-10)σ. Using measured proton-to-3He cross-section ratios and the effective polarization approximation, neutron asymmetries of -(1-3)% were obtained. The neutron asymmetry at high Q2 is related to moments of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Our measured neutron asymmetry at Q2=0.97 GeV2 agrees well with a prediction based on two-photon exchange using a GPD model and in addition provides a new independent constraint on these distributions.« less

  16. PARAMETRIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-FOAM COMPOSITION, SIMULANT PROPERTIES AND NOBLE METALS ON THE GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE OF A NON-NEWTONIAN WASTE SLURRY SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero, H; Charles Crawford, C; Mark Fowley, M

    2008-08-07

    Gas holdup tests were performed in bench-scale and small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing systems at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101. These featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A anti-foam agent. Results indicated that this anti-foam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter-intuitively, that the holdup increased as the non-newtonian simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). Such results raised the potential of increased flammable gas retention in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs) during a Design Basis Event (DBE). Additional testing was performed to determine the effects of simulant properties, composition of alternate AFAs, and presence of trace noble metals. Key results are that: (1) Increased gas holdup resulting from addition of Q2-3183A is due to a decrease in surface tension that supports small bubbles which have low rise velocities. (2) Dow Corning 1520-US AFA shows it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA, however, requires significantly higher dosage for the same anti-foam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA.

  17. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; et al

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentummore » transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ε at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.« less

  18. Thermal and moisture problems in existing basements create a unique challenge as the exterior face of the wall is not easily or inexpensively accessible. This approach addresses thermal and moisture management from the interior face of the wall without disturbing the exterior soil and landscaping. It is effective at reducing energy loss through the wall principally during the heating season.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Durable Interior Foundation Insulation Retrofits for Cold Climates Cloquet, Minnesota PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Cold Climate Foundation Research Facility Location: Cloquet Residential Research Facility, Cloquet, MN Partners: NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Building Component: Foundation wall system Application: Retrofit and new; single-family and multifamily Year Tested: 2012-2014 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold, very cold The U.S. Department of Energy Building America team,

  19. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    roller-coaster of cold and warm temperatures during the 2003-04 heating season, U.S. propane markets also withstood a rather mixed winter season with inventories remaining within...

  20. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2008 (Next Release on July 23, 2008) Grilling Season vs. Heating Season While use of propane in outdoor applications such as grilling and camping reaches a peak during the spring...