National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ozone osha occupational

  1. OSHA's Final Rule on Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silica Presentation slides | Department of Energy OSHA's Final Rule on Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica Presentation slides OSHA's Final Rule on Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica Presentation slides May 12, 2016 David O'Connor's presentation of OSHA's Final Rule on Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica held during DOE's VTC/WebEx on May 12, 2016. OSHA's Final Rule on Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica

  2. OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 | Department of Energy OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 November 26, 2004 Federal Register copy of OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health

  3. OSHA's approach to risk assessment for setting a revised occupational exposure standard for 1,3-butadiene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, E.A.; Martonik, J. )

    1990-06-01

    In its 1980 benzene decision (Industrial Union Department, ALF-CIO v. American Petroleum Institute, 448 U.S. 607 (1980)), the Supreme Court ruled that before he can promulgate any permanent health or safety standard, the Secretary (of Labor) is required to make a threshold finding that a place of employment is unsafe--in the sense that significant risks are present and can be lessened by a change in practices (448 U.S. at 642). The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has interpreted this to mean that whenever possible, it must quantify the risk associated with occupational exposure to a toxic substance at the current permissible exposure limit (PEL). If OSHA determines that there is significant risk to workers' health at its current standard, then it must quantify the risk associated with a variety of alternative standards to determine at what level, if any, occupational exposure to a substance no longer poses a significant risk. For rulemaking on occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene, there are two studies that are suitable for quantitative risk assessment. One is a mouse inhalation bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and the other is a rat inhalation bioassay conducted by Hazelton Laboratories Europe. Of the four risk assessments that have been submitted to OSHA, all four have used the mouse and/or rat data with a variety of models to quantify the risk associated with occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene. In addition, OSHA has performed its own risk assessment using the female mouse and female rat data and the one-hit and multistage models.

  4. Congress Offers OSHA Praise on VPP | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Congress Offers OSHA Praise on VPP Congress Offers OSHA Praise on VPP Recently, members of a House panel questioned John Henshaw, Assistant Secretary of the Occupational Safety and...

  5. OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational ...

  6. OSHA`s process safety management standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morelli, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    On February 24, 1992, OSHA published the final rule for its Process Safety Management Standard (PSM) mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. (see Federal Register 57 FR 6356-6417). This standard imposes several responsibilities upon employers whose processes can cause large accident releases that could result in processes can cause large accident releases that could result in catastrophes. In contrast to OSHA`s Hazard Communication standard which focuses on routine daily exposures to hazardous materials, the PSM Standard is concerned with processes whereby the use, storage, manufacturing, handling or on-site movement of highly hazardous chemicals which exceed threshold quantities, provides potential for a catastrophic release. The PSM Standard requires: a written program, plans, training, hazard analysis and compliance auditing. This paper outlines the provisions under this Standard pursuant to OSHA regulation 29 Code of Federal Regulation 1910.119.

  7. Controlling OSHA PSM documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Person, J.S. [Warren-Forthought, Inc., Angleton, TX (United States)

    1997-06-01

    At present, most companies in the hazardous materials process industries are knowledgeable in the requirements of the OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) standard (29 CFR 1910.119), issued in May of 1992. The current question facing many of these companies is no longer ``How does one comply?`` but rather, ``What does one do with all the documentation generated from the OSHA PSM Standard?``. Using an Electronic Performance Support System (EPSS) for delivering and controlling OSHA PSM documentation will be discussed. This paper will address the important components of an EPSS and successful case studies.

  8. Current DOE and OSHA VPP Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Need to know which sites are current DOE-VPP or OSHA VPP Sites? The link, below, will take you to a Voluntary Protection Programs Participant's Association web page where you may search for current...

  9. Exemptions from OSHA`s PSM rule oil and gas field production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, H.H. [Shawnee Engineers, Houston, TX (United States); Landes, S. [SH Landes, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) regulation, OSHA 1910.119, contains a number of exemptions which are specifically directed to the low hazard situations typically found in the field production facilities of the oil and gas industry. Each relevant PSM exemption is discussed with particular regard to the requirements of hydrocarbon production facilities.

  10. OSHA's Final Rule on Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MB) More Documents & Publications Construction Safety Advisory Committee, Meeting Minutes - May 11, 2000 Federal Register Notice, CBDPP Final Rule Approaches to Safe Nanotechnology

  11. TRADE instructional materials for SARA/OSHA training. Volume 2, Managers and supervisors training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This document provides instructional materials for an eight-hour training course for managers and supervisors of hazardous waste sites. It is one of three volumes of course materials TRADE is preparing to help DOE contractor training staff comply with 29 CFR 1910.120, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) rule that implements Title I of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. OSHA`s final rule for hazardous waste operators was published in the Federal Register of March 6, 1989 (54 FR 9294). Combined with the materials in Volumes I and III and with appropriate site-specific information, these materials will help DOE contractors to meet the requirements of 1910.120 (e) that ``on-site management and supervisors directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in, hazardous waste operations`` receive the same initial training as that of the employees they supervise and at least eight additional hours of specialized training in managing hazardous waste operations.

  12. WAP Memorandum 013: Updated OSHA Requirements for Confined Spaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Standard (29 CFR 1926 Subpart AA) took effect August 3, 2015. OSHA has issued a 60-day extension to the enforcement of this rule via a memorandum titled “Temporary Enforcement Policy for Construction Work in Confined Spaces,” which moves the effective enforcement date to Oct. 2, 2015.

  13. A review of OSHA PSM citations relating to mechanical integrity of process piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casada, M.L.; Remson, A.C.; Yerger, C.M. [JBF Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    OSHA`s process safety management (PSM) regulation has been in effect for more than three years. The regulation poses challenges for facilities in documenting the integrity of process piping systems. This paper summarizes the results of a project sponsored by the Materials Technology Institute (MTI) to compile PSM enforcement information relating to mechanical integrity W and process safety information (PSI) relating to equipment. This paper provides an analysis of how OSHA is citing violations of the PSM regulation as it relates to process piping. This information should be helpful to engineers and maintenance personnel who need guidance on how to ``OSHA-proof`` their mechanical integrity compliance for process piping systems.

  14. Occupational safety and health law handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarvadi, D.G.; Keller; Heckman

    1999-09-01

    This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise and authoritative volume. In 19 chapters, the authoring law firm of Keller and Heckman cover the OSHAct and its development; OSHA, NIOSH, and OSHRC; the roles played by other regulatory agencies; the OSHA rulemaking process; OSHA Standards and the General Duty Clause; record keeping and reporting; employers' and employees' rights; inspections; violations, penalties, and how to contest them; criminal prosecutions; state plans; industry-specific issues; OSHA reform; and international regulations and standards. This book references approximately 400 seminal OSHA legal decisions from the approximately 1,300 cases on record and includes coverage of Canadian and European Community regulations, making it the first comprehensive global overview of occupational safety and health law.

  15. Using OSHA`s requirement for the revalidation of PHA`s to comply with EPA`s proposed risk management rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Him, M.S.; Mannan, M. [RMT/Jones and Neuse, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-11-01

    OSHA`s Process Safety Management rule not only requires the performance of process hazards analyses (PHA`s) of covered areas, but the revalidation of these PHA`s every 5 years. With the May 26, 1997 deadline for the completion of initial PHA`s nearing and the pending approval on or before March 1996 of EPA`s Risk Management Programs (RMP) for Chemical Accidental Release Prevention ({section}40 CFR 68), PSM-covered facilities must start developing plans for compliance with one or more of the requirements of these regulations. This paper discusses some of the strategies that companies falling under Tier 3 of EPA`s RMP rule may use to comply with OSHA`s revalidation of PHA`s and the upcoming EPA rule. The paper also provides details on the use of other PSM elements for PHA revalidation (such as compliance audits and management of change), the development of schedules for PHA revalidation, preparation time, the revalidation process, and the documentation/identification of RMP hazard scenarios.

  16. Using OSHA`s requirement for the revalidation of PHA`STo comply with EPA`s proposed risk management rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Him, M.S.; Mannan, M. [RMT/Jones & Neuse, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-08-01

    OSHA`s Process Safety Management rule not only requires the performance of process hazards analyses (PHA`s) of covered areas, but the revalidation of these PHA`s every 5 years. With the May 26, 1997 deadline for the completion of initial PHA`s nearing and the pending approval on or before March 1996 of EPA`s Risk Management Programs (RMP) for Chemical Accidental Release Prevention ({section}40 CFR 68), PSM-covered facilities must start developing plans for compliance with one or more of the requirements of these regulations. This paper discusses some of the strategies that companies falling under Tier 3 of EPA`s RMP rule may use to comply with OSHA`s revalidation of PHA`s and the upcoming EPA rule. The paper also provides details on the use of other PSM elements for PHA revalidation (such as compliance audits and management of change), the development of schedules for PHA revalidation, preparation time, the revalidation process, and the documentation/identification of RMP hazard scenarios.

  17. OSHA safety regulation calls for step-by-step approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellomo, P.J. (Arthur D. Little Inc., Houston, TX (US))

    1992-06-01

    The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's long-awaited process safety management (PSM) regulation mandates the implementation of a PSM program at facilities handling highly hazardous materials, including oil refineries and petrochemical plants. This article presents a step-by-step PSM program compliance strategy, delineated and explored through practical examples.

  18. Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... NESHAP National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NFPA National Fire ...EIS-0271 Acronyms and Abbreviations March 1999 xii O 3 Ozone OSHA Occupational Safety and ...

  19. ARM - Ozone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ozone Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Ozone In the stratosphere, ozone, is not only a greenhouse gas but also shields us from ultraviolet light. There has been a loss of stratospheric ozone, especially in the Antarctic region. During the Antarctic springtime, ozone levels

  20. The OSHA and EPA programs on preventing chemical accidents and potential applications in the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.M.

    1996-08-01

    OSHA issued in 1992, the Process Safety Management (PSM) of Highly Hazardous Substances. This rule requires owners/operators of facilities that handle hazardous chemicals in quantities greater than the listed thresholds to establish all the elements of a PSM. EPA has issued in June 1996, the rules for a Risk Management Program which also refers to specific substances and threshold quantities. These rules are applicable to all the facilities that use or store any of 139 regulated substances at quantities ranging from 100 lb to 10,000 lb. The RMP rule covers off-site hazards, while the OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) rule covers worker safety issues within the plant boundary. Some of the listed substances may be found in photovoltaic manufacturing facilities. This brief report presents the basic elements of these two rules and discusses their potential applicability in the photovoltaic industry.

  1. Preparing for CAAA risk management plans: The lessons of OSHA PSM process safety management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, D.P. [Control Systems Consultants, Inc., Ashland, KY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    29 CFR 1910.119 OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) became law in 1992, presenting covered facilities with extraordinarily comprehensive and demanding requirements for information management. This paper reports an approach adopted by petrochemical plants that have pioneered automated, integrated compliance with PSM information requirements. The approach is worthy of consideration by the many additional plants that will be covered by 40 CFR Part 67 Risk Management Programs for Chemical Accidental Release Prevention (RNT), which closely parallels PSM`s information requirements.

  2. Process safety management (OSHA) and process risk management (CAA) application. Application to a coke plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graeser, W.C.; Mentzer, W.P.

    1995-12-01

    Risk Management Programs for Chemical Accidental Release Prevention is the name of the proposed rule for the RMP Risk Management Program. The RMP was written in response to several catastrophic releases of hazardous substances. The rule is applicable to facilities that store, process or use greater than threshold quantities of 62 listed flammable chemicals and another 100 listed toxic substances. Additionally, a Risk Management Plan is registered with the EPA, Chemical Safety and Hazardous Investigation Board, state governments and the local emergency planning commission. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (specifically Section 112r) required the EPA to develop a three phase Risk Management Plan for industry: prevention program; hazard assessment; and emergency response program. The Prevention Program closely follows the OSHA`s Process Safety Management Standard. The Hazard Assessment section requires facilities to develop plans for a worst case scenario. The Emergency Response section defines the steps the facility and each employee will take if a release occurs. This section also needs to be coordinated with the Local Emergency Planning Commission. These regulations are described using Clairton Works as an example of compliance.

  3. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  4. Statistical Analysis of Occupational Safety Data of Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) and Non-VPP Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) was originally developed by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1982 to foster greater ownership of safety and health in the workplace. The Department of Energy (DOE) adopted VPP in 1992; currently 23 sites across the DOE complex participate in the program. As its name implies, it is a voluntary program; i.e. not required by laws or regulations.

  5. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  6. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  7. ARM - Measurement - Ozone Concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement : Ozone Concentration The atmospheric concentration or volume mixing ratio (mole fraction) of Ozone Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is...

  8. Supervisors` orientation to occupational safety in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-10-01

    This document presents OSHA regulations, safety and health guidelines pertinent to DOE and the first-line supervisor.

  9. ARM - Instrument - ozone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsozone Documentation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Ozone Monitor (OZONE) Instrument Categories Aerosols An in-situ Ozone Monitor measures atmospheric ozone concentration, typically by ultraviolet photometry in a dual absorption cell. The OZONE is part of the Aerosol Observing System (AOS). Locations Eastern North Atlantic ENA C1 Browse Data Browse Plots Graciosa Island,

  10. ARM - Campaign Instrument - ozone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsozone Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Ozone Monitor (OZONE) Instrument...

  11. NIOSH comments to DOL on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration proposed rule on occupational exposure to lead by R. A. Lemen, September 1, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The testimony concerns the view of NIOSH regarding the OSHA proposed rule on occupational exposure to lead. Data in reports of air and blood analysis for lead suggest that there are highly variable concentrations of lead in air that range from more than 900 micrograms/cubic meter to levels less than the detection limits of the methods used. Blood concentrations also varied from those typical of concentrations found in the general population to levels substantially in excess of occupational standards of 60 microg/dl. A walk through survey report on air and blood lead concentrations is underway in a brass foundry. The National Occupational Exposure Survey, conducted by NIOSH, has been used to estimate the number of workers in the nine industry sectors requested by OSHA. Microfiche copies of three control technology reports on lead exposure and control in nonferrous foundries and secondary copper smelting were submitted. NIOSH is also submitting a final control technology report on a low energy battery shredder designed to reduce lead emissions.

  12. ARM - Measurement - Ozone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsOzone ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ozone Ozone measurements are given in Dobson units and are integers with 3 significant figures. A Dobson Unit represents the physical thickness of the ozone layer if it were brought to the Earth's surface. A value of 300 Dobson units equals three millimeters. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered

  13. PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract PDF icon PIA - Richland Occupational...

  14. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-04-01

    Ozone, an ambient pollutant, is transformed into other airborne pollutants in the indoor environment. In this dissertation, the type and amount of byproducts that result from ozone reactions with common indoor surfaces, surface residues, and vapors were determined, pollutant concentrations were related to occupant exposure, and frameworks were developed to predict byproduct concentrations under various indoor conditions. In Chapter 2, an analysis is presented of secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of ozone with gas-phase, terpene-containing consumer products in small chamber experiments under conditions relevant for residential and commercial buildings. The full particle size distribution was continuously monitored, and ultrafine and fine particle concentrations were in the range of 10 to>300 mu g m-3. Particle nucleation and growth dynamics were characterized.Chapter 3 presents an investigation of ozone reactions with aircraft cabin surfaces including carpet, seat fabric, plastics, and laundered and worn clothing fabric. Small chamber experiments were used to determine ozone deposition velocities, ozone reaction probabilities, byproduct emission rates, and byproduct yields for each surface category. The most commonly detected byproducts included C1?C10 saturated aldehydes and skin oil oxidation products. For all materials, emission rates were higher with ozone than without. Experimental results were used to predict byproduct exposure in the cabin and compare to other environments. Byproduct levels are predicted to be similar to ozone levels in the cabin, which have been found to be tens to low hundreds of ppb in the absence of an ozone converter. In Chapter 4, a model is presented that predicts ozone uptake by and byproduct emission from residual chemicals on surfaces. The effects of input parameters (residue surface concentration, ozone concentration, reactivity of the residue and the surface, near-surface airflow conditions, and byproduct yield

  15. Ozone and acid rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-09

    The roles of ozone and other oxidizing agents are discussed. The major polluting emissions are SO/sub 2/, NO, and volatile organic chemicals. In the usual ambient concentrations, these substances are relatively harmless. However, when SO/sub 2/ and NO are oxidized, they are converted into more acid, more toxic, substances. Oxidants, including OH, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, HO/sub 2/, and organic peroxides, arise out of complex photochemistry that involves the ozone, the nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic chemicals. Were SO/sub 2/ the only pollutant, most of it would escape unchanged to the western Atlantic Ocean where it would be so diluted as to have no effect. At present about 35 percent of the SO/sub 2/ produced in the United States leaves the continent. In contrast, because of higher rates of reaction with oxidants, most of the NO is converted into nitric acid and deposited on land. The nitrogen oxides are involved in the production of ozone, some of which is naturally present. But particularly in urban settings where concentrations of NO/sub x/ are elevated and volatile organic chemicals such as those in gasoline are present, ozone concentrations may rise to levels deleterious to health. The Environmental Protection Agency has set standards for levels not to be exceeded, but nearly half of urban communities are not in compliance. The NO/sub x/ involved in the formation of urban ozone comes mostly from vehicular emissions.

  16. Tropospheric ozone in east Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadnis, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    An analysis of the observed data for the tropospheric ozone at mid latitudes in east Asia is done. There are three ways by which the tropospheric ozone is calculated, namely: (1) Ozonesonde measurements, (2) Fishman`s method of Residual Ozone and (3) TOMS measurements - an indirect method of calculating tropospheric ozone. In addition the surface ozone values at the network sites in Japan is also considered. The analysis of data is carried out for a period of twelve years from 1979 to 1991. In general it is observed that the tropospheric ozone is more in summer than winter, obviously because of the larger tropopause height in summer. On an average for the period of the analysis, the ozone values are at a high of about 60 DU (dobson units). While in winter the values go down to around 30 DU. Also a time series analysis shows an increasing trend in the values over the years. The ozonesonde values are correlated more to the TOMS tropospheric ozone values. For the stations analyzed in Japan, the TOMS tropospheric ozone values are generally greater than the ozonesonde values. The analysis of the average monthly surface ozone in Japan shows highs in spring and lows in summer. This can be attributed to movement of pollutant laden fronts towards Japan during spring. The highs for surface ozone are about 50 DU while the lows are around 20 DU.

  17. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL SUVEILLANCE SYSTEM (OMSS) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be

  18. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be

  19. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  20. Occupant Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupant Safety Assessment and Crash Biomechanics Background During crashes, vehicle occupants may experience a wide variety of injuries that often correspond to their location within the vehicle, their age and gender, and type of vehicle and crash. Current finite-element models that are used to assess the level of injuries employ only 60,000 to 100,000 elements and require 12 hours of computation to assess vehicle structural components. Occupant models mostly represent the "50% adult

  1. Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho...

  2. Ozone Risk Assessment Utilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-08-10

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates aremore » based on the EPA''s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.« less

  3. Ozone transport commission developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    On September 27, 1994, the states of the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) signed an important memorandum of understanding (MOU) agreeing to develop a regional strategy for controlling stationary sources of nitrogen oxide emissions. Specifically, the states of the Ozone Transport Region, OTR, agreed to propose regulations for the control of NOx emissions from boilers and other indirect heat exchangers with a maximum gross heat input rate of at least 250 million BTU per hour. The Ozone Transport Region was divided into Inner, Outer and Northern Zones. States in the Outer Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions by 55%. States in the Inner Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions 65%. Facilities in both zones have the option to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million Btu by May 1, 1999. This option provides fairness for the gas-fired plants which already have relatively low NOx emissions. Additionally, States in the Inner and Outer Zones agreed to reduce their NOx emissions by 75% or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.15 pounds per million BTU by May 1, 2003. The Northern Zone States agree to reduce their rate of NOx emissions by 55% from base year levels by May 1, 2003, or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million BTU. As part of this MOU, States also agreed to develop a regionwide trading mechanism to provide a cost-effective mechanism for implementing the reductions.

  4. Ozone in the free atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitten, R.C.; Prasad, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    Experts in the field discuss the state of the ozone layer - its elements, distribution, functions, and biological and climatic effects of perturbations.

  5. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  6. Occupational Safety Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Q1 2012 rates should be considered preliminary as of the date of this report (July 2012). All data has not yet been submitted to CAIRS. 1 Occupational Safety Performance Comparable ...

  7. Promising Technology: Ozone Laundry System for Multiload Clothes Washers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These laundry systems use ozone as the chemical cleaning agent. The system generates ozone by electrifying oxygen in the air, and then dissolves the ozone in water.

  8. Impact of the revised OSHA exposure standard on evaluation and control of benzene and other volatile organic chemicals in the liquid petroleum pipeline industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, D.O.

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the benzene exposure potential of workers in the liquid petroleum pipeline industry and to assess the impact of compliance with the revised standard on this industry. In addition, exposure to ethylene dibromide (EDB), and ethylene dichloride (EDC), which have toxicological profiles similar to that of benzene and are routinely found in this industry, were evaluated and appropriate control protocols were recommended. Exposure potential to benzene in excess of the 0.5 ppm (8-hour TWA) OSHA action level was shown to be limited to three free product handling operations, and that this increased exposure potential was dependent on the length of time necessary to perform the operations. The incidence and magnitude of benzene overexposure was not severe and control could be accomplished with engineering methods, along with work practice controls and personal protective equipment. Through application of a risk assessment model it was shown that 14 excess leukemia deaths per one thousand workers could be expected in the employee population that routinely performs those operation having maximum benzene exposure potential. This compares to less than on excess leukemia death per one thousand workers in the total work population. The evaluation of EDB and EDC indicated that exposure potential to EDB was of greatest concern. Even though exposure could be limited through application of standard industrial hygiene methods, any control protocol short of total elimination of EDB from the product stream may be not sufficient to reduce exposure to accepted levels.

  9. ARM - Measurement - Ozone Column Abundance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Column Abundance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ozone Column Abundance The vertically integrated amount of ozone (commonly measured in Dobson Unit, 1 DU = 134 mmol/m^2) Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all

  10. Occupational Safety Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Occupational Safety Performance Occupational Safety Performance July 19, 2012 Occupational Safety Performance, DOE Quarterly TRC and DART Case Rates - Corporate Analysis of DOE ...

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports November 17, 2015 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2014 Report The...

  12. Occupant Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The collection of Emergency Procedures documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. All of these documents are only available to computers attached to the DOE Network. They are for use only by DOE Headquarters employees. • Building Diagrams and Assembly Areas • Occupant Emergency Plans (OEP's)

  13. Occupational Medicine | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Medicine The Occupational Medicine office provides medical surveillance examinations and consultations to Ames Laboratory and university employees according to federal and state regulations. The Occupational Medicine office enhances the efficiency of existing safety and health programs and assists in the reduction of workplace injuries and illnesses.

  14. Relation between Atmospheric Ozone and Geomagnetic Disturbances...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This involves a decrease of ozone in the 50 to 65 deg N region and an increase south of 50 deg N. Two or three days after the storm, the ozone amount increases in the 50 to 65 deg ...

  15. 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Standards

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... XVII (7-1-07 Edition) 1910.7 which will be available on the OSHA web site. APPENDIX A ... tion), and synthetic web (nylon, poly- ester, and polypropylene). (b) Definitions. ...

  16. Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL ...

  17. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Occupational Safety |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupational Safety FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences ...

  18. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  19. Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medicine - ...

  20. Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory (268.86 KB) More Documents & Publications Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - INL Education

  1. DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program Procedures PDF icon DOE HQ Occupational Safety...

  2. Discharge cell for ozone generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nakatsuka, Suguru

    2000-01-01

    A discharge cell for use in an ozone generator is provided which can suppress a time-related reduction in ozone concentration without adding a catalytic gas such as nitrogen gas to oxygen gas as a raw material gas. The discharge cell includes a pair of electrodes disposed in an opposed spaced relation with a discharge space therebetween, and a dielectric layer of a three-layer structure consisting of three ceramic dielectric layers successively stacked on at least one of the electrodes, wherein a first dielectric layer of the dielectric layer contacting the one electrode contains no titanium dioxide, wherein a second dielectric layer of the dielectric layer exposed to the discharge space contains titanium dioxide in a metal element ratio of not lower than 10 wt %.

  3. Occupational Medical Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-12-08

    The Occupational Medical Program (OMP) oversees all Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) health care, and provides services to all managing and operating (M&O) contractors at the INEL and for the Department of Energy Idaho Office (DOE-ID). The evolution of the automated OMP at the INEL is guided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directives and regulations. The OMP is developing a multiyear plan for the computerization of patient and demographics, epidemiology, medical records, andmore » surveillance. This plan will require the following six development phases: Employee Demographic Phase, Patient Surveillance Certification and Restrictions Phase, Electronic Notification Phase, Epidemiology-Industrial Hygiene/Radiation Exposure/OMP Integration Phase, Medical Scheduling Phase, and Medical Records Phase.« less

  4. Image-based occupancy sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polese, Luigi Gentile; Brackney, Larry

    2015-05-19

    An image-based occupancy sensor includes a motion detection module that receives and processes an image signal to generate a motion detection signal, a people detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a people detection signal, a face detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a face detection signal, and a sensor integration module that receives the motion detection signal from the motion detection module, receives the people detection signal from the people detection module, receives the face detection signal from the face detection module, and generates an occupancy signal using the motion detection signal, the people detection signal, and the face detection signal, with the occupancy signal indicating vacancy or occupancy, with an occupancy indication specifying that one or more people are detected within the monitored volume.

  5. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  6. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  7. Mario Molina, Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and Ozone Depletion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prize-winning Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) The Science and Policies of the Ozone Layer -- A Historical Perspective, IDEaS - Nobel Laureate Mario J....

  8. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ozone Formation as a Function of NOx Reductions Summary and Implications for Air Quality Impacts The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment

  9. Ozone contactor hydraulic considerations in meeting CT disinfection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimization of ozone dose and contact time for CT calculations was performed in the pilot ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Ozone: Science and Engineering (The Journal of the ...

  10. Reformulated Gasoline Use Under the 8-Hour Ozone Rule

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact on gasoline price and supply when additional ozone non-attainment areas come under the new 8-hour ozone standard.

  11. Reactivity of Ozone with Solid Potassium Iodide Investigated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactivity of Ozone with Solid Potassium Iodide Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reactivity of Ozone with Solid Potassium...

  12. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels You are...

  13. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Authors:...

  14. ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge...

  15. Nevada Department of Transportation - Occupancy Permits | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occupancy Permits Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of Transportation - Occupancy Permits Abstract This website gives...

  16. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of ...

  17. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2014 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The DOE 2014 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2014.

  18. Safety & Occupational Health Specialist | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Occupational Health Specialist Safety & Occupational Health Specialist Submitted by admin on Sat, 2015-10-17 00:14 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency...

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2009 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE 2009 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2009.

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1996 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during the calendar year 1996.

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2010 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2010.

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2003 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE 2003 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2003.

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1995 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1995 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during the calendar year 1995.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1998 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at DOE facilities during the calendar year 1998.

  5. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  6. DOE 2008 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE. The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  7. Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers’ compensation, and much more.

  8. The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2003_deer_lawson.pdf (335.4 KB) More Documents & Publications Weekend/Weekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin DOE's Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California Real-World Studies of Ambient Ozone Formation as a

  9. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past five-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information has been analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  10. Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013 Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013 January 29, 2015 OE-3 2015-01: DOE Occupational Radiation...

  11. Review of atmospheric ozone and current thinking on the Antarctic ozone hole. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A general review of the formation, global distribution and concentration variations on different temporal scales of atmospheric ozone is presented. The nature and extent of the recently discovered Antarctic ozone hole is discussed, and summaries of the various theories that have been advanced to account for this phenomenon are reviewed.

  12. Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics The Department of Energy recognizes the importance of maintaining a healthy and fit Federal workforce. To that end, our occupational health care professionals at the Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics in Forrestal and Germantown provide the following services: Walk-in care. Assessment, nursing care and follow-up for minor illnesses and injuries on a walk-in basis. First-response. Emergency treatment to any

  13. Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

  14. Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System...

  15. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Occupational Radiation Exposure: Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting A Basic Overview of OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Outreach & Awareness Series ...

  16. Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security ...

  17. DOE's Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ozone Formation as a Function of NOx Reductions Summary and Implications for Air Quality Impacts Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S.

  18. The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications WeekendWeekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California Real-World Studies of ...

  19. Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program | Department of Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking

  20. Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Ozone is used commercially for treatment of potable and non-potable water, and as an industrial oxidant. ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for using iron in ozone oxidation that significantly improves the speed of oxidation reactions. Description Ozone is recognized as potent and effective oxidizing agent, and has a

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  2. 2011 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Summary poster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU

    2012-12-12

    This poster graphically presents data pertaining to occupational radiation exposure in terms of total effective dose (TED), primarily, but also collective dose and average measureable dose.

  3. RSF Workshop Session IV: Occupant Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Design Decisions and Occupant...

  4. Imaging of occupational and environmental lung diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akira, M.

    2008-03-15

    The chest radiograph is the basic tool for identifying occupational and environmental lung diseases; however, its sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of occupational and environmental lung diseases are low. High-resolution CT is the optimal method of recognizing parenchymal abnormalities in occupational and environmental disease. With the exception of pleural plaques, the CT findings of occupational and environmental lung diseases are nonspecific. Therefore, correlation of imaging features with history of exposure, other clinical features, and sometimes pathology is needed for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis.

  5. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    special tests depending on the individual's work and exposure history. * An occupational medicine physician, independent of DOE, will review the exam results and provide a ...

  6. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of ...

  7. Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, ...

  8. Real-Time Occupancy Change Analyzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The Real-Time Occupancy Change Analyzer (ROCA) produces an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scans the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converts the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. Changes in the occupancy grid can be reported in real time to support a number of tracking capabilities. The benefit of ROCA is that rather than only providing a vector tomore » the detected change, it provides the actual x,y position of the change.« less

  9. Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers ...

  10. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    employees during 1985. May 19, 2006 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor...

  11. The 1986 residential occupant survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

    1987-04-01

    In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

  12. Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory | Department of Energy Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory (295.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System

  13. PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medicine Contract PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract (60.05 KB) More Documents & Publications Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  14. DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupational Safety and Health Program DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program Procedures DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program (1.18 MB) More Documents & Publications HQ Confined Space Program, Policy 2010-001 Independent Oversight Review, Department of Energy Contractor - August 2000 FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety

  15. Promising Technology: Wireless Lighting Occupancy Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupancy sensors and controls detect human presence, and modulate light settings accordingly. When there is no human presence detected, the system can dim or turn off lights. This technology ensures that lights are not used when there are no occupants present, which can lead to significant energy savings.

  16. Cal/OSHA process safety standard update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourmehraban, I.

    1995-12-31

    Process Safety Management (PSM) regulation applies mainly to chemical and oil companies, plus other industries such as food processing, and paper production. It covers plants that deal with any of about 130 toxic chemicals in quantities above thresholds limits in Appendix A of PSM standard or flammable liquids and gases in quantities greater than 10,000 pounds. The State Consultation PSM teams (North and South) use a detailed audit checklist featuring above elements for audit of facilities requesting PSM assistance. The audit focuses on three generic activities: records, onsite conditions, and interviews. Records include written programs that outline the requirements and documentation of completion. Onsite conditions are implementation of activities specified in written programs. Interviews are for evaluation of transferred information to the workers that are already developed in written programs and training programs.

  17. Occupancy change detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  18. Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal Facility Managers Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal ...

  19. Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory VisitDosimBadgeTrckg-PIA.pdf...

  20. CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Jennifer ...

  1. Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - INL ...

  2. Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Congress established Public Law ...

  3. Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & ...

  4. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. ... measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. ...

  5. Ozone depletion, developing countries, and human rights: Seeking better ground on which to fight for protection of the ozone layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, V.

    1995-12-31

    I urge you not to take a complacent view of the situation. The state of depletion of the ozone layer continues to be alarming... In February, 1993, the ozone levels over North America and most of Europe were 20 percent below normal... Even now, millions of tons of CFC [chlorofluorocarbon] products are en route to their fatal stratospheric rendezvous... This exponential increase calls for increased reflection on the state of the ozone layer and calls for bold decisions.

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1987 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Twentieth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1987.

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  10. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1988 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Twenty-first Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1988.

  12. FAQS Reference Guide – Occupational Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the July 2011 version of DOE-STD-1160-2011, Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  13. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  15. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  16. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  17. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  20. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Energy Employees' Occupational

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... DOL District Claims Office, by the National Institute of Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH), by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Chicago Office or by the DOE-Grand Junction Office. ...

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  3. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Occupational Radiation Exposure Information page on this web page is intended to ... Other Related Sites: Provides links to other DOE and non-DOE web sites for information ...

  4. 2014 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report Appendices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Labor Category Occupation Code Occupation Name 562 Groundskeepers 570 Forest Workers 580 Misc. Agriculture 610 Mechanics/Repairers 641 Masons 642 Carpenters 643 Electricians 644 Painters 645 Pipe Fitter 650 Miners/Drillers 660 Misc. Repair/Construction Laborers 850 Handlers/Laborers/Helpers 110 Manager - Adminstrator 400 Sales 450 Admin. Support and Clerical 910 Military 990 Miscellaneous 681 Machinists 682 Sheet Metal Workers 690 Operators, Plant/System/Utility 710 Machine Setup/Operators 771

  5. Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office | Department of Energy Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational

  6. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) | Department of Energy Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

  7. Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration Pantex Site Office | Department of Energy Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office (337.13 KB) More Documents &

  8. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations | Department of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation

  9. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations | Department of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation

  10. Department of Energy Worker's Rights

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... The Rule is a lot like the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) rules, which applies to the rest of the country. In fact, 10 CFR 851 requires the use of OSHA ...

  11. Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office (64.61 KB) More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  12. Evaluation of microporous carbon filters as catalysts for ozone decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whinnery, L.; Coutts, D.; Shen, C.; Adams, R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Quintana, C.; Showalter, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Ozone is produced in small quantities in photocopiers and laser printers in the workplace and large quantities in industrial waste water treatment facilities. Carbon filters are commonly used to decompose this unwanted ozone. The three most important factors in producing a filter for this purpose are flow properties, efficiency, and cost. Most ozone decomposition applications require very low back-pressure at modest flow rates. The tradeoff between the number of pores and the size of the pores will be discussed. Typical unfiltered emissions in the workplace are approximately 1 ppm. The maximum permissible exposure limit, PEL, for worker exposure to ozone is 0.1 ppm over 8 hours. Several methods have been examined to increase the efficiency of ozone decomposition. Carbon surfaces were modified with catalysts, the surface activated, and the surface area was increased, in attempts to decompose ozone more effectively. Methods to reduce both the processing and raw material costs were investigated. Several sources of microporous carbon were investigated as ozone decomposition catalysts. Cheaper processing routes including macropore templating, faster drying and extracting methods were also studied.

  13. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2007 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The annual DOEOccupational Radiation Exposure 2007 Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and ALARA process requirements. In addition the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  14. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  15. Process-scale modeling of elevated wintertime ozone in Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Holdridge, D. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-12-31

    Measurements of meteorological variables and trace gas concentrations, provided by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality for Daniel, Jonah, and Boulder Counties in the state of Wyoming, were analyzed for this project. The data indicate that highest ozone concentrations were observed at temperatures of -10 C to 0 C, at low wind speeds of about 5 mph. The median values for nitrogen oxides (NOx) during these episodes ranged between 10 ppbv and 20 ppbv (parts per billion by volume). Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during these periods were insufficient for quantitative analysis. The few available VOCs measurements indicated unusually high levels of alkanes and aromatics and low levels of alkenes. In addition, the column ozone concentration during one of the high-ozone episodes was low, on the order of 250 DU (Dobson unit) as compared to a normal column ozone concentration of approximately 300-325 DU during spring for this region. Analysis of this observation was outside the scope of this project. The data analysis reported here was used to establish criteria for making a large number of sensitivity calculations through use of a box photochemical model. Two different VOCs lumping schemes, RACM and SAPRC-98, were used for the calculations. Calculations based on this data analysis indicated that the ozone mixing ratios are sensitive to (a) surface albedo, (b) column ozone, (c) NOx mixing ratios, and (d) available terminal olefins. The RACM model showed a large response to an increase in lumped species containing propane that was not reproduced by the SAPRC scheme, which models propane as a nearly independent species. The rest of the VOCs produced similar changes in ozone in both schemes. In general, if one assumes that measured VOCs are fairly representative of the conditions at these locations, sufficient precursors might be available to produce ozone in the range of 60-80 ppbv under the conditions modeled.

  16. Safety and Occupational Health Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety and Occupational Health Specialist Safety and Occupational Health Specialist Submitted by admin on Tue, 2016-05-10 18:01 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy ...

  17. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1992- 1994 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994.

  18. A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentreview-high-occupancy-vehicle-hov-lan Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This...

  19. Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management Workshop...

  20. The DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compensation Program | Department of Energy The DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program January 23, 2009 DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The U.S. Congress passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) in 2000. The purpose of EEOICPA is to compensate eligible employees

  1. CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program- December 4, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-35, Rev. 1)

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2006 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 06 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2006 Report The DOE 2006 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2006. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 95 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2006 have been grouped into 34 sites across the complex. This

  3. Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dosimetry Report Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835),

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2000 Report | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 0 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2000 Report The DOE 2000 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2000. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 104 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2000 have been grouped into 28 geographic sites across the complex.

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2001 Report | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 1 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2001 Report The DOE 2001 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2001. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 107 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2001 have been grouped into 30 geographic sites across the complex.

  6. ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oak Ridge Operations Office | Department of Energy Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office (73.78 KB) More Documents &

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1997 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 7 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1997 Report The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1997 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during the calendar year 1997. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of DOE's performance in

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2002 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2002 Report The DOE 2002 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2002. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 102 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2002 have been grouped into 29 geographic sites across the complex.

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2004 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 4 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2004 Report The DOE 2004 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2004. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 96 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2004 have been grouped into 25 geographic sites across the complex. This

  10. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2005 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2005 Report The DOE 2005 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2005. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 101 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2005 have been grouped into 26 geographic sites across the complex.

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2007 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 7 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2007 Report The DOE 2007 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2007. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 90 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2007 have been grouped into 29 sites across the complex. This

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2008 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 8 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2008 Report The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2008. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 92 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2008 have been grouped into 30 sites across the complex. This

  13. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2011 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2011 Report The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2011. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 107 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2011 have been grouped into 32 sites. This information has been

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2012. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 94 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2012 have been grouped into 32 sites. This information has been analyzed

  15. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2013 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 3 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2013 Report The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2013. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors, as well as members of the public in controlled areas that are monitored for exposure to radiation. The 105 DOE organizations submitting radiation

  16. Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities. Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION (329.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A -

  17. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General. The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION (127.39 KB) More Documents & Publications Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL

  18. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration) after nearing

  19. Projections of Future Summertime Ozone over the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfister, G. G.; Walters, Stacy; Lamarque, J. F.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barth, Mary; Wong, John; Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy

    2014-05-05

    This study uses a regional fully coupled chemistry-transport model to assess changes in surface ozone over the summertime U.S. between present and a 2050 future time period at high spatial resolution (12 km grid spacing) under the SRES A2 climate and RCP8.5 anthropogenic pre-cursor emission scenario. The impact of predicted changes in climate and global background ozone is estimated to increase surface ozone over most of the U.S; the 5th - 95th percentile range for daily 8-hour maximum surface ozone increases from 31-79 ppbV to 30-87 ppbV between the present and future time periods. The analysis of a set of meteorological drivers suggests that these mostly will add to increasing ozone, but the set of simulations conducted does not allow to separate this effect from that through enhanced global background ozone. Statistically the most robust positive feedbacks are through increased temperature, biogenic emissions and solar radiation. Stringent emission controls can counteract these feedbacks and if considered, we estimate large reductions in surface ozone with the 5th-95th percentile reduced to 27-55 ppbV. A comparison of the high-resolution projections to global model projections shows that even though the global model is biased high in surface ozone compared to the regional model and compared to observations, both the global and the regional model predict similar changes in ozone between the present and future time periods. However, on smaller spatial scales, the regional predictions show more pronounced changes between urban and rural regimes that cannot be resolved at the coarse resolution of global model. In addition, the sign of the changes in overall ozone mixing ratios can be different between the global and the regional predictions in certain regions, such as the Western U.S. This study confirms the key role of emission control strategies in future air quality predictions and demonstrates the need for considering degradation of air quality with future

  20. Morphological basis of tolerance to ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, M.J.; Dekker, N.P.; Cabral-Anderson, L.J.; Shami, S.G.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to study Type 1 epithelial cells in the ozone (O/sub 3/)-tolerant lung epithelium. Rats were made tolerant by exposure to 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2 days and allowed to recover in air. Reexposure to a lethal concentration of O/sub 3/ (6 ppm) at 3, 7, and 15 days of recovery revealed that tolerance was present at 3 days but almost absent at 7 and 15 days of recovery. Using Type 2 cell proliferation as a means of quantitating Type 1 cell injury, it was observed that when the preexposed rats were reexposed to 0.5 ppm at 3, 7, and 15 days, very little Type 1 cell injury occurred at 3 days. However, at 7 and 15 days the amount of Type 1 cell injury was the same as that associated with the original exposure. To determine whether there was any change in the alveolar epithelial cell populations between the periods of tolerance (3 days) and its decline (7 and 15 days), the percentage of tritiated thymidine (( /sup 3/H)TdR-labeled Type 1 and 2 cells at these times were determined. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)TdR-labeled Type 1 and 2 cells between the third and fifteenth days of recovery as excess cells were sloughed off and the tissue returned to normal. Using electron microscopic morphometry, Type 1 and 2 cells were then studied during the decline of tolerance. No change was found in the morphology of Type 2 cells; however, the morphology of Type 1 cells revealed a 58% decrease in surface area and a 25% increase in the arithmetic mean thickness when tolerance was present at 3 days. As tolerance declined (7 and 15 days), Type 1 cell morphology returned to normal. It was concluded that tolerance exists when the surface area of a cell exposed to a particular concentration of ozone is small enough so that the existing antioxidant mechanism contained within that cell volume can protect it from damage.

  1. Occupational employment survey, booklet of definitions. Petroleum refining, coal products, and related industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The publication gives occupational definitions for 149 occupations in the petroleum refining, coal products, and related industries.

  2. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2003 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2003-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  3. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1997 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  4. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2002 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  5. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in their management of radiological safety programs and to assist them in the prioritization of resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside the DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of collective data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  6. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1999 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  7. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2000 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2000-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE in making this report most useful to them. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  8. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1998 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health with support from Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  9. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2004 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors, as well as members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  10. DOE 2014 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T A * S H I E L D * A L A R A * N E U T R O N * ELECTRO N * T E D * I N T E R N A L * C E D * G A M M A * B E T A * S H I E L D * A L A R A * N E U T R O N * E L E C TR ON * TE D * IN T E R N A L * C E D * G A M M A * B E T A * S H I E L D * A L A R A September 2015 DOE 2014 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE This document is available on the U.S. Department of Energy Radiation Exposure Monitoring System Program Web Site at: http://energy.gov/ehss/occupational-radiation-exposure Foreword iii

  11. Headquarters Occupational Safety and Health Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-03

    To implement the Occupational Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters employees as an element of the DOE Integrated Safety Management System. Cancels: HQ 3790.2A. Canceled by DOE O 251.91. This directive was reviewed and certified as current and necessary by Bruce M. Carnes, Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, 9/18/02. Canceled by DOE N 251.91.

  12. Common occupational classification system - revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    Workforce planning has become an increasing concern within the DOE community as the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM or EM) seeks to consolidate and refocus its activities and the Office of Defense Programs (DP) closes production sites. Attempts to manage the growth and skills mix of the EM workforce while retaining the critical skills of the DP workforce have been difficult due to the lack of a consistent set of occupational titles and definitions across the complex. Two reasons for this difficulty may be cited. First, classification systems commonly used in industry often fail to cover in sufficient depth the unique demands of DOE`s nuclear energy and research community. Second, the government practice of contracting the operation of government facilities to the private sector has introduced numerous contractor-specific classification schemes to the DOE complex. As a result, sites/contractors report their workforce needs using unique classification systems. It becomes difficult, therefore, to roll these data up to the national level necessary to support strategic planning and analysis. The Common Occupational Classification System (COCS) is designed to overcome these workforce planning barriers. The COCS is based on earlier workforce planning activities and the input of technical, workforce planning, and human resource managers from across the DOE complex. It provides a set of mutually-exclusive occupation titles and definitions that cover the broad range of activities present in the DOE complex. The COCS is not a required record-keeping or data management guide. Neither is it intended to replace contractor/DOE-specific classification systems. Instead, the system provides a consistent, high- level, functional structure of occupations to which contractors can crosswalk (map) their job titles.

  13. Job Seekers - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Seekers About HPMC OMS Contact Us Customer Satisfaction Survey Program Directions Event Calendar Hours of Operation Job Seekers Notice of Privacy Practices Patient Rights & Responsibilities Frequently Asked Questions Job Seekers Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Search the links below for positions available to interested candidates. Candidates selected for positions with HPMC Occupational Medical Services are hired and employed by either

  14. Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 July 2011 DOE STANDARD OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1160-2011 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program website at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1160-2011 iv

  15. Controlling superconductivity in La2-xSrxCuO4+δ by ozone and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Controlling superconductivity in La2-xSrxCuO4+ by ozone and vacuum annealing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlling superconductivity in La2-xSrxCuO4+ by ozone ...

  16. Real-World Studies of Ambient Ozone Formation as a Function of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California ...

  17. Weekend/Weekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emissions Control Experiment Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California

  18. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-06-01

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  19. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-12-01

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  20. Effect of ozonation on the composition of crude coal-tar benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semenova, S.A.; Patrakov, Y.F.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of ozonation on the composition of crude benzene produced by the coal-tar chemical industry was studied.

  1. DOE's Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California DOE's Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2002_deer_lawson.pdf (393.04 KB) More Documents & Publications The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment Real-World Studies of Ambient Ozone Formation as a Function of NOx Reductions … Summary and Implications for Air Quality

  2. Report card on low level ozone in urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onischak, M.

    1994-12-31

    It has been four years since the Clean Air Act was amended in November of 1990. Much work has been done in this time, and the country is beginning to see real air quality benefits. Although these changes have not completely licked the urban ozone problem yet, they have made a lot of progress. All of the urban areas which have been required to reduce their ozone levels have done a good job of lowering their emissions. While the urban areas have not all been able to meet every federal deadline, the areas have all been able to achieve the control milestones before the mandatory Clean Air Act sanctions have taken effect. Some areas are even ready to declare their ozone problems solved.

  3. Occupational ALARA Program Guide for Use with Title 10, CFR, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational "as low as is reasonably achievable" (ALARA) program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. For completeness, this Guide also references detailed guidance provided in the DOE-STD-1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL (DOE 1999a), hereinafter referred to as the RCS.

  4. Impact of heterogeneous chemistry on model predictions of ozone changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granier, C.; Brasseur, G. )

    1992-11-20

    A two-dimensional chemical/transport model of the middle atmosphere is used to assess the importance of chemical heterogeneous processes in the polar regions (on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs)) and at other latitudes (on sulfate aerosols). When conversion on type I and type II PSCs of N[sub 2]O[sub 5] into HNO[sub 3] and of CIONO[sub 2] into reactive forms of chlorine is taken into account, enhanced CIO concentrations lead to the formation of a springtime ozone hole over the Antarctic continent; no such major reduction in the ozone column is found in the Arctic region. When conversion of nitrogen and chlorine compounds is assumed to occur on sulfate particles in the lower stratosphere, significant perturbations in the chemistry are also found. For background aerosol conditions, the concentration of nitric acid is enhanced and agrees with observed values, while that of nitrogen oxides is reduced and agrees less than if heterogeneous processes are ignored in the calculations. The concentration of the OH radical is significantly increased. Ozone number density appears to become larger between 16 and 30 km but smaller below 16 km, especially at high latitudes. The ozone column is only slightly modified, except at high latitudes where it is substantially reduced if the CIONO[sub 2] conversion into reactive chlorine is considered. After a large volcanic eruption these changes are further exacerbated. The ozone budget in the lower stratrosphere becomes less affected by nitrogen oxides but is largely controlled by the CIO[sub x] and HO[sub x] chemistries. A substantial decrease in the ozone column is predicted as a result of the Pinatubo volcanic eruption, mostly in winter at middle and high latitudes. 62 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - 1999 Northeast Corridor Ozone & Particulate Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Northeast Corridor Ozone & Particulate Study ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 1999 Northeast Corridor Ozone & Particulate Study 1999.07.23 - 1999.08.11 Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Abstract As part of the 1999 NARSTO Northeast Corridor Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEC-OPS) field campaign, the DOE G-1 aircraft sampled trace gases and aerosols in and

  6. Update of national ozone study: Where are we now?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper is one of three keynote presentations given at the conference. It addresses the issue of national ozone research in focusing on the regional task force, Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG). The overall objectives of the OTAG initiatives are reported. These include development of a comprehensive regional emissions inventory, selection of research models and protocols, identification of criteria for selecting emissions control strategies, and development of a framework for a NO{sub x} trading system. Findings from preliminary modeling runs and analyses are presented. 15 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased ?{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. Ozone metabolic effects

  8. Coordinated NO{sub x} control strategies: Phase II Title IV, ozone transport region and ozone transport assessment group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, W.F.; Dunn, R.M.; Baublis, D.C.

    1998-12-31

    Many electric utilities are faced with future nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) reduction requirements. In some instances, these utilities will be affected by multiple regulatory programs. For example, numerous fossil fired plants must comply with Phase II of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), state NO{sub x} rules as a result of the recommendations of the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) and future requirements of the Proposed Rule for Reducing Regional Transport of Ground-Level Ozone (Ozone Transport SIP Rulemaking). This paper provides an overview of NO{sub x} regulatory programs, NO{sub x} compliance planning concepts, and NO{sub x} control technology options that could be components of an optimized compliance strategy.

  9. Systems and methods for sensing occupancy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasu, Aravind; Mathias, Dean; Liu, Chenguang; Christensen, Randy; Christensen, Bruce

    2014-09-09

    A computer implemented method for sensing occupancy of a workspace includes creating a difference image that represents luminance differences of pixels in past and current images of the workspace resulting from motion in the workspace, determining motion occurring in regions of the workspace based on the difference image, and altering a workspace environment based at least in part on the determined motion. The method also includes determining which pixels in the difference image represent persistent motion that can be ignored and determining which pixels representing motion in the difference image are invalid because the pixels are isolated from other pixels representing motion.

  10. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  11. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  12. Fall Protection Can Prevent Serious Injuries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    protection requirements were not followed. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), falls from elevations, including into holes in floors, are the...

  13. Ireland Worksite Earns VPP RECOGNITION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON - Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Jonathan L. Snare today made an important announcements regarding OSHA's Voluntary Protection Program (VPP).

  14. SWPF System Turnover from Construction to Commissioning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... initial walkdown to identify Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) or 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, concerns or deficiencies. 3 An Operations ...

  15. Enterprise Assessments Assessment of Construction Quality and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the DOE Worker Safety and Health Program (10 CFR 851) endorse the NEC requirements for the required minimum work ...

  16. DOE-STD-1167-2003 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing ...

  17. CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Peer Review | Department of Energy Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Jennifer Senick, Rutgers View the Presentation CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review (1.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of

  18. Calendar Year 2014 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor | Department of Energy Calendar Year 2014 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Calendar Year 2014 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Calendar Year 2014 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Calendar

  19. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Program EEOICPA Program The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) administers the EEOICPA Program. For information on how to submit an EEOICPA claim, please go to: U.S. Department of Labor, Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation DOE's role is to provide requested record information to DOL.

  20. Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its primary standards for occupational radiation protection. This final rule is the culmination of a systematic analysis to identify the elements of a comprehensive radiation protection program and determine those elements of such a program that should be codified as DOE continues its transition from a system

  1. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Subpart A - General Provisions | Department of Energy PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

  2. Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Facility Managers | Department of Energy Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal Facility Managers Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal Facility Managers This fact sheet provides federal facility managers with an overview of the energy savings potential of wireless lighting occupancy sensors for room types, cost considerations, key steps to successful installation of wireless sensors, pros and cons of

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1999 Report | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 89 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1989 Report The Twenty-second Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1989. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees and contractors that are monitored for exposure to radiation. This information has been analyzed and trends over time

  4. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management | Department of Energy Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1989 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 89 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1989 Report The Twenty-second Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1989. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees and contractors that are monitored for exposure to radiation. This information has been analyzed and trends over time

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1990 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 90 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1990 Report The Twenty-third Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1990. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees and contractors that are monitored for exposure to radiation. This information has been analyzed and trends over time

  7. A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy Policy, Guidance & Reports » Worker Health & Safety » A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program January 2015 A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to assist former and current DOE Federal,

  8. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the

  9. Occupational Radiation Exposures at the Department of Energy | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Occupational Radiation Exposures at the Department of Energy Occupational Radiation Exposures at the Department of Energy Nimi Rao*, U.S. Department of Energy ; Derek Hagemeyer, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Abstract: The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) project began in 1969 under the AEC and has undergone significant evolutions since inception. The system serves as the central repository for occupational radiation exposure records for all

  10. Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION The familiar level of this module is designed to provide the basic information to meet the requirements that are related to 10 CFR 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection," in the following DOE Functional Area Qualification Standards: DOE-STD-1177-2004, Emergency Management DOE-STD-1151-2002, Facility Representative DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene

  11. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the

  12. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah...

  13. Calendar Year 2014 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Calendar Year 2014 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal ...

  14. Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal ...

  15. Hawaii Clean Energy Iniative Use and Occupancy Permit | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Instructions: Hawaii Clean Energy Iniative Use and Occupancy PermitPermittingRegulatory GuidanceInstructions...

  16. Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal Facility Managers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An ...

  17. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and ...

  18. Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensati...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... its contractors and subcontractors, or certain survivors of such individuals for occupational illness and death ... drugs in the practice of medicine), without evidence of ...

  19. Dimensionality Control of d-orbital Occupation in Oxide Superlattices...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results Journal Article: Dimensionality Control of d-orbital Occupation in Oxide Superlattices Citation Details ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Scientific Reports; Journal ...

  20. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE...

  1. PIA - Richland Occupational Injury and Illness | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Injury and Illness More Documents & Publications Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline

  2. A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to ...

  3. Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Gehl, Anthony C; Christian, Jeffrey E

    2012-01-01

    Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

  4. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  5. Occupant radon exposure in houses with basements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, E.M.; Fuoss, S.

    1995-12-31

    This study compares basement and main-level radon exposure based on bi-level week-long radon measurements, occupancy and activity data collected in normal use during heating and non-heating seasons in a geographically-stratified random sample of about 600 Minnesota homes, in response to critiques of radon measurement protocol. Basement radon (RN1) (M=4.5, SD=4.5) and main level (Rn2)(M=2.9, SD=3.4) correlation was 0.8 (p=.00), including seasonal variation. In a 101-house subsample where Rn1 >=4.0 pCi/L and Rn2 <=3.9 pCi/L, maximum household exposure in basements was 1162 pCiHrs (M=120, Sd=207), main-level 2486 pCiHrs (M-434, SD=421). In same households, persons with most basement-time maxed 100 hrs (M=13,SD=23), persons with most main-level time maxed 160 hrs (M=79, SD=39). Basement activities show two patterns, (1) member used it for personal domain, e.g. sleeping, and (2) household used it for general activities, e.g. TV or children`s play. Basement occupancy justifies measurement of radon in the lowest livable housing level.

  6. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The

  7. Occupancy schedules learning process through a data mining framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Oca, Simona; Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-12-17

    Building occupancy is a paramount factor in building energy simulations. Specifically, lighting, plug loads, HVAC equipment utilization, fresh air requirements and internal heat gain or loss greatly depends on the level of occupancy within a building. Developing the appropriate methodologies to describe and reproduce the intricate network responsible for human-building interactions are needed. Extrapolation of patterns from big data streams is a powerful analysis technique which will allow for a better understanding of energy usage in buildings. A three-step data mining framework is applied to discover occupancy patterns in office spaces. First, a data set of 16 offices with 10 minute interval occupancy data, over a two year period is mined through a decision tree model which predicts the occupancy presence. Then a rule induction algorithm is used to learn a pruned set of rules on the results from the decision tree model. Finally, a cluster analysis is employed in order to obtain consistent patterns of occupancy schedules. Furthermore, the identified occupancy rules and schedules are representative as four archetypal working profiles that can be used as input to current building energy modeling programs, such as EnergyPlus or IDA-ICE, to investigate impact of occupant presence on design, operation and energy use in office buildings.

  8. Software for the occupational health and safety integrated management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vătăsescu, Mihaela

    2015-03-10

    This paper intends to present the design and the production of a software for the Occupational Health and Safety Integrated Management System with the view to a rapid drawing up of the system documents in the field of occupational health and safety.

  9. Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Health Services > Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) Occupational Health Services Behavioral Health Services Beryllium Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program Medical Exam Scheduling Return to Work Risk Communication Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase

  10. Occupancy schedules learning process through a data mining framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    D'Oca, Simona; Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-12-17

    Building occupancy is a paramount factor in building energy simulations. Specifically, lighting, plug loads, HVAC equipment utilization, fresh air requirements and internal heat gain or loss greatly depends on the level of occupancy within a building. Developing the appropriate methodologies to describe and reproduce the intricate network responsible for human-building interactions are needed. Extrapolation of patterns from big data streams is a powerful analysis technique which will allow for a better understanding of energy usage in buildings. A three-step data mining framework is applied to discover occupancy patterns in office spaces. First, a data set of 16 offices with 10more » minute interval occupancy data, over a two year period is mined through a decision tree model which predicts the occupancy presence. Then a rule induction algorithm is used to learn a pruned set of rules on the results from the decision tree model. Finally, a cluster analysis is employed in order to obtain consistent patterns of occupancy schedules. Furthermore, the identified occupancy rules and schedules are representative as four archetypal working profiles that can be used as input to current building energy modeling programs, such as EnergyPlus or IDA-ICE, to investigate impact of occupant presence on design, operation and energy use in office buildings.« less