Sample records for ozone nonattainment area

  1. Maps depicting nonattainment areas pursuant to Section 107 of the Clean Air Act - 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarn, J.; Beal, W.; Tate, C.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is a detailed mapping of the United States depicting those areas nonattaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and total suspended particulates. It includes nonattainment area maps and supporting lists from Federal Register publications for final actions through September 1, 1985.

  2. Title I implementation: Status report on nonattainment areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, L.D.; Snyder, T.C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key provisions of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) focus on bringing cities and other areas into attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone, carbon monoxide (CO), and fine particulates (PM-10). The CAAA's new classification scheme for pollutant nonattainment areas is based on the relative severity of pollution in these areas and determines the stringency of control measures and the dates by which attainment of the standards will be required. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) final rule on air quality designations and classifications, published in late 1991, shows that ozone pollution remains a persistent problem; the number of counties that fail to meet the ozone standard has sharply increased since 1987. In contrast, incidence of PM-10 pollution has decreased; many counties have achieved the PM-10 standard since 1987. Nationwide, the number of CO nonattainment areas has increased, though not dramatically. Many of the new Title I requirements focus on the role of nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) in the formation of ground-level ozone. In ozone nonattainment areas and ozone transport regions, Title I generally requires major sources of NO[sub x] to have the same control measures as those that apply to major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This requirement compels state regulators to adopt an integrated VOC/NO[sub x] control strategy. The NO[sub x] emission standards proposed by state regulators are considerably more stringent than those given in federal guidelines. Both the EPA and the states plan to allow the use of multifacility emissions averaging in state NO[sub x] control strategies, thereby providing industry flexibility. Proposed federal Economic Incentive Program (EIP) rules would also allow sources in states with approved EIPs to use mobile source emission reduction credits to meet certain stationary source emission reduction requirements.

  3. Title I implementation: Status report on nonattainment areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, L.D.; Snyder, T.C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key provisions of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) focus on bringing cities and other areas into attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone, carbon monoxide (CO), and fine particulates (PM-10). The CAAA`s new classification scheme for pollutant nonattainment areas is based on the relative severity of pollution in these areas and determines the stringency of control measures and the dates by which attainment of the standards will be required. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) final rule on air quality designations and classifications, published in late 1991, shows that ozone pollution remains a persistent problem; the number of counties that fail to meet the ozone standard has sharply increased since 1987. In contrast, incidence of PM-10 pollution has decreased; many counties have achieved the PM-10 standard since 1987. Nationwide, the number of CO nonattainment areas has increased, though not dramatically. Many of the new Title I requirements focus on the role of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in the formation of ground-level ozone. In ozone nonattainment areas and ozone transport regions, Title I generally requires major sources of NO{sub x} to have the same control measures as those that apply to major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This requirement compels state regulators to adopt an integrated VOC/NO{sub x} control strategy. The NO{sub x} emission standards proposed by state regulators are considerably more stringent than those given in federal guidelines. Both the EPA and the states plan to allow the use of multifacility emissions averaging in state NO{sub x} control strategies, thereby providing industry flexibility. Proposed federal Economic Incentive Program (EIP) rules would also allow sources in states with approved EIPs to use mobile source emission reduction credits to meet certain stationary source emission reduction requirements.

  4. Maps depicting nonattainment areas pursuant to Section 107 of the Clean Air Act - 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, J.; Beal, W.; Duggan, G.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a detailed mapping of the United States depicting those areas not attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulates. It includes nonattainment area maps and supporting lists from Federal Register publications for final actions through February 1, 1982.

  5. Maps depicting nonattainment areas pursuant to Section 107 of the Clean Air Act - 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duggan, G.; Pearson, J.; Beal, W.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a detailed mapping of the United States Depicting those areas not attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulates. It includes nonattainment area maps and supporting lists from Federal Register publications for final actions through February 1, 1983.

  6. Maps depicting nonattainment areas pursuant to Section 107 of the Clean Air Act - 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarn, J.; Beal, W.; Tate, C.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a detailed mapping of the United States depicting those areas not attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulates. It includes non-attainment area maps and supporting lists from Federal Register publications for final actions through July 1, 1984.

  7. Texas’ Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: Procedures for Measuring Electricity Savings from the Adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IRC/IECC 2001) in New Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four areas in Texas have been designated by the EPA as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the NAAQS maximum allowable limits, Beaumont-Port Arthur, El Paso, Dallas-Ft. Worth, and Houston-Galveston-Brazoria. These areas face severe...

  8. Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program (Released in the STEO June 1999)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 107(d) of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990 (the Act), required states to identify all areas that do not meet the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone, and directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to designate these areas as ozone nonattainment areas. Section 181 of the Act required EPA to classify each area as a marginal, moderate, serious, severe or extreme ozone nonattainment area. EPA classified all areas that were designated as in nonattainment for ozone at the time of the enactment of the 1990 Amendments, except for certain "nonclassifiable" areas (56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991).

  9. Detailed Description of Data for Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.; Ahmad, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    County Residential Building Permit Activity Map3.ppt shows Available Weather Files & Weather Station in Texas Map4.ppt shows NAHB Division of East & West Texas Figure 6: EPA Non-attainment and affected counties November 2002 Energy Systems Laboratory...2 and WYEC2 weather files compared to IECC weather zones for Texas. November 2002 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University SB5 DOE-2 Report p. 24 Figure 9: NAHB Division of East & West Texas 3.9 Building Characteristics from NAHB Folder Name...

  10. Potential impacts of Title I nonattainment on the electric power industry: A Chicago case study (Phase 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernau, M.E.; Makofske, W.J.; South, D.W.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study uses version IV of the Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) to examine the potential impacts of Title I (nonattainment) and Title IV (acid rain) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) on the utility industry. The UAM is run for a grid that covers the Commonwealth Edison Power Pool and encompasses the greater Chicago area and surrounding rural areas. Meteorological conditions are selected from an ozone (O{sub 3}) episode on July 5 and 6, 1988.

  11. An ozone climatology of the Dallas-Fort Worth area and its relationship to meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobis, Timothy Edward

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , no extensive studies on ozone in this area have been published. This study presents a broad overview of the ozone problem in the DFW area. An ozone spatial and temporal climatology was constructed using ozone data at 23 different monitoring sites from 1980...

  12. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ambient Ozone Formation as a Function of NOx Reductions Summary and Implications for Air Quality Impacts DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern...

  13. Texas’ Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: Report for the TERP Advisory Board Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-TR-02/06-01 TEXAS1 SENATE BILL 5 LEGISLATION FOR REDUCING POLLUTION IN NON- ATTAINMENT AND AFFECTED AREAS: Report for the TERP Advisory Board Meeting Jeff Haberl, Charles Culp, Bahman Yazdani, Tom Fitzpatrick, Dan Turner Energy Systems... Laboratory (ESL) Texas A&M University System June 2002 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System TERP Report p. 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report outlines the Energy Systems Laboratory's responsibilities...

  14. Ozone production rate and hydrocarbon reactivity in 5 urban areas: A cause of high ozone concentration in Houston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    petrochemical complexes in the world. As a consequence the concentration of O3 in the Houston metropolitan area are ubiquitous in urban areas, the major source categories being on and off-road vehicles, power plants from nearby petrochemical facili- ties. A comparison between Houston and 4 other cities (Nashville, TN

  15. An examination of utility emissions contributions to elevated ozone concentrations in the Chicago area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernau, M.E.; Guziel, K.A.; South, D.W.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the pollutant load to the atmosphere and subsequent damaging effects, Titles I and IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAAs) require reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Title IV is aimed at reducing acidic deposition and requires utilities to reduce SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions to specified levels. As a consequence of this, many utilities will have to install SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control technologies. Title I is concerned with bringing regions into compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for the criteria pollutants, among which is ozone (O{sub 3}). The NAAQS for O{sub 3} is 120 ppb (parts per billion by volume) hourly average concentration, not to be exceeded four times in three years. O{sub 3} is a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when NO{sub x} and VOCs react together in the presence of sunlight. Utilities are a significant source of NO{sub x} and an unimportant source of VOCs. In the past, O{sub 3} control strategy has focused on reducing VOC emissions because of the possibility that reducing NO{sub x} actually might make O{sub 3} concentrations higher. However, this approach has not worked, perhaps because of underestimation of natural and manmade VOC emissions and transport of O{sub 3} from other regions. Computer modeling has shown that for many highly polluted areas massive NO{sub x} reductions may be necessary in addition to or in place of VOC controls. Utilities are a potential source of these NO{sub x} reductions.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality non-attainment Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    programs, go to www.ncsc.ncsu.edu Summary: ambient air quality non-attainment and maintenance counties in North Carolina. Annual Mobile Clean Air... 's air quality problems....

  17. The Chicago VOC trading system : the consequences of market design for performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosobud, Richard F.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chicago cap-and-trade approach to regulating stationary source VOC emissions in the Chicago ozone non-attainment area is a pioneering program that could set a precedent for other urban areas troubled by high ozone ...

  18. Texas Senate Bill 5 - Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment Areas: An Overview of the Legislation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culp, Charles; Haberl, Jeff; Bahman, Yazdani; Fitzpatrick, Tom; Bryant, J.; Turner, D.

    Standards SB 5 adopts the energy efficiency chapter of the International Residential Code, as it existed on May 1, 2001, as the energy code for single-family residential construction; and in all other residential, commercial, and industrial construction... for single-family residential construction, and the International Energy Conservation Code for all other residential, commercial and industrial construction in the state. Requires that municipalities establish procedures for administration and enforcement...

  19. Concentration of ozone in surface air over greater Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widen, Donald Allen

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface ozone concentrations were measured in the Greater Boston area from November, 1964 to December, 1965. Ozone was monitored continuosly using a Mast microcoulombmetric sensor. A chromium trioxide filter was fitted to ...

  20. Examination of the Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols on Southeast Texas Ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Mark David

    2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    such as ozone, reactive nitrogen, mercury, and sulfur containing compounds. Urban areas are most impacted by these trace gases, which is a concern because ozone especially affects the health of citizens. Experiments have three basic parts. First we generate mono...

  1. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  2. AREA

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionofDepartmentNo.7-052 ofFocusAREA FAQ #

  3. 7, 97959828, 2007 Tropospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 9795­9828, 2007 Tropospheric ozone climatology over Beijing A. J. Ding et al. Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tropospheric ozone climatology over Beijing: analysis of aircraft data;ACPD 7, 9795­9828, 2007 Tropospheric ozone climatology over Beijing A. J. Ding et al. Title Page

  4. 8, 1106311101, 2008 Tropospheric Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 11063­11101, 2008 Tropospheric Ozone climatology in the southern subtropics G. Clain et al.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tropospheric ozone climatology at two southern Tropospheric Ozone climatology in the southern subtropics G. Clain et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  5. Evaluation of microporous carbon filters as catalysts for ozone decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whinnery, L.; Coutts, D.; Shen, C.; Adams, R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Quintana, C.; Showalter, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone is produced in small quantities in photocopiers and laser printers in the workplace and large quantities in industrial waste water treatment facilities. Carbon filters are commonly used to decompose this unwanted ozone. The three most important factors in producing a filter for this purpose are flow properties, efficiency, and cost. Most ozone decomposition applications require very low back-pressure at modest flow rates. The tradeoff between the number of pores and the size of the pores will be discussed. Typical unfiltered emissions in the workplace are approximately 1 ppm. The maximum permissible exposure limit, PEL, for worker exposure to ozone is 0.1 ppm over 8 hours. Several methods have been examined to increase the efficiency of ozone decomposition. Carbon surfaces were modified with catalysts, the surface activated, and the surface area was increased, in attempts to decompose ozone more effectively. Methods to reduce both the processing and raw material costs were investigated. Several sources of microporous carbon were investigated as ozone decomposition catalysts. Cheaper processing routes including macropore templating, faster drying and extracting methods were also studied.

  6. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Farragut, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN); Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L. (Dublin, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  7. Areas Participating in the Oxygenated Gasoline Program (Released in the STEO July 1999)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 211(m) of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401-7671q) requires that gasoline containing at least 2.7% oxygen by weight is to be used in the wintertime in those areas of the county that exceed the carbon monoxide National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The winter oxygenated gasoline program applies to all gasoline sold in the larger of the Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA) or Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in which the nonattainment area is located.

  8. Reductions in ozone concentrations due to controls on variability in industrial flare emissions in Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Junsang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High concentrations of ozone in the Houston/Galveston area are associated with industrial plumes of highly reactive hydrocarbons, mixed with NOx. The emissions leading to these plumes can have significant temporal variability, ...

  9. The effect of variability in industrial emissions on ozone formation in Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ambient observations have indicated that high concentrations of ozone observed in the Houston/Galveston area are associated with plumes of highly reactive hydrocarbons, mixed with NOx, from industrial facilities. Ambient ...

  10. Ozone response to emission changes: a modeling study during the MCMA-2006/MILAGRO Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jihee

    The sensitivity of ozone production to precursor emissions was investigated under five different meteorological conditions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MCMA-2006/MILAGRO field campaign using the ...

  11. Real-World Studies of Ambient Ozone Formation as a Function of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. ace29lawson.pdf More Documents & Publications Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. Health Impacts Program DOE's...

  12. Ozone predictabilities due to meteorological uncertainties in the Mexico City basin using ensemble forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bei, Naifang

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the sensitivity of ozone (O3)[(O subscript 3)] predictions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) to meteorological initial uncertainties and planetary boundary layer ...

  13. Texas Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: An Overview of Legislative Responsibilities, Code Compliance Issues and Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bryant, J. A.; Turner, W. D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The 78th Texas Legislature further expanded SB-5 into code certification for code officials and above code programs. Using data available from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, TCEQ, the EPA and new procedures developed by the Laboratory...

  14. Texas’ Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: Annual Report to the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first annual report by the Energy Systems Laboratory, which covers the Laboratory's efforts to support Senate Bill 5. In this report the accomplishments and progress to date are presented, along with recommendations, issues encountered...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutants ozone Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Global Ozone Project Ozone Formation in Summary: , power plants and industry all emit air pollution that forms ground-level ozone. Ozone is a primary... Stratospheric and...

  16. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  17. Ozone decomposition in water solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewes, Cecil Grayson

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Hewes, III; B. S. , Texas ASH University Directed by Dr. R. R. Davison The rate of the decomposition of ozone in water solutions at various pH's and temperatures were ob- tained by an iodometrical method. The orders of the reactions and the reaction...

  18. 6, 74277469, 2006 Linear ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    from biases in the schemes' climatology coefficients. Cariolle v2.1 analyses showed biases of up to 20 and Kelder (1998) ozone climatology into the scheme. Chem2D-OPP v2.1 analyses showed biases up to 20 analysed temperatures and the temperature climatology supplied with the scheme. Future developments should

  19. 2, 15091543, 2002 Ozone production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/2/1509/ c European Geosciences Union 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Ozone as a consequence of local catabatic winds. Aver- age mid-day peroxy radical concentrations at Mt. Cimone; Atlas and Ridley, 1996; Fischer et al., 1998; Zanis et al., 2000a, b). Often, free tropospheric

  20. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10?wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300?°C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

  1. Ozone concentrations in El Paso, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crocker, J.E. (Texas Air Control Board, Austin); Applegate, H.G.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    El Paso, Texas may have a problem in meeting ambient air standards due to influx of pollutants from foreign sources. Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua, and Fort Bliss abut the city and are areas over which the Texas Air Control Board (TACB) has little or no jurisdiction. The Board maintains two Continuous Air Monitoring Stations (CAM) in El Paso. Ozone, nitric oxide, and nitrogen dioxide data were obtained from these stations. If the EPA Empirical Kinetic Model is used for El Paso, reducing NMHC concentrations may increase rather than decrease O/sub 3/ concentrations. The Texas State Implementation Plan, while not based on Empirical Kinetic Modeling, calls for a reduction of 18% in NMHC. However, 31% of all NMHC in El Paso arise from sources over which Texas had little (a federal military reservation) or no (Cd. Juarez) jurisdiction. It appears the TACB is correct in believing the SIP for O/sub 3/ may not bring El Paso into compliance. (JMT)

  2. Project Summary Report 1838-S 1 The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Project Summary Report 1838-S ­ 1 ­ The University of Texas at Austin Center for Transportation Project Summary Report 1838-S Transportation Control Measure Effectiveness in Ozone Nonattainment Areas the most beneficial impact in terms of mobility, emissions, and cost. It is necessary that such a procedure

  3. Ozone production in transpacific Asian pollution plumes and implications for ozone air quality in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Rokjin

    Ozone production in transpacific Asian pollution plumes and implications for ozone air quality in transpacific Asian pollution plumes, and the implications for ozone air quality in California, by using pollution plumes. Strong dilution of Asian pollution plumes takes place during entrainment in the U

  4. Discharge cell for ozone generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nakatsuka, Suguru (Amagasaki, JP)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discharge cell for use in an ozone generator is provided which can suppress a time-related reduction in ozone concentration without adding a catalytic gas such as nitrogen gas to oxygen gas as a raw material gas. The discharge cell includes a pair of electrodes disposed in an opposed spaced relation with a discharge space therebetween, and a dielectric layer of a three-layer structure consisting of three ceramic dielectric layers successively stacked on at least one of the electrodes, wherein a first dielectric layer of the dielectric layer contacting the one electrode contains no titanium dioxide, wherein a second dielectric layer of the dielectric layer exposed to the discharge space contains titanium dioxide in a metal element ratio of not lower than 10 wt %.

  5. Y-12 Plant Stratospheric Ozone Protection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Y-12 Plant staff is required by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems) standard ESS-EP-129 to develop and implement a Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program which will minimize emissions of ozone-depleting substances to the environment and maximize the use of ozone-safe alternatives in order to comply with Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments and the implementing regulations promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This plan describes the requirements, initiatives, and accomplishments of the Y-12 Plant Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program.

  6. Tropospheric Ozone Pollution and Personal Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    ://www.nctcog.org/trans/air/ozone/formation.gif #12;Health Effects · Chest pain, coughing, throat irritation, and congestion · Wheezing and difficulty

  7. DOE's Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California 2002 DEER Conference Presentation:...

  8. The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications WeekendWeekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California...

  9. An Assessment of Tropospheric Ozone Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Assessment of Tropospheric Ozone Pollution --A North American Perspective-- Surface Urban, California 94304 #12;AN ASSESSMENT OF TROPOSPHERIC OZONE POLLUTION: A NORTH AMERICAN PERSPECTIVE The NARSTO, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F., Mexico Alan Dunker, General Motors Research & Development

  10. Laboratory measurement of secondary pollutant yields from ozone reaction with HVAC filters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Destaillats, Hugo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Hugo Destaillats,from Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Hugo Destaillatsfrom Ozone Reaction with HVAC Filters Hugo Destaillats

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aura-omi tropospheric ozone Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric ozone. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the satellite provides global total column ozone (TCO) and in combination Summary: with other instruments...

  12. Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wai Kit, E-mail: kekyeung@ust.hk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Joueet, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Schrotter, Jean-Christophe [Water Research Center of Veolia, Anjou Recherche, Chemin de la Digue, BP 76. 78603, Maisons Laffitte, Cedex (France)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

  13. 17 October 2014 Antarctic Ozone Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    as measured with an electrochemical ozonesonde on 10 October. One can see two large "bite-outs" of ozone). Ushuaia is marked with a green dot. One can see that Ushuaia is well inside the polar vortex. The PV data

  14. Ozone treatment of biomass to enhance digestibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almendarez, Maria Elena

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is very resistant to enzymatic degradation. Lignocellulosic materials require pretreatment to enhance their digestibility. The main objective of this research was to further enhance the digestibility of biomass (bagasse) with ozonation as a follow...

  15. Pinatubo fails to deepen the ozone hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, R.A.

    1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Philippine volcano Pinatubo exploded last year, pumping the upper atmosphere full of find debris, researchers foresaw yet another assault on the stratosphere's beleaguered ozone layer. Some calculations of the effects of volcanic debris implied that as much as 25% to 30% of the ozone shield over temperature latitudes might be eaten away by the volcanic haze - five times the observed loss over the past decade. Early measurements didn't bear out that concern, but researchers weren't prepared to call off the alarm until the verdict came in from the most vulnerable part of the planet's ozone layer, the frigid stratosphere over Antarctica. Although the hole was more extensive than ever before, probably because of unusual weather patterns, total ozone bottomed out well above the record set last year - even a tad above the low levels seen in 1987, 1989, and 1990.

  16. Methane production from ozonated pulp mill effluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremmon, C.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was made of the production of methane from desugared spent sulfite liquor (SSL) reacted with ozone. The ozonated SSL was fed continuously to three anaerobic fermenters for three months as the sole source of carbon and energy. The fermenters were inoculated with anaerobic bacteria obtained from sewage sludge and acclimated for 1 month in ozonated SSL prior to continuous fermentation. Chemical and biological parameters such as COD, BOD, total sulfur content, redox potential, pH, fatty acid composition, and methane bacteria populations were monitored to determine changes in the SSL during fermentation. Methane production from ozone-treated SSL averaged 1.7 liters/ liter or 17 ml of CH/sub 4/ produced/gram of volatile solids fed. Fatty acis analysis of fermenter effluent indicated a net production of 58 mM/ liter of acetate during ozonated SSL fermentation. This acetic acid production shows future potential for further fermentation by protein-producing yeast. Although the rate of conversion of volatile solids to CH/sub 4/ in this process was not competitive with domestic or agricultural waste digesters, this study did indicate the potential benefits of ozonating organic wastes for increased methane fermentation yields.

  17. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    ozone record from Paramaribo, Surinam (6°N, 55°W) (also in SHADOZ) shows a marked contrast to southern tropical ozone because Surinam is often north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). A more

  18. The impact of interannual variability on multidecadal total ozone simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, Charles H.

    to reinforce the chemical ozone depletion caused by the enhanced aerosol loading following the eruption of Mt

  19. Ozone treatment in a closed culture system for Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constant flow of air. The Orthotoridine-Manganese Method (OTM) wss employed to measure ozone in solution (APHA, 1976) . Because of the rapid rate of decomposition of ozone in water, it was determined that the production of ozone could not be measured... by introducing into water and then sampling that water for analysis with OTM. Therefore, ozone was introduced directly into a solution of OTM reagent with subsequent changes in color of the reagent, measured on a "B & L Spectronic 70" spectrophotometer, being...

  20. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  1. A study of the effect of ozone and antioxidants on ozone-sensitive loblolly pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posey, Karen Lashea

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and exposed to LSX ambient ozone for two months. Arrows indicate pestained SDS-PAGE molecular weight standards (kD) and Rubisco large subunit. Lane R = pure spinach Rubisco large subunit. Lanes 1 and 2 = control seedlings in the Ozoban study. Lanes 3 and 4... radicals are produced during normal metabolism when oxygen is reduced to water. Grimes et al. (1983) studied the products that form from ozone in cells and found no detectable superoxide radicals, leading them to propose that either ozone or hydroxyl...

  2. Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather than ozonolysis, is the main formaldehyde source in those filters. Emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not found to be large enough to substantially increase indoor concentrations in typical building scenarios. Nevertheless, ozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as a source of low levels of indoor irritants.

  3. Ozone-depleting-substance control and phase-out plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.; Brown, M.J.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title VI of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires regulation of the use and disposal of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) (e.g., Halon, Freon). Several important federal regulations have been promulgated that affect the use of such substances at the Hanford Site. On April 23, 1993, Executive Order (EO) 12843, Procurement Requirements and Policies for Federal Agencies for Ozone-Depleting Substances (EPA 1993) was issued for Federal facilities to conform to the new US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations implementing the Clean Air Act of 1963 (CAA), Section 613, as amended. To implement the requirements of Title VI the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), issued a directive to the Hanford Site contractors on May 25, 1994 (Wisness 1994). The directive assigns Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) the lead in coordinating the development of a sitewide comprehensive implementation plan to be drafted by July 29, 1994 and completed by September 30, 1994. The implementation plan will address several areas where immediate compliance action is required. It will identify all current uses of ODSs and inventories, document the remaining useful life of equipment that contains ODS chemicals, provide a phase-out schedule, and provide a strategy that will be implemented consistently by all the Hanford Site contractors. This plan also addresses the critical and required elements of Federal regulations, the EO, and US Department of Energy (DOE) guidance. This plan is intended to establish a sitewide management system to address the clean air requirements.

  4. Ozone determination in different copying centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Chen-Fu

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &ixicolr&gi 1st ed. , New York. Hemisphere Publishing Corp, 1 987, ppl35-13(? 12. Menzel, D. B. : Toxicity of Ozone, Oxygen and Radiation. AI111 Rev. of Pharmacol. 1970; 10: 37&)-394. 13. Menzel, D. B. : Ozone: An overview of its toxicity in m;in . in...-Threshold Limit Values for Chemi?;il Substances and Physical Agents in the Work Environm?ni 1991-1992. Cincinnati, Ohio: ACGIH 1991 24. Wadden, R. A. , and P. A. Scheff: /ndoor At't Pollt&ttr ii l si ?d New York: John Wiley & Sons, inc. , 1983, ppl-5. 25...

  5. The effect of marine isoprene emissions on secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation in the coastal United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    The effect of marine isoprene emissions on secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation) in the coastal areas of the continental United States is studied using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regional-scale Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Marine isoprene emission rates

  6. Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary o Regional nuclear war could cause global which traps pollutants o Nuclear weapons cause explosions, which then causes things around the vicinity to start burning, which in turn releases black carbon; it is not the nuclear material or fallout causing

  7. Impact of primary formaldehyde on air pollution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Wenfang

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a radical source that plays an important role in urban atmospheric chemistry and ozone formation. The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is characterized by high anthropogenic emissions of HCHO ...

  8. Detailed Analysis of the Builder Option Packages for Climate Zones 3,4,5, and 6 for Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, M.; Haberl, J. S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the summary spreadsheets. BOPs for climate zones 3,4,5 and 6 were submitted for approval to ESL on April 29,2002. It was stated that the suggested BOPs were 10 to 15% less consumptive than the IECC chapter 4/5 house. Analysis was done on these BOPs...

  9. Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: Procedures for Measuring Electricity Savings from the Adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IRC/IECC 2001) in New Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, (March). NAHB 2002. Home Builder?s Surveys, National Association of Home Builders, 1201 15th Street NW, Washington, D.C., 20005. NOAA 1993... sources, including NAHB (2002), F.W. Dodge (2002), RECS (1999) and LBNL (1995). 5 The average house size for each county is determined from published RECS (1995) data. 6 The appropriate weather data for each county is the nearest TMY2 weather file...

  10. Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

  11. Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates #12 Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission es- timates / by Bas Subject headings: satellite retrieval / nitrogen dioxide / ozone / air pollution / emis- sion estimates

  12. Application of gaseous disinfectants ozone and chlorine dioxide for inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydogan, Ahmet

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inhibitor line Ozone Generator Oxygen Concentrator CellSequal oxygen concentrator and Pure-O-Tech ozone generator.This oxygen is then supplied into the ozone generator for

  13. Ozone chemistry in the smoke from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, J.A.; Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone depletion occurred in the core of the plume of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires within 100 km of the fires, primarily in regions where NO{sub x} concentrations were high and ultraviolet flux was near zero. Rapid conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} can explain almost all of the ozone loss. Ozone was produced in diffuse regions of the plume, where the ultraviolet flux was higher than in the core. However, due to the relatively high ratio of nonmethane hydrocarbons to NO{sub x}, ozone production was slow. Since ozone was produced in a much larger volume than it was depleted, the plume as a whole was a source of ozone on a regional scale. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effects of ozone on the respiratory health, allergic sensitization, and cellular immune system in children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwick, H.; Popp, W.; Wagner, C.; Reiser, K.; Schmoeger, J.B.; Boeck, A.H.; Herkner, K.; Radunsky, K. (Pulmonary Department, Krankenhaus Lainz, Vienna (Austria))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the lasting effects of high ozone concentrations under environmental conditions, we examined the respiratory health, pulmonary function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, allergic sensitization, and lymphocyte subpopulations of 10- to 14-yr-old children. A total of 218 children recruited from an area with high ozone concentrations (Group A) were tested against 281 children coming from an area with low ozone concentrations (Group B). As to subjective complaints, categorized as 'usually cough with or without phlegm,' 'breathlessness,' and 'susceptibility to chest colds,' there was no difference between the two groups. The lung function parameters were similar, but in Group A subjects' bronchial hyperresponsiveness occurred more frequently and was found to be more severe than in Group B (29.4 versus 19.9%, p less than 0.02; PD20 2,100 {plus minus} 87 versus 2,350 {plus minus} 58 micrograms, p less than 0.05). In both groups the number of children who had been suffering from allergic diseases and sensitization to aeroallergens, found by means of the skin test, was the same. Comparison of the total IgE levels showed no difference at all between the two groups. As far as the white blood cells are concerned, the total and differential cell count was the same, whereas lymphocyte subpopulations showed readily recognizable changes.

  15. airborne antarctic ozone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    winter weather conditions: Severe cold and isolated air ow: circumpolar vortex North pole vortex breakdown replenishes ozone layer from outside: mixes air 12; E11;ects...

  16. antarctic ozone recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    winter weather conditions: Severe cold and isolated air ow: circumpolar vortex North pole vortex breakdown replenishes ozone layer from outside: mixes air 12; E11;ects...

  17. antarctic ozone hole: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    winter weather conditions: Severe cold and isolated air ow: circumpolar vortex North pole vortex breakdown replenishes ozone layer from outside: mixes air 12; E11;ects...

  18. antarctic ozone experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    winter weather conditions: Severe cold and isolated air ow: circumpolar vortex North pole vortex breakdown replenishes ozone layer from outside: mixes air 12; E11;ects...

  19. antarctic ozone depletion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    winter weather conditions: Severe cold and isolated air ow: circumpolar vortex North pole vortex breakdown replenishes ozone layer from outside: mixes air 12; E11;ects...

  20. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the material balance on ozone (equation 4-1). S [O 3 ](equation 5-2, which reflects a steady-state material balance

  1. Ozone heating and the destabilization of traveling waves during summer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, T.R.; Cordero, E.C.; Li, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of ozone heating on the linear stability of lower stratospheric traveling waves of the summertime, extratropical circulation are examined. Based on coupled equations for the quasigeostrophic potential vorticity and ozone volume mixing ratio, it is shown that the diabatic heating arising from ozone advection can offset the damping due to Newtonian cooling, leading to wave amplification and significant changes in the structure and zonally rectified fluxes of the wave fields in both the lower stratosphere and troposphere. The vertical profile of the zonal mean wind plays a crucial role in determining whether the ozone heating destabilizes eastward and/or westward traveling disturbances.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient ozone levels Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level ozone. Lesson 2: Ozone Formation... , power plants and industry all emit air pollution that forms ... Source: Royer, Dana - Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences,...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash ozonation technology Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ozonation technology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ash ozonation technology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fine volcanic Predicting...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient ozone growth Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate and Environment (Climate) Impacts of ozone on trees and crops Summary: and carbon sequestration. Vegetation exposure to ozone reduces photosynthesis, growth, and...

  5. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Ozone and Short-term Mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    . With the National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS), we have developed na- tional approaches Ambient Air Qual- ity Standard (NAAQS) for ozone, adding a daily maximum 8-hour stan- dard of 80 ppb.19 Because of the relevance of epidemiologic evi- dence to the NAAQS for ozone and other pollutants

  6. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

  7. Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2366 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS P Zhao1,2 , JA Siegel1, Austin, Texas 78758, USA ABSTRACT HVAC filters have a significant influence on indoor air quality% for Filter #2 at a face velocity of 0.81 cm/s. The potential for HVAC filters to affect ozone concentrations

  8. URBAN OZONE CONCENTRATION FORECASTING WITH ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK IN CORSICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Perceptron; Ozone concentration. 1. Introduction Tropospheric ozone is a major air pollution problem, both, Ajaccio, France, e-mail: balu@univ-corse.fr Abstract: Atmospheric pollutants concentration forecasting is an important issue in air quality monitoring. Qualitair Corse, the organization responsible for monitoring air

  9. Effects of 20002050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickley, Loretta J.

    ) project major changes in anthro- pogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone precur- sors over the 2Effects of 2000­2050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy; published 27 September 2008. [1] We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) driven by a general

  10. Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 REACTIONS BETWEEN OZONE AND BUILDING PRODUCTS: IMPACT ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2118 REACTIONS BETWEEN OZONE AND BUILDING PRODUCTS: IMPACT ON PRIMARY of reactions of ozone on building products and on their emissions in indoor air. For this purpose, 12 building products were exposed to ozone in a dedicated experimental setup. The measured ozone removal rate

  11. Ozone ensemble forecast with machine learning Vivien Mallet,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ozone ensemble forecast with machine learning algorithms Vivien Mallet,1,2 Gilles Stoltz,3 forecasts. The latter rely on a multimodel ensemble built for ozone forecasting with the modeling system Europe in order to forecast ozone daily peaks and ozone hourly concentrations. On the basis of past

  12. Urban Form and Air Pollution in US Urban Areas!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    of Minnesota Grant No. 0853467 #12;Air Pollution Impacts on Health 2 EPA, 2010 Ozone PM2.5 PM10 Lead NitrogenUrban Form and Air Pollution in US Urban Areas! Center for Transportation Studies Research #12;Purpose and Research Questions 4 Purpose: Explore relationship between air pollution and urban

  13. Potential impacts of climate change on tropospheric ozone in California: a preliminary episodic modeling assessment of the Los Angeles basin and the Sacramento valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this preliminary and relatively short modeling effort, an initial assessment is made for the potential air quality implications of climate change in California. The focus is mainly on the effects of changes in temperature and related meteorological and emission factors on ozone formation. Photochemical modeling is performed for two areas in the state: the Los Angeles Basin and the Sacramento Valley.

  14. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone, an ambient pollutant, is transformed into other airborne pollutants in the indoor environment. In this dissertation, the type and amount of byproducts that result from ozone reactions with common indoor surfaces, surface residues, and vapors were determined, pollutant concentrations were related to occupant exposure, and frameworks were developed to predict byproduct concentrations under various indoor conditions. In Chapter 2, an analysis is presented of secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of ozone with gas-phase, terpene-containing consumer products in small chamber experiments under conditions relevant for residential and commercial buildings. The full particle size distribution was continuously monitored, and ultrafine and fine particle concentrations were in the range of 10 to>300 mu g m-3. Particle nucleation and growth dynamics were characterized.Chapter 3 presents an investigation of ozone reactions with aircraft cabin surfaces including carpet, seat fabric, plastics, and laundered and worn clothing fabric. Small chamber experiments were used to determine ozone deposition velocities, ozone reaction probabilities, byproduct emission rates, and byproduct yields for each surface category. The most commonly detected byproducts included C1?C10 saturated aldehydes and skin oil oxidation products. For all materials, emission rates were higher with ozone than without. Experimental results were used to predict byproduct exposure in the cabin and compare to other environments. Byproduct levels are predicted to be similar to ozone levels in the cabin, which have been found to be tens to low hundreds of ppb in the absence of an ozone converter. In Chapter 4, a model is presented that predicts ozone uptake by and byproduct emission from residual chemicals on surfaces. The effects of input parameters (residue surface concentration, ozone concentration, reactivity of the residue and the surface, near-surface airflow conditions, and byproduct yield) were explored. In Chapter 5, the reaction of ozone with permethrin, a residual insecticide used in aircraft cabins, to form phosgene is investigated. A derivatization technique was developed to detect phosgene at low levels, and chamber experiments were conducted with permethrin-coated cabin materials. It was determined that phosgene formation, if it occurs in the aircraft cabin, is not likely to exceed the relevant, health-based phosgene exposure guidelines.

  15. Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

  16. Attosecond electronic and nuclear quantum photodynamics of the ozone molecule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halász, G. J. [Department of Information Technology, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, PO Box 12 (Hungary)] [Department of Information Technology, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, PO Box 12 (Hungary); Perveaux, A.; Lasorne, B.; Gatti, F. [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)] [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Robb, M. A. [Imperial College London, Department of Chemistry, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Imperial College London, Department of Chemistry, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vibók, Á. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Debrecen, H-40410 Debrecen, PO Box 5 (Hungary)] [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Debrecen, H-40410 Debrecen, PO Box 5 (Hungary)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics simulations are investigated for the ozone molecule on the attosecond time scale. The initial wavepacket is pumped as a coherent superposition of two or three electronic states.

  17. Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort D.

    We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

  18. The role of ozone in tracheal cell transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomassen, D.G.; Harkema, J.R.; Sun, J.D.; Stephens, N.D.; Griffith, W.C. (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examined the potential role of ozone as a respiratory carcinogen by characterizing its ability to induce or modulate the preneoplastic transformation of rat tracheal epithelial cells. The chemical reactivity of ozone and the types of damage it can cause suggest that it may have a role in environmental carcinogenesis. Few other studies have examined the direct cytotoxic or transforming effects of ozone after in vivo or in vitro exposure of cells, and no studies have been reported on the comparative effects of ozone on respiratory cells exposed in vivo or in vitro. The induction of early preneoplastic changes in populations of rat tracheal epithelial cells by carcinogens can be detected and quantified in vitro after exposures in vivo or in vitro of tracheal epithelial cells. This cell culture and transformation system was used to characterize the transforming potency of ozone. Tracheal epithelial cells were isolated from Fischer-344/N rats that had been exposed for six hours per day, five days per week for one, two, or four weeks to 0, 0.12, 0.5, or 1.0 parts per million (ppm)* ozone (sea-level equivalents). Cell populations were examined in culture for increases in the frequency of preneoplastic variants. Rats exposed to ozone did not exhibit an increase in the frequency of preneoplastic tracheal cells, although exposed tracheas did exhibit dose-dependent morphological changes. Rat tracheal epithelial cells were given single, 40-minute in vitro exposures to concentrations of ozone that did not result in any detectable decrease in colony-forming efficiency.

  19. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials: Preliminary Results and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials air quality. #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removing ozone from indoor

  20. Comparison of three vertically resolved ozone data sets: climatology, trends and radiative forcings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassler, B.

    Climate models that do not simulate changes in stratospheric ozone concentrations require the prescription of ozone fields to accurately calculate UV fluxes and stratospheric heating rates. In this study, three different ...

  1. Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 14251436 A development of ozone abatement strategies for the Grenoble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 1425­1436 A development of ozone abatement strategies are generated in the Grenoble plume. For developing ozone abatement strategies it is important to know whether

  2. A delayed effect of ozone fumigation on photosynthesis of Norway spruce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A delayed effect of ozone fumigation on photosynthesis of Norway spruce D. Eamus1 A.W. Davis J into the long-lastincl effects of ozone fumiga- tion upon photosynthesis of Norway spruce. Measurements were

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute ozone-induced change Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract Predicting ozone-induced reduction of carbon... a leaf-level model to the whole tree, it is possible to investigate whether the ozone-induced ... Source: Michigan...

  4. Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Yuan Ma-scale reactors were operated at the LaPrairie Wastewater Treatment plant (one control and one ozonated

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid regulates ozone-induced Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ozone-induced Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acid regulates ozone-induced Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Plant Molecular Biology 51:...

  6. Meteorological Simulations of Ozone Episode Case Days during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13,1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were petiormed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1,2,4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11-13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawirisonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. We found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

  7. 1 Ozone pollution forecasting 3 Herve Cardot, Christophe Crambes and Pascal Sarda.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crambes, Christophe

    Contents 1 Ozone pollution forecasting 3 Herv´e Cardot, Christophe Crambes and Pascal Sarda. 1;1 Ozone pollution forecasting using conditional mean and conditional quantiles with functional covariates Herv´e Cardot, Christophe Crambes and Pascal Sarda. 1.1 Introduction Prediction of Ozone pollution

  8. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, V. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cascio, W.E. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Phillips, P.M. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Andrews, D. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miller, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Doerfler, D.L. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kodavanti, U.P., E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased ?{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone metabolic effects are only slightly exacerbated in geriatric rats.

  9. Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 23, No. 3, September 2003 ( 2003) Ozone Production in the Negative DC Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    : Corona discharge; corona plasma; plasma reacting flow; ozone; electrostatic precipitator; Damkohler

  10. Learning about ozone depletion Paul J. Crutzen & Michael Oppenheimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    Learning about ozone depletion Paul J. Crutzen & Michael Oppenheimer Received: 12 January 2007 Mainz, Germany M. Oppenheimer (*) Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA e-mail: omichael@princeton.edu M. Oppenheimer Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International

  11. Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, W P L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. R. Holmes (1977): “Nitrogen Dioxide Photolysis in the LosO3 Ozone NO Nitric Oxide NO2 Nitrogen Dioxide NO3 NitrateNitrogen Pentoxide HONO Nitrous Acid HNO3 Nitric Acid HNO4 Peroxynitric Acid HO2H Hydrogen Peroxide CO Carbon Monoxide SO2 Sulfur Dioxide

  12. The Exposure-Response Curve for Ozone and Risk of Mortality and the Adequacy of Current Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    and applied several statistical models to data on air pollution, weather, and mortality for 98 U.S. urban mortality. Interventions to further reduce ozone pollution would benefit public health, even in regions pollutant linked to numerous harmful health effects, including reduced lung function, increased frequency

  13. Ensemble-Based Observation Targeting for Improving Ozone Prediction in Houston and the Surrounding Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , observation targeting, observational impact factor. 1. Introduction The severity of air pollution situations is deter- mined by a complicated interaction among three factors: the emissions to the atmosphere, chemical high-pollution concentrations form on a given day is dominated principally by meteorological processes

  14. Chemical characterization of ozone formation in the Houston-Galveston area: A chemical transport model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Constituent sources and sinks; 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305 of the atmosphere and hence the lifetime of reactive atmospheric pollutants and many re- duced chemical species. O3 model study Wenfang Lei1 and Renyi Zhang Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University

  15. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartment ofAnnouncement | Department of| Department of

  16. The effect of ozone on nicotine desorption from model surfaces:evidence for heterogeneous chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Singer, Brett C.; Lee, Sharon K.; Gundel, LaraA.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure using nicotine as a tracer or biomarker is affected by sorption of the alkaloid to indoor surfaces and by its long-term re-emission into the gas phase. However, surface chemical interactions of nicotine have not been sufficiently characterized. Here, the reaction of ozone with nicotine sorbed to Teflon and cotton surfaces was investigated in an environmental chamber by monitoring nicotine desorption over a week following equilibration in dry or humid air (65-70 % RH). The Teflon and cotton surfaces had N{sub 2}-BET surface areas of 0.19 and 1.17 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and water mass uptakes (at 70 % RH) of 0 and 7.1 % respectively. Compared with dry air baseline levels in the absence of O{sub 3}, gas phase nicotine concentrations decrease, by 2 orders of magnitude for Teflon after 50 h at 20-45 ppb O{sub 3}, and by a factor of 10 for cotton after 100 h with 13-15 ppb O{sub 3}. The ratios of pseudo first-order rate constants for surface reaction (r) to long-term desorption (k) were r/k = 3.5 and 2.0 for Teflon and cotton surfaces, respectively. These results show that surface oxidation was competitive with desorption. Hence, oxidative losses could significantly reduce long-term re-emissions of nicotine from indoor surfaces. Formaldehyde, N-methylformamide, nicotinaldehyde and cotinine were identified as oxidation products, indicating that the pyrrolidinic N was the site of electrophilic attack by O{sub 3}. The presence of water vapor had no effect on the nicotine-O{sub 3} reaction on Teflon surfaces. By contrast, nicotine desorption from cotton in humid air was unaffected by the presence of ozone. These observations are consistent with complete inhibition of ozone-nicotine surface reactions in an aqueous surface film present in cotton but not in Teflon surfaces.

  17. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

  18. CF[sub 3] chemistry: Potential implications for stratospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, M.K.W.; Sze, N.D.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Weistenstein, D.K.; Heisey, C.W. (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Wayne, R.P.; Biggs, P.; Canosa-Mas, C.E. (Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sidebottom, H.W.; Treacy, J. (Univ. College, Dublin (Ireland))

    1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors address questions about the chemistry of CF[sub 3] bearing compounds in the atmosphere, and the impact that the existence of and reaction rate constants for such species may have on stratospheric ozone. Species considered include CF[sub 3], CF[sub 3]O, CF[sub 3]O[sub 2], CF[sub 3]OH, CF[sub 3]OOH, CF[sub 3]ONO[sub 2], CF[sub 3]O[sub 2]NO[sub 2], and CF[sub 3]OOCl. Based on their calculational results, the authors suggest a number of experimental measurements which should substantially decrease uncertainties associated with the role of CF[sub 3] species in atmospheric chemistry related to ozone.

  19. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND OZONE ON AMORPHOUS SILICATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Dapeng; He Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco [Physics Department, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Brucato, John Robert; Tozzetti, Lorenzo [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, I-50125 Florence (Italy); De Sio, Antonio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, I-50125 Florence (Italy)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen in the interstellar medium is seen in the gas phase, in ices (incorporated in H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}), and in grains such as (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} )SiO{sub 3} or (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} ){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, 0 < x < 1. In this investigation, we study the diffusion of oxygen atoms and the formation of oxygen molecules and ozone on the surface of an amorphous silicate film. We find that ozone is formed at low temperature (<30 K), and molecular oxygen forms when the diffusion of oxygen atoms becomes significant, at around 60 K. This experiment, besides being the first determination of the diffusion energy barrier (1785 {+-} 35 K) for oxygen atoms on a silicate surface, suggests bare silicates as a possible storage place for oxygen atoms in low-A{sub v} environments.

  20. Meeting the New Ozone Standard: Challenges and Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation by Anna Garcia, executive director of the Ozone Transport Commission, was part of the July 2008 Webcast sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Clean Energy and Air Quality Integration Initiative that was titled Role of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Improving Air Quality and Addressing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals on High Electric Demand Days.

  1. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User Facilities

  2. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ozone loss Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry Summary: stratospheric ozone losses during cold Arctic Januaries, M. Rex, R. J. Salaw- itch, M. L. Santee, J. W. Waters... , and UARS MLS to demonstrate that the...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric ozone depletion Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78992007 Summary: ozone depletion based on sequential assimilation of satellite data from the ENVISATMIPAS and Odin... 2007 Abstract. The objective of this study...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient ozone exposure Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 12 Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials: Preliminary...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric ozone increases Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 78 Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 336 Time-Scale Analysis for Reactive Deposition of Ozone via Passive...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorate ozone effects Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: students confuse the relationship between the ozone hole and the greenhouse effect, thus confusing... , and to suggest more effective teaching methods. 2....

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing ground ozone Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are analyzed... to superposition of the "natural" pro- cesses. Comparison of the total ozone ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

  9. Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 22, No. 4, December 2002 ( 2002) Ozone Production in the Positive DC Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 22, No. 4, December 2002 ( 2002) Ozone Production the distribution of ozone, but does not affect the rate of production. KEY WORDS: Corona discharge; corona plasma

  10. Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirksen, Ruud

    Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, in situ ambient absorption gas cell mea- surements for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and ground-based zenith for ozone and nitrogen dioxide that are retrieved from measured spectra of the zenith sky

  11. Ensemble forecasting with machine learning algorithms for ozone, nitrogen dioxide and PM10 on the Prev'Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, Vivien

    Ensemble forecasting with machine learning algorithms for ozone, nitrogen dioxide and PM10'Air operational platform. This platform aims at forecasting maps, on a daily basis, for ozone, nitrogen dioxide models, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, threshold exceedance 1. Introduction1 Operational

  12. Experimental study of reactions between ozone and building products M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ozone and building products and document their potential impact on indoor air quality. PreliminaryExperimental study of reactions between ozone and building products M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F experiments were conducted on four building products: two carpets, a gypsum board and a pine wood board

  13. Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns E. A. Celarier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns E. A. Celarier,1 E. J. Brinksma the standard nitrogen dioxide (NO2) data product (Version 1.0.), which is based on measurements made), Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D15S15, doi:10

  14. Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring; published 28 August 2008. [1] We present an approach to infer ground-level nitrogen dioxide (NO2), Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring

  15. Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Summary Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates be inferred for important trace gases such as ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Chemical transport models.11 to 3.79. Total nitrogen dioxide columns can be retrieved from space in the 405­465 nm window

  16. Tropospheric ozone trends at Mauna Loa Observatory tied to decadal climate variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii reveal little change in tropospheric ozone levels during spring a suite of chemistry­climate model simulations. We show that the flow of ozone-rich air from Eurasia towards Hawaii during spring weakened in the 2000s as a result of La-Niña-like decadal cooling

  17. PPPL-3281, Preprint: January 1998, UC-426 Synthesis of Ozone at Atmospheric Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to ~250 ppm were produced using a thermal plasma reactor system based on an ICP torch operating at 2.5 MHz by rapid mixing of molecular oxygen with atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The ozone concentration in industrial processes is increasing. Applications for ozone include treatment of waste water, water

  18. Separating the dynamical effects of climate change and ozone depletion. Part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    ) fixed at 1960 levels and ozone depleting substances (ODSs) varying in time, 2) ODSs fixed at 1960 levels averaged wave drag in SH spring and summer, as well as for final warming dates. Ozone depletion a significant impact on the stratosphere on both a global and a regional scale. Over the past three decades

  19. Chapter Descriptions, Parties Request, and Timetable 2010 WMO/UNEP Ozone Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jánosi, Imre M.

    AND SURFACE ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION CHAPTER 3: FUTURE OZONE AND ITS IMPACT ON SURFACE UV CHAPTER 4) of this 2010 ozone assessment. It provides updated information on degradation products which could have of understanding on ODS degradation products in the stratosphere (e.g., HCl, HF, BrO, CF2O), examines how

  20. The Role of Material Porosity on Ozone Uptake for Metakaolin-Concrete Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    to a diminished environmental impact, clay may cause increased removal of ozone, an important indoor pollutant velocity, Heterogeneous Chemistry, Construction Materials 1 Introduction Metakaolin-cement systems hold ozone uptake. Cement is an essential component in the building industry used in formulating concrete

  1. Simultaneous retrievals of column ozone and aerosol optical properties from direct and diffuse solar irradiance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    of column ozone and aerosol optical properties from direct and diffuse solar irradiance measurements, JSimultaneous retrievals of column ozone and aerosol optical properties from direct and diffuse solar irradiance measurements Christian D. Goering,1 Tristan S. L'Ecuyer,1 Graeme L. Stephens,1 James R

  2. Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion of Silver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion The corrosion of Ag contaminated with NaCl particles in gaseous environments containing humidity and ozone analyzed using a coulometric reduction technique. The atmospheric corrosion of Ag was greatly accelerated

  3. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2006 Home Work Assignment No. 4, Ozone Chemistry Problems 11.8 and 11.9 (sub-part 1 and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

  4. Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpasuvan, Varavut

    Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change? Dennis L. Hartmann of Climate Change (IPCC) assess- ment of the status of global warming, which reported that winter stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse warming are possible. These interactions may be responsible

  5. NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307­313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp , and Dennis R. Decoteau1 Abstract - Sixteen selections of Apocynum cannabinum (Indian Hemp) and nine, adaxial stipple, similar to symptoms ascribed to ambient ozone in the field. Indian Hemp was more

  6. Surface ozone background in the United States: Canadian and Mexican pollution influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Rokjin

    of anthropogenic emissions from Canada, Mexico, and outside North America on daily maximum 8-hour average ozone Surface ozone Air quality standard Chemical transport model Global model a b s t r a c t We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) with 1 Ă? 1 horizontal resolution to quantify the effects

  7. Stratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In this paper we focus on South Eastern South America (SESA), a region that has exhibited one of the largest South America 1 Introduction The depletion of ozone in the polar Antarctic strato- sphere (i.e. `theStratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South

  8. Tropospheric ozone climatology over Irene, South Africa, from 1990 to 1994 and 1998 to 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Tropospheric ozone climatology over Irene, South Africa, from 1990 to 1994 and 1998 to 2002 R. D in South Africa are reported for the period 1990 to 1994 and a more recent period, 1998 to 2002, when), Tropospheric ozone climatology over Irene, South Africa, from 1990 to 1994 and 1998 to 2002, J. Geophys. Res

  9. Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials Paper # 715 Donna A and unpainted drywall as passive ozone control surfaces in a room-sized laboratory chamber. Mean deposition-50%, resulted in increased reactivity for activated carbon. In our model for a typical house, about 35

  10. Southeast Idaho Area Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

  11. INFLUENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE AND CARBON DIOXIDE ON INSECT DENSITIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DELUCIA, E.; DERMODY, O.; O'NEILL, B.; ALDEA, M.; HAMILTON, J.; ZANGERL, A.; ROGER, A.; BERENBAUM, M.

    2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The combustion of fossil fuels is profoundly altering the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Beginning with the Industrial Revolution, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased from approximately 280 to 370 {micro}l l{sup -1} in 2004, and it is expected to exceed 550 {micro}l l{sup -1} by 2050. Tropospheric ozone has risen even more rapidly than CO{sub 2} and average summer concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere are expected to continue to increase by 0.5-2.5% per year over the next 30 years. Although elevated CO{sub 2} stimulates photosynthesis and productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, ozone (O{sub 3}) is deleterious. In addition to directly affecting the physiology and productivity of crops, increased concentrations of tropospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} are predicted to lower the nutritional quality of leaves, which has the potential to increase herbivory as insects eat more to meet their nutritional demands. We tested the hypothesis that changes in tropospheric chemistry affect the relationship between plants and insect herbivores by changing leaf quality. The susceptibility to herbivory of soybean grown in elevated CO{sub 2} or O{sub 3} was examined using free air gas concentration enrichment (SoyFACE). FACE technology has the advantage that plants are cultivated under realistic field conditions with no unwanted alteration of microclimate or artificial constraints on the insect community.

  12. THE IMPACT OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABLE LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherburne, Carol [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Remediation, LLC; Osterberg, Paul [Fauske and Associates, LLC, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Johnson, Tom [Fauske and Associates, LLC, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Frawely, Thomas [Fauske and Associates, LLC, Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site, in conjunction with AREVA Federal services, has designed a process to treat dissolved radioactive waste solids with ozone. It is known that in this radioactive waste process, radionuclides radiolytically break down water into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, which presents a well defined flammability hazard. Flammability limits have been established for both ozone and hydrogen separately; however, there is little information on mixtures of hydrogen and ozone. Therefore, testing was designed to provide critical flammability information necessary to support safety related considerations for the development of ozone treatment and potential scale-up to the commercial level. Since information was lacking on flammability issues at low levels of hydrogen and ozone, a testing program was developed to focus on filling this portion of the information gap. A 2-L vessel was used to conduct flammability tests at atmospheric pressure and temperature using a fuse wire ignition source at 1 percent ozone intervals spanning from no ozone to the Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) of ozone in the vessel, determined as 8.4%(v/v) ozone. An ozone generator and ozone detector were used to generate and measure the ozone concentration within the vessel in situ, since ozone decomposes rapidly on standing. The lower flammability limit of hydrogen in an ozone-oxygen mixture was found to decrease from the LFL of hydrogen in air, determined as 4.2 % (v/v) in this vessel. From the results of this testing, Savannah River was able to develop safety procedures and operating parameters to effectively minimize the formation of a flammable atmosphere.

  13. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  14. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  15. Oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) by ozone and combined ozone/hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, N.K.V.; Papailhou, A.L.; Croue, J.P.; Dore, M. (Univ. de Poitiers (France)); Peyrot, J. (British Petroleum, Harfleur (France))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work was to study the reaction of ozone and combined ozone/hydrogen peroxide on oxygenated additives such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) in dilute aqueous solution using controlled experimental conditions. Experiments conducted in a semi-continuous reactor with MTBE and ETBE in combination (initial concentration: 2 mmol/L of each) showed that ETBE was better eliminated than MTBE with both ozone and combined O[sub 3]/H[sub 2]O[sub 2]. batch experiments led to the determination of the ratio of the kinetic constants for the reaction of OH[degree]-radical with MTBE and ETBE (k[sub OH[degree]/ETBE]/k[sub OH[degree]//MTBE] = 1.7). Tert-butyl formate and tert-butyl acetate were identified as the ozonation byproducts of MTBE an ETBE, respectively, while tert-butyl alcohol was found to be produced during the ozonation of both compounds. 10 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Detailed Analysis of Thermal Mass Effects in a Code-Traceable DOE-2 Simulation of the 2000 IECC for a Single-Family Residence in Texas: A Project for Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Nonattainment and Affected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the thermal mass effects in a code-traceable DOE-2 simulation of the 2000 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) for a single-family residence in Texas. This report is composed of two major simulations: 1) the simulation...

  17. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry LaBuz; Rui Afonso

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the fourth quarterly report and it refers to the time period from January to March 2004. The on-site deployment and testing of the ozonation system took place during this period. This report summarizes these activities including some preliminary results. No significant issues or concerns are identified.

  18. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  19. Three-dimensional simulations of wintertime ozone variability in the lower stratosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, R.B.; Douglass, A.R.; Kaye, J.A. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA)); Geller, M.A.; Yuechen, Chi (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA)); Allen, D.J.; Larson, E.M.; Nash, E.R.; Nielsen, J.E. (Applied Research Corp., Landover, MD (USA))

    1991-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of ozone has been calculated for the winters of 1979 and 1989 using winds derived from the authors stratospheric data assimilation system (STRATAN). The ozone fields calculated using this technique are found to compare well with satellite-measured fields for simulations of 2-3 months. Here the authors present comparisons of model fields with both satellite and sonde measurements to verify that stratospheric transport processes are properly represented by this modeling technique. Attention is focussed on the northern hemisphere middle and high latitudes at the 10-hPa level and below, where transport processes are most important to the ozone distribution. First-order quantities and derived budgets from both the model and satellite data are presented. By sampling the model with a limb-viewing satellite and then Kalman filtering the observations of the model, it is shown that transient subplanetary-scale features that are essential to the ozone budget are missed by the satellite system.

  20. Climatology and Trends in the Forcing of the Stratospheric Ozone Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    A thorough analysis of the ozone transport was carried out using the Transformed-Mean Eulerian (TEM) tracer transport equation and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re- Analysis (ERA-40). In ...

  1. A Spatial Econometric Approach to Measuring Pollution Externalities: An Application to Ozone Smog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    A Spatial Econometric Approach to Measuring Pollution Externalities: An Application to Ozone Smog C.-Y. Cynthia Lin University of California at Davis ­ USA Abstract. This paper uses spatial econometrics

  2. Evaluation of a novel ozone generation technique for disinfection of poultry hatchers and processed broiler carcasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Gerardo Arturo

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When comparing electrochemically generated ozone(03)(2.94.2 wt % inside the (hatcher) and formaldehyde (16 n-A formalin + 7.5 g potassium pertnanganate) for disinfection of Salmonella enteiltidis (SE) contaminated agar plates and typical hatchery...

  3. Climatology and trends in the forcing of the stratospheric ozone transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    A thorough analysis of the ozone transport was carried out using the Transformed-Mean Eulerian (TEM) tracer continuity equation and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40). In ...

  4. Atmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 28292838 Diurnal and seasonal cycles of ozone precursors observed from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingenter, Oliver W.

    characteristics. Ethane and propane, largely originated from leakage of natural gas or liquefied petroleum gases) and nitrogen oxides (NO+NO2 ÂĽ NOx), ozone is photochemically pro- duced and can accumulate to hazardous levels

  5. Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: Exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian Rural Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, B.R.; Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Jones, L.; Kearney, J.; Franklin, C.A. (Environmental Health Directorate, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities in areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV[sub 1.0]), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF[sub 25-75]), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V[sub 50]max). After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P < 0.01) mean decrements of 1.7% in FVC and 1.3% in FEV[sub 1.0] compared with Saskatchewan children, after adjusting for age, sex, weight, standing height, parental smoking, and gas cooking. There were no statistically significant regional differences in the pulmonary flow parameters (P > 0.05). 54 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  6. Formation of ozone and oxidation of methane in a direct current corona discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tangirala, Umashanker

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FORMATION OF OZONE AND OXIDATION OF METHANE IN A DIRECT CURRENT CORONA DISCHARGE A Thesis by UMASHANKER TANGIRALA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1976 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering FORMATION OF OZONE AND OXIDATION OF METHANE IN A DIRECT CURRENT CORONA DISCHARGE A Thesis by UMASHANKER TANGIRALA Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ( ad of Department...

  7. Ozone response of foliage and cells of sensitive and tolerant potato cultivars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illman, B.L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ozone response was contrasted between Cherokee' and Norchip', relatively ozone-sensitive and -tolerant potato cultivars, respectively. Leaf conductance of the two cultivars was determined with a diffusive resistance porometer before, during and after a 3-hour exposure to 0.25 ppm ozone (490 ..mu..g m3). While Cherokee foliage had a higher leaf conductance at the onset of the ozone exposure, conductance of Norchip foliage was too high throughout the experiment to account for relative tolerance of the latter cultivar. Norchip and Cherokee both exhibited abaxial and bifacial necrosis with more numerous lesions on the abaxial surface. Abaxial and bifacial necrosis were characterized by injured spongy, and spongy plus palisade cells, respectively. The percent of injured cell types were the same in both cultivars, but the absolute number of cells injured was greater in Cherokee than Norchip. Two types of cell injury were observed in necrotic lesions. One type of injury was characterized by collapsed, basophilic cells and the other by intact, basophilic cells. The ozone response of isolated leaf protoplasts of the two cultivars was similar. Two types of protoplast injury were observed, one characterized by lysis and the other by reduced staining with fluorescein diacetate. Maximum protoplast response to ozone was observed within the first 5 minutes of a 15 minute exposure. Little additional protoplast response occurred after 10 minutes.

  8. Nanoscale Discharge Electrode for Minimizing Ozone Emission from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    functionatexcessiveconcentrationlevelsinpoorlyventilated areas, causing/aggravating chest pains, asthma, coughing, shortness of breath, and throat

  9. Optimization of stabilized leachate treatment using ozone/persulfate in the advanced oxidation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu Amr, Salem S. [School of Civil Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Aziz, Hamidi Abdul, E-mail: cehamidi@eng.usm.my [School of Civil Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Adlan, Mohd Nordin [School of Civil Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Ozone and persulfate reagent (O{sub 3}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) was used to treat stabilized leachate. ? Central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM) was applied. ? Operating variables including ozone and persulfate dosage, pH variance, and reaction time. ? Optimum removal of COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N was 72%, 96%, and 76%, respectively. ? A good value of ozone consumption (OC) obtained with 0.60 (kg O{sub 3}/kg COD). - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of employing persulfate reagent in the advanced oxidation of ozone to treat stabilized landfill leachate in an ozone reactor. A central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate the relationships between operating variables, such as ozone and persulfate dosages, pH, and reaction time, to identify the optimum operating conditions. Quadratic models for the following four responses proved to be significant with very low probabilities (<0.0001): COD, color, NH{sub 3}–N, and ozone consumption (OC). The obtained optimum conditions included a reaction time of 210 min, 30 g/m{sup 3} ozone, 1 g/1 g COD{sub 0}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} ratio, and pH 10. The experimental results were corresponded well with predicted models (COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N removal rates of 72%, 96%, and 76%, respectively, and 0.60 (kg O{sub 3}/kg COD OC). The results obtained in the stabilized leachate treatment were compared with those from other treatment processes, such as ozone only and persulfate S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} only, to evaluate its effectiveness. The combined method (i.e., O{sub 3}/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) achieved higher removal efficiencies for COD, color, and NH{sub 3}–N compared with other studied applications. Furthermore, the new method is more efficient than ozone/Fenton in advanced oxidation process in the treatment of the same studied leachate.

  10. Proposed Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: Revision on Subpart 1 Area Reclassification and Anti-Backsliding Provisions Under Former 1-Hour Ozone Standard; Proposed Deletion of Obsolete 1-Hour Ozone Standard Provision

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronicNORTH LAS VEGASEly District Record

  11. Air-Quality Data from NARSTO (North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NARSTO is a public/private partnership dedicated to improving management of air quality in North America. It was established on February 13, 1995 when representatives of Canada, the United States, and Mexico signed the NARSTO Charter in a ceremony at the White House. The Department of Energy is one of the charter members providing funding. The central programmatic goal of NARSTO is to provide data and information for use in the determination of workable, efficient, and effective strategies for local and regional ozone and fine particle management. Since its founding, NARSTO has completed three major scientific Assessments of critical air quality management issues. NARSTO maintains the Quality Systems Science Center and the NARSTO Data Archive for storing data from NARSTO Affiliated Research Activities and making these data available to the scientific community. NARSTO also facilitates activities, such as the Reactivity Research Working Group, which provide critical reviews of the state of the science in areas of interest to air quality policy makers. In January 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Sciences Division announced their sponsorship of the NARSTO Quality Systems Science Center (QSSC). The QSSC is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory within the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). Quality Assurance and Data Management assistance and guidelines are provided by the QSCC, along with access to data files. The permanent data archive is maintained by the NASA EOSDIS Distributed Active Archive Center at the Langley Research Center. The archived data can be reached by a link from the QSSC.(Specialized Interface) See also the NARSTO web site at http://www.narsto.org/

  12. The pulmonary response of white and black adults to six concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seal, E. Jr.; McDonnell, W.F.; House, D.E.; Salaam, S.A.; Dewitt, P.J.; Butler, S.O.; Green, J.; Raggio, L. (Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many early studies of respiratory responsiveness to ozone (O3) were done on healthy, young, white males. The purpose of this study was to determine whether gender or race differences in O3 response exist among white and black, males and females, and to develop concentration-response curves for each of the gender-race groups. Three hundred seventy-two subjects (n > 90 in each gender-race group), ages 18 to 35 yr, were exposed once for 2.33 h to 0.0 (purified air), 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, 0.30, or 0.40 ppm O3. Each exposure was preceded by baseline pulmonary function tests and a symptom questionnaire. The first 2 h of exposure included alternating 15-min periods of rest and exercise on a motorized treadmill producing a minute ventilation (VE) of 25 L/min/m2 body surface area (BSA). After exposure, subjects completed a set of pulmonary function tests and a symptom questionnaire. Lung function and symptom responses were expressed as percent change from baseline and analyzed using a nonparametric two factor analysis of variance. Three primary variables were analyzed: FEV1, specific airway resistance (SRaw), and cough. Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant differences in response to O3 among the individual gender-race groups. For the group as a whole, changes in the variables FEV1, SRaw, and cough were first noted at 0.12, 0.18, and 0.18 ppm O3, respectively. Adjusted for exercise difference, concentration-response curves for FEV1 and cough among white males were consistent with previous reports (1).

  13. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  14. Fading of alizarin and related artists's pigments by atmospheric ozone: reaction products and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosjean, D.; Whitmore, P.M.; De Moor, C.P.; Cass, G.R.; Druzik, J.R.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The colorants alizarin and Alizarin Crimson (a calcium-aluminum lake pigment) and their simple structural homologue anthraquinone were deposited on silica gel, cellulose, and Teflon substrates and exposed in the dark to ozone in purified air (approx.0.4 ppm O/sub 3/ for 95 days and approx.10 ppm O/sub 3/ for 18-80 h). Exposed and control samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Alizarin Crimson reacted with ozone on all substrates, yielding phthalic acid (major), benzoic acid (minor), and other minor and unidentified products. Anthraquinone did not react with ozone irrespective of conditions. Alizarin did not react on Teflon or cellulose but reacted on silica gel to yield phthalic acid (major) and other products. A chemical mechanism responsible for the fading of these alizarin-related colorants by ozone is suggested that is consistent with the products distribution, the observed reactivity sequence, and the observed substrate-specific effects. The possible application of this work to predicting the ozone fastness of other alizarin-related pigments is discussed briefly. 33 references, 5 figures.

  15. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  16. Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean increases18 in global (excluding China) anthropogenic emissions, 37% to Chinese emission19 increases

  17. A numerical study of mass transfer of ozone dissolution in bubble plumes with an Euler-Lagrange Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Huaxiong

    , as a model problem for a water purification system. The effect of bubble diameter and plume structure on mass are widely observed and exploited in engineering applications, with water purification using ozone bubble the mass transfer process of ozone dissolution in a bubble plume inside a rectangular water tank

  18. Impact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    indoor air quality (IAQ) since they produce secondary pollutants, mainly aldehydes which are known to document the impact on IAQ of outdoor ozone during summer air pollution episodes. For this purpose, a oneImpact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F

  19. THE EFFECT OF THE PRESENCE OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABILITY LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherburne, C.

    2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process uses ozone to effect the oxidation of metal oxalates produced during the dissolution of sludge in the Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks. The ozone reacts with the metal oxalates to form metal oxide and hydroxide precipitants, and the CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and any unreacted O{sub 3} gases are discharged into the vapor space. In addition to the non-radioactive metals in the waste, however, the SRS radioactive waste also contains a variety of radionuclides, hence, hydrogen gas is also present in the vapor space of the ECC system. Because hydrogen is flammable, the impact of this resultant gas stream on the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL) of hydrogen must be understood for all possible operating scenarios of both normal and off-normal situations, with particular emphasis at the elevated temperatures and pressures of the typical ECC operating conditions. Oxygen is a known accelerant in combustion reactions, but while there are data associated with the behavior of hydrogen/oxygen environments, recent, relevant studies addressing the effect of ozone on the flammability limit of hydrogen proved scarce. Further, discussions with industry experts verified the absence of data in this area and indicated that laboratory testing, specific to defined operating parameters, was needed to comprehensively address the issue. Testing was thus designed and commissioned to provide the data necessary to support safety related considerations for the ECC process. A test matrix was developed to envelope the bounding conditions considered credible during ECC processing. Each test consists of combining a gas stream of high purity hydrogen with a gas stream comprised of a specified mixture of ozone and oxygen in a temperature and pressure regulated chamber such that the relative compositions of the two streams are controlled. The gases are then stirred to obtain a homogeneous mixture and ignition attempted by applying 10J of energy to a fuse wire. A gas combination is considered flammable when a pressure rise of 7% of the initial absolute pressure is observed. The specified testing methodology is consistent with guidelines established in ASTM E-918-83 (2005) 'Standard Practices for Determining Limits of Flammability of Chemicals at Elevated Temperature and Pressure'.

  20. Laboratory measurement of secondary pollutant yields from ozone reaction with HVAC filters.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We used Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional sampling methods to monitor and identify trace level organic pollutants formed in heterogeneous reactions between ozone and HVAC filters in real time. Experiments were carried out using a bench-scale flow tube reactor operating with dry air and humidified air (50% RH), at realistically high ozone concentrations (150 ppbv). We explored different filter media (i.e., fiberglass and cotton/polyester blends) and different particle loadings (i.e., clean filter and filters loaded with particles for 3 months at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Port of Oakland, CA). Detailed emission dynamics of very low levels of certain organic pollutants from filter media upon ozone exposure in the presence of moisture have been obtained and analyzed.

  1. Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals gives accurate forward barrier heights; however, it significantly underestimates reaction energies.

  2. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basalt K Eburru Geothermal Area Eburru Geothermal Area East African Rift System Kenya Rift Basalt Fukushima Geothermal Area Fukushima Geothermal Area Northeast Honshu Arc...

  3. METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA OUTLOOK MORGANTOWN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS Bureau to be repeated over the next five years. The Morgantown Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had an average annual

  4. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  5. Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also...

  6. Protected Areas Stacy Philpott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    · Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas · Natural preservation · Research · No · No #12;II. National Parks · Ecosystem protection

  7. Study of air pollution: Effects of ozone on neuropeptide-mediated responses in human subjects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boushey, H.A.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study examined the hypothesis that ozone inactivates the enzyme, neutral endopeptidase, responsible for limiting the effects of neuropeptides released from afferent nerve endings. Cough response of capsaicin solution delivered from a nebulizer at 2 min. intervals until two or more coughs were produced. Other endpoints measured included irritative symptoms as rated by the subjects on a nonparametric scale, spirometry, of each concentration of ozone were compared to those of filtered air in a single-blind randomized sequence. The results indicate that a 2 h. exposure to 0.4 ppm of ozone with intermittent light exercise alters the sensitivity of airway nerves that mediate the cough response to inhaled materials. This dose of ozone also caused a change in FEV1. A lower level of ozone, 0.02 ppm, caused a change in neither cough threshold nor FEV1, even when the duration of exposure was extended to three hours. The findings are consistent with the author's hypothesis that ozone may sensitize nerve endings in the airways by inactivating neutral endopeptidase, an enzyme that regulates their activity, but they do not demonstrate that directly examining an effect directly mediated by airway nerves allows detection of effects of ozone at doses below those causing effects detected by standard tests of pulmonary function.

  8. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  9. Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickley, Loretta J.

    Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution) The nitrogen-fixing legume kudzu (Pueraria montana) is a wide- spread invasive plant in the southeastern United the effects of kudzu invasions on soils and trace N gas emissions at three sites in Madison County, Georgia

  10. Effects of Ion-Exchange Treatment on Bromate Formation and Oxidation Efficiency during Ozonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    water treatment. In this study, we applied several different ion exchangers (i.e., anion exchange resins technologies in advanced drinking water treatment processes along with activated carbon treatment. Ozonation), chlorine-resistant pathogenic organisms, and various micropollutants in drinking water treatment. In Japan

  11. Constraining global isoprene emissions with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) formaldehyde column measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Constraining global isoprene emissions with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) formaldehyde emission estimates are highly uncertain because of a lack of direct observations. Formaldehyde (HCHO the observation of this trace gas to help constrain isoprene emissions. We use HCHO column observations from

  12. Three-dimensional modeling of ozone on Mars Franck Lefe`vre,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, François

    picture of a global anticorrelation between the ozone (O3) and water vapor columns. However and Structure: Middle atmosphere--constituent transport and chemistry (3334); 5405 Planetology: Solid Surface Planets: Atmospheres--composition and chemistry; 6225 Planetology: Solar System Objects: Mars; KEYWORDS

  13. The impact of large scale biomass production on ozone air pollution in Joost B. Beltman a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    The impact of large scale biomass production on ozone air pollution in Europe Joost B. Beltman a , Carlijn Hendriks a , Markus Tum b , Martijn Schaap a,* a TNO, Department of Climate, Air by up to 25% and 40%. Air pollution mitigation strategies should consider land use management. a r t i

  14. Synthesis of nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle and dye degradation using photocatalytic ozonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad, E-mail: mahmoodi@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Environmental Research, Institute for Color Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bashiri, Marziyeh; Moeen, Shirin Jebeli [Department of Environmental Research, Institute for Color Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Environmental Research, Institute for Color Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle (NZFMN) was synthesized and characterized. ? Dye degradation by photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN was studied. ? Formate, acetate and oxalate were detected as dominant dye degradation aliphatic intermediates. ? Nitrate, sulfate and chloride ions were detected as mineralization products of dyes. ? NZFMN was an effective magnetic nanocatalyst to degrade dyes. -- Abstract: In this paper, nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle (NZFMN) was synthesized and its dye degradation ability using photocatalytic ozonation was investigated. The NZFMN was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) and alternative gradient force magnetometer (AGFM). Reactive Red 198 (RR198) and Direct Green 6 (DG6) were used as dye models. UV–vis and ion chromatography (IC) analyses were employed to study dye degradation. The effects of operational parameters on decolorization such as NZFMN dosage, dye concentration, salt and pH were studied. RR198 and DG6 were completely decolorized (100%) by photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN. Formate, acetate and oxalate anions were detected as dominant aliphatic intermediates. Nitrate, sulfate and chloride ions were detected as mineralization products of dyes. Results showed that the photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN was a very effective method for dye degradation.

  15. Supporting Information for Impact of Chlorine Emissions from Sea-Salt Aerosol on Coastal Urban Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    DIOXIDE H2O2 HYDROGEN PEROXIDE NH3 AMMONIA NIT AEROSOL NITRATE SO2 SULFUR DIOXIDE SO3 SULFUR TRIOXIDE OSD extensions* NO NITRIC OXIDE NO2 NITROGEN DIOXIDE O3 OZONE HONO NITROUS ACID HNO3 NITRIC ACID HNO4 PERNITRIC ACID N2O5 NITROGEN PENTOXIDE NO3 NITRATE RADICAL HO2 HYDROPEROXY RADICAL CO CARBON MONOXIDE CO2 CARBON

  16. INTERRELAITONS BETWEEN VARIABILITY OF GROUND-LEVEL OZONE AND LAND COVER CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    ozone monitoring stations in Connecticut and Rohde Island were used for the analysis. The monitoring stations were classified into different categories based on their locations and land cover characteristics. Cars and gasoline-burning engines are large sources of VOCs. VOCs also come from consumer products

  17. Growth and crown architecture of two aspen genotypes exposed to interacting ozone and carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Growth and crown architecture of two aspen genotypes exposed to interacting ozone and carbon to O3, atmos- pheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing rapidly (Keeling et al., 1995 concentrations may offset the detrimental effects of increasing O3 (Allen, 1990). Some studies have shown that CO

  18. A Laboratory Method For Measuring The Ozone Emission From In-duct Air Cleaners.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    : Emission rate, HVAC air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators, coronas, standard test method 1 Introduction Subchapter 8.7). However, in-duct air cleaners including electronic air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators of an ozone analyzer. Viner et al. (1992) studied commercial in-duct electrostatic precipitators and observed

  19. Earth'sFuture Stratospheric ozone response to a solar irradiance reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, Charles H.

    the stratospheric ozone response to a proposed geoengineering activity wherein a reduced top-of-atmosphere (TOA to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Experiment G1. Three primary simulations were completed geoengineering activities have been proposed as possible techniques to help counteract the ongoing climate change

  20. Stratospheric ozone response to sulfate geoengineering: Results from the Geoengineering Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Stratospheric ozone response to sulfate geoengineering: Results from the Geoengineering Model for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA Abstract Geoengineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosols has the experiments G3 and G4 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. On average, the models simulate

  1. Probing into regional ozone and particulate matter pollution in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    ) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution and associated health effects have been one of the majorProbing into regional ozone and particulate matter pollution in the United States: 1. A 1 year CMAQ-term simulations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and subsequent process analyses

  2. Ozone depletion during the solar proton events of October//November 2003 as seen by SCIAMACHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-JĂĽrgen

    Ozone depletion during the solar proton events of October//November 2003 as seen by SCIAMACHY G changes caused by the solar proton events from 26 October to 6 November 2003, known as the ``Halloween differences are given. Two regimes can be distinguished, one above about 50 km dominated by HOx (H, OH, HO2

  3. PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Influence of UV irradiation and ozone on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of purified humid air containing predetermined quantities of SO2, NO2, H2S, Cl2, HCI, NH3 and O3. This lackPublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Influence of UV irradiation and ozone by ultraviolet (UV) light was investigated. A modified coulometric reduction technique was used, substituting

  4. Earth'sFuture Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Earth'sFuture Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss following a regional nuclear inertia and albedo effects in the ocean and expanded sea ice. The combined cooling and enhanced UV would put significant pressures on global food supplies and could trigger a global nuclear famine. Knowledge

  5. Interactions of ozone and pathogens on the surface structure of Norway spruce needles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Interactions of ozone and pathogens on the surface structure of Norway spruce needles K. Ojanperä S and pathogens. It also acts as a barrier to air pollutants (Jeffree, 1986). The epicuticular wax of Norway and then a plate-like wax structure (Sauter and Voss, 1986). The life span of healthy needles of Norway spruce

  6. Characterization and correction of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 ultraviolet measurements and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    analysis indicates that reflectance degradation began at the beginning of the mission; the reflectance degrades by 15% around 290 nm and by 2.2% around 325 nm from 2007 through 2009. Degradation shows of radiance in the ultraviolet (UV) region is essential for retrievals of ozone profiles especially

  7. White Pine Emission Trends of Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes After Acute Ozone Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    White Pine Emission Trends of Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes After Acute Ozone Exposure Daniel M of White Pine (Pinus strobus) specimens located at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). To measure terpene production, dynamic branch enclosures were simultaneously positioned on White Pine

  8. Thickness influence on surface morphology and ozone sensing properties of nanostructured ZnO transparent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 71004 Heraklion, Crete, Greece Available online 19 January 2006 Abstract Transparent zinc oxide (Zn Keywords: Zinc oxide; PLD; AFM; Ozone 1. Introduction Zinc oxide (ZnO) is an n-type semiconductor devices [3], varistors, planar optical waveguides [4], transparent electrodes [5,6], ultraviolet

  9. A neural emission-receptor model for ozone reduction S.Barazzetta, G. Corani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corani, Giorgio

    in air pollution studies because of their impact on human health and agricultural crops and forests. High,guariso@elet.polimi.it Abstract: Ground level ozone pollution is a complex phenomenon heavily affecting industrialized and pop problem that determines the least cost alternatives to obtain a given air quality standard. The decision

  10. Author's personal copy Digestive utilization of ozone-exposed forage by rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditchkoff, Steve

    Author's personal copy Digestive utilization of ozone-exposed forage by rabbits (Oryctolagus Digestibility Forage quality Herbivore nutrition Phenolics Rabbits Southern Piedmont a b s t r a c t A mixture) in a digestibility experiment. Forages and feed refusals were analyzed for concentrations of total cell wall

  11. The Economic Impact of Global Climate and Tropospheric Ozone on World Agricultural Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Xiaodu (Dulles) Wang Bachelor of Science with majors in Electrical Engineering, Economics and ComputerThe Economic Impact of Global Climate and Tropospheric Ozone on World Agricultural Production Engineering The Johns Hopkins University, June 2003 Submitted to the Engineering Systems Division

  12. Net ecosystem fluxes of isoprene over tropical South America inferred from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Net ecosystem fluxes of isoprene over tropical South America inferred from Global Ozone Monitoring estimate isoprene emissions over tropical South America during 1997­2001 using column measurements (ATSR) firecounts and GOME NO2 columns. We find that South America can be split into eastern and western

  13. Ground-level ozone in the 21st century: future trends,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ground-level ozone in the 21st century: future trends, impacts and policy implications October 2008 Price ÂŁ39 web royalsociety.org Science Policy REPORT 15/08 #12;Cover image: Sunrise over the River Ganges in Varanasi, India showing a sunny and polluted sky, characteristic of photochemical smog

  14. Transport of Asian ozone pollution into surface air over the western United States in spring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transport of Asian ozone pollution into surface air over the western United States in spring Meiyun the mechanisms involved in the transport of Asian pollution plumes into western U.S. surface air through, including the interleaving and mixing of Asian pollution and stratospheric air associated with complex

  15. Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested the hypothesis that the two common oxidant air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm)* of ozone or 15 ppm of nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. Ozone delayed the appearance of tracheal tumors and reduced the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. A suspected neuroendocrine differentiation of those lung tumors could not be established by immunocytochemistry due to overfixation of tissues. On the other hand, ozone seemed to mitigate development of hepatotoxic lesions mediated by diethylnitrosamine. In animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and exposed to nitrogen dioxide, fewer tracheal tumors and no lung tumors were found. Only a few lung tumors were produced in animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in an atmosphere of 65% oxygen. The previously observed neuroendocrine nature of tumors induced by simultaneous exposure to diethylnitrosamine and hyperoxia could not be established because the long fixation of tissues precluded immunocytochemical stains. Animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in filtered air while being housed in wire-mesh cages developed fewer lung tumors than animals given the same treatment and kept on conventional bedding in shoebox cages. Although all inhalants tested are known to produce substantial cell proliferation in the respiratory tract, it was not possible to document whether this would enhance lung tumor development. The role of the two common air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

  16. AREA 5 RWMS CLOSURE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    TRU material in the trench because there is no groundwater pathway under foreseeable climate conditions. The Area 5 RWMS probabilistic PA model can be modified and used to...

  17. Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

  18. Five blind men and the elephant: what can the NASA Aura ozone measurements tell us about stratosphere-troposphere exchange?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Q.; Prather, M. J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five blind men and the elephant: what can the NASA Auraof the five blind men and the elephant, where the five Auramen” who are touching the “elephant” (ozone) in dif- ferent

  19. Climate change, ambient ozone, and health in 50 US cities Michelle L. Bell & Richard Goldberg & Christian Hogrefe &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change, ambient ozone, and health in 50 US cities Michelle L. Bell & Richard Goldberg Haven, CT 06511, USA e-mail: michelle.bell@yale.edu R. Goldberg Center for Climate Systems Research emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs),

  20. Re-evaluation of total and Umkehr ozone data from NOAA-CMDL Dobson spectrophotometer observatories. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komhyr, W.D.; Quincy, D.M.; Grass, R.D.; Koenig, G.L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)] [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to improve the quality of total ozone and Umkehr data obtained in the past at the NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory and the Dobson spectrophotometer ozone observatories. The authors present results of total ozone data re-evaluations for ten stations: Byrd, Antarctica; Fairbanks, Alaska; Hallett, Antarctica; Huancayo, Peru; Haute Provence, France; Lauder, New Zealand; Perth, Australia; Poker Flat, Alaska; Puerto Montt, Chile; and South Pole, Antarctica. The improved data will be submitted in early 1996 to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) World Ozone Data Center (WODC), and the Atmospheric Environment Service for archiving. Considerable work has been accomplished, also, in reevaluating Umkehr data from seven of the stations, viz., Huancayo, Haute Provence, Lauder, Perth, Poker Flat, Boulder, Colorado; and Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

  1. Effects of a modular two-step ozone-water and annealing process on silicon carbide graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Matthew J., E-mail: matthew.webb@cantab.net; Lundstedt, Anna; Grennberg, Helena [Department of Chemistry—BMC, Uppsala University, Box 576, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Polley, Craig; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Dirscherl, Kai [DFM—Danish Fundamental Metrology, Matematiktorvet 307, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Burwell, Gregory; Guy, Owen J. [College of Engineering, Faraday Tower, Singleton Park, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Palmgren, Pĺl [VG Scienta Scientific AB, Box 15120, Vallongatan 1, SE-750 15 Uppsala (Sweden); Yakimova, Rositsa [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    By combining ozone and water, the effect of exposing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide to an aggressive wet-chemical process has been evaluated after high temperature annealing in ultra high vacuum. The decomposition of ozone in water produces a number of oxidizing species, however, despite long exposure times to the aqueous-ozone environment, no graphene oxide was observed after the two-step process. The systems were comprehensively characterized before and after processing using Raman spectroscopy, core level photoemission spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy together with low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In spite of the chemical potential of the aqueous-ozone reaction environment, the graphene domains were largely unaffected raising the prospect of employing such simple chemical and annealing protocols to clean or prepare epitaxial graphene surfaces.

  2. Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

    Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

  3. Ozone effects on net primary production and carbon sequestration in the conterminous United States using a biogeochemistry model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felzer, Benjamin Seth.; Kicklighter, David W.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Wang, Chien.; Zhuang, Qianlai.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The effects of air pollution on vegetation may provide an important control on the carbon cycle that has not yet been widely considered. Prolonged exposure to high levels of ozone, in particular, has been observed to inhibit ...

  4. Demonstration of Advanced Technologies for Multi-Load Washers in Hospitality and Healthcare – Ozone Based Laundry Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Brian K.; Parker, Graham B.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Sullivan, Greg; Goetzler, W.; Sutherland, T. A.; Foley, K. J.

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate market-ready retrofit technologies for reducing the energy and water use of multi-load washers in healthcare and hospitality facilities. Specifically, this project evaluated laundry wastewater recycling technology in the hospitality sector and ozone laundry technology in both the healthcare and hospitality sectors. This report documents the demonstration of ozone laundry system installations at the Charleston Place Hotel in Charleston, Sout Carolina, and the Rogerson House assisted living facility in Boston, Massachusetts.

  5. Surfactants containing radioactive run-offs: Ozone treatment, influence on nuclear power plants water waste special treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokudina, S.A.; Grachok, M.A. [Belarussian State Economic Univ., Minsk (Belarus)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the problems encountered in the efficiency of radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plants in Kursk. The ozonization of aqueous solutions of surfactants was carried out in the laboratory`s ozonization system. The surfactants which are discharged to the ion exchangers deteriorate resins, clog up the ion exchangers, and decrease filtration velocity. Therefore, this investigation focused on finding a method to increase the efficiency of this treatment process.

  6. A study of ozone in the surface layer of Kiev and its impact on the human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shavrina, A V; Kiforenko, S I; Sheminova, V A; Veles, A A; Blum, O B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-level ozone in Kiev for an episode of its high concentration in August 2000 was simulated with the model of the urban air pollution UAM-V (Urban Airshed Model). The study of total ozone over Kiev and its concentration changes with height in the troposphere is made on the basis of ground-based observations with the infrared Fourier spectrometer at the Main Astronomical Observatory of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine as a part of the ESA-NIVR-KNMI no 2907. In 2008 the satellite Aura-OMI data OMO3PR on the atmosphere ozone profiles became available. Beginning in 2005, these data include the ozone concentration in the lower layer of the atmosphere and can be used for the evaluation of the ground-level ozone concentrations in all cities of Ukraine. Some statistical investigation of ozone air pollution in Kiev and medical statistics data on respiratory system was carried out with the application of the "Statistica" package. The regression analysis, prognostic regression simulation, and retrospective p...

  7. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  8. Geographic Area Month

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

  9. Resonating Valence Bond Quantum Monte Carlo: Application to the ozone molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azadi, Sam; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the potential energy surface of the ozone molecule by means of Quantum Monte Carlo simulations based on the resonating valence bond concept. The trial wave function consists of an antisymmetrized geminal power arranged in a single-determinant that is multiplied by a Jastrow correlation factor. Whereas the determinantal part incorporates static correlation effects, the augmented real-space correlation factor accounts for the dynamics electron correlation. The accuracy of this approach is demonstrated by computing the potential energy surface for the ozone molecule in three vibrational states: symmetric, asymmetric and scissoring. We find that the employed wave function provides a detailed description of rather strongly-correlated multi-reference systems, which is in quantitative agreement with experiment.

  10. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Derived Data, Global Earth Coverage (GEC) from NASA's Earth Probe Satellite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This is data from an external datastream processed through the ARM External Data Center (XDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The XDC identifies sources and acquires data, called "external data", to augment the data being generated within the ARM program. The external data acquired are usually converted from native format to either netCDF or HDF formats. The GEC collection contains global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Data are available from July 25, 1996 - December 31, 2005, but have been updated or replaced as of September 2007. See the explanation on the ARM web site at http://www.arm.gov/xds/static/toms.stm and the information at the NASA/TOMS web site: http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (Registration required)

  11. Identification and characterization of missing or unaccounted-for area-source categories. Final report, Jan-Dec 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kersteter, S.L.; Zimmerman, D.J.; Cawkwell, P.R.; Chadha, A.; Henning, B.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report identifies and characterizes missing or unaccounted for area source categories. Area source emissions of particulate matter (TSP), sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and carbon monoxide (CO) are estimated annually by the U.S. EPA. Area sources include all mobile sources and any stationary sources that are too small, difficult, or numerous to be inventoried as point sources. A missing or unaccounted for source category is one that does not explicitly appear on the National Emissions Data System (NEDS) area source category list or the State Implementation Plan (SIP) area source category list in Chapter 4 of Procedures for the Preparation of Emissions Inventory for Precursors of Ozone (EPA-450/4-88-021, December 1988). A partial list of missing or unaccounted for categories identified by the project includes: roofing activities; airport, rail yard, and marine support activities; charbroiling; automobile fires; paving or traffic paints; road and highway construction; and wineries.

  12. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  13. Past changes in the vertical distribution of ozone – Part 1: Measurement techniques, uncertainties and availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassler, B.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Staehelin, J.; August, T.; Bhartia, P. K.; Clerbaux, C.; Degenstein, D.; Maziere, M. De; Dinelli, B. M.; Dudhia, A.; Dufour, G.; Frith, S. M.; Froidevaux, L.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Granville, J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Hoppel, K.; Hubert, D.; Kasai, Y.; Kurylo, M. J.; Kyrola, E.; Lambert, J.-C.; Levelt, P. F.; McElroy, C. T.; McPeters, R. D.; Munro, R.; Nakajima, H.; Parrish, A.; Raspollini, P.; Remsberg, E. E.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Rozanov, A.; Sano, T.; Sasano, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Smit, H. G. J.; Stiller, G.; Tamminen, J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Urban, J.; van der A, R. J.; Veefkind, J. P.; Vigouroux, C.; von Clarmann, T.; von Savigny, C.; Walker, K. A.; Weber, M.; Wild, J.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    , Germany 28Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan 29Association of International Research Initiatives for Environmental Studies, Tokyo, Japan 30Research Centre Jülich, Institute for Energy and Climate Research... Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden Published by Copernicus Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 1396 B. Hassler et al.: Ozone profile measurements 34Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany 35...

  14. An assessment of alternatives and technologies for replacing ozone- depleting substances at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, C.W.; Miller, K.B.; Friedman, J.R.; Rapoport, R.D.; Conover, D.R.; Hendrickson, P.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Koss, T.C. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Guidance

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title VI of the Clean Air Act, as amended, mandates a production phase-out for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). These requirements will have a significant impact on US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, DOE uses ODSs in three major activities: fire suppression (halon), refrigeration and cooling (chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs]), and cleaning that requires solvents (CFCs, methyl chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride). This report provides basic information on methods and strategies to phase out use of ODSs at DOE facilities.

  15. Relationship between rubisco sulfhydryl content and relative sensitivity of potato cultivars to ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enyedi, A.J.; Pell, E.J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA))

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) induced a reduction in quantity of rubisco in potato foliage. In vitro, O{sub 3} predisposed purified rubisco to elevated proteolysis; reagents which protected sulfhydryl (SH) groups suppressed this effect. We hypothesized that rubisco SH content correlated directly with foliar O{sub 3} sensitivity. Rubisco was purified from Solanum tuberosum L. O{sub 3}-tolerant cv. Superior (SP) and Norgold Russet (NR), and O{sub 3}-susceptible cv. Norland (NL) and Cherokee (CK). When native rubisco was titrated with DTNB, protein of NL contained 1.33 and 1.26 times more SH groups than SP and NR, respectively. Rubisco from CK also contained more SH groups than SP and NR, but the difference was not significant. Rubisco of SP, NR and CK denatured by SDS exhibited identical number of SH groups, however, NL exhibited 1.15 times more SH groups. The greater number of SH groups in rubisco from NL versus SP and NR may explain its relative sensitivity to ozone. The role of SH groups in ozone-sensitivity of CK will require further study.

  16. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  17. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan

    ) Common Use Areas All floored areas in the building for circulation and standard facilities provided and the like. These are extracts of NWPC standard method of measurement of building areas with an addition fromSection S ANNEXURE 4 MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS 1. GROSS BUILDING

  19. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  20. MSL ENTERANCE REFERENCE AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    MSL ENTERANCE LOBBY ELEV STAIRS SSL-019 REFERENCE AREA SSL-021 GROUP STUDY SSL-018 STUDY ROOM SSL-029 SSL-020 COPY ROOM SSL-022 GROUP STUDY SSL-026 STACKS SSL-023 GROUP STUDY SSL-024 GROUP STUDY SSL TBL-014 TBL-014A STAIRS SSL-007 GIS/ WORKROOM SSL-011 SSL-008 SSL-009 SSL-010 SSL-014 SSL-017 STAIRS

  1. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  2. EPA`s proposed renewable oxygenate requirement (ROR): Pros and cons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czeskleba, H.M. [Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its final rule that sets for the details for requirements to sell reformulated gasoline (RFG) in certain ozone non-attainment areas. At the same time, EPA also issued a proposed rule to require that 30% of the oxygen required in RFG be based on a renewable oxygenate. Renewables include ethanol and its ether derivatives such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE). The RFG rule is a final rule, while the Renewable Oxygenate Requirement (ROR) rule is a proposed rule yet to be finalized and subject to revision. Included in this paper are brief reviews of Ashland petroleum Company`s ethanol usage, oxygenated fuel and reformulated gasoline blending economics, and some comments on the EPA proposed renewable oxygenate requirement.

  3. Ozone generation by negative direct current corona discharges in dry air fed coaxial wire-cylinder reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yehia, Ashraf [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt and Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies in Alkharj, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 83, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt and Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies in Alkharj, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 83, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Mizuno, Akira [Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)] [Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical study was made in this paper for calculating the ozone generation by negative dc corona discharges. The corona discharges were formed in a coaxial wire-cylinder reactor. The reactor was fed by dry air flowing with constant rates at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, and stressed by a negative dc voltage. The current-voltage characteristics of the negative dc corona discharges formed inside the reactor were measured in parallel with concentration of the generated ozone under different operating conditions. An empirical equation was derived from the experimental results for calculating the ozone concentration generated inside the reactor. The results, that have been recalculated by using the derived equation, have agreed with the experimental results over the whole range of the investigated parameters, except in the saturation range for the ozone concentration. Therefore, the derived equation represents a suitable criterion for expecting the ozone concentration generated by negative dc corona discharges in dry air fed coaxial wire-cylinder reactors under any operating conditions in range of the investigated parameters.

  4. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 11:12am Addthis...

  5. Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

  6. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  7. Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  8. Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function and symptoms in Mexico City schoolchildren

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillejos, M.; Gold, D.R.; Dockery, D.; Tosteson, T.; Baum, T.; Speizer, F.E. (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-X, Mexico City, (Mexico))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of ambient ozone (O3) on respiratory function and acute respiratory symptoms were evaluated in 143 7- to 9-yr-old schoolchildren followed longitudinally at 1- to 2-wk intervals over a period of 6 months at three schools in Pedregal, Mexico City. The maximum O3 level exceeded the World Health Organization guideline of 80 ppb and the U.S. standard of 120 ppb in every week. For an increase from lowest to highest in the mean O3 level during the 48 hr before spirometry (53 ppb), logistic regression estimated relative odds of 1.7 for a child reporting cough/phlegm on the day of spirometry. For the full population, the mean O3 level during the hour before spirometry, not adjusted for temperature and humidity, predicted a significant decrement in FVC but not in FEV1 or FEF25-75. In contrast, the mean O3 level during the previous 24-, 48-, and 168-h periods predicted significant decrements in FEV1 and FEF25-75 but not in FVC. Ozone was consistently associated with a greater decrement in lung function for the 15 children with chronic phlegm as compared with the children without chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or wheeze. Ozone in the previous 24-, 48-, and 168-h periods predicted decrements in FEV1 for children of mothers who were current or former smokers, but not for children of mothers who were never smokers. Many of these effects were reduced in multiple regression analyses including temperature and humidity, as temperature and O3 were highly correlated.

  9. Predicting tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical in a global, three-dimensional, chemistry, transport, and deposition model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, C.S.

    1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the most important chemically reactive tropospheric gases are ozone (O{sub 3}) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Although ozone in the stratosphere is a necessary protector against the sun`s radiation, tropospheric ozone is actually a pollutant which damages materials and vegetation, acts as a respiratory irritant, and is a greenhouse gas. One of the two main sources of ozone in the troposphere is photochemical production. The photochemistry is initiated when hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) react with nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} = NO + NO{sub 2}) in the presence of sunlight. Reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH, is the main sink for many tropospheric gases. The hydroxyl radical is highly reactive and has a lifetime on the order of seconds. Its formation is initiated by the photolysis of tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric chemistry involves a complex, non-linear set of chemical reactions between atmospheric species that vary substantially in time and space. To model these and other species on a global scale requires the use of a global, three-dimensional chemistry, transport, and deposition (CTD) model. In this work, I developed two such three dimensional CTD models. The first model incorporated the chemistry necessary to model tropospheric ozone production from the reactions of nitrogen oxides with carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH{sub 4}). The second also included longer-lived alkane species and the biogenic hydrocarbon isoprene, which is emitted by growing plants and trees. The models` ability to predict a number of key variables (including the concentration of O{sub 3}, OH, and other species) were evaluated. Then, several scenarios were simulated to understand the change in the chemistry of the troposphere since preindustrial times and the role of anthropogenic NO{sub x} on present day conditions.

  10. Lagrangian methods for climatological analysis of regional atmospheric transport with an emphasis on Texas ozone exceedances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dexheimer, Darielle Nicole

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . ............ 43 19 48-hour backward trajectory for Event 2. Ozone values for 1998-08- 15?1998-08-17 are also shown. ...................... 45 20 Geopotential height in m at 1000 hPa on 1998-08-16 at 18Z and a plot of surface weather on 1998-08-17 at 0Z provided....1) for all possible delta-function initial conditions (all x0), that is, partialdiffG partialdifft +v ?nablaG =0,G(x, x0,t0)=delta(x -x0). (3.2) The principal advantage of this solution technique is that, if G can be found, the solution to (3...

  11. Highly reproducible and reliable metal/graphene contact by ultraviolet-ozone treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Hacker, Christina A.; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, A. R.; Richter, Curt A.; Gundlach, David J., E-mail: david.gundlach@nist.gov, E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Liang, Yiran; Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei, E-mail: david.gundlach@nist.gov, E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn; Peng, Lianmao [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Resist residue from the device fabrication process is a significant source of contamination at the metal/graphene contact interface. Ultraviolet Ozone (UVO) treatment is proven here, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman measurement, to be an effective way of cleaning the metal/graphene interface. Electrical measurements of devices that were fabricated by using UVO treatment of the metal/graphene contact region show that stable and reproducible low resistance metal/graphene contacts are obtained and the electrical properties of the graphene channel remain unaffected.

  12. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? (II) ----Ozone layer depth reconstruction via HEWV effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jilong; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested by Chen {\\it et al.} that the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance ($280-400$ nm) could influence the Earth's surface temperature variation by "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect. In this manuscript, we reconstruct the developing history of the ozone layer depth variation from 1860 to 2011 based on the HEWV effect. It is shown that the reconstructed ozone layer depth variation correlates with the observational variation from 1958 to 2005 very well ($R=0.8422$, $P>99.9\\%$). From this reconstruction, we may limit the spectra band of the surface Ultraviolet irradiance referred in HEWV effect to Ultraviolet B ($280-320$ nm).

  13. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  14. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun Deng Associate ResearchWestern Area Power

  15. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011 Mon, Next2025Steps to MakingImportance of700 Area

  16. CEES - Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating the Past - VisualizingFocus Areas

  17. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | BlandinePrincetonOPT Optics MetrologyDepartment of00 Area

  18. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    two hydrogen fueling stations at existing gasoline stations at the new addresses shown in Table 1 Stations." Table 1: Address Change in Location for Two Hydrogen Fueling Stations (PON-09-608) Addresses Sacramento and the San Juan Capistrano stations are in nonattainment zones for ozone particulate matter (PM

  19. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  20. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  1. Ozone Abundance in a Nitrogen-Carbon Dioxide Dominated Terrestrial Paleoatmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Thomas; A. L. Melott; L. D. Martin; C. H. Jackman

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the ozone distribution for a model terrestrial paleoatmosphere in which the present oxygen abundance is largely replaced by carbon dioxide, which we argue is a reasonable working assumption. In principle, the presence of carbon dioxide might supplement the ozone shield as compared with models based on nitrogen without high carbon dioxide abundance so that early life need not have been as UV-resistant as often assumed. An extrasolar planet with a high-CO2 atmosphere might contain enough O3 to be a source of false positive biomarkers. We find that the globally averaged O3 column density can be the same, or nearly four times higher (depending upon the O2 partial pressure) when CO2 is used in place of N2 as the replacement component for lowered O2 in a 1-atm terrestrial planet with solar radiation. The effect is important for making quantitative deductions from future data, but does not invalidate the use of O3 as a biomarker for free oxygen. These results make prospects for detection of extrasolar planetary O3 absorption somewhat better than before.

  2. Ozone Abundance in a Nitrogen-Carbon Dioxide Dominated Terrestrial Paleoatmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, B C; Martin, L D; Jackman, C H

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the ozone distribution for a model terrestrial paleoatmosphere in which the present oxygen abundance is largely replaced by carbon dioxide, which we argue is a reasonable working assumption. In principle, the presence of carbon dioxide might supplement the ozone shield as compared with models based on nitrogen without high carbon dioxide abundance so that early life need not have been as UV-resistant as often assumed. An extrasolar planet with a high-CO2 atmosphere might contain enough O3 to be a source of false positive biomarkers. We find that the globally averaged O3 column density can be the same, or nearly four times higher (depending upon the O2 partial pressure) when CO2 is used in place of N2 as the replacement component for lowered O2 in a 1-atm terrestrial planet with solar radiation. The effect is important for making quantitative deductions from future data, but does not invalidate the use of O3 as a biomarker for free oxygen. These results make prospects for detection of extrasolar pla...

  3. NOx Emission Reduction and its Effects on Ozone during the 2008 Olympic Games

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Wang, Yuhang; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Zhen; Gustafson, William I.; Shao, Min

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We applied a daily-assimilated inversion method to estimate NOx (NO+NO2) emissions for June-September 2007 and 2008 on the basis of the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and model simulations using the Regional chEmistry and trAnsport Model (REAM). Over urban Beijing, rural Beijing, and the Huabei Plain, OMI column NO2 reductions are approximately 45%, 33%, and 14%, respectively, while the corresponding anthropogenic NOx emission reductions are only 28%, 24%, and 6%, during the full emission control period (July 20 – Sep 20, 2008). The emission reduction began in early July and was in full force by July 20, corresponding to the scheduled implementation of emission controls over Beijing. The emissions did not appear to recover after the emission control period. Meteorological change from summer 2007 to 2008 is the main factor contributing to the column NO2 decreases not accounted for by the emission reduction. Model simulations suggest that the effect of emission reduction on ozone concentrations over Beijing is relatively minor using a standard VOC emission inventory in China. With an adjustment of the model emissions to reflect in situ observations of VOCs in Beijing, the model simulation suggests a larger effect of the emission reduction.

  4. Step-coverage simulation for tetraethoxysilane and ozone atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujino, K. (Semiconductor Process Lab., Toyko (Japan)); Egashira, Y.; Shimogaki, Y.; Komiyama, H. (Univ. of Tokyo, (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation model for atmospheric pressure (AP) CVD has bee developed using one-dimensional diffusion and mass conservation equations. The model was applied to trench step-coverage of the tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and O[sub 3] CVD, in which it was not necessary to consider lateral diffusion because of narrow (and deep) trenches. For nondoped silicate glass (NSG), the step-coverage of a 4.5 aspect ratio trench showed a good fit if a sticking probability of 0.0039 was assumed for the 0.6% ozone (in oxygen) deposition and of 0.0026 for the 6% ozone deposition (both 400 C). The reaction rate constant was compared with the diffusion mass-transfer coefficient, and the reaction proved to be limited by diffusion of the reactant, TEOS, which directly participated in the CVD reaction. For the 2 m/o phosphosilicate glass (PSG) step-coverage, which had a slight overhang, the model matched the obtained results well only when an active growth species with a high sticking probability of 1.0 was added to the growth species of nondoped oxide. This analytical simulation method satisfactorily explains the experimental data.

  5. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 21, PAGES 3465-3468, NOVEMBER 1, 2000 Increasing background ozone in surface air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    that an important consideration for pollution control strategies is the O3 back- ground present in surface air over background ozone in surface air over the United States C.-Y. Cynthia Lin, Daniel J. Jacob, J. William Munger in surface air over the United States from 1980 to 1998 is examined using monthly probability distributions

  6. Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK d Resource Management and Science Division, 1314 Cherokee Orchard Road, Great and 2001: Clingmans Dome, Cherokee Orchard Road and Purchase Knob. Cutleaf coneflower exhibited a greater adjacent to the Cherokee Orchard Road Loop. Ozone injury was greatest on the lower leaves for both species

  7. SOLA, 2008, Vol. 4, 117 120, doi:10.2151/sola.2008 030 We analyzed tropospheric column ozone (TCO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    SOLA, 2008, Vol. 4, 117 120, doi:10.2151/sola.2008 030 Abstract We analyzed tropospheric column the energy budget of the Earth's atmosphere. According to a recent IPCC report (2007), radiative forcing, recent increases in energy consumption have led to a significant amount of emissions of ozone precursors

  8. The effects of ethylenediurea and sodium erythorbate on photosynthetic function of ozone-exposed loblolly pine seedlings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehler, Eric Anthony

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -top chambers in east Texas for one growing season beginning in April 1994 while being exposed to either sub-ambient (CF), approximate ambient (NF), 1.5Y,, 2.OX, or 2.5X ambient ozone levels. Net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g), and chloroplast...

  9. COMBUSTION AND FLAME 24, 27-34 (1975) 27 Flame Emission Studies of Ozone with Metal Alkyls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    COMBUSTION AND FLAME 24, 27-34 (1975) 27 Flame Emission Studies of Ozone with Metal Alkyls: Zn (CH3 of combustion. Premixed [2, 3] anddiffusion [4] flames of metal alkyl compounds have been carried out to deter- tageous to study the combustion of polyatomic molecules under single-collision conditions, i

  10. Preliminary assessment of the impact of commercial aircraft on local air quality in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratliff, Gayle L. (Gayle Lois)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the impact of aircraft emissions on local air quality by performing two analyses: an assessment of U.S. commercial aircraft contribution to county budgets of primary pollutants in nonattainment areas, ...

  11. Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

  12. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  13. ARM - Ozone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane BackgroundFacilityOther Aircraft

  14. Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

  15. Reducing the contribution of the power sector to ground-level ozone pollution : an assessment of time-differentiated pricing of nitrogen oxide emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Michael T. (Michael Timothy)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) is a prevalent air pollutant across the United States and a requisite precursor for tropospheric (ground-level) ozone formation. Both pollutants significantly impact human health and welfare, so National ...

  16. A cost-effectiveness analysis of alternative ozone control strategies : flexible nitrogen oxide (NOx) abatement from power plants in the eastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Lin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone formation is a complex, non-linear process that depends on the atmospheric concentrations of its precursors, nitrogen oxide (NOx) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), as well as on temperature and the available ...

  17. Removal of pollutant compounds from water supplies using ozone, ultraviolet light, and a counter, current packed column. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, E.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many water pollutants are determined to be carcinogenic and often appear in very low concentrations and still pose a health risk. Conventional water treatment processes cannot remove these contaminants and there is a great demand for the development of alternative removal technologies. The use of ozone and ultraviolet light in a counter current packed column could prove to be an effective treatment process to remove these contaminants.

  18. Northwest Area Foundation Horizons Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Northwest Area Foundation Horizons Program Final Evaluation Report ­ Executive Summary Diane L by the Northwest Area Foundation in partnership with two national organizations and delivered by a number to remember that Horizons was not designed to reduce poverty, but instead to contribute to the Foundations

  19. Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    226 Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area / Assessment Unit DI Prod. N(eq) Sum Total Cumu subbasin, Washington. Geographic Area / Assessment Unit IntegratedPriorityRestoration Category Habitat% (unscaled results) of the combined protection benefit for summer steelhead within the Methow basin, and 51

  20. tight environment high radiation area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    #12;Irradiation Studies of Optical Components - II CERN, week of Oct. 24, 2005 1.4 GeV proton beam 4 x· tight environment · high radiation area · non-serviceable area · passive components · optics only, no active electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle Optical Diagnostics 01-13-2006 1 #12

  1. Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Daly, K.S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan (Development Plan) is to guide the physical development of the 200 Areas (which refers to the 200 East Area, 200 West Area, and 200 Area Corridor, located between the 200 East and 200 West Areas) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.lB (DOE 1991a) by performing the following: Establishing a land-use plan and setting land-use categories that meet the needs of existing and proposed activities. Coordinating existing, 5-year, and long-range development plans and guiding growth in accordance with those plans. Establishing development guidelines to encourage cost-effective development and minimize conflicts between adjacent activities. Identifying site development issues that need further analysis. Integrating program plans with development plans to ensure a logical progression of development. Coordinate DOE plans with other agencies [(i.e., Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Being a support document to the Hanford Site Development Plan (DOE-RL 1990a) (parent document) and providing technical site information relative to the 200 Areas.

  2. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Research Areas Research Areas High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP) Research Areas During open solicitations proposals are sought...

  3. The sensitivity of modeled ozone to the temporal distribution of point, area, and mobile source emissions in the eastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stehr, Jeffrey

    the emissions of NOx from day to night, for example in electric powered vehicles recharged at night, could have vehicles to the fleet (Bloomer et al., 2009) many regulators are focusing on reducing emissions at peak a memorandum of under- standing to reduce NOx emissions from peaking units on high electrical demand days (HEDD

  4. Progress Update: M Area Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

  5. Wellhead Protection Area Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates activities which can occur on or below the land surface of the area surrounding a wellhead. The purpose of these regulations is to limit well contamination and preserve...

  6. Controlling Bats in Urban Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to avoid obstacles and capture insects. Bats also emit audible sounds that may be used for communi- cation. L-1913 4-08 Controlling BATS Damage In urban areas, bats may become a nuisance becauseoftheirsqueaking,scratchingandcrawl- inginattics...

  7. Protected Water Area System (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

  8. The Program Area Committee Chairperson.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Mary; Richardson, Burl B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    worksheets and others. Prepared by Mary G. Marshall and Burl B. RichardsQ Extension program development specialists, The Texas A&M University System. THE PROGRAM AREA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON You Hold an Important Position! Whenever people gather...

  9. Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

  10. Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince George’s County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

  11. Transforming Parks and Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    Transforming Parks and Protected Areas Policy and governance in a changing world Edited by Kevin S from the British Library Library of Congress Cataloging In Publication Data Transforming parks

  12. Respiratory responses of vigorously exercising children to 0. 12 ppm ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonnell, W.F. 3d.; Chapman, R.S.; Leigh, M.W.; Strope, G.L.; Collier, A.M.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in respiratory function have been suggested for children exposed to less than 0.12 ppm ozone (O3) while engaged in normal activities. Because the results of these studies have been confounded by other variables, such as temperature or the presence of other pollutants or have been questioned as to the adequacy of exposure measurements, the authors determined the acute response of children exposed to 0.12 ppm O3 in a controlled chamber environment. Twenty-three white males 8 to 11 yr of age were exposed once to clean air and once to 0.12 ppm O3 in random order. Exposures were for 2.5 h and included 2 h of intermittent heavy exercise. Measures of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and the symptom cough were determined prior to and after each exposure. A significant decline in FEV1 was found after the O3 exposure compared to the air exposure, and it appeared to persist for 16 to 20 h. No significant increase in cough was found due to O3 exposure. Forced vital capacity, specific airways resistance, respiratory frequency, tidal volume, and other symptoms were measured in a secondary exploratory analysis of this study.

  13. Comparison of the responses of children and adults to acute ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonnell, W.F.; Chapman, R.S.; Horstman, D.H.; Leigh, M.W.; Salaam, S.A.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the paper is to compare the results of two studies in which the respiratory responses of children and adults to acute ozone (O/sub 3/) exposure were measured. Forty-two 18-30 year old males were exposed for 2.5 hours in a controlled environmental chamber to either 0.0 or 0.12 ppm O3 while performing intermittent heavy exercise. Twenty-two 8-11 year old males were exposed in a similar manner to both air and 0.12 ppm O3. Measures of respiratory symptoms and function were made before and after exposure. Adults experienced an increase in the symptom cough and decrements in forced vital capacity and some measures of forced expiratory flow. Children experienced similar decrements in pulmonary function, but had no increase in symptoms. The authors concluded that as measured by pulmonary function children appear to be no more responsive to O3 exposure than are adults and may experience fewer symptoms.

  14. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and ``excess`` human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all ``non-external`` causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM{sub 15}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub 4}{sup =}, for 63{sup 4} locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  15. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and excess'' human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all non-external'' causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO[sub 4][sup =], Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM[sub 15], PM[sub 2.5] and SO[sub 4][sup =], for 63[sup 4] locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  16. Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique...

  17. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  18. Activation of phospholipase A{sub 2} in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes containing lipid ozonation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgo, M.G.; Squadrito, G.L.; Pryor, W.A. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activation of phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) by lipid ozonation products is reported. The principal products from the ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) are 1-palmitoyl-2-[8-3(5-octyl-1,2,4-trioxolan-3-yl)octanoyl]--sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PC-Criegee ozonide) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(9-oxononanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PC-aldehyde). Here we test the hypothesis that these two compounds are mediators of ozone toxicity. Using POPC vesicles, we find that PLA{sub 2} recognizes and hydrolyzes PC-Criegee ozonide at the same rate as that of arachidonic acid. Although the PC-aldehyde is not a substrate for PLA{sub 2}, the enzymatic rate of hydrolysis by PLA{sub 2} of unaltered fatty acids incorporated into POPC is enhanced when PC-aldehyde is present in the bilayer. Thus, both PC-Criegee ozonide and PC-aldehyde alter the activity of PLA{sub 2}, perhaps via an effect on membrane packing order. The capacity of PLA{sub 2} to recognize the PC-Criegee, and therefore ozone-induced damage, suggests a detoxification property of the enzyme and also a role in maintaining the structural properties of bilayer membranes that have been altered by exposure to ozone. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. 100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

  20. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  1. Hydrocarbon Observations and Ozone Production Rates in Western Houston During the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Spicer, Chet W.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of total non-methane hydrocarbon in whole air canisters collected from the top of a skyscraper on the western edge of Houston, Texas are summarized with an emphasis on samples collected during the passage of plumes of O{sub 3} and the associated rapid increase in the mixing ratio of this species. The back-trajectories associated with these events showed a pronounced deceleration of air parcels over central and western Houston and were not necessarily associated with direct passage over the petrochemical plants located in the heavily industrialized eastern part of Houston. As a result of the time these air parcels spent over the central and western parts of Houston, their VOC mix and associated chemical production rates were expected to differ from similar observations made over eastern Houston from aircraft sampling at low altitudes. Although periods of high O{sub 3} in the western part of the city were closely associated with light alkenes, these same observations show isoprene to make a significant contribution to the total VOC reactivity in the early afternoon (the start of peak photochemical activity) in contrast to observations made east of our sampling site that found the reactivity to be dominated by anthropogenic species. By initializing a 0-dimensional chemical kinetic model with observations made at the Williams Tower, we find that the ozone production efficiency scaled linearly to the ratio of total hydrocarbons and NO{sub x}, with an average OPE of 7.2, ranging from 2.3 to 16.9; these values are smaller than those reported in eastern Houston, suggesting a strong gradient in photochemical productivity across the city.

  2. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  3. NUTRITIVE QUALITY OF EASTERN GAMAGRASS, BIG BLUESTEM, AND HIGHBUSH BLACKBERRY EXPOSED TO TROPOSPHERIC OZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditchkoff, Steve

    metropolitan areas to rural areas important to agricultural and forestry practices. Many studies regarding O3) the ambient concentration of O3. Because forage quality can be just as important as quantity, I chose to investigate effects on nutritive quality parameters in addition to biomass yield. Mean 12-hr daytime (0900

  4. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  5. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  6. Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 provides for the designation and establishment of a system of natural areas in order to preserve the natural ecosystems of these areas. Designated natural...

  7. Atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban and a suburban area of Korea from 2002 to 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, H.B.; Kannan, K.; Lee, S.J.; Ok, G. [National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Pusan (Republic of Korea)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric bulk samples (wet and dry) were collected monthly during 2002 to 2004 from an urban and a suburban area in Korea for assessment of depositional flux and seasonal variations in the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH depositional flux ranged from 64.1 to 610 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the urban area and from 65 to 460 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the suburban area. The fluxes of PAHs measured in this study were comparable with those reported for urban and suburban areas in other countries. The fluxes of particulates and PAHs were higher in winter than in summer, consistent with the greater per capita consumption of fossil fuel in winter than in summer. Ambient temperature played a major role in the seasonal variability in PAH fluxes. Photochemical degradation of PAHs appears to occur during the summer months. The relationship of PAH depositional fluxes with major air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and presence of particulate matter up to 10 {mu} m in size (PM10), was also investigated. Dominant PAH compounds in both the urban and the suburban locations were benzo(g,h,i)perylene, pyrene, and indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene. Based on the PAH diagnostic ratios and a factor analysis, the major sources of PAHs in the urban and the suburban regions were found to be similar. Diesel exhaust, coal combustion, and gasoline emissions contributed predominantly to atmospheric PAH contamination.

  8. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  9. Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  11. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  12. Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Photo of Comfort Station at the Chickasaw National Recreation...

  13. Products and Mechanisms of the Reaction of Oleic Acid with Ozone and Nitrate Radical Hui-Ming Hung, Yasmine Katrib, and Scot T. Martin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the addition of ozone to the double bond of oleic acid, which yields a primary ozonide (molozonide).21 The high-energy chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) are used, and -NO2 are observed in the infrared spectra, and high molecular weight molecules are formed

  14. Ozonization at the Vacancy Defect Site of the Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Lei Vincent Liu, Wei Quan Tian, and Yan Alexander Wang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan Alexander

    Ozonization at the Vacancy Defect Site of the Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Lei Vincent Liu, Wei at the vacancy defect site of the single-walled carbon nanotube has been studied by static quantum mechanics approach. Among five different reaction pathways at the vacancy defect, the reaction involving

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 58, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2011 2961 Low-Energy X-ray and Ozone-Exposure Induced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Sharon

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 58, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2011 2961 Low-Energy X-ray and Ozone principles calculations of the relevant binding energies, and reaction and diffusion barriers for oxygen) has not been evaluated in a low-energy X-ray radiation environment [15], a case in which displacement

  16. 66 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-155. 1996. Quality Assurance, Training, and Certification in Ozone Air Pollution Studies Schilling, Miller, and Takemoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , and Certification in Ozone Air Pollution Studies Schilling, Miller, and Takemoto Air Resources Board. 1990 air quality standards--1990 Update. Mailout No. 90­ 68. Mobile Source Division, On­Road­Control data: summary of 1990 air quality data-- gaseous and particulate pollutants. Annual summary. Technical

  17. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavala, M.

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies ...

  18. The 2013 Ozone Garden Network: Building Upon the Success of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    on solar polar - New Campus: awaiting final approval for placement St. Louis Science Center Grant's Farm's Farm - 15 km SW of Forest Part - Extremely high traffic area (~1,000,000 /yr) · Installation

  19. RHIC | New Areas of Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 MediaBrookhavenBlackA New Area of

  20. History of 100-B Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlen, R.K.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

  1. Surrounding Area Restaurants...Hungry

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at Young -Final»EnergySupportSurrounding Area

  2. Resource Areas of Texas: Land.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Curtis L.; Carter, Clarence R.; McKee, Gordon S.

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prairie (Coastal ~~~(l), soils are less acid and some are calcareous. Main series: lrictoria, Orelia, Clareville. ~ight, acid sands and darker, loamy to clayey soils-some $;dine and sodic-lie in a narrow band along the coast. Main aeries: Harris...). Mai series: Truce, Waurika, Brown, moderately deep 11 shallow, calcareous, clay1 a1 oils are alg common. Main series: (: 1 to alk nts; somt Bonti. ey soils >wens. over sh Bottomlands-minor areas or brown to clam gray, loam1 1 Main senes 3...

  3. Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

  4. Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

    1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

  5. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective.

  6. Air Pollution Issues of the 1990's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, J. C.

    of 1990 will contain. However, many political and economic battles remain to be fought. Currently, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that more than $30 billion a year is being spent to control air pollution in this country (1... or simply air toxics. Like ambient ozone nonattainment, air toxics exemplify the pollution problems of the 1990's. Toxic air emissions often occur in tiny amounts compared to criteria pollutants. The causes and effects can vary dramatically from city...

  7. Ashland Area Support Substation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  8. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

  9. Multi-model Estimates of Intercontinental Source-Receptor Relationships for Ozone Pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiore, A M; Dentener, F J; Wild, O; Cuvelier, C; Schultz, M G; Hess, P; Textor, C; Schulz, M; Doherty, R; Horowitz, L W; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Shindell, D T; Stevenson, D S; Szopa, S; Van Dingenen, R; Zeng, G; Atherton, C; Bergmann, D; Bey, I; Carmichael, G; Collins, W J; Duncan, B N; Faluvegi, G; Folberth, G; Gauss, M; Gong, S; Hauglustaine, D; Holloway, T; Isaksen, I A; Jacob, D J; Jonson, J E; Kaminski, J W; Keating, T J; Lupu, A; Marmer, E; Montanaro, V; Park, R; Pitari, G; Pringle, K J; Pyle, J A; Schroeder, S; Vivanco, M G; Wind, P; Wojcik, G; Wu, S; Zuber, A

    2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the surface O{sub 3} response over a 'receptor' region to emission changes over a foreign 'source' region is key to evaluating the potential gains from an international approach to abate ozone (O{sub 3}) pollution. We apply an ensemble of 21 global and hemispheric chemical transport models to estimate the spatial average surface O{sub 3} response over East Asia (EA), Europe (EU), North America (NA) and South Asia (SA) to 20% decreases in anthropogenic emissions of the O{sub 3} precursors, NO{sub x}, NMVOC, and CO (individually and combined), from each of these regions. We find that the ensemble mean surface O{sub 3} concentrations in the base case (year 2001) simulation matches available observations throughout the year over EU but overestimates them by >10 ppb during summer and early fall over the eastern U.S. and Japan. The sum of the O{sub 3} responses to NO{sub x}, CO, and NMVOC decreases separately is approximately equal to that from a simultaneous reduction of all precursors. We define a continental-scale 'import sensitivity' as the ratio of the O{sub 3} response to the 20% reductions in foreign versus 'domestic' (i.e., over the source region itself) emissions. For example, the combined reduction of emissions from the 3 foreign regions produces an ensemble spatial mean decrease of 0.6 ppb over EU (0.4 ppb from NA), less than the 0.8 ppb from the reduction of EU emissions, leading to an import sensitivity ratio of 0.7. The ensemble mean surface O{sub 3} response to foreign emissions is largest in spring and late fall (0.7-0.9 ppb decrease in all regions from the combined precursor reductions in the 3 foreign regions), with import sensitivities ranging from 0.5 to 1.1 (responses to domestic emission reductions are 0.8-1.6 ppb). High O{sub 3} values are much more sensitive to domestic emissions than to foreign emissions, as indicated by lower import sensitivities of 0.2 to 0.3 during July in EA, EU, and NA when O{sub 3} levels are typically highest, and by the weaker relative response of annual incidences of daily maximum 8-hour average O{sub 3} above 60 ppb to emission reductions in a foreign region (<10-20% of that to domestic) as compared to the annual mean response (up to 50% of that to domestic). Applying the ensemble annual mean results to changes in anthropogenic emissions from 1996 to 2002, we estimate a Northern Hemispheric increase in background surface O{sub 3} of about 0.1 ppb yr{sup -1}, at the low end of the 0.1-0.5 ppb yr{sup -1} derived from observations. From an additional simulation in which global atmospheric methane was reduced, we infer that 20% reductions in anthropogenic methane emissions from a foreign source region would yield an O{sub 3} response in a receptor region that roughly equals that produced by combined 20% reductions of anthropogenic NO{sub x}, NMVOC and CO emissions from the foreign source region.

  10. Time-Resolved Molecular Characterization of Limonene/Ozone Aerosol using High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular composition of limonene/O3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) as a function of reaction time. SOA was generated by ozonation of D-limonene in a reaction chamber and sampled at different time intervals using a cascade impactor. The SOA samples were extracted into acetonitrile and analyzed using a HR-ESI-MS instrument with a resolving power of 100,000 (m/?m). The resulting mass spectra provided detailed information about the extent of oxidation inferred from the O:C ratios, double bond equivalency (DBE) factors, and aromaticity indexes (AI) in hundreds of identified individual SOA species.

  11. AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF OZONE AND REACTIVE NITROGEN COMPOUNDS IN TAMPA, FLORIDA DURING THE BAY REGIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The overall objective of the aircraft measurements in BRACE was to study the emission, transport areas, over the centers of Tampa and St. Petersburg, and over Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico the advection path) and, in other cases, over the Gulf of Mexico, where additional chemical inputs were

  12. Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air Purifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    of California, Irvine, CA ABSTRACT Indoor air purifiers are advertised as safe household prod- ucts for health. This is a serious concern, because O3 is a criteria air pollutant reg- ulated by health-related federal and state of growing air pollution problems in urban areas, indoor air purification has gained widespread popularity

  13. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  14. Critical Areas of State Concern (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation designates the Chesapeake Bay, other Atlantic Coastal Bays, and their tributaries and adjacent lands as critical areas of state concern. It is state policy to protect these areas...

  15. Local Area Networks - Applications to Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakken, B. M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LOCAL AREA NETWORKS - APPLICATIONS TO MERCY MANAGmNT Advanced BRUCE M. BAKKEN Software bfanager Micro Syatems Corporation Milwaukee, WI ABSTRACT One of the newest advances in computer technology is the Local Area Network. Its many...

  16. Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To promote efficiency and avoid waste and duplication, rural and unincorporated areas of Indiana are divided into geographic areas, to be assigned to an electricity provider that will have the sole...

  17. Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Game preserves and closed areas exist within the state of Montana for the protection of all the game animals and birds. Construction and development is limited in these areas. Currently, only three...

  18. Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - February 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stochastic Optimization for Power System Configuration with Renewable Energy in Remote Areas Ludwig Kuznia, Bo Zeng, Grisselle Centeno, Zhixin Miao.

  19. Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the September 2009 IES Street and Area Lighting Conference in Philadelphia.

  20. Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

  1. D-Area Preliminary Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Paik, I.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, , ()

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive review of hazards associated with the D-Area was performed to identify postulated event scenarios.

  2. Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity of 5 poplar clones during; The stem volume and biomass (stem + branches) production, net photosynthesis of mature leaves and leaf area found in volume production, woody biomass production, total leaf area and net photosynthesis. Above

  3. Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    67(1) 1 Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are an important tool for managing fisheries protected area is "any area of the marine environ- ment that has been reserved by Federal, State, tribal, territorial, or local laws or regulations to provide lasting protection for part or all of the natural

  4. THE 2012 KINDER HOUSTON AREA SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADJUSTED. #12;WHAT IS THE BIGGEST PROBLEM IN THE HOUSTON AREA TODAY? (1982-2012) 51 47 25 1510 36 71 27 10THE 2012 KINDER HOUSTON AREA SURVEY: Perspectives on a City inTransition STEPHEN L. KLINEBERG The GHP-Kinder Institute Luncheon and Release of the Findings, 24 April 2012 #12;KINDER HOUSTON AREA

  5. Local control of area-preserving maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristel Chandre; Michel Vittot; Guido Ciraolo

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method of control of chaos in area-preserving maps. This method gives an explicit expression of a control term which is added to a given area-preserving map. The resulting controlled map which is a small and suitable modification of the original map, is again area-preserving and has an invariant curve whose equation is explicitly known.

  6. West Central North East Area of Tucson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 West Central North East Area of Tucson #Individuals Anna Broad-billed Costa Rufous Black-chinned 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 West Central North East Area of Tucson not be conflicting, and urban areas may actually provide valuable surrogates for degraded habitats. Our knowledge

  7. Sum frequency generation and catalytic reaction studies of the removal of the organic capping agents from Pt nanoparticles by UV-ozone treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliaga, Cesar; Park, Jeong Y.; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Hyun Sook; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the structure of the organic capping layers of platinum colloid nanoparticles and their removal by UV-ozone exposure. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFGVS) studies identify the carbon-hydrogen stretching modes on poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and tetradecyl tributylammonium bromide (TTAB)-capped platinum nanoparticles. We found that the UV-ozone treatment technique effectively removes the capping layer on the basis of several analytical measurements including SFGVS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The overall shape of the nanoparticles was preserved after the removal of capping layers, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SFGVS of ethylene hydrogenation on the clean platinum nanoparticles demonstrates the existence of ethylidyne and di-{sigma}-bonded species, indicating the similarity between single-crystal and nanoparticle systems.

  8. The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county government that provides real property tax exemptions for property owners who...

  9. Radiation-dominated area metric cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederic P. Schuller; Mattias N. R. Wohlfarth

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide further crucial support for a refined, area metric structure of spacetime. Based on the solution of conceptual issues, such as the consistent coupling of fermions and the covariant identification of radiation fields on area metric backgrounds, we show that the radiation-dominated epoch of area metric cosmology is equivalent to that epoch in standard Einstein cosmology. This ensures, in particular, successful nucleosynthesis. This surprising result complements the previously derived prediction of a small late-time acceleration of an area metric universe.

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  11. White Etch Areas: Metallurgical Characterization and Atomistic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Atomistic Modeling Presented by R. Scott Hyde of Timken Company at the 2014 Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar Timken Hyde White Etch Areas ANL Presentation Oct 2014...

  12. Management of Specific Flood Plain Areas (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Floodplain management orders by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources as well as approved local ordinances designate an area as a regulated floodplain. These regulations establish minimum...

  13. Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area, Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At International Geothermal...

  14. Redevelopment of Areas Needing Redevelopment Generally (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redevelopment commissions are responsible for developing plans and managing tools used to address conditions of blight (redevelopment areas) and underutilized land of economic significance ...

  15. DFAS Wide-Area Workflow Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the DFAS wide-area workflow issues and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  16. Solar Power for Deployment in Populated Areas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Nathan Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The thesis presents background on solar thermal energy and addresses the structural challenges associated with the deployment of concentrating solar power fields in urban areas.… (more)

  17. Pulmonary function and symptom responses after 6. 6-hour exposure to 0. 12-ppm ozone with moderate exercise (journal version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folinsbee, L.J.; Horstman, D.H.; McDonnell, W.F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (O/sub 3/) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. The hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time was tested. Ten nonsmoking males (18-35 yr) were exposed once to clear air (CA) and once to 0.12 pp, O/sub 3/ for 6.75 h. Exposures consisted of six 50-min exercise periods, each followed by 10-min rest and measurement; a 45-min lunch period followed the third exercise period. Exercise ventilation averaged approximately 40 1/min. Forced expiratory and inspiratory spirometry and respiratory symptoms were measured prior to exposure and after each exercise. Increases in the symptom ratings of cough and pain on deep inspiration were observed with O/sub 3/ exposure but not with CA. Airway reactivity to methacholine was approximately doubled following O/sub 3/ exposure. Spirometry results indicate that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ results in a marked increase in non-specific airway reactivity and progressive changes in respiratory function.

  18. Faculty & Staff Areas of Specialization ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Engineering Engagement for Student Success (ENG2 ) . . . . .9 Division of Engineering Services Services WARREN R. HULL Manager, Engineering Communication Studio MIMI LAVALLE Director of CommunicationsFaculty & Staff Areas of Specialization 2010-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;Faculty & Staff Areas

  19. Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering understands our students may work as Industrial Engineers in other engineering industries, and to help prepare them for these careers, the ISE Areas of Interest was formulated. The courses

  20. Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan Update 2013 West Ash Fire: Wednesday August 29 the boundary of the original plan to include all the area within the Upper Niobrara White Natural Resource, 2012 #12;Facilitated by: Nebraska Forest Service In cooperation with: Region 23 Fire Protection

  1. Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: Mathematics Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    with the City of Calgary's vibrant energy and diversity. The university is home to scholars in 14 facultiesPostdoctoral Scholar position Area: Mathematics Education Duration: 18 months Start date: January 1, invites applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the area of mathematics education. This competition

  2. ARRA Proposed Award: Retrofit Bay Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARRA Proposed Award: Retrofit Bay Area Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco per year Prime contractor: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) Sub contractors: Alameda County Waste Management Authority (StopWaste.org) County of Contra Costa County of Marin City

  3. 7, 66876718, 2007 Mexico City area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Discussions Emissions from forest fires near Mexico City R. Yokelson1 , S. Urbanski2 , E. Atlas3 , D. Toohey4ACPD 7, 6687­6718, 2007 Mexico City area mountain fires R. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract to: R. Yokelson (bob.yokelson@umontana.edu) 6687 #12;ACPD 7, 6687­6718, 2007 Mexico City area

  4. Alamo Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alamo Area Council of Governments

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    KFH GROUP, INC. ALAMO AREA REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN Developed for: The Alamo Area Council of Governments and the San Antonio-Bexar County Metropolitan Planning Organization By: KFH Group..............................................................................................................................4 SUMMARY OF TRAVEL PATTERNS IN THE ALAMO REGION...............................................9 COORDINATION AND SERVICE ALTERNATIVES .................................................................16 COORDINATED TRANSPORTATION: PLANNED...

  5. BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven FOR U.S. Department of Energy March 2009 #12;i OU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA..................................................................................................................4 4.0 Building 96 ­ Operational Background

  6. Nutrient Management Examination Competency Areas Individual Specialists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    and reference materials are included on the Nutrient Management Resource CD distributed at the Nutrientv.01.2014 Nutrient Management Examination Competency Areas Individual Specialists The competency areas in this listing were developed according to the requirements of Pennsylvania's Nutrient Management

  7. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  8. 3000 Area Phase 1 environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranade, D.G.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to sell the 3000 Area to prospective buyers. Environmental Services was requested by the WHC Economic Transition group to assess potential environmental liabilities in the area. Historical review of the area indicated that the site was the location of ``Camp Hanford`` in 1951 and has been used for a variety of purposes since then. The activities in the area have changed over the years. A number of Buildings from the area have been demolished and at least 15 underground storage tanks (USTs) have been removed. Part of the 3000 Area was identified as Operable Unit 1100-EM-3 in the Tri-Party Agreement and was cleaned up by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The cleanup included removal of contaminated soil and USTS. WHC and ICF KH had also performed sampling and analysis at some locations in the 3000 Area prior to USACE`s work on the Operable Unit 1100-EM-3. They removed a number of USTs and performed remediation.

  9. 200 North Aggregate Area source AAMS report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the 200 North Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past practice investigations.

  10. Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LED Area Lighting Retrofit: Yuma Border Patrol Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations. The LED system was found to equal or better the incumbent system in terms of both illuminance and uniformity, and an advanced optical system and lower pole height improved the illuminance uniformity, reduced stray light, and increased projected energy and maintenance cost savings. This high luminous flux and high temperature application is not unique and similar applications can benefit from the findings of this installation.

  11. About Kings Area Rural Transit The Kings County Area Public Transit Agency operates the Kings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    Case Study About Kings Area Rural Transit The Kings County Area Public Transit Agency operates's Central Valley. In the middle is Kings County, home to diverse communities of rural workers. The county the Kings Area Rural Transit (KART) vanpool program in California's San Joaquin Valley. Part of KART

  12. Regulating new construction in historic areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellers-Garcia, Oliver

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is an examination of how the restrictiveness of different design regulations impacts the process of new construction in historic areas. The North End, South End, and Back Bay neighborhoods of Boston were identified ...

  13. Critical Areas Act of 1973 (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act applies to certain areas of the state with important historic, cultural, or esthetic values, or natural systems with functions of greater than local significance. Plans for a given...

  14. Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is...

  15. Fast Adaptive Silhouette Area based Template Matching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    Fast Adaptive Silhouette Area based Template Matching Daniel Mohr and Gabriel Zachmann If (Technical Informatics and Computer Systems) Prof. Dr. Gabriel Zachmann (Computer Graphics) Prof. Dr Template Matching Daniel Mohr and Gabriel Zachmann Clausthal University of Technology, Department

  16. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  17. Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid Electric Trolleys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the evaluation done by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity on the Knoxville Area Transit's use of propane hybrid electric trolleys.

  18. Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Ryan, P. Barry; Ozkaynak, Haluk

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding and quantifying outdoor and indoor sources of human exposure are essential but often not adequately addressed in health-effects studies for air pollution. Air pollution epidemiology, risk assessment, health tracking and accountability assessments are examples of health-effects studies that require but often lack adequate exposure information. Recent advances in exposure modeling along with better information on time-activity and exposure factors data provide us with unique opportunities to improve the assignment of exposures for both future and ongoing studies linking air pollution to health impacts. In September 2006, scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with scientists from the academic community and state health departments convened a symposium on air pollution exposure and health in order to identify, evaluate, and improve current approaches for linking air pollution exposures to disease. This manuscript presents the key issues, challenges and recommendations identified by the exposure working group, who used cases studies of particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutant exposure to evaluate health-effects for air pollution. One of the over-arching lessons of this workshop is that obtaining better exposure information for these different health-effects studies requires both goal-setting for what is needed and mapping out the transition pathway from current capabilities to meeting these goals. Meeting our long-term goals requires definition of incremental steps that provide useful information for the interim and move us toward our long-term goals. Another over-arching theme among the three different pollutants and the different health study approaches is the need for integration among alternate exposure assessment approaches. For example, different groups may advocate exposure indicators, biomonitoring, mapping methods (GIS), modeling, environmental media monitoring, and/or personal exposure modeling. However, emerging research reveals that the greatest progress comes from integration among two or more of these efforts.

  19. Pulmonary function and symptom responses after 6. 6-hour exposure to 0. 12 ppm ozone with moderate exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folinsbee, L.J.; McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (O/sub 3/) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. Small decrements in lung function have been reported following 2-h exposures to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/. For short exposures to higher O/sub 3/ concentrations, lung function decrements are a function of exposure duration. Thus, we investigated the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time. Ten nonsmoking males were exposed once to clean air and once to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ for 6.6 h. Exposures consisted of six 50-min exercise periods, each followed by 10-min rest and measurement; a 35-min lunch period followed by the third exercise period. Exercise ventilation averaged approximately 40 L/min. Forced expiratory and inspiratory spirometry and respiratory symptoms were measured prior to exposure and after each exercise. Airway reactivity to methacholine was determined after each exposure. After correcting for the air exposures, FEV 1.0 was found to decrease linearly during the O/sub 3/ exposure and was decreased by an average of 13.0 percent at the end of exposure. Decreases in FVC and FEF24-75% were also linear and averaged 8.3 and 17.4 percent, respectively, at the end of exposure. On forced inspiratory tests, the FIVC and FIV05 were decreased 12.6 and 20.7 percent, respectively. Increases in the symptom ratings of cough and pain on deep inspiration were observed with O/sub 3/ exposure but not with clean air. Airway reactivity to methacholine was approximately doubled following O/sub 3/ exposure.

  20. Metropolitan area network support at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMar, Phil; Andrews, Chuck; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; Colon, Orlando; Fry, Steve; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Lamore, Donna; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in wide area network service offerings, coupled with comparable developments in local area network technology have enabled many research sites to keep their offsite network bandwidth ahead of demand. For most sites, the more difficult and costly aspect of increasing wide area network capacity is the local loop, which connects the facility LAN to the wide area service provider(s). Fermilab, in coordination with neighboring Argonne National Laboratory, has chosen to provide its own local loop access through leasing of dark fiber to nearby network exchange points, and procuring dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) equipment to provide data channels across those fibers. Installing and managing such optical network infrastructure has broadened the Laboratory's network support responsibilities to include operating network equipment that is located off-site, and is technically much different than classic LAN network equipment. Effectively, the Laboratory has assumed the role of a local service provider. This paper will cover Fermilab's experiences with deploying and supporting a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) infrastructure to satisfy its offsite networking needs. The benefits and drawbacks of providing and supporting such a service will be discussed.

  1. Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Feinerman, Alan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1?±?0.01?nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175–300?°C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}–Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3?? cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the sonolytic destruction of methyl tert-butyl ether by ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, J.W. [Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Industrial Environment and Health] [Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Industrial Environment and Health; Hoffmann, M.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). W.M. Keck Labs.] [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). W.M. Keck Labs.

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics and mechanism of the sonolytic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) have been investigated at an ultrasonic frequency of 205 kHz and power of 200 W L{sup {minus}1}. The observed first-order degradation rate constant for the loss of MTBE increased from 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} to 8.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} as the concentration of MTBE decreased from 1.0 to 0.01 mM. In the presence of O{sub 3}, the sonolytic rate of destruction of MTBE was accelerated substantially. The rate of MTBE sonolysis with ozone was enhanced by a factor of 1.5--3.9 depending on the initial concentration of MTBE. tert-Butyl formate, tert-butyl alcohol, methyl acetate, and acetone were found to be the primary intermediates and byproducts of the degradation reaction with yields of 8, 5, 3, and 12%, respectively. A reaction mechanism involving three parallel pathways that include the direct pyrolytic decomposition of MTBE, the direct reaction of MTBE with ozone, and the reaction of MTBE with hydroxyl radical is proposed.

  3. Final report on activities and findings under DOE grant “Interactive Photochemistry in Earth System Models to Assess Uncertainty in Ozone and Greenhouse Gases”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prather, Michael J. [UCI

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric chemistry controls the abundances and hence climate forcing of important greenhouse gases including N2O, CH4, HFCs, CFCs, and O3. Attributing climate change to human activities requires, at a minimum, accurate models of the chemistry and circulation of the atmosphere that relate emissions to abundances. This DOE-funded research provided realistic, yet computationally optimized and affordable, photochemical modules to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that augment the CESM capability to explore the uncertainty in future stratospheric-tropospheric ozone, stratospheric circulation, and thus the lifetimes of chemically controlled greenhouse gases from climate simulations. To this end, we have successfully implemented Fast-J (radiation algorithm determining key chemical photolysis rates) and Linoz v3.0 (linearized photochemistry for interactive O3, N2O, NOy and CH4) packages in LLNL-CESM and for the first time demonstrated how change in O2 photolysis rate within its uncertainty range can significantly impact on the stratospheric climate and ozone abundances. From the UCI side, this proposal also helped LLNL develop a CAM-Superfast Chemistry model that was implemented for the IPCC AR5 and contributed chemical-climate simulations to CMIP5.

  4. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  5. USACE Small Business Area of Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ACE Page 1 USACE Small Business Area of Responsibility OFC CODE STREET CITY ST ZIP TELEPHONE D S N-761-4609 Deputy to PARCs , Office of Small Business Prog, HQ U.S. Army Corps of CESB 60 Forsyth Street RM10M15

  6. Geophysical investigations of certain Montana geothermal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wideman, C.J. (Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Butte); Dye, L.; Halvorson, J.; McRae, M.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected hot springs areas of Montana have been investigated by a variety of geophysical techniques. Resistivity, gravity, seismic, and magnetic methods have been applied during investigations near the hot springs. Because the geology is extremely varied at the locations of the investigations, several geophysical techniques have usually been applied at each site.

  7. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  8. Evolution of the Size and Functional Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenemann, P. Thomas

    Evolution of the Size and Functional Areas of the Human Brain P. Thomas Schoenemann Department-6570/06/1021-0379$20.00 Key Words neuroanatomy, encephalization, behavior, adaptation, selection Abstract The human brain to understand basic principles of brain evolution that appear to operate across broad classes of organisms

  9. Orc Notation Structured Wide-Area Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Orc Notation Structured Wide-Area Programming Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu April 12, 2010 Rennes, France #12;Orc Notation hierarchical structure. #12;Orc Notation Orc · Goal: Internet scripting language. · Next: Component integration

  10. Structured Wide-Area Programming: Orc Calculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Structured Wide-Area Programming: Orc Calculus Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Concurrency · ubiquitous. · difficult interactions. · Support hierarchical structure. #12;Orc · Initial Goal: Internet scripting language. · Next

  11. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E. [Siemens/KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  12. ARLINGTON/DEFOREST AREA CATERING INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    ARLINGTON/DEFOREST AREA CATERING INFORMATION Rude's Family Catering DeForest, WI 608-846-5959 (Debbie) Roadside Grill DeForest, WI 608-846-1874 (Pete) Piggly Wiggly Poynette, WI 608-635-2647 (Heidi INFORMATION Holiday Inn Express 7184 Morrisonville Rd. DeForest, WI 53532 608-846-8686 toll free 800-HOLIDAY

  13. n. Area Dipartimento Proponente Titolo Finanziamento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    Breuil (Monte Circeo) e di altri siti del Lazio meridionale, quale possibile area rifugio nel Pleistocene'enteropatogeno Shigella flexneri. 5.000,00 si 13 A Dip. Biologia e biotecnologie BIAGIONI Stefano Biochemical biotecnologie CACCHIONE Stefano Functional characterization of Drosophila telomeres 5.000,00 17 A Dip. Biologia

  14. Renewal of Brooklyn's GowanusCanalArea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Renewal of Brooklyn's GowanusCanalArea #12;#12;#12;54 TheJournalofIJrbanTechnology/Spnng1995 is active in all aspectsof the harbor sedimentwork. The Gowanus Canal project will benefit fiom this work economicallyacceptable methodsofdisposingofthesediment. unlikely that the dredged materials fiom the Gowanus Canal can

  15. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  16. California Energy Balance ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Balance Database ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental January 2012 The Issue Comprehensive and reliable energy statistics are essential for good policy analysis and for future projections of energy supply and demand. In 2005, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

  17. 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

  18. Campus Area Housing RENTAL RESOURCE GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    , faculty, staff, communi- ty members, and area property owners and management companies. For more they live, have access to the academic and personal support programs and services offered by UW owned properties that participate in PHC. PHC property owners and managers provide enhanced services

  19. Turkish Trailblazer: Boosting Rural Areas through Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Çokgezen Reviewed by · Aline Kraemer Sector · Consumer Products Enterprise Class · Large Domestic Company her company and the economic and social welfare of rural areas of Turkey. To achieve success, Ms production units in impoverished parts of Turkey in six years. Hey Textile's investment has improved

  20. 11USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Urban air basin produced oxidants, notably ozone, induce a decline in productivity in plants. This loss of productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    11USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Abstract Urban air basin produced oxidants, notably ozone, induce a decline in productivity in plants. This loss of productivity is manifested have been well-studied: increased production and more rapid turnover of antioxidant systems; production

  1. RESEARCH INTERESTS My research has four major areas of emphasis presently. The first area is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesser, Ronald Keith

    is the documentation of radiation dispersion in rural and urban areas subsequent to release from a nuclear accident to refine models for predicting fallout patterns subsequent to nuclear dispersive weapons (dirty bombs and outside of the body. Radiation dosimetry is a central tenet of my third area of research, the biological

  2. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Queen

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

  3. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development and evaluation of the delineations for the New Jersey (NJ) WEA. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the New Jersey WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL identified a selection of leasing areas and proposed delineation boundaries within the established NJ WEA. The primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  4. Electrohydrodynamically driven large-area liquid ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pregenzer, Arian L. (Corrales, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-area liquid ion source comprises means for generating, over a large area of the surface of a liquid, an electric field of a strength sufficient to induce emission of ions from a large area of said liquid. Large areas in this context are those distinct from emitting areas in unidimensional emitters.

  5. Kirkland gets license in hot Philippines area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, A.S.

    1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Kirkland As, Oslo, has received a geophysical survey and exploration contract (GSEC) in a sizzling exploration and development theater off the Philippines. The license covers about 6,000 sq miles of undisputed waters, with depths mostly less than 300 ft, and lies in the Reed Bank area off Northwest Palawan Island, where several major oil and gas strikes have been made recently. Kirkland has 1 year in which to carry out its seismic work commitment. The terms of the GSEC then give an option to drill one well in a 6 month period. Once the results have been analyzed, the company can either drill another well or enter into a service contract for the license. Kirkland has a 65% share in the license, with the remainder split between Philippine companies Philodrill Corp., Beguet Mining Corp. subsidiary Petrofields, and Seafront Resources Corp. The Philippines is one of Kirkland's main areas of activity, the Kirkland Commercial Manager Ralph Baxter.

  6. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  7. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Parker, Z.; Fields, M.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Draxl, C.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development of three delineated leasing area options for the Massachusetts (MA) WEA and the technical evaluation of these leasing areas. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the MA WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL worked with BOEM to identify an appropriate number of leasing areas and proposed three delineation alternatives within the MA WEA based on the boundaries announced in May 2012. A primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  8. WRAP process area development control work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan defines the manner in which the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module I Process Area will be maintained under development control status. This status permits resolution of identified design discrepancies, control system changes, as-building of equipment, and perform modifications to increase process operability and maintainability as parallel efforts. This work plan maintains configuration control as these efforts are undertaken. This task will end with system testing and reissue of field verified design drawings.

  9. Functional Area Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRADS provided on this page are provided as examples of functional area Objectives and Criteria used to evaluate how requirements are meet. They are only examples and should not be utilized as is. In accordance with DOE Standard 3006-2010, CRADs should be developed by team members to reflect the specifics of the proposed review (i.e., breadth and depth) as defined in the approved Plan of Action.

  10. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  11. Property:GeothermalArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresentsGeothermalArea Jump to: navigation,

  12. Southern CA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa,HomeIndiana:RhodeSoutheasternCA Area Jump to:

  13. Ohaaki Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy Resources JumpBuildingsOhaaki Geothermal Area

  14. Olkaria Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy ResourcesCoMaine: EnergyOlkaria Geothermal Area

  15. Larderello Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN) JumpLarderello Geothermal Area Jump to:

  16. Los Azufres Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster AndLittletown,Longwei SiliconLos Azufres Geothermal Area

  17. Medicine Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanosElectric Co LtdJacksonLake Geothermal Area

  18. Mokai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbHMilo,Energy Information Modoc HighMokai Geothermal Area

  19. Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a townLoadingMastic,(Redirected from Maui Area) Jump

  20. Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a townLoadingMastic,(Redirected from Maui Area)

  1. Banbury Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT BiomassArnprior,AurantiaBanbury Geothermal Area Jump to:

  2. Reykjanes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia Blue Ridge AndREIIReykjanes Geothermal Area Jump to:

  3. Pamukoren Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPPSolar Jump to:Pamukoren Geothermal Area Jump to:

  4. Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search

  5. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area...

  6. Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity...

  7. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 -...

  9. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  10. Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern...

  11. areas vulnerabilities impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on residential electricity consumption for the nine San Francisco Bay Area counties 22 Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental...

  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Conservation, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

  13. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date...

  14. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  15. Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  16. Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Columbus Salt Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful...

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski,...

  18. Analytical Modeling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analytical Modeling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (White, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  19. Geothermal Literature Review At White Mountains Area (Goff &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At White Mountains Area...

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  2. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  3. Aeromagnetic Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    literature review of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area. Notes Aeromagnetic intensity residual map compiled for Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area, providing...

  4. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique...

  5. Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - D-Area Groundwater Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report...

  6. THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power Administration Transmission Substation THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power...

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

  8. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lake City Hot Springs Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

  9. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lake City Hot Springs Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity...

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Lienau, 1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

  11. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

  12. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Smith, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal...

  13. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Range Geothermal Region Big Windy Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Bingham Caribou Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Birdsville...

  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity...

  15. area mercantour massif: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    image through flexible fiber bundle One set of optics per viewport 11 12; tight environment high radiation area non-serviceable area passive components...

  16. Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries...

  17. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  18. Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled by core-shell iron nanoclusters. Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled by core-shell...

  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

  20. ARM - Instrument - ozone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS)govInstrumentsgramsgovInstrumentsngm DocumentationgovInstrumentsozone Documentation ARM

  1. ARM - Measurement - Ozone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARM DatagovMeasurementsNitrogen

  2. ARM - Measurement - Ozone Concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARM

  3. ARM - Campaign Instrument - ozone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)

  4. Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

  5. Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

  6. Algorithm for the calculation of proximity area and area centroid within the carpal joint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Nolan Lee

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's corresponding proximity distance and projected bone information to calculate proximity "area" and its centroid. The programs accuracy was tested creating input files from a know geometry and testing the output for different thresholds. Each wrist was analyzed...

  7. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  8. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  9. REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSON RL

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

  10. Expanding the Area of Gravitational Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe how gravitational entropy is intimately connected with the concept of gravitational heat, expressed as the difference between the total and free energies of a given gravitational system. From this perspective one can compute these thermodyanmic quantities in settings that go considerably beyond Bekenstein's original insight that the area of a black hole event horizon can be identified with thermodynamic entropy. The settings include the outsides of cosmological horizons and spacetimes with NUT charge. However the interpretation of gravitational entropy in these broader contexts remains to be understood.

  11. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

  12. Type of Farming Areas in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliot, F. F. (Foster Floyd); Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred)

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -L180 I'EXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMkNrI' FI'AI'ION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR - COLLEGE, STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS - JLLETIN NO. 427 MAY, 1931 1IVISION OF FARM AND RANCH ECONOMICS i COOPERATION WITH THE BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECO- NOMICS..., UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ype of Farming Areas in Texas AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President STATION STAF'Ft ADMINISTRATION : A. B CONNER M S Director R. E: KARPER: M: s:: Vice-Director CLARICE MIXSON...

  13. Pacific Northwest Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOski Energy LLC Place:Ferry County JumpPVDAQBiodieselArea

  14. Klamath Falls Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood,George CountyMexicoFacility |Geothermal Area Jump

  15. Clean Cities: Chicago Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheckInnovation,ClassroomArkansasCentralChicago Area

  16. Astor Pass Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio EnergyInstituteFunding JumpGeothermal Area Jump

  17. Gumuskoy Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a county inAl., ItGumuskoy Geothermal Area Jump to:

  18. Hot Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi GtelHomer, Alaska:Horace, NorthHorvatic JumpOpenHot Lake Area)

  19. Outdoor Area Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on Our National-Projects2008Outdoor Area Lighting

  20. SULI Areas of Research | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORTSORNRecoverynaturalSTORM/PALMSULI Areas

  1. Bouillante Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Area Solar Energy Association Jump to:BotetourtHumboldt2Geothermal

  2. Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus AreaDataBusPFAN) | OpenInc JumpNew YorkNew pageJump to:

  3. Cerro Prieto Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER esMidAmericanArea

  4. Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarland is a cityMcleod 88 Geothermal Area

  5. Shakes Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton AbbeyARaft River,Shakes Springs Geothermal Area

  6. Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardtonManagement,SmartestEnergy LtdSnyderGeothermal Area

  7. 100-F/IU Area ROD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-on halloweenReliable solar:2 OFsupports national securityArea

  8. Silver Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,Pvt LtdShrub Oak, NewSilicium deSilver Peak Area) Jump

  9. Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open Energy InformationAirQualityPermitProcessAreaGeology

  10. Manley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a town in Carroll County,Manitoba HydroGeothermal Area

  11. Surrond Area Resturants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSiteDepartmentChallengeCompliance with OrderSupportSurrond Area

  12. Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has TypeGeothermal Area Jump to: navigation,

  13. Jemez Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6 Climate Zone Subtype A.645565°,Jehin Co Ltd JumpOpenArea

  14. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text09-0018-CXBasinDeseret Generation &Area Jump

  15. Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverseEnergy. ItTroy,Truckhaven Area) Jump

  16. Fang Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: Energy Resources Jump4748456°,Fallon NavalFang Geothermal Area

  17. Fenton Hill Hdr Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: EnergyFeilden Clegg Bradley Studios Jump to:FenixArea Jump

  18. Fernley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: EnergyFeilden Clegg Bradley StudiosFernFernley Geothermal Area

  19. Jemez Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview Jump to:Jamestown,JeffersonGeothermal Area

  20. Kilo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:Keystone Clean Air Jump to: navigation,Kilo Geothermal Area