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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Fnr Is required for NifL-dependent oxygen control of nif gene expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Klebsiella pneumoniae, NifA-dependent transcription of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes is inhibited by NifL in response to molecular oxygen and combined nitrogen. We recently showed that K. pneumoniae NifL is a flavoprotein, which apparently senses oxygen through a redox-sensitive, conformational change. We have now studied the oxygen regulation of NifL activity in Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae strains by monitoring its inhibition of NifA-mediated expression of K. pneumoniae ø(nifH?-?lacZ) fusions in different genetic backgrounds. Strains of both organisms carrying fnr null mutations failed to release NifL inhibition of NifA transcriptional activity under oxygen limitation: nif induction was similar to the induction under aerobic conditions. When the transcriptional regulator Fnr was synthesized from a plasmid, it was able to complement, i.e., to relieve NifL inhibition in the fnr mutant backgrounds. Hence, Fnr appears to be involved, directly or indirectly, in NifL-dependent oxygen regulation of nif gene expression in K. pneumoniae. The data indicate that in the absence of Fnr, NifL apparently does not receive the signal for anaerobiosis. We therefore hypothesize that in the absence of oxygen, Fnr, as the primary oxygen sensor, activates transcription of a gene or genes whose product or products function to relieve NifL inhibition by reducing the flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor under oxygen-limiting conditions. In diazotrophic proteobacteria, transcription of the nitrogen

Roman Grabbe; Kai Klopprogge; Ruth; A. Schmitz

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Diesel prices remain fairly stable  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices remain fairly stable The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel slightly fell to 3.85 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6-tenths of a penny from a week...

3

Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: When EIA's demand forecast is combined with its outlook for production and net imports, distillate stocks are projected to remain low for the rest of the year. - Stocks...

4

Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When EIA’s demand forecast is combined with its outlook for production and net imports, distillate stocks are projected to remain low for the rest of the year.

5

Los Alamos supercomputer remains fastest in world  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

world Los Alamos supercomputer remains fastest in world The latest list of the TOP500 computers in the world continued to place the Roadrunner supercomputer as fastest in the world...

6

Armament remains from His Majesty's sloop Boscawen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

His Majesty's Sloop Boscawen was built on Lake Champlain by British forces in 1759 as part of their successful campaign to drive the French Army from the Champlain Valley. This thesis describes and analyzes the armament remains found in and around the hull during its excavation in 1984 and 1985. Weaponry recovered from Boscawen includes small arms parts and ammunition, pole arms, and artillery munitions. The distribution of armaments indicates that muskets, other personal weapons, and artillery munitions were loaded into the center of the hold, while ammunition for small arms was loaded in the bow and stern. Attributes of individual arms remains show that non-regulation British, French, and Dutch muskets were most commonly represented on board. The variety of arms remains and ammunition types supports Boscawen's historically documented use as an active combat ship in 1759 and as an armed transport for the Royal Artillery in 1760. A review of research reports on contemporary archaeological sites reveals serious deficiencies in the description and identification of weaponry from some sites. Additionally, the site reports generally do not consider the distribution of artifacts. A re-analysis of armament remains from Seven Years War sites would improve our understanding of how small arms and artillery were distributed on and among those sites.

Carter, Brinnen Stiles

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

FAL 2006-04, Financial Assistance Letters Remaining in Effect  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance Letters (FALs) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued FALs Financial Assistance Letters (FALs) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued FALs have been superseded by a formal rulemaking, incorporated into other guidance, and/or canceled. *************** Financial Assistance Letters Remaining in Effect Number Date Subject 2006-03 05/10/2006 Implementation Guidance for Awarding Technology Investment Agreements Financial Assistance Letters Discontinued Number Date Subject Disposition 2004-03 02/12/2004 Intellectual Property Moved to the Guide to Financial Assistance 2004-06 11/02/2004 Award Terms Moved to the Guide to Financial Assistance 2005-03 06/27/2005 Eligibility Determination Required by Section 2306 of the Energy Policy Act Moved to the Guide to

8

Oxygen analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

Benner, William H. (Danville, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: When EIA's demand forecast is combined with its outlook for production and net imports, distillate stocks are projected to remain low for the rest of the year. - Stocks are beginning at very low levels. The September 1 distillate fuel stock level (112 million barrels) is nearly 20% less than last year, and about 15% below the 10 year average for end of August levels. - But stocks on the East Coast, at 39.8 million barrels, are 39% behind year-ago levels, and about a similar percentage below end-of-August 10-year average levels. Over the last 10 years, the average stock build from the end of August through the end of November has been about 10 million barrels. We are forecasting about a 12 million barrel build, which does not reach the normal band. Forecast stocks peak at the end of November at 127 million

10

Oxygen analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

Benner, W.H.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Oxygen Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of...

12

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

Grula, J W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hand-Held Analyzer Quickly Detects Buried Human Remains  

A lightweight hand-held analyzer invented by ORNL researchers uses visual andauditory cues to quickly alert investigators to the presence of buried human remains.The Lightweight Analyzer for Buried Remains And Decomposition Odor Recognition(LABRADOR) ...

14

DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary DOE removes all remaining HEU...

15

US Removes Last Remaining HEU from Czech Republic, Sets Nonproliferati...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Remaining HEU from Czech Republic, Sets Nonproliferation Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

16

A Study on Remaining Useful Life Prediction for Prognostic Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? We consider the prediction algorithm and performance evaluation for prognostics and health management (PHM) problems, especially the prediction of remaining useful life (RUL) for… (more)

Liu, Gang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Measurement and Verification Working...

18

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Design and Implementation Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Program Design and Implementation...

19

Coal likely to remain most prevalent fuel for electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal is currently the dominant fuel for electricity generation and is likely to remain so, even if additional environmental control regulations ...

20

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

22

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost-Effectiveness Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Cost-Effectiveness Working Group In July 2011,...

23

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Tools and Methods Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on...

24

ORISE: Study finds foreign doctorate recipients' stay rates remain...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the United States remains high No evidence that visa restrictions are reducing stay rates, according to report FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jan. 18, 2012 FY12-12 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The...

25

World supplies of rapeseed and canola likely to remain tight in the 2012/13 season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even if Canadian farmers harvest a record canola crop of 14.5–15.0 million metric tons (MMT) in late summer 2012, there is a high probability that world production of rapeseed and canola will remain behind requirements in the 2012/13 season—mainly due to p

26

Remaining uncertainties in the kinetic mechanism of hydrogen combustion  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the performance of an updated hydrogen combustion mechanism is presented. Particular attention was paid to different channels of reaction between H atoms and HO{sub 2} radicals, to pressure dependence of the recombination of HO{sub 2} radicals, and to the anomalous rate constant of reaction between OH and HO{sub 2} radicals. The contemporary choice of the reaction rate constants is presented with the emphasis on their uncertainties. Then the predictions of ignition, oxidation, flame burning velocities, and flame structure of hydrogen-oxygen-inert mixtures are shown. The modeling range covers ignition experiments from 950 to 2700 K and from subatmospheric pressures up to 87 atm; hydrogen oxidation in a flow reactor at temperatures around 900 K from 0.3 up to 15.7 atm; flame burning velocities in hydrogen-oxygen-inert mixtures from 0.35 up to 4 atm; and hydrogen flame structure at 1 and 10 atm. Comparison of the modeling and experiments is discussed in terms of the range of applicability of the present detailed mechanism. The necessity for analysis of the mechanism to have an exhaustive list of reactions is emphasized. (author)

Konnov, Alexander A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Oxygen scavengers - The chemistry of sulfite under hydrothermal conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control of oxygen corrosion is critical to the reliability of steam generator systems. Mechanical deaeration and chemical oxygen scavenging effectively reduce oxygen levels in boiler feedwater systems. This paper reviews the use of sulfites to reduce oxygen and provide corrosion control throughout the boiler feedwater circuit as well as mechanical and operational oxygen reduction methods. The mechanism of oxygen pitting, electrochemical reactions, and the basis of operation of mechanical deaeration are discussed. Estimating techniques for the amount of steam required and a deaerator troubleshooting guide are included. The chemistry of sulfites is covered in detail. Also included are a functional definition of chemical oxygen scavengers and a general discussion of their various types.

Cotton, I.J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) - the nation's only remaining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collider (RHIC) - the nation's only remaining Collider (RHIC) - the nation's only remaining particle collider, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory - has made a series of landmark discoveries and continuing breakthroughs in science and technology. One major accomplishment has been RHIC's ability to recreate and study in detail a type of matter that last existed at the beginning of the universe to better understand the strongest force in nature - the force that holds together the fundamental particles that make up 99 percent of visible matter in the universe today, everything from stars to planets to people. In addition to giving us a new way to explore and understand the nature of the early universe and the force that holds together ordinary matter, research at RHIC has revealed stunning

29

Remaining gross market potentials for the Central District  

SciTech Connect

The remaining gross market potential for the central district was studied for 28 power distributors. A special cross tabulation from the Bureau of the Census was used to develop a housing base from which work completions from the Revised Home Insulation Program (RHIP) data base could be subtracted. Key observations were: The largest percentage of remaining gross market potential for RHIP surveys lies in the service area of Nashville Electric Service (28.0%). Approximately 20% of the electrically heated and/or cooled living quarters have installed one or more measures under the Home Weatherization Option. In comparison to the number of RHIP surveys completed, 47.1% of the consumers went on to install one or more of the recommended weatherization measures. Only 1.6% of the occupied living quarters have installed a heat pump under the Heat Pump Option of RHIP. The district penetration rate for heat pump water heater installations in living quarters with existing electric water heaters is less than 0.005%. The largest percentage of remaining solar water heater installations is found in the Nashville Electric Service (NES) area (60.4%). Of the distributors that offered all 4 options in addition to the survey, NES had the highest overall average in performance and closures.

Camp, W.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Science Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Requirements About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network...

31

Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving Complex of Photosynthesis Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the evolution of complex aerobic life. Coupled to the reduction of carbon dioxide, biological photosynthesis contributes foodstuffs for nutrition while recycling CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with O2. By utilizing sunlight to power these energy-requiring reactions, photosynthesis also serves as a model for addressing societal energy needs as we enter an era of diminishing fossil fuel resources and climate change. Understanding, at the molecular level, the dynamics and mechanisms behind photosynthesis is of fundamental importance and will prove critical to the future design of devices aimed at converting sunlight into electrochemical energy and transportable fuel.

32

Remaining gross market potentials for the Appalachian District  

SciTech Connect

A survey provided a rank ordering of the 22 power distributors and each option's installations under the Revised Home Insulation Program (RHIP). A special cross tabulation from the Bureau of the Census was used to develop a housing base from which work completions from the RHIP data base could be subtracted. Key observations were: the largest percentage of remaining gross market potential for RHIP surveys lies in the service area of the Knoxville utilities Board (22.6%). Approximately 23% of the electrically heated and/or cooled living quarters have installed 1 or more measures under the Home Weatherization Option. In comparison to the number of RHIP surveys completed, 48.3% of the RHIP participants went on to install 1 or more of the recommended weatherization measures. Only 1.8% of the occupied living quarters have installed a heat pump under the Heat Pump Option of RHIP. The district penetration rate for heat pump water heater installation in living quarters with existing electric water heaters is 0.1%. The largest percentage of remaining solar water heater installations is found in the Knoxville Utilities Board's service area (43.3%). Of the distributors that offered all 4 options in addition to the survey, the municipality of Oak Ridge had the highest overall average in performance and closure.

Camp, W.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Remaining gross market potentials for the Alabama District  

SciTech Connect

A survey provided a rank ordering of the 25 power distributors and each option's installations under the Revised Home Insulation Program (RHIP). A special cross tabulation from the Bureau of the Census was used to develop a housing base from which work completions from the RHIP data base could be subtracted. Key observations were: The largest percentage of remaining gross market potential for RHIP surveys lies in the service area of the City of Huntsville Utilities (22.0%). Approximately 34% of the electrically heated and/or cooled living quarters have installed one or more measures under the Home Weatherization Option. In comparison to the number of RHIP surveys completed, 77.3% of the consumers went on to install one or more of the recommended weatherization measures. Only 2.5% of the occupied living quarters have installed a heat pump under the Heat Pump Option of RHIP. The district penetration rate for heat pump water heater installations in living quarters with existing electric water heaters is less than 0.01%. The largest percentage of remaining solar water heater installations is found in the City of Huntsville Utilities service area (52.5%). Of the distributors that offered all 4 options in addition to the survey, the municipality of Sheffield had the highest overall average in performance and closure.

Camp, W.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Tools and Methods Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Tools and Methods Working Group In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required "Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response." The Implementation Proposal was for FERC's June 2010 National Action Plan for Demand Response. Part of the July 2011 Implementation Proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given the rapid development of the demand response industry, DOE and FERC decided

35

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Program Design and Implementation Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Program Design and Implementation Working Group In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required "Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response." The Implementation Proposal was for FERC's June 2010 National Action Plan for Demand Response. Part of the July 2011 Implementation Proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given the

36

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in yield and 4 cP in viscosity in comparison to high AA pulp for the oxygen delignification. This difference is also seen for high-kappa SW kraft pulps with an average improvement of {approx}3% in yield and 3 cP in viscosity for low AA high kappa number 50 pulp. Low AA hardwood kappa number 20 pulp had an average improvement of {approx}4% in yield and 6-12 cP in viscosity as compared to high AA pulp. Lower kraft cooking temperature (160 vs. 170 C) in combination with the medium AA provides a practical approach for integrating high kappa pulping of hardwoods (i.e., low rejects) with an advanced extended oxygen delignification stage. ECF pulp bleaching of low and high kappa kraft SW and HW pulps exhibit comparable optical and physical strength properties when bleached D(EPO)D.

Arthur J. Ragauskas

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts The Remaining Mysteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To anyone who has read a scientific journal or even a newspaper in the last six months, it might appear that cosmic gamma-ray bursts hold no more mysteries: they are cosmological, and possibly the most powerful explosions in the Universe. In fact, however, bursts remain mysterious in many ways. There is no general agreement upon the nature of the event which releases the initial energy. One burst at least appears to strain the energy budget of the merging neutron star model. There is evidence that another recent event may have come from a nearby supernova. Finally, while the number count statistics clearly show a strong deviation from the -3/2 power law expected for a Euclidean, homogeneous distribution, the distributions of some classes of bursts appear to follow a -3/2 power law rather closely. The recent data on bursts is reviewed, some of the mysteries discussed, and future experiments are outlined.

Hurley, K

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

EOR dips in U. S. but remains a significant factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the Journal's exclusive biennial enhanced oil recovery EOR survey including heavy oil projects, and other estimates, worldwide production from enhanced oil recovery projects at the start of 1994 remained about 1.9 million b/d or about the same as at the beginning of 1992. The 1.9 million b/d represents about 3.2% of the world's oil production. Although worldwide EOR production has hit a plateau, projects in the next few years in China, Alaska, Indonesia, Canada, Venezuela, and the US Permian basin might boos the production trend upward. The Journal's current survey found US EOR production decreased by 7%, to 709,000 bo/d. This production rate is still 10% of the overall US daily oil production. The percentage remained the same because between January 1992 and January 1994, total US oil production dropped almost 400,000 bo/d to 6.9 million b/d. Total US oil production is currently about 6.6 million bo/d. The number of US EOR projects has steadily decreased since 1986 but this is the first survey showing less production from EOR projects. Twelve tables compile data on the following: US EOR production; active US EOR projects; planned EOR projects, US and non-US; producing Canadian EOR projects; completed/terminated Canadian projects; producing EOR projects outside US and Canada, completed/terminated/postponed projects outside US and Canada; producing thermal EOR US projects; producing CO[sub 2] gas EOR US projects; producing chemical and microbial EOR US projects; completed/terminated/postponed/delayed US projects; and producing worldwide heavy oil EOR projects.

Moritis, G.

1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not been preceded by the evolution of nitrogen fixation, and if these organisms had not also acquired the ability to fix nitrogen at the beginning of or very early in their history. The evolution of nitrogen fixation also appears to have been a precondition for the evolution of (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosynthesis. Given that some form of chlorophyll is obligatory for true photosynthesis, and its light absorption and chemical properties make it a "universal pigment," it may be predicted that the evolution of nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis are also closely linked on other Earth- like planets.

John W. Grula

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

40

Investment in generation is heavy, but important needs remain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasting the direction of the US electric power industry for 2007, much less the distant future, is like defining a velocity vector; doing so requires a direction and speed to delineate progress. In this special report, the paper looks at current industry indicators and draws conclusions based on more than 100 years of experience. To borrow verbatim the title of basketball legend Charles Barkely's book 'I may be wrong but I doubt it'. The forecast takes into consideration USDOE's National Electric Transmission Congestion Study (August 2006),a summary of industry data prepared by Industrial Info Resources (IIR) and NERC's 2006 Long-Term Reliability Assessment (October 2006). It also reports opinions of industry specialists. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Maize, K.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the

42

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

----------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- Chapter 6.1 (February 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must

43

A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State and Regional Policy Assistance » Technical Assistance » Demand State and Regional Policy Assistance » Technical Assistance » Demand Response - Policy » A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required "Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response." The Implementation Proposal was for FERC's June 2010 National Action Plan for Demand Response. Part of the July 2011 Implementation Proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given the rapid development of the demand response industry, DOE and FERC decided

44

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Required Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Required Documents Required Documents Required Documents All foreign nationals, including students and postdocs, must select the foreign nationals employment category to complete the new-hire process. Contact (505) 665-7158 Email Complete following forms before New-Hire Orientation Be sure to bring the forms with you for the orientation event, but do not sign and date: Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification (pdf) - original, unexpired documents for verification of employment eligibility. Please refer to the I-9 verification form titled, "Lists of Acceptable Documents", which was included with your offer letter. (Laminated documents or hospital/temporary birth certificates are not accepted.) Note: Failure to provide required documents will result in delay and/or

46

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is

47

School requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a smooth surface and no "lip". Some presentations require AV equipment such as LCD or overhead projectors. A wireless microphone and sound system may be helpful to ensure that...

48

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is identified in FAR

49

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300?F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300?F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Acquisition LetteJ'S (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All odJer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LetteJ'S (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All odJer previously issued ALs have been LetteJ'S (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All odJer previously issued ALs have been supersedcd by a formal rule-making. incorporated into other guidance, and/or canceled. ~ ~,COUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT NUMBER 93-4 94-19 95-06 95-14 96-09 98-04 98-11 99.{)4 99-06 2000-02 2000-05 2000-08 2000-09 2000-10R 2000-12 200 1-03 ~ SUBJECT !!AIE 04/07/93 12/09/94 06!2819~ 11/17/9~ Displaced Workers Benefits Program Basic Labor Policies Fringe Benefits Personal Property Letter System Subcontracts under the New Independent States - Industrial Partnering Program Full and Open Competition - Management and Operating Contracts Diversity Plans Waiver of Synopsis Requirements Consortium Buying 09/16/96 03/11/98 09/18/98 06/23/99 08/27/99 DOE Authorized Subcontract for Use by DOE Management and

54

Method and apparatus to predict the remaining service life of an operating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and computer-based apparatus for monitoring the degradation of, predicting the remaining service life of, and/or planning maintenance for, an operating system are disclosed. Diagnostic information on degradation of the operating system is obtained through measurement of one or more performance characteristics by one or more sensors onboard and/or proximate the operating system. Though not required, it is preferred that the sensor data are validated to improve the accuracy and reliability of the service life predictions. The condition or degree of degradation of the operating system is presented to a user by way of one or more calculated, numeric degradation figures of merit that are trended against one or more independent variables using one or more mathematical techniques. Furthermore, more than one trendline and uncertainty interval may be generated for a given degradation figure of merit/independent variable data set. The trendline(s) and uncertainty interval(s) are subsequently compared to one or more degradation figure of merit thresholds to predict the remaining service life of the operating system. The present invention enables multiple mathematical approaches in determining which trendline(s) to use to provide the best estimate of the remaining service life.

Greitzer, Frank L. (Richland, WA); Kangas, Lars J. (West Richland, WA); Terrones, Kristine M. (Los Alamos, NM); Maynard, Melody A. (Richland, WA); Pawlowski, Ronald A. (West Richland, WA), Ferryman; Thomas A. (Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA); Wilson, Bary W. (Coconut Creek, FL)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--------------------------- Chapter 6.5 (January 2011) 1 Competition Advocate Responsibilities [Reference: FAR 6.5, FAR 7 and DEAR 906.501] Overview This section discusses the competition advocate requirements and provides a Federal Procurement Data System-New Generation (FPDS-NG) coding assistance sheet and screen shots for the FPDS-NG Competition Report. Background FAR Part 6.5, -Competition Advocates,‖ implements section 20 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, which requires the head of each executive agency to designate an Agency Competition Advocate and Procuring Activity Advocates (hereafter referred to as Activity Competition Advocates). In accordance with DEAR 906.501, the Secretary of

57

Meeting the oxygen requirements of an isolated perfused rat liver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liver perfusion systems can be used as organ culture platforms for metabolic, genetic and systems engineering, tissue regeneration, pharmacokinetics, organ storage and marginal donor reconditioning for transplantation. The ...

Izamis, Maria-Louisa, 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Algae for Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Algae for Oxygen Algae for Oxygen Name: Pam Burkardt Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I am Pam Burkardt, a seventh grader at Fox Chapel School. I have a question on algae. I read somewhere that someday people might take bath tubs full of algae onto spaceships to provide oxygen for the crew. How much oxygen does algae give off, is this really possible? Replies: I think that most of the oxygen in the atmosphere comes in fact from one-celled plants in the oceans, like algae. They are likely to produce a lot of oxygen per unit weight because they don't have non-photosynthesizing bark, roots, branches, etc., nor (I think) a major dormant period like temperate-zone plants. The cost of space travel at present is dominated by the expense of heaving weight up into Earth orbit (it costs very little extra to send it to the Moon, for example, or Mars). For missions of short duration the weight of the compressed oxygen you need to carry is less than the weight of algae, water and extra plumbing you'd need to carry if you relied on algae to produce your oxygen. The important use of green plants would be in very long duration space flight (years) or permanent inhabitation of worlds like the Moon, where you need an unlimited supply of oxygen. Now if you want to fantasize, Venus' atmosphere is almost all carbon dioxide. Suppose you dropped a whole lot of specially gene-tailored one-celled plants into the atmosphere (not the surface, it's too hot). Why then they might eat up all the carbon dioxide and produce a breathable atmosphere. The "greenhouse effect" would go away, and Venus would become a nice habitable if tropical world only 50 million miles away.

59

Plants making oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants making oxygen Plants making oxygen Name: Doug Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How many plants are needed to make enough oxygen for one person for one hour? We are experimenting with Anacharis plants. Replies: The problem can be solved when broken down into smaller questions: 1. How much oxygen does a person need in an hour? 2. How much oxygen does a plant produce in an hour? 3. Based on the above, how many plants will provide the oxygen needs of the person for the hour? Here is the solution to the first question: A resting, healthy adult on an average, cool day breathes in about 53 liters of oxygen per hour. An average, resting, health adult breathes in about 500 mL of air per breath. This is called the normal tidal volume. Now, 150 mL of this air will go to non- functioning areas of the lung, called the "dead space." The average breath rate for this average person is 12 breaths per minute. So, the amount of air breathed in by the person which is available for use is 12 x (500 mL -150 mL) = 4,200 mL/minute. Multiply by 60 to get 252,000 mL/hour. That is, every hour, the person will breathe in 252 L of air. Now, on an average, cool, clear day, only 21% of that air is oxygen. So, 21% of 252 L is 53 L. So, in an hour, the person breathes in about 53 L of oxygen.

60

Optimization of Oxygen Purity for Coal Conversion Energy Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of coal into gaseous and liquid fuels and chemical feedstock will require large quantities of oxygen. This oxygen will be produced in large multi-train air separation plants which will consume about 350 kilowatt hours of energy for each ton of coal processed. Thus, the oxygen plants in a commercial coal conversion facility may require 150 megawatts. Design of the oxygen plants will require close attention to energy consumption. Many coal conversion processes can accept oxygen at less than the historical 99.5% purity with significant savings in energy and cost. The air separation process is reviewed with emphasis on optimum oxygen purity. An energy reduction of 8.4% can be achieved when oxygen purity is reduced from 99.5% to 95%. Oxygen is a major tonnage chemical which is also highly energy intensive. The current United States capacity of about 80 thousand tons per day places it in the top five of basic chemicals, and its energy requirement of 350 to 450 kilowatt hours per ton makes it a major energy consumer. The growing synfuels industry -- conversion of coal into hydrocarbon fuels and chemical feed-stocks -- will greatly increase the production of oxygen and presents major opportunities for energy conservation.

Baker, C. R.; Pike, R. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) - Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) Synopsizing Proposed Non-Competitive Contract Actions Citing the Authority of FAR 6.302-1 [Reference: FAR 5 and DEAR 905] Overview This section discusses publicizing sole source actions as part of the approval of a Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC) using the authority of FAR 6.302-1. Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. One exception permits contracting without full and open competition when the required supplies or services are available from only one responsible source (FAR 6.302-1). This exception is

62

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

Lucian A. Lucia

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this concept offers substantial savings over SCR and is an economically attractive alternative to purchasing NOx credits or installing other conventional technologies. In conjunction with the development of oxygen based low NOx technology, Praxair also worked on developing the economically enhancing oxygen transport membrane (OTM) technology which is ideally suited for integration with combustion systems to achieve further significant cost reductions and efficiency improvements. This OTM oxygen production technology is based on ceramic mixed conductor membranes that operate at high temperatures and can be operated in a pressure driven mode to separate oxygen with infinite selectivity and high flux. An OTM material was selected and characterized. OTM elements were successfully fabricated. A single tube OTM reactor was designed and assembled. Testing of dense OTM elements was conducted with promising oxygen flux results of 100% of target flux. However, based on current natural gas prices and stand-alone air separation processes, ceramic membranes do not offer an economic advantage for this application. Under a different DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement, Praxair is continuing to develop oxygen transport membranes for the Advanced Boiler where the economics appear more attractive.

David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Oxygen detection in biological systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

kinetics of flash induced oxygen evolution of algae through measuring ...... (1999) Fast response oxygen micro-optodes based on novel soluble ormosil glasses.

65

Modeling the Oxygen - Hydrazine Reaction in PWR Secondary Feedwater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proper control of oxygen in primary water reactor (PWR) secondary feedwater, using hydrazine, has been an enduring issue. The requirements on the oxygen concentration are partly opposing. Fully deoxygenated conditions in the steam generators are essential to minimize corrosion. On the other hand, some oxygen in the feedwater counteracts corrosion of carbon steel surfaces and the transport of corrosion products to the steam generators. Optimization is, therefore, essential. This work applies the frame...

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost-Effectiveness Working Group Cost-Effectiveness Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Cost-Effectiveness Working Group In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required "Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response." The Implementation Proposal was for FERC's June 2010 National Action Plan for Demand Response. Part of the July 2011 Implementation Proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given the rapid development of the demand response industry, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project, in which state officials, industry

67

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification Working Group Measurement and Verification Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Measurement and Verification Working Group In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required "Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response." The Implementation Proposal was for FERC's June 2010 National Action Plan for Demand Response. Part of the July 2011 Implementation Proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given the rapid development of the demand response industry, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project, in which state officials, industry

68

Why does Low-Luminosity AGN Fueling Remain an Unsolved Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite many years of effort, observational studies have not found a strong correlation between the presence of any proposed fueling mechanism and low-luminosity AGN. After a discussion of the mass requirements for fueling, I summarize this observational work and provide a number of hypotheses for why the nature of AGN fueling has remained unresolved. In particular, I stress the potential importance of the increasing number of candidate fueling mechanisms with decreasing mass accretion rate, the relevant spatial scales for different fueling mechanisms, and the lifetime of an individual episode of nuclear accretion. The episodic AGN lifetime is a particularly relevant complication if it is comparable to or shorter than the time that the responsible fueling mechanisms are observationally detectable. I conclude with a number of relatively accessible areas for future investigation.

Martini, P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Magnetism in Lithium–Oxygen Discharge Product  

SciTech Connect

Nonaqueous lithium–oxygen batteries have a much superior theoretical gravimetric energy density compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, and thus could render long-range electric vehicles a reality. A molecular-level understanding of the reversible formation of lithium peroxide in these batteries, the properties of major/minor discharge products, and the stability of the nonaqueous electrolytes is required to achieve successful lithium–oxygen batteries. We demonstrate that the major discharge product formed in the lithium–oxygen cell, lithium peroxide, exhibits a magnetic moment. These results are based on dc-magnetization measurements and a lithium– oxygen cell containing an ether-based electrolyte. The results are unexpected because bulk lithium peroxide has a significant band gap. Density functional calculations predict that superoxide- type surface oxygen groups with unpaired electrons exist on stoichiometric lithium peroxide crystalline surfaces and on nanoparticle surfaces; these computational results are consistent with the magnetic measurement of the discharged lithium peroxide product as well as EPR measurements on commercial lithium peroxide. The presence of superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with spin can play a role in the reversible formation and decomposition of lithium peroxide as well as the reversible formation and decomposition of electrolyte molecules.

Lu, Jun; Jung, Hun-Ji; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Schlueter, John A.; Du, Peng; Assary, Rajeev S.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Ferguson, Glen A.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Hassoun, Jusef; Iddir, Hakim; Zhou, Jigang; Zuin, Lucia; Hu, Yongfeng; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

Oxygen generator for medical applications (USIC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall Project objective is to develop a portable, non-cryogenic oxygen generator capable of supplying medical grade oxygen at sufficient flow rates to allow the field application of the Topical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (THOT{reg_sign}) developed by Numotech, Inc. This project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) and is managed by collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Numotech, Inc, and LLC SPE 'Spektr-Conversion.' The project had two phases, with the objective of Phase I being to develop, build and test a laboratory prototype of the membrane-pressure swing adsorber (PSA) system producing at 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum of 98% oxygen purity. Phase II objectives were to further refine and identify the pre-requisites needed for a commercial product and to determine the feasibility of producing 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum oxygen purity of 99%. In Phase I, Spektr built up the necessary infrastructure to perform experimental work and proceeded to build and demonstrate a membrane-PSA laboratory prototype capable of producing 98% purity oxygen at a flow rate of 5 L/min. Spektr offered a plausible path to scale up the process for 15 L/min. Based on the success and experimental results obtained in Phase I, Spektr performed work in three areas for Phase II: construction of a 15 L/min PSA; investigation of compressor requirements for the front end of the membrane/PSA system; and performing modeling and simulation of assess the feasibility of producing oxygen with a purity greater than 99%. Spektr successfully completed all of the tasks under Phase II. A prototype 15 L/min PSA was constructed and operated. Spektr determined that no 'off the shelf' air compressors met all of the specifications required for the membrane-PSA, so a custom compressor will likely need to be built. Modeling and simulation concluded that production of oxygen with purities greater than 99% was possible using a Membrane-PSA system.

Staiger, C. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Comparative analysis of remaining oil saturation in waterflood patterns based on analytical modeling and simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In assessing the economic viability of a waterflood project, a key parameter is the remaining oil saturation (ROS) within each pattern unit. This information helps in identifying the areas with the highest ROS and thus potential for further development. While special core analysis, log-inject-log, and thermal-decay time-log-evaluation techniques are available, they provide only single-point values and a snapshot in time near a wellbore. Also, they can quickly add up to an expensive program. The analytical areal distribution method estimates ROS in a waterflood pattern unit from material balance calculations using well injection and production data with no pressure information required. Well production and injection volumes are routinely measured in oilfield operations, making the method very attractive. The areal distribution technique estimates two major uncertainties: vertical loss of injected water into nontarget areas or areal loss into surrounding patterns, and injected water for gas fill-up. However, developers tested it only in low-pressure conditions, which are increasingly rare in oilfield operations. The main purpose of my research, then, was to verify whether or not the areal distribution method is valid in higher pressure conditions. Simulation of various waterflood patterns confirmed that the areal distribution method with its estimated ROS is capable of precise estimation of actual ROS, but at high pressures it requires consideration of pressure data in addition to injection and production data.

Azimov, Anar Etibar

73

Oxygen in Underwater Cave  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen in Underwater Cave Oxygen in Underwater Cave Name: Natalie Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: HI Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Is it possible for there to be free oxygen in an underwater cave? If it is, then how does it work? Replies: Yes it is possible as I have personally experienced. If the cave roof rises to a level above the water, air dissolved in the water will slowly out gas until the water is at the same level at all places. A pocket of breathable air will form. In many caves the roof dips below water level in one place but it above it on both sides. Think of a U shaped tube where the bottom of the U is blocked by water. This is called a siphon and I have passed through many of these to find breathable air on the other side. R. W. "Bob" Avakian Oklahoma State Univ. Inst. of Technology

74

Phosphorescent semiconductor nanocrystals and proteins for biological oxygen sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxygen is required for cellular respiration by all complex life making it a key metabolic profiling factor in biological systems. Tumors are defined by hypoxia (low pO2), which has been shown to influence response to ...

McLaurin, Emily J. (Emily Jane)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful April 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies. ITM Oxygen will enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, as well as other gasification-based processes. The technology will also enhance the economics of oxy-fired combustion technologies, making it an attractive option for the capture of carbon

77

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate  

SciTech Connect

A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman (Drexel-MED); (St. Louis-MED); (WU-MED)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medical ExaminerCoroner on the Handling of a BodyHuman Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Medical ExaminerCoroner on the Handling of a BodyHuman Remains...

82

Using Remaining Battery lifetime information and Relaying to decrease Outage Probability of a Mobile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Remaining Battery lifetime information and Relaying to decrease Outage Probability is to demonstrate that by employing relaying and using the remaining battery lifetime information of Mobile is determined based on the remaining battery lifetime of the MT. We assume a linear relationship between

Singh, Suresh

83

Efficiency evaluation of oxygen enrichment in energy conversion processes  

SciTech Connect

The extent to which energy conversion efficiencies can be increased by using oxygen or oxygen-enriched air for combustion was studied. Combustion of most fuels with oxygen instead of air was found to have five advantages: increases combustion temperature and efficiency, improves heat transfer at high temperatures, reduces nitrous oxide emissions, permits a high ration of exhaust gas recirculation and allows combustion of certain materials not combustible in air. The same advantages, although to a lesser degree, are apparent with oxygen-enriched air. The cost-effectiveness of the process must necessarily be improved by about 10% when using oxygen instead of air before such use could become justifiable on purely economic terms. Although such a modest increase appears to be attainable in real situations, this study ascertained that it is not possible to generally assess the economic gains. Rather, each case requires its own evaluation. For certain processes industry has already proven that the use of oxygen leads to more efficient plant operation. Several ideas for essentially new applications are described. Specifically, when oxygen is used with exhaust gas recirculation in external or internal combustion engines. It appears also that the advantages of pulse combustion can be amplified further if oxygen is used. When burning wet fuels with oxygen, direct steam generation becomes possible. Oxygen combustion could also improve processes for in situ gasification of coals, oil shales, peats, and other wet fuels. Enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding methods might also become more effective if oxygen is used. The cold energy contained in liquid oxygen can be substantially recovered in the low end of certain thermodynamic cycles. Further efforts to develop certain schemes for using oxygen for combustion appear to be justified from both the technical and economic viewpoints.

Bomelburg, H.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

Cassano, A.A.

1985-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

88

Oxygen Handling and Cooling Options in High Temperature Electrolysis Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory is working on a project to generate hydrogen by high temperature electrolysis (HTE). In such an HTE system, safety precautions need to be taken to handle high temperature oxygen at ~830°C. This report is aimed at addressing oxygen handling in a HTE plant.. Though oxygen itself is not flammable, most engineering material, including many gases and liquids, will burn in the presence of oxygen under some favorable physicochemical conditions. At present, an absolute set of rules does not exist that can cover all aspects of oxygen system design, material selection, and operating practices to avoid subtle hazards related to oxygen. Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite in an oxygen-enriched environment at a temperature lower than that in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Even many metals, if ignited, burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment. However, these hazards do not preclude the operations and systems involving oxygen. Oxygen can be safely handled and used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. In fact, the incidence of oxygen system fires is reported to be low with a probability of about one in a million. This report is a practical guideline and tutorial for the safe operation and handling of gaseous oxygen in high temperature electrolysis system. The intent is to provide safe, practical guidance that permits the accomplishment of experimental operations at INL, while being restrictive enough to prevent personnel endangerment and to provide reasonable facility protection. Adequate guidelines are provided to govern various aspects of oxygen handling associated with high temperature electrolysis system to generate hydrogen. The intent here is to present acceptable oxygen standards and practices for minimum safety requirements. A summary of operational hazards, along with oxygen safety and emergency procedures, are provided.

Manohar S. Sohal; J. Stephen Herring

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fuel cell oxygen electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A.sub.x WO.sub.3 where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt.sub.y WO.sub.3 where y is at least 0.8.

Shanks, Howard R. (Ames, IA); Bevolo, Albert J. (Ames, IA); Danielson, Gordon C. (Ames, IA); Weber, Michael F. (Wichita, KS)

1980-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (<10{sup -5} atm). The anomalies are due to non-equilibrium effects and can be avoided by using very strict criteria for the attainment of equilibrium. The slowness of the oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Requirements Uncertainty in a Software Product Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex system's requirements almost always remain uncertain late into its software development. In gas turbine engine control systems at Rolls-Royce, for a traditional project (non-product line) typically 50% of requirements will change between Critical ... Keywords: Requirements, Uncertainty, Software Product Lines

Andy J. Nolan; Silvia Abrahao; Paul C. Clements; Andy Pickard

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FC26-98FT40343 Project Description Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing, scaling-up, and demonstrating a novel air separation technology for large-scale production of oxygen (O2) at costs that are approximately one-third lower than conventional cryogenic plants. An Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen plant co-produces power and oxygen. A phased technology RD&D effort is underway to demonstrate all necessary technical and economic requirements for scale-up and industrial commercialization. The ITM Oxygen production technology is a radically different approach to producing high-quality tonnage oxygen and to enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle and other advanced power generation systems. Instead of cooling air to cryogenic temperatures, oxygen is extracted from air at temperatures synergistic with power production operations. Process engineering and economic evaluations of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants comparing ITM Oxygen with a state-of-the-art cryogenic air separation unit are aimed to show that the installed capital cost of the air separation unit and the installed capital of IGCC facility are significantly lower compared to conventional technologies, while improving power plant output and efficiency. The use of low-cost oxygen in combustion processes would provide cost-effective emission reduction and carbon management opportunities. ITM Oxygen is an enabling module for future plants for producing coal derived shifted synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen [H2] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) ultimately for producing clean energy and fuels. Oxygen-intensive industries such as steel, glass, non-ferrous metallurgy, refineries, and pulp and paper may also realize cost and productivity benefits as a result of employing ITM Oxygen.

95

Dense ceramic membranes for partial oxygenation of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most significant cost associated with partial oxidation of methane to syngas is that of the oxygen plant. In this paper, the authors offer a technology that is based on dense ceramic membranes and that uses air as the oxidant for methane-conversion reactions, thus eliminating the need for the oxygen plant. Certain ceramic materials exhibit both electronic and ionic conductivities (of particular interest is oxygen-ion conductivity). These materials transport not only oxygen ions (functioning as selective oxygen separators) but also electrons back from the reactor side to the oxygen/reduction interface. No external electrodes are required and if the driving potential of transport is sufficient, the partial oxidation reactions should be spontaneous. Such a system will operate without an externally applied potential. Oxygen is transported across the ceramic material in the form of oxygen anions, not oxygen molecules. In principle, the dense ceramic materials can be shaped into a hollow-tube reactor, with air passed over the outside of the membrane and methane through the inside. The membrane is permeable to oxygen at high temperatures, but not to nitrogen or any other gas. Long tubes of La-Sr-Fe-Co-O (SFC) membrane were fabricated by plastic extrusion, and thermal stability of the tubes was studied as a function of oxygen partial pressure by high-temperature XRD. Mechanical properties were measured and found to be acceptable for a reactor material. Fracture of certain SFC tubes was the consequence of an oxygen gradient that introduced a volumetric lattice difference between the inner and outer walls. However, tubes made with a particular stoichiometry (SFC-2) provided methane conversion efficiencies of >99% in a reactor. Some of the reactor tubes have operated for up to {approx} 1,000 h.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Sweeney, S.M.; Mieville, R.L.; Maiya, P.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Pei, S.; Kobylinski, T.P. [Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (United States); Bose, A.C. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

GRR/Section 11-TX-b - Human Remains Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1-TX-b - Human Remains Process 1-TX-b - Human Remains Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-TX-b - Human Remains Process 11TXBHumanRemainsProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Regulations & Policies CCP Art. 49 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11TXBHumanRemainsProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedure a developer must follow when human remains are discovered on or near the project site. Local law enforcement must conduct an investigation into the death of the person, and is the

97

GRR/Section 11-MT-b - Human Remains Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Human Remains Process b - Human Remains Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-MT-b - Human Remains Process 11MTBHumanRemainsProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana State Historic Preservation Office Regulations & Policies MCA 22-3-805: Discovery of Human Remains or Burial Material Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11MTBHumanRemainsProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 11-MT-b.1 - Cease Operations and Contact County Coroner MCA 22-3-805: (1) A [developer] who by...construction, or other ground-disturbing

98

GRR/Section 11-CO-b - Human Remains Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1-CO-b - Human Remains Process 1-CO-b - Human Remains Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-CO-b - Human Remains Process 11COBHumanRemainsProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs Regulations & Policies Historical, Prehistorical, and Archaeological Resources Act of 1973 8 CCR 1504-7, Rules and Procedures Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11COBHumanRemainsProcess.pdf 11COBHumanRemainsProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 11-CO-b.1 and 11-CO-b.2 - Notify County Coroner

99

GRR/Section 11-WA-b - Human Remains Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 11-WA-b - Human Remains Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-WA-b - Human Remains Process 11-WA-b - Human Remains Process (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the necessary procedure when a developer discovers human remains on a project site. In Washington, every person has the duty to notify the coroner upon the discovery of any human remains in the most expeditious manner possible. The Washington Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (DAHP) handles the disposition of non-forensic remains, while the county coroner handles the disposition of

100

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs. log pO{sub 2} is {approx} 1/5 in the p-type region, pO{sub 2} = 10{sup -5} {approx} 10{sup -1} atm. The pO{sub 2} at which the p-n transition is observed increases with increasing temperature. The activation energy for ionic conduction was estimated to be 0.86 eV from an Arrhenius plot of the minimum conductivity vs. reciprocal temperature. At temperatures below 940 C, a plateau in the conductivity isotherm suggests the presence of a two-phase region. Most likely, phase separation occurs to form a mixture of a perovskite phase and an oxygen vacancy ordered phase related to brownmillerite. Additional data for the oxygen non stoichiometry are presented.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft Word - AL 2010-07 Acquistion Letters Remaining in Effect...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued ALs have been superseded by a formal rule-making, incorporated into other guidance, andor...

102

NETL: News Release - New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2009 22, 2009 New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful Ceramic Membrane Enables Efficient, Cost-Effective Co-Production of Power and Oxygen Washington, D.C. -The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies. ITM Oxygen will enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, as well as other gasification-based processes. The technology will also enhance the economics of oxy-fired combustion technologies, making it an attractive option for the capture of carbon dioxide from existing coal-fired power plants.

103

An Analytical Model for Predicting the Remaining Battery Capacity of Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Analytical Model for Predicting the Remaining Battery Capacity of Lithium-Ion Batteries Peng cycle-life tends to shrink significantly. The capacities of commercial lithium-ion batteries fade by 10 prediction model to estimate the remaining capacity of a Lithium-Ion battery. The proposed analytical model

Pedram, Massoud

104

PREDICTION OF REMAINING LIFE OF POWER TRANSFORMERS BASED ON LEFT TRUNCATED AND RIGHT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for the overall fleet of transformers. 1. Introduction. 1.1. Background. Electrical transmission is an important. The prediction of the remaining life can be based on historical lifetime information about the transformer the remaining life of the healthy individual transformers in their fleet and the rate at which

105

An artificial neural network method for remaining useful life prediction of equipment subject to condition monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate equipment remaining useful life prediction is critical to effective condition based maintenance for improving reliability and reducing overall maintenance cost. In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN) based method is developed for ... Keywords: Accurate, Artificial neural network, Bearing, Prediction, Remaining useful life

Zhigang Tian

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video | National Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam ... Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video

108

Oxygen to the core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-01 1-01 For immediate release: 01/10/2013 | NR-13-01-01 Oxygen to the core Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly An artist's conception of Earth's inner and outer core. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- An international collaboration including researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has discovered that the Earth's core formed under more oxidizing conditions than previously proposed. Through a series of laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments at high pressure (350,000 to 700,000 atmospheres of pressure) and temperatures (5,120 to 7,460 degrees Fahrenheit), the team demonstrated that the depletion of siderophile (also known as "iron loving") elements can be produced by core formation under more oxidizing conditions than earlier

109

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

O' Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O' Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants – Interim Study FY13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important criterion for cable performance is its ability to withstand a design-basis accident. With nearly 1000 km of power, control, instrumentation, and other cables typically found in an NPP, it would be a significant undertaking to inspect all of the cables. Degradation of the cable jacket, electrical insulation, and other cable components is a key issue that is likely to affect the ability of the currently installed cables to operate safely and reliably for another 20 to 40 years beyond the initial operating life. The development of one or more nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and supporting models that could assist in determining the remaining life expectancy of cables or their current degradation state would be of significant interest. The ability to nondestructively determine material and electrical properties of cable jackets and insulation without disturbing the cables or connections has been deemed essential. Currently, the only technique accepted by industry to measure cable elasticity (the gold standard for determining cable insulation degradation) is the indentation measurement. All other NDE techniques are used to find flaws in the cable and do not provide information to determine the current health or life expectancy. There is no single NDE technique that can satisfy all of the requirements needed for making a life-expectancy determination, but a wide range of methods have been evaluated for use in NPPs as part of a continuous evaluation program. The commonly used methods are indentation and visual inspection, but these are only suitable for easily accessible cables. Several NDE methodologies using electrical techniques are in use today for flaw detection but there are none that can predict the life of a cable. There are, however, several physical and chemical ptoperty changes in cable insulation as a result of thermal and radiation damage. In principle, these properties may be targets for advanced NDE methods to provide early warning of aging and degradation. Examples of such key indicators include changes in chemical structure, mechanical modulus, and dielectric permittivity. While some of these indicators are the basis of currently used technologies, there is a need to increase the volume of cable that may be inspected with a single measurement, and if possible, to develop techniques for in-situ inspection (i.e., while the cable is in operation). This is the focus of the present report.

Simmons, Kevin L.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Pardini, Allan F.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Jones, Anthony M.

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When EIA’s demand forecast is combined with its outlook for production and net imports, distillate stocks are projected to remain low for the rest of the year.

113

Italy makes U-turn on nuclear power, but hurdles remain  

SciTech Connect

A consortium consisting of ENEL and EDF in partnership with others including Edison, a major generator, and possibly a number of heavy industrial electricity users could invest in nuclear plants. But many technical, political, regulatory, and financial hurdles remain.

NONE

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume  

SciTech Connect

Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ~10 to 18°C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50°C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO2) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO3•2H2O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal ? uraninite ? metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the volume might decrease because of decreases in the water-volume fraction caused by sludge solid reactions, compaction, or intergrowth and recrystallization of metaschoepite. In that case, fewer STSCs may be needed, but the shear strength would increase, and this could challenge recovery by water jet erosion and require more aggressive retrieval methods. Overall, the tests described herein indicate that the settled solids volume remains the same or decreases with time. The only case for which the sludge solids volumes increase with time is for the expansion factor attendant upon the anoxic corrosion of uranium metal to produce UO2 and subsequent reaction with oxygen to form equimolar UO2.25 and UO3•2H2O.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

Plants and Night Oxygen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants and Night Oxygen Production Plants and Night Oxygen Production Name: Ashar Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: India Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: I would like to know if there are any plants which produces oxygen at night (without photosynthesis). I was told by a friend that Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) produces oxygen even at night and I'm not convinced. I would like to get confirmation from experts. Replies: Some plants (particularly those of dry regions, e.g., deserts) only open their stomates at night to avoid drying out to intake CO2 (and output O2) (CAM photosynthesis) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crassulacean_acid_metabolism Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, PhD Missouri Botanical Garden Bringing oxygen producing plants into your home is a way to mimic the healthy lifestyle factors of longevity in humans from the longest lived cultures.

116

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE, Oxygenates, and MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline Contents * Introduction * Federal gasoline product quality regulations * What are oxygenates? * Who gets gasoline with oxygenates? * Which areas get MTBE? * How much has been invested in MTBE production capacity? * What does new Ethanol capacity cost? * What would an MTBE ban cost? * On-line information resources * Endnotes * Summary of revisions to this analysis Introduction The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an

117

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

White House: D'Agostino To Remain as NNSA Administrator | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White House: D'Agostino To Remain as NNSA Administrator White House: D'Agostino To Remain as NNSA Administrator White House: D'Agostino To Remain as NNSA Administrator September 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, President Barack Obama announced that Thomas Paul D'Agostino, Under Secretary for Nuclear Security of the Department of Energy and Administrator for Nuclear Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, will continue serving in his current role. The following is a quote from the President included in today's White House press release (the full release is included below): "The dedication and talent of these individuals will be tremendously valuable to my administration as we work to tackle our challenges at home and abroad, and I look forward to working with them in the coming months and years."

119

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its field sites donated 53,630 pounds - or 27 tons - of non-perishable items to a food drive by federal workers to help feed families across the country in 2013. EM surpassed its goal to donate 50,000 pounds to the 2013 Feds Feed Families Campaign. In Ohio, EM's Portsmouth site donated to the Community Action Committee of Pike County Food Pantry, which typically feeds about 250 needy families

120

Device indicating the time remaining of the useful life of a battery  

SciTech Connect

A device is described for a battery in open circuit condition measuring in increments of time, the remaining useful life of a storage battery to the point of full discharge where the battery is used as a prime source of power, having in combination a series circuit connected in parallel to a storage battery in an open circuit condition, means included in the series circuit indicating the entire useful range of the open circuit voltage excursion of the battery on a full scale in increments of time, and the means including means indicating in increments of time the remaining useful life of the battery for any particular use.

Smith, L.S.

1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CO/sub 2/ recovery from oxygen firefloods  

SciTech Connect

An additional benefit from the oxygen in-situ combustion process or fireflooding is the generation of produced gases containing a high concentration of CO/sub 2/ (>90 mole %). This CO/sub 2/ could be recovered and utilized for miscible and immiscible CO/sub 2/ flooding for EOR. This paper investigates the feasibility of recovering and marketing CO/sub 2/ from oxygen firefloods for this purpose. The expected compositions and volumes of associated gas produced from commercial oxygen in-situ combustion projects based on literature data and actual field tests are presented. In addition, the market prospects based on the transportation requirements and the costs associated with the recovery of CO/sub 2/ from an oxygen in-situ combustion project are discussed. 12 references, 2 figures, 4 tables. (JMT)

Persico, P.J.; Wetherington, J.B.; Hvizdos, L.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

CO/sub 2/ recovery from oxygen firefloods  

SciTech Connect

The use of high purity oxygen in a fireflood project prevents the introduction of nonreactive nitrogen into the oil reservoir, and thus will significantly increase the CO/sub 2/ concentration in the produced gas. The increased CO/sub 2/ concentration would greatly simplify the recovery and processing required to utilize this CO/sub 2/ in a CO/sub 2/ flooding EOR project. The basic products produced by the reaction of oxygen with hydrocarbon fuel in the in situ combustion process are CO/sub 2/, carbon monoxide, and water. Oxygen fireflooding has technical and economic advantages over conventional fireflooding for EOR. Gas produced in an oxygen fireflood represents a major new source of high concentration CO/sub 2/ for EOR. 12 references.

Persico, P.J.; Wetherington, J.B.; Hvizdos, L.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Oxygenates vs. synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methanol synthesis from H{sub 2}/CO has been carried out at 7.6 MPa over zirconia-supported copper catalysts. Catalysts with nominal compositions of 10/90 mol% and 30/70 mol% Cu/ZrO{sub 2} were used in this study. Additionally, a 3 mol% cesium-doped 10/90 catalyst was prepared to study the effect of doping with heavy alkali, and this promoter greatly increased the methanol productivity. The effects of CO{sub 2} addition, water injection, reaction temperature, and H{sub 2}/C0 ratio have been investigated. Both CO{sub 2} addition to the synthesis gas and cesium doping of the catalyst promoted methanol synthesis, while inhibiting the synthesis of dimethyl ether. Injection of water, however, was found to slightly suppress methanol and dimethyl ether formation while being converted to CO{sub 2} via the water gas shift reaction over these catalysts. There was no clear correlation between copper surface area and catalyst activity. Surface analysis of the tested samples revealed that copper tended to migrate and enrich the catalyst surface. The concept of employing a double-bed reactor with a pronounced temperature gradient to enhance higher alcohol synthesis was explored, and it was found that utilization of a Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a first lower temperature bed and a Cs-promoted ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a second high-temperature bed significantly promoted the productivity of 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol) from H{sub 2}/CO synthesis gas mixtures. While the conversion of CO to C{sub 2+} oxygenates over the double-bed configuration was comparable to that observed over the single Cu-based catalyst, major changes in the product distribution occurred by the coupling to the zinc chromite catalyst; that is, the productivity of the C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} alcohols decreased dramatically, and 2-methyl branched alcohols were selectively formed. The desirable methanol/2-methyl oxygenate molar ratios close to 1 were obtained in the present double-bed system that provides the feedstock for the synthesis of high octane and high cetane ethers, where the isobutanol productivity was as high as 139 g/kg cat/hr. Higher alcohol synthesis has been investigated over a Cs/Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at temperatures higher (up to 703K) than those previously utilized, and no sintering of the catalyst was observed during the short-term testing. However, the higher reaction temperatures led to lower CO conversion levels and lower yield of alcohols, especially of methanol, because of equilibrium limitations. With the double catalyst bed configuration, the effect of pressure in the range of 7.6--12.4 MPa on catalyst activity and selectivity was studied. The upper bed was composed of the copper-based catalyst at 598K, and the lower bed consisted of a copper-free Cs-ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at a high temperature of 678K. High pressure was found to increase CO conversion to oxygenated products, although the increase in isobutanol productivity did not keep pace with that of methanol. It was also shown that the Cs/Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst could be utilized to advantage as the second-bed catalyst at 613--643K instead of the previously used copper-free Cs-ZnO/ Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at higher temperature, With double Cs/Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, high space time yields of up to 202 g/kg cat/hr, with high selectivity to isobutanol, were achieved.

Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman; Alessandra Beretta; Maria A. Burcham; Qun Sun; Yeping Cai; Biswanath Roy

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Oxygen vs. Liquid Nitrogen - Liquid Oxygen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Paramagnetism) Paramagnetism Liquid Oxygen and Fire! What happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a test tube of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a test tube of liquid oxygen! Joanna: Let's see what happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire. Steve: Fire?! Joanna: Yeah! Steve: Really?! Joanna: Why not! Steve: Okay! Joanna: As nitrogen boils, it changes into nitrogen gas. Because it's so cold, it's denser than the air in the room. The test tube fills up with

125

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase IV Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel furnace designs based on Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) technology were developed under subcontract by Techint Technologies, Coraopolis, PA, to fully exploit the energy and environmental capabilities of DOC technology and to provide a competitive offering for new furnace construction opportunities. Capital cost, fuel, oxygen and utility costs, NOx emissions, oxide scaling performance, and maintenance requirements were compared for five DOC-based designs and three conventional air5-fired designs using a 10-year net present value calculation. A furnace direct completely with DOC burners offers low capital cost, low fuel rate, and minimal NOx emissions. However, these benefits do not offset the cost of oxygen and a full DOC-fired furnace is projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is roughly $6/lb NOx, compared with an estimated $3/lb. NOx for equ8pping a conventional furnace with selective catalytic reduction (SCCR) technology. A furnace fired with DOC burners in the heating zone and ambient temperature (cold) air-fired burners in the soak zone offers low capital cost with less oxygen consumption. However, the improvement in fuel rate is not as great as the full DOC-fired design, and the DOC-cold soak design is also projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The NOx improvement with the DOC-cold soak design is also not as great as the full DOC fired design, and the incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is nearly $9/lb NOx. These results indicate that a DOC-based furnace design will not be generally competitive with conventional technology for new furnace construction under current market conditions. Fuel prices of $7/MMBtu or oxygen prices of $23/ton are needed to make the DOC furnace economics favorable. Niche applications may exist, particularly where access to capital is limited or floor space limitations are critical. DOC technology will continue to have a highly competitive role in retrofit applications requiring increases in furnace productivity.

Riley, M.F.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Quantifying requirements volatility effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an organization operating in the bancassurance sector we identified a low-risk IT subportfolio of 84 IT projects comprising together 16,500 function points, each project varying in size and duration, for which we were able to quantify its requirements ... Keywords: ?-ratio, ?-ratio, Compound monthly growth rate, IT dashboard, IT portfolio management, Quantitative IT portfolio management, Requirements churn, Requirements creep, Requirements metric, Requirements scrap, Requirements volatility, Requirements volatility dashboard, Scope creep, Volatility benchmark, Volatility tolerance factor

G. P. Kulk; C. Verhoef

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Determining the Remaining Strength of Pitting Corrosion in Corroded Pipelines with API579 Criterion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the long-distance oil and gas pipelines have buried underground in a long term, there is corrosion on the inside and outside surfaces of pipeline, which can cause serious hole leaking accident, and bring the huge economic losses. In order to ... Keywords: API579 criterion, remaining strength, pipeline corrosion, pitting corrosion, evaluation system

Song-wei Gao; Bo Gao; Li-jian Yang

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

An analytical model for predicting the remaining battery capacity of lithium-ion batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting the residual energy of the battery source that powers a portable electronic device is imperative in designing and applying an effective dynamic power management policy for the device. This paper starts up by showing that a 30% error in predicting ... Keywords: accelerated rate capacity, cycle aging and dynamic voltage scaling, remaining battery capacity, temperature

Peng Rong; Massoud Pedram

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

`TVLSI-00029-2003.R1 An Analytical Model for Predicting the Remaining Battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

`TVLSI-00029-2003.R1 1 An Analytical Model for Predicting the Remaining Battery Capacity of Lithium-Ion Batteries Peng Rong, Student Member, IEEE and Massoud Pedram, Fellow, IEEE Abstract -- Predicting the residual energy of the battery source that powers a portable electronic device is imperative in designing

Pedram, Massoud

130

Estimating the Remaining Useful Life of Residential Cory Welch and Brad Rogers, Navigant Consulting, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the Remaining Useful Life of Residential Appliances Cory Welch and Brad Rogers, Navigant. This paper describes a methodology for estimating the RUL of residential technologies using mortality data is that Weibull shape factors for many residential appliances were found to fall within a tight range

131

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

132

It's Elemental - The Element Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine The Element Oxygen [Click for Isotope Data] 8 O Oxygen 15.9994 Atomic Number: 8 Atomic Weight: 15.9994 Melting Point: 54.36 K (-218.79°C or -361.82°F) Boiling Point: 90.20 K (-182.95°C or -297.31°F) Density: 0.001429 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the greek words oxys and genes, which together mean "acid forming." Say what? Oxygen is pronounced as OK-si-jen. History and Uses: Oxygen had been produced by several chemists prior to its discovery in 1774, but they failed to recognize it as a distinct element. Joseph

133

Oxygen sensitive, refractory oxide composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxide compositions containing niobium pentoxide and an oxide selected from the group consisting of hafnia, titania, and zirconia have electrical conductivity characteristics which vary greatly depending on the oxygen content.

Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Regional imaging with oxygen-14  

SciTech Connect

The metabolic significance of the distribution of labeled oxygen was studied in the dog by inhalation of gas mixtures labeled with oxygen-14 (T/sub /sup 1///sub 2// = 71 seconds) maintained at a constant level of activity. Under steady-state conditions, whole-body images were developed by detection of the positron annihilation emissions with a dual head rectilinear scanner in the coincidence mode. (auth)

Russ, G.A.; Bigler, R.E.; Dahl, J.R.; Kostick, J.; McDonald, J.M.; Tilbury, R.S.; Laughlin, J.S.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

OECD Crude "Demand" Remains Flat Between 1st and 2nd Quarters  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: As we enter the year 2000, we can expect crude oil demand to follow the usual pattern and remain relatively flat in OECD countries between first and second quarters. Note that for OECD, product demand is greater than crude use. These areas import products from outside the region. While product demand falls during the second and third quarters, crude inputs to refineries remain high enough to allow for some product stock building Additionally, purchases of crude oil exceed inputs to refineries for a time, allowing crude oil stocks to build as well in order to cover the shortfall between crude oil production and demand during the fourth and first quarters. Price can strengthen during the "weak product demand" summer months when the market feels stock building is inadequate to meet the

136

Enhanced Contaminated Human Remains Pouch: initial development and preliminary performance assessments  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to produce a proof of concept prototype Enhanced Contaminated Human Remains Pouch (ECHRP) with self-decontamination capability to provide increased protection to emergency response personnel. The key objective was to decrease the concentration of toxic chemicals through the use of an absorbent and reactive nanocellulose liner. Additionally, nanomaterials with biocidal properties were developed and tested as a 'stand-alone' treatment. The setting was a private company research laboratory. The main outcome measures were production of a functional prototype. A functional prototype capable of mitigating the threats due to sulfur mustard, Soman, and a large variety of liquid and vapor toxic industrial chemicals was produced. Stand-alone biocidal treatment efficacy was validated. The ECHRP provides superior protection from both chemical and biological hazards to various emergency response personnel and human remains handlers.

Iseli, A.M.; Kwen, H.D.; Ul-Alam, M.; Balasubramanian, M.; Rajagopalan, S.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

An analytical model for predicting the remaining battery capacity of lithium-ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Predicting the residual energy of the battery source that powers a portable electronic device is imperative in designing and applying an effective dynamic power management policy for the device. This paper starts up by showing that a 30 % error in predicting the battery capacity of a lithium-ion battery can result in up to 20 % performance degradation for a dynamic voltage and frequency scaling algorithm. Next, this paper presents a closed form analytical expression for predicting the remaining capacity of a lithium-ion battery. The proposed high-level model, which relies on online current and voltage measurements, correctly accounts for the temperature and cycle aging effects. The accuracy of the highlevel model is validated by comparing it with DUALFOIL simulation results, demonstrating a maximum of 5 % error between simulated and predicted data. Index Terms—Accelerated rate capacity, cycle aging and dynamic voltage scaling, remaining battery capacity, temperature. I.

Peng Rong; Student Member; Massoud Pedram

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement The owner or operator of a diesel powered vehicle must limit the length of time their vehicle remains idle. The limit is based on the outside

139

BER Requirements Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

140

ASCR Requirements Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

TVDG Training Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Requirements TVDG Training Requirements information is now located at: http:www.bnl.govuserscenterTrainingtandem.asp. You will automatically be taken to the new...

142

Design Principles and Remaining Needs for U.S. Federal Climate Policy: Emission Fees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions almost certainly requires adding a price to those activities that cause emissions. Policy makers have largely overlooked the most direct option, which is to set a price on emissions (an emission fee), and ...

Paul A. T. Higgins

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

HAN System Security Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, "Home Area Network (HAN) Security Requirements," identifies and discusses the key cyber security requirements for different interfaces of HAN-based systems. These cyber security requirements for HAN interfaces are derived from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) "Catalog of Control Systems Security," which provides an excellent checklist of general security requirements.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

145

Admission Requirements Admission Requirements for Graduate Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

required reports. Such a candidate may, for a nominal fee and with the approval of his/her graduate advisor://www.utdallas.edu/admissions/graduate/degrees/ There is a $50.00 nonrefundable application fee. Applicants are advised to carefully review the program a bachelor's degree. Test Scores (GMAT, GRE) Standardized test scores must be official and reported directly

O'Toole, Alice J.

146

Requirement-Reviews.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 3 h%p:www.nersc.govsciencerequirements---reviews final---reports * Compurequirements f or 20132014 * Execurequirements * Case s...

147

Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Collaborative Requirements Engineering Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dependencies, safety, and environmental requirements) is essential to the ... Construction, and Operation of Constructed Facilities, March 2012. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Emergency Medical Treatment Required  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help present if possible OptaComp will complete the "First Report of Injury or Illness" and authorize medical Investigation Report" to Environmental Health & Safety within 48 hours Emergency Medical Treatment Required

Weston, Ken

150

FES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

151

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Vapor Phase Catalytic Upgrading of Model Biomass-Derived Oxygenate Compounds  

SciTech Connect

When biomass is converted to a liquid bio-oil through pyrolysis, it has a significantly higher oxygen content compared to petroleum fractions. In order to convert the pyrolysis products into infrastructure-compatible fuels, oxygen removal is required. Oxygen removal can be achieved by both hydrotreating (which requires the addition of hydrogen) and decarboxylation or decarbonylation, whereby oxygen is rejected as CO2 and CO, respectively. In the present contribution, a number of catalysts were tested for their activity and selectivity in deoxygenation of model biomass-derived oxygenated compounds (e.g., acetic acid, phenol). Comparison of catalytic activity of materials for different compounds, as well as material characterization results will be discussed. Materials tested will include modified zeolites and supported transition metal catalysts.

Yung, M. M.; Gomez, E.; Kuhn, J. N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

An Assessment of Uncertainty in Remaining Life Estimation for Nuclear Structural Materials  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, several operating US light-water nuclear power reactors (LWRs) have moved to extended-life operations (from 40 years to 60 years), and there is interest in the feasibility of extending plant life to 80 years. Operating experience suggests that material degradation of structural components in LWRs (such as the reactor pressure vessel) is expected to be the limiting factor for safe operation during extended life. Therefore, a need exists for assessing the condition of LWR structural components and determining its remaining useful life (RUL). The ability to estimate RUL of degraded structural components provides a basis for determining safety margins (i.e., whether safe operation over some pre-determined time horizon is possible), and scheduling degradation management activities (such as potentially modifying operating conditions to limit further degradation growth). A key issue in RUL estimation is calculation of uncertainty bounds, which are dependent on current material state, as well as past and future stressor levels (such as time-at-temperature, pressure, and irradiation). This paper presents a preliminary empirical investigation into the uncertainty of RUL estimates for nuclear structural materials.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Fricke, Jacob M.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements All DOE supervisors, managers, and executives will comply with mandatory supervisory training requirements (5 CFR 412; 5 CFR 315.801; 5 CFR 315.901; DOE O 360.1; and DOE O 320.1): * New supervisors: 80 hours of supervisory training, with 40 hours required to be completed during the supervisory probationary period. * Experienced supervisors: minimum of 8 hours of supervisory training each year. The Office of Learning and Workforce Development has developed an inventory of training and developmental activities that will meet the supervisory training requirements. The DOE courses Supervisory Essentials (32 hours) and Navigating the Federal Hiring Process (8 hours) are required to fulfill the first year 40-hour training

156

Management requirements for accreditation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... handbook, shall be defined in the quality manual. ... It is a fundamental requirement that the results ... NIST Handbook 150 (and ISO/IEC 17025) details ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Public Safety Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... need excellent situational awareness in order to do their jobs effectively. ... performance requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

CCI: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for...

159

Public Safety Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Usage scenario. ... imposed by public safety applications and usage scenarios is key in ... requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used as ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

160

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASCR Science Network Requirements Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research, DOE Office of ScienceEnergy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD — April 15 and 16,

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

New Employee Training Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All New Employees New Supervisors New Employee Training Requirements Welcome to Berkeley Lab We value you and the talents that you bring to our workplace. The training listed...

162

Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

Ulloa, Osvaldo

164

Microchemical systems for singlet oxygen generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Lasers (COIL) are a technology of interest for industrial and military audiences. COILs are flowing gas lasers where the gain medium of iodine atoms is collisionally pumped by singlet delta oxygen ...

Hill, Tyrone F. (Tyrone Frank), 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Oxygen Sensitivity of Krypton and Lyman-? Hygrometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxygen sensitivity of krypton and Lyman-? hygrometers is studied. Using a dewpoint generator and a controlled nitrogen/oxygen flow the extinction coefficients of five hygrometers associated with the third-order Taylor expansion of the Lambert–...

Arjan van Dijk; Wim Kohsiek; Henk A. R. de Bruin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Innovative oxygen separation membrane prototype  

SciTech Connect

Improvements are still needed to gas separation processes to gain industry acceptance of coal gasification systems. The Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) technology, being developed by the US Department of Energy and its partners, offers an opportunity to lower overall plant cost and improve efficiency compared to cryogenic distillation and pressure swing adsorption methods. The technology is based on a novel class of perovskite ceramic oxides which can selectively separate oxygen ions from a stream of air at high temperature and pressure. Those ions are transported across the ITM leaving non-permeate air which can be integrated with a fuel-fired gas system, enabling co-production of power and steam along with the concentrated, high-purity oxygen. The project is at the second phase, to scale up the ITM Oxygen ceramic devices to demonstrate the technology at the 1-5 tpd capability in the Subscale Engineering Prototype. A third phase to demonstrate commercial viability extends to the end of the decade. 2 figs.

NONE

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Integrated Management Requirements mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia's approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Advanced Light Water Reactor utility requirements document  

SciTech Connect

The ALWR Requirements Document is a primary work product of the EPRI Program. This document is an extensive compilation of the utility requirements for design, construction and performance of advanced light water reactor power plants for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document's primary emphasis is on resolution of significant problems experienced at existing nuclear power plants. It is intended to be used with companion documents, such as utility procurement specifications, which would cover the remaining detailed technical requirements applicable to new plant projects. The ALWR Requirements Document consists of several major parts. This volume is Part I, The Executive Summary. It is intended to serve as a concise, management level synopsis of advanced light water reactors including design objectives and philosophy, overall configuration and features and the steps necessary to proceed from the conceptual design stage to a completed, functioning power plant.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Recent advances in the kinetics of oxygen reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen reduction is considered an important electrocatalytic reaction; the most notable need remains improvement of the catalytic activity of existing metal electrocatalysts and development of new ones. A review is given of new advances in the understanding of reaction kinetics and improvements of the electrocatalytic properties of some surfaces, with focus on recent studies of relationship of the surface properties to its activity and reaction kinetics. The urgent need is to improve catalytic activity of Pt and synthesize new, possibly non- noble metal catalysts. New experimental techniques for obtaining new level of information include various {ital in situ} spectroscopies and scanning probes, some involving synchrotron radiation. 138 refs, 18 figs, 2 tabs.

Adzic, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Full SPP Partnership Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Requirements: Partnership Requirements: ENERGY STAR Partnership for Commercial & Industrial Service and Product Providers (SPP) Eligible Organizations Companies providing energy efficiency services and products to commercial buildings and industrial manufacturing facilities/plants are eligible for the Service and Product Provider (SPP) partnership, but must meet certain requirements as specified below. Types of eligible companies include: architecture, distributor, energy consultant/energy management services, energy improvement contractor, energy information services, energy services company (ESCO), engineering, equipment manufacturer, financial services, on-site energy production services, unregulated energy retailer and marketer, or other supplier of standard energy-efficient products and/or services for commercial buildings and/or

171

Technical Safety Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Requirements Safety Requirements FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: Contractor has developed, maintained, and received DOE Field Office Approval for the necessary operating conditions of a facility. The facility has also maintained an inventory of safety class and safety significant systems and components. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830.205, Nuclear Safety Rule.  DOE-STD-3009-2002, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses.  DOE-STD-1186-2004, Specific Administrative Controls. Guidance:  DOE G 423.1-1, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Technical Safety Requirements.  NSTP 2003-1, Use of Administrative Controls for Specific Safety Functions. Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation

172

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

NSLS II: Authentication Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Pages Login Access to this area of the NSLS-II website requires a valid username and password. Username: Password: Next > Last Modified: April 2, 2013 Please forward all...

174

The Role of Oxygen in Coal Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Products supplies oxygen to a number of coal gasification and partial oxidation facilities worldwide. At the high operating pressures of these processes, economics favor the use of 90% and higher oxygen purities. The effect of inerts in the oxidant on gasifier and downstream production units also favor the use of oxygen in place of air. Factors that must be considered in selecting the optimum oxygen purity include: end use of the gasifier products, oxygen delivery pressure and the cost of capital and energy. This paper examines the major factors in oxygen purity selection for typical coal gasifiers. Examples demonstrating the effect of oxygen purity on several processes are presented: production of synthetic natural gas (SNG), integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation and methanol synthesis. The potential impact of a non-cryogenic air separation process currently under development is examined based on integration with a high temperature processes.

Klosek, J.; Smith, A. R.; Solomon, J.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study  

SciTech Connect

The current study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) oxygen plant to provide oxygen for industrial combustion applications. PSA oxygen plants utilize a molecular sieve material to separate air into an oxygen rich product stream and a nitrogen rich exhaust stream. These plants typically produce 90-95% purity oxygen and are located in close proximity to the point of use. In contrast, high purity (99.999%) oxygen is produced by the distillation of liquid air at a remote plant and is usually transported to the point of use either as a cryogenic liquid in a tank trailer or as a high pressure gas via pipeline. In this study, experiments were performed to the test PSA system used in conjunction with an A'' burner and comparisons were made with the results of the previous study which utilized high purity liquid oxygen. 4 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Delano, M.A. (Union Carbide Industrial Gases, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (USA)); Kwan, Y. (Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Application of oxygen-enriched combustion for locomotive diesel engines. Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermodynamic simulation is used to study the effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on the performance and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. The parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the oxygen-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, the gross and net power outputs of an engine operating under different levels of oxygen enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in an increase in net engine power of approximately 13% when intake air with an oxygen content of 28% by volume is used and fuel injection timing is retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure improves power by only 4%. If part of the significantly higher exhaust enthalpies available as a result of oxygen enrichment are recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met, resulting in substantial net power improvements. Oxygen enrichment reduces particulate and visible smoke emissions but increases NO emissions. However, a combination of retarded fuel injection timing and post-treatment of exhaust gases may be adequate to meet the locomotive diesel engine NO{sub x} standards. Exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required to realize the full potential of oxygen enrichment. Economic analysis shows that oxygen-enrichment technology is economically feasible and provides high returns on investment. The study also indicates the strong influence of membrane parasitic requirements and exhaust energy recovery on economic benefits. To obtain an economic advantage while using a membrane with higher parasitic power requirements, it is necessary to recover a part of the exhaust energy.

Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.R.; Assanis, D.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Oxygen suppression in boiling water reactors. Quarterly report 2, January 1--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boiling water reactors (BWR's) generally use high purity, no-additive feedwater. Primary recirculating coolant is neutral pH, and contains 100 to 300 ppB oxygen and stoichiometrically related dissolved hydrogen. However, oxygenated water increases austenitic stainless steel susceptibility to intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when other requisite factors such as stress and sensitization are present. Thus, reduction or elimination of the oxygen in BWR water may preclude cracking incidents. One approach to reduction of the BWR coolant oxygen concentration is to adopt alternate water chemistry (AWC) conditions using an additive(s) to suppress or reverse radiolytic oxygen formation. Several additives are available to do this but they have seen only limited and specialized application in BWR's. The objective of this program is to perform an in-depth engineering evaluation of the potential suppression additives supported by critical experiments where required to resolve substantive uncertainties.

Burley, E.L.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae  

SciTech Connect

An overview of photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable chemical feed stock and energy carrier is presented. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of photosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance--including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transport and (3) the minimum number of light reactions that are required to split water to elemental hydrogen and oxygen. Each of these research topics is being actively addressed by the photobiological hydrogen research community.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Environmental laws and regulations LANL complies with more than 30 state and federal regulations and policies designed to protect human health and the environment. Regulators Regulators Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Homepage EPA - Region VI U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Homepage DOE Environmental Policy DOE Citizen's Advisory Board U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Southwest Region 2 New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) NMED Homepage NMED DOE Oversight Office

180

VFP: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Researcher! Preparing for Your Visit Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: Complete the entrance survey within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or poster. Abstract for General Audience Complete and submit an abstract summarizing your research experience. Oral or Poster Presentation: Deliver an oral or poster presentation to mentors and peers the final week

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

BER Science Network Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network Network Requirements Report of the Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop Conducted July 26 and 27, 2007 BER Science Network Requirements Workshop Biological and Environmental Research Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Bethesda, MD - July 26 and 27, 2007 ESnet is funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. Dan Hitchcock is the ESnet Program Manager. ESnet is operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This work was supported by the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities Division, and the Office of Biological &

182

SULI: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Intern! Preparing for Your Internship Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: First create an account by following the link, educationLink New Account Setup. After creating the account, you can login to the educationLink site. Complete the entrance survey posted on your EduLink site within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or

183

Federal Metering Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metering Requirements Metering Requirements FUPWG - May 23, 2013 Brad Gustafson Federal Energy Management Program 2 42 USC 8253 - ENERGY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENT (e) Metering By October 1, 2012, in accordance with guidelines established by the Secretary under paragraph (2), all Federal buildings shall, for the purposes of efficient use of energy and reduction in the cost of electricity used in such buildings, be metered. Each agency shall use, to the maximum extent practicable, advanced meters or advanced metering devices that provide data at least daily and that measure at least hourly consumption of electricity in the Federal buildings of the agency. Not later than October 1, 2016, each agency shall provide for equivalent metering of natural gas and steam, in accordance with guidelines established by the Secretary

184

Oxygen scavenger/metal passivator reduces corrosion, toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Haverhill Paper board, a Haverhill, MA manufacturer of recycled paperboard, generates about 120,000 lb/hr of 650 psi, 650/sup 0/F (superheated) steam. Boiler deposition and condensate return corrosion problems were always high on the list of things to avoid. A water treatment firm provided the solution with a recently developed oxygen scavenger. The new scavenger, a Chemical Processing Vaaler Award winner (Mid-November, 1986, p. 130), is a patented formulation containing methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO). The formulation is designed to provide protection comparable to hydrazine but without the toxicity concerns. Used in conjunction with the mechanical deaerator, MEKO scavenges the remaining 5-7 ppb of oxygen from the feed water, producing methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), N/sub 2/O, and water. High volatility gives it the ability to leave the boiler with the steam, protecting the entire generating system. MEKO also acts as a metal surface passivator, protecting iron surfaces from corrosion by forming passivated oxide films. In use since December, 1985, the MEKO-based oxygen scavenger has coupled with the other chemical and mechanical water treatment methods to maintain the boiler in operating condition. The MEKO is performing as well or better than the hydrazine at about the same cost - while avoiding the toxicity problem.

Barry, J.; Toy, D.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Requirements engineering with ORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of IT project overspends and failures suggest that many IT projects do not conform to requirements. Despite decades of development the IT industry still seems to lack an effective method of ensuring that a project will be right first time. ...

Ken Evans

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Requirements for Xenon International  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Training requirements. - 19...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z www.OSHA.gov Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) Training requirements. - 1926.454 Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) - Table of Contents * Part...

188

Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this Model Procedure is to identify precautions and provide guidance to Medical Examiners/Coroners on the handling of a body or human remains that are potentially contaminated with...

189

Jupiter Oxygen Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Place Schiller Park, Illinois Zip 60176 Product Illinois-based oxy-fuel combustion company involved in the capture of CO2. References Jupiter Oxygen Corporation1...

190

Insitu Oxygen Conduction Into Internal Combustion Chamber  

Insitu Oxygen Conduction Into Internal Combustion Chamber Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

191

Areas Participating in the Oxygenated Gasoline Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand and Price Outlook ... is a colorless, odorless, and poisonous gas ... oxygen by weight is to be used in the wintertime in those areas of the county that ...

192

Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction with Reduced Platinum ...  

Platinum is the most efficient electrocatalyst for accelerating the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Under operating conditions, though, platinum catalysts ...

193

Electrocatalysis of anodic and cathodic oxygen-transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect

The electrocatalysis of oxygen-transfer reactions is discussed in two parts. In Part I, the reduction of iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) is examined as an example of cathodic oxygen transfer. On oxide-covered Pt electrodes (PtO), a large cathodic current is observed in the presence of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to coincide with the reduction of PtO. The total cathodic charge exceeds the amount required for reduction of PtO and IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to produce an adsorbed product. An electrocatalytic link between reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and reduction of PtO is indicated. In addition, on oxide-free Pt electrodes, the reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} is determined to be sensitive to surface treatment. The electrocatalytic oxidation of CN{sup {minus}} is presented as an example of anodic oxygen transfer in Part II. The voltametric response of CN{sup {minus}} is virtually nonexistent at PbO{sub 2} electrodes. The response is significantly improved by doping PbO{sub 2} with Cu. Cyanide is also oxidized effectively at CuO-film electrodes. Copper is concluded to serve as an adsorption site for CN{sup {minus}}. It is proposed that an oxygen tunneling mechanism comparable to electron tunneling does not occur at the electrode-solution interface. The adsorption of CN{sup {minus}} is therefore considered to be a necessary prerequisite for oxygen transfer. 201 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

Wels, B.R.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

NERSC Requirements Workshop November  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements Workshop November 2009 Lattice gauge theory and some other HE theory Doug Toussaint (University of Arizona) Help from: Paul Mackenzie (Fermilab) Crude comparison of lattice hadron spec- trum to the real world. Lattice Gauge Theory First-principles computations in QCD Also, computations in other strongly coupled field theories * Find hadronic factors to get fundamental physics from experi- ments * Understand structure and interactions of hadrons, maybe even nuclei * Understand QCD: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking * Other strongly interacting theories (what if we don't find the Higgs?) * Quark-gluon matter at high temeratures (RHIC, LHC, early uni- verse) or high densities (neutron stars) HEP theory projects at NERSC now: * Production and analysis of QCD configurations with dynamical quarks, (Doug Toussaint) (MILC collaboration) * Heavy quarks, using

195

Support Requirements for Synfuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing synfuels from coal is technically feasible. Projects have a high probability of success but risks do exist (technical, marketing, environmental delays, regulatory and political changes, etc.). The various segments of the developing synfuels industry are identified. For each segment its characteristics, uncertainties and risks are discussed, as well as the type of support of guarantee required to develop this portion of the synfuels industry.

Hyland, M. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

BER Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray spectroscopy identification and DFT simulations of oxygenated intermediates on a platinum fuel-cell cathode. The study shows that two types of hydroxyl intermediates (non-hydrated OH and hydrated OH) with distinct activities coexist on a fuel-cell cathode. The performance of polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) fuel cells is limited by the reduction at the cathode of various oxygenated intermediates in the four-electron pathway of the oxygen reduction reaction. A research team led by SLAC scientists performed x-ray spectroscopy identification and DFT simulations of oxygenated intermediates on a platinum fuel-cell cathode

198

HERSCHEL MEASUREMENTS OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN ORION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) in emission from the H{sub 2} Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} and widths of 3 km s{sup -1}. The beam-averaged column density is N(O{sub 2}) = 6.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and assuming that the source has an equal beam-filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19''), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O{sub 2} relative to H{sub 2} is (0.3-7.3) x 10{sup -6}. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a {approx}5'' diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is {approx}10 M{sub sun} and the dust temperature is {>=}150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O{sub 2} abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T {>=} 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O{sub 2}. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature {>=}180 K. The inferred O{sub 2} column density {approx_equal}5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} can be produced in Peak A, having N(H{sub 2}) {approx_equal} 4 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10-15 km s{sup -1}) C-shock, which can produce N(O{sub 2}) up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}.

Goldsmith, Paul F.; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Li Di [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Liseau, Rene; Black, John H. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Bell, Tom A. [Centro de Astrobiologia, CSIC-INTA, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Hollenbach, David [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kaufman, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Melnick, Gary [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Neufeld, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pagani, Laurent; Encrenaz, Pierre [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Snell, Ronald [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bergin, Edwin [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Caselli, Paola [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Caux, Emmanuel [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Falgarone, Edith, E-mail: Paul.F.Goldsmith@jpl.nasa.gov [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

BES Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Generation of reactive oxygen species by fungal NADPH oxidases is required for rice blast disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizing all of the known techniques for NOx reduction. To be precise, the NOx formed within the flame] and several others [6, 7] have suggested certain reduction methods which are consistent with NOx formation, not solid waste. The results of NOx reduction techniques in coal combustion should be applied with caution

Talbot, Nicholas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effects of Pressure on Oxygen Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To measure the effects of pressure on the output of a membrane oxygen sensor and a nonmembrane oxygen sensor, the authors pressure cycled a CTD sensor package in a laboratory pressure facility. The CTD sensor package was cycled from 30 to 6800 db ...

M. J. Atkinson; F. I. M. Thomas; N. Larson

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Oxygen Control in PWR Makeup Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three fixed-bed processes can accelerate hydrazine-oxygen reactions in PWR makeup water and reduce oxygen levels to below 5 ppb. In this comparative-test project, activated carbon based systems offered the best combination of low cost, effectiveness, and commercial availability. A second process, employing palladium-coated anion resin, is also commercially available.

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Naperville, IL); Kobylinski, Thaddeus P. (Lisle, IL); Morissette, Sherry L. (Las Cruces, NM); Pei, Shiyou (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Naperville, IL); Kobylinski, Thaddeus P. (Lisle, IL); Morissette, Sherry L. (Las Cruces, NM); Pei, Shiyou (Naperville, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Modelling Hydrogen Reduction and Hydrodeoxygenation of Oxygenates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations, we have studied the reduction of nickel oxide and biomass derived oxygenates (catechol, guaiacol, etc.) in hydrogen. Both the kinetic barrier and thermodynamic favorability are calculated with respect to the modeled reaction pathways. In early-stage reduction of the NiO(100) surface by hydrogen, the pull-off of the surface oxygen atom and simultaneous activation of the nearby Ni atoms coordinately dissociate the hydrogen molecules so that a water molecule can be formed, leaving an oxygen vacancy on the surface. In hydrogen reaction with oxygenates catalyzed by transition metals, hydrogenation of the aromatic carbon ring normally dominates. However, selective deoxygenation is of particular interest for practical application such as biofuel conversion. Our modeling shows that doping of the transition metal catalysts can change the orientation of oxygenates adsorbed on metal surfaces. The correlation between the selectivity of reaction and the orientation of adsorption are discussed.

Zhao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Cheah, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Repository seals requirements study  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC we have detected strong absorption over energies ~0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central ~1 arcmin of the galaxy, NGC 1399, the group, NGC 5044, and the cluster, A1795. These systems have amongst the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below ~0.4 keV the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=10^{5-6} K where ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT, and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from HI, and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass drop-out in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra, XMM, and ASTRO-E.

David A. Buote

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

208

GAO-07-1036, CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION: Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congressional Requesters Congressional Requesters CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain September 2007 GAO-07-1036 What GAO Found United States Government Accountability Office Why GAO Did This Study Highlights Accountability Integrity Reliability September 2007 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain Highlights of GAO-07-1036, a report to congressional requesters Control systems-computer-based systems that monitor and control sensitive processes and physical functions-perform vital functions in many of our nation's critical infrastructures, including electric power, oil and gas, water treatment, and chemical production. The disruption of

209

Apparatus for determining past-service conditions and remaining life of thermal barrier coatings and components having such coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for determining past-service conditions and/or remaining useful life of a component of a combustion engine and/or a thermal barrier coating ("TBC") of the component comprises a radiation source that provides the exciting radiation to the TBC to excite a photoluminescent ("PL") material contained therein, a radiation detector for detecting radiation emitted by the PL material, and means for relating a characteristic of an emission spectrum of the PL material to the amount of a crystalline phase in the TBC, thereby inferring the past-service conditions or the remaining useful life of the component or the TBC.

Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Devitt, John William (Clifton Park, NY); Ruud, James Anthony (Delmar, NY); Brewer, Luke Nathaniel (Rexford, NY)

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Remaining Sites Verification Package for 100-F-38 Stained Soil Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-093  

SciTech Connect

The 100-F-38 Stained Soil site was an area of yellow stained soil that was discoverd while excavating a trench for the placement of electrical conduit. The 100-F-38 Stained Soil site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations support future unrestricted land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario. The results also show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils and the contaminant concentrations remaining in the soil are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

Repository seals requirement study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Equipment Operational Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

Method of detecting oxygen partial pressure and oxygen partial pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

Dees, D.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Berkeley, CA); Sun, Hai (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide  

SciTech Connect

The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

Strmcnik, D.; Escudero, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M. (Materials Science Division); (Inst. de Quimica Fisica); (Toyota Central R& D Labs.)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on pattering of platinum surfaces with cyanide.  

SciTech Connect

The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

Strmcnik, D.; Escudero-Escribano, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; Inst. de Quimica Fisica; Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Proceedings: EPRI Workshop on Condition and Remaining Life Assessment of Hot Gas Path Components of Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The severity of modern combustion turbine operation is a reflection of industry competition to achieve higher thermal efficiency. This competitive stance has resulted in new turbine designs and material systems that have at times outpaced condition and remaining life assessment (CARLA) technology. These proceedings summarize a two-day workshop on CARLA technology for hot section components of large combustion turbines.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal needed to produce nothing but pure water as exhaust and clean electricity for power. At the heart of every fuel cell is an advanced plastic membrane coated with a platinum catalyst. That's where the production of electricity takes

219

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by weight [6]. The potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

Boehman, Andre L.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process  

This patent-pending technology, “Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process,” provides a metal-oxide oxygen carrier for application in fuel combustion processes that use oxygen.

222

SNFP detonation phenomena of hydrogen/oxygen in spent fuel containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Movement of spent nuclear fuels from the Hanford K Basins near the Columbia River to dry interim storage facility on the Hanford plateau will require repackaging the fuel in the basin into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), drying of the fuel, transporting the contained fuel, hot conditioning, and finally interim storage. Each of these functions will be accomplished while the fuel is contained in the MCOs. Hydrogen and oxygen can be generated within the MCOs by several mechanisms. The principal source of hydrogen and oxygen within the MCOs is residual water from the vacuum drying and hot conditioning operations. This document assesses the detonation phenomena of hydrogen and oxygen in the spent fuel containers. Several process scenarios have been identified that could generate detonation pressures that exceed the nominal 10 atmosphere design limit of the MCOs. Only 42 grams of radiolized water are required to establish this condition.

Cooper, T.D.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design optimization of oxygenated fluid pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In medical emergencies, an oxygen-starved brain quickly suffers irreparable damage. In many cases, patients who stop breathing can be resuscitated but suffer from brain damage. Dr. John Kheir from Boston Children's Hospital ...

Piazzarolo, Bruno Aiala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Permanent magnet hydrogen oxygen generating cells  

SciTech Connect

A generating cell for hydrogen and oxygen utilizes permanent magnets and electromagnets. Means are provided for removing gases from the electrodes. Mixing chambers are provided for water and the electrolyte used in the cell.

Harris, M.

1976-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE Kee Chul Kim Ph.D.727-366; Figure 1. Oxygen-uranium phase-equilibrium _ystem [18]. uranium dioxide powders and 18 0 enriched carbon

Kim, Kee Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

THE PATH OF OXYGEN IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experiment is described in which an attempt is made to follow the path of oxygen in photosynthesis by the use of O{sup 18} as a tracer.

Dorough, G.D.; Calvin, M.

1950-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Oxygen-Diffused Titanium as a Candidate Brake Rotor Material  

SciTech Connect

Titanium alloys are one of several candidate materials for the next generation of truck disk brake rotors. Despite their advantages of lightweight relative to cast iron and good strength and corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are unlikely to be satisfactory brake rotor materials unless their friction and wear behavior can be significantly improved. In this study, a surface engineering process oxygen diffusion was applied to titanium rotors and has shown very encouraging results. The oxygen diffused Ti-6Al-4V (OD-Ti) was tested on a sub-scale brake tester against a flat block of commercial brake lining material and benchmarked against several other Ti-based materials, including untreated Ti-6Al-4V, ceramic particle-reinforced Ti composites (MMCs), and a thermal-spray-coated Ti alloy. With respect to friction, the OD-Ti outperformed all other candidate materials under the imposed test conditions with the friction coefficient remaining within a desirable range of 0.35-0.50, even under the harshest conditions when the disk surface temperature reached nearly 600 ?C. In addition, the OD-Ti showed significantly improved wear-resistance over the non-treated one and was even better than the Ti-based composite materials.

Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Microsoft Word - AL 2010-07 Acquistion Letters Remaining in Effect May 2010 revision 1 June 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No. AL 2010-07 Rev. 1 No. AL 2010-07 Rev. 1 Acquisition Regulation Date 06/01/2010 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Senior Procurement Executives. Acquisition Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued ALs have been superseded by a formal rule-making, incorporated into other guidance, and/or canceled. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT NUMBER DATE SUBJECT 93-4 04/07/1993 Displaced Workers Benefits Program 94-19 12/09/1994 Basic Labor Policies Fringe Benefits 95-06 06/28/1995 Personal Property Letter System 2000-09 11/11/2000 Source Selection Authority 2005-11 07/15/2005 Home Office Expenses for Management and

229

FLAMES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA: DEFLAGRATION-DETONATION TRANSITION IN THE OXYGEN-BURNING FLAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flame in a Type Ia supernova is a conglomerate structure that, depending on density, may involve separate regions of carbon, oxygen, and silicon burning, all propagating in a self-similar, subsonic front. The separation between these three burning regions increases as the density declines until eventually, below about 2 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, only carbon burning remains active, the other two burning phases having 'frozen out' on stellar scales. Between 2 and 3 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, however, there remains an energetic oxygen-burning region that trails the carbon burning by an amount that is sensitive to the turbulence intensity. As the carbon flame makes a transition to the distributed regime (Karlovitz number {approx}> 10), the characteristic separation between the carbon- and oxygen-burning regions increases dramatically, from a fraction of a meter to many kilometers. The oxygen-rich mixture between the two flames is created at a nearly constant temperature, and turbulence helps to maintain islands of well-mixed isothermal fuel as the temperature increases. The delayed burning of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation.

Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kerstein, A. R. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Aspden, A. J., E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: arkerst@sandia.gov, E-mail: ajaspden@lbl.gov [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035  

SciTech Connect

Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

R. A. Carlson

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

231

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Hot Gas Path Parts Condition and Remaining Life Assessment for GE 7FA in Baseload Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on two years experience operating four advanced gas turbines (AGT) General Electric MS 7221 FA at Martin CC of Florida Power & Light (FP&L), this guideline describes the operating and maintenance philosophy used for baseload AGT units and the integrity of the hot path components and their remaining life. The guideline will assist utilities operating the GE MS 7221FA class AGT plan inspections and comparisons with other units in this class.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

Oxy-combustion: Oxygen Transport Membrane Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combustion: Oxygen Transport combustion: Oxygen Transport Membrane Development Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D

233

Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions and their uses are described. Mixed metal oxide compositions of the invention have stratified crystalline structure identifiable by means of powder X-ray diffraction patterns. In the form of dense ceramic membranes, the present compositions demonstrate an ability to separate oxygen selectively from a gaseous mixture containing oxygen and one or more other volatile components by means of ionic conductivities.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Plainfield, IL); Kobylinski, Thaddeus P. (Prospect, PA); Morissette, Sherry L. (Las Cruces, NM); Pei, Shiyou (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel, Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to achieve DOE targets for carbon dioxide capture, it is crucial not only to develop process options that will generate and provide oxygen to the power cycle in a cost-effective manner compared to the conventional oxygen supply methods based on cryogenic air separation technology, but also to identify effective integration options for these new technologies into the power cycle with carbon dioxide capture. The Linde/BOC developed Ceramic Autothermal Recovery (CAR) process remains an interesting candidate to address both of these issues by the transfer of oxygen from the air to a recycled CO{sub 2} rich flue-gas stream in a cyclic process utilizing the high temperature sorption properties of perovskites. Good progress was made on this technology in this project, but significant challenges remain to be addressed before CAR oxygen production technology is ready for commercial exploitation. Phase 1 of the project was completed by the end of September 2008. The two-bed 0.7 tons/day O2 CAR process development unit (PDU) was installed adjacent to WRI's pilot scale coal combustion test facility (CTF). Start-up and operating sequences for the PDU were developed and cyclic operation of the CAR process demonstrated. Controlled low concentration methane addition allowed the beds to be heated up to operational temperature (800-900 C) and then held there during cyclic operation of the 2-bed CAR process, in this way overcoming unavoidable heat losses from the beds during steady state operation. The performance of the PDU was optimized as much as possible, but equipment limitations prevented the system from fully achieving its target performance. Design of the flue gas recirculation system to integrate CAR PDU with the CTF and the system was completed and integrated tests successfully performed at the end of the period. A detailed techno-economic analysis was made of the CAR process for supplying the oxygen in oxy-fuel combustion retrofit option using AEP's 450 MW Conesville, Ohio plant and contrasted with the cryogenic air separation option (ASU). Design of a large scale CAR unit was completed to support this techno-economic assessment. Based on the finding that the overall cost potential of the CAR technology compared to cryogenic ASU is nominal at current performance levels and that the risks related to both material and process scale up are still significant, the team recommended not to proceed to Phase 2. CAR process economics continue to look attractive if the original and still 'realistic' target oxygen capacities could be realized in practice. In order to achieve this end, a new fundamental materials development program would be needed. With the effective oxygen capacities of the current CAR materials there is, however, insufficient economic incentive to use this commercially unproven technology in oxy-fuel power plant applications in place of conventional ASUs. In addition, it is now clear that before a larger scale pilot demonstration of the CAR technology is made, a better understanding of the impact of flue-gas impurities on the CAR materials and of thermal transients in the beds is required.

Krish Krishnamurthy; Divy Acharya; Frank Fitch

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

236

Oxygen Nonstoichiometry, Thermo-chemical Stability and Crystal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gas separation membranes and oxygen sensors, oxygen nonstoichiometry and crystal ... New Electric Current Effects on 8-Y Zirconia Ceramics: Pore/Bubble ...

237

Match Pumps to System Requirements  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency matching pumps to system requirements

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Temperature requirements of Pacific coastal fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sampling tubes were tightly f i t t e d on each jar.fish was placed in each jar, a stopper secured in place, andof oxygenated water through each jar At prevented oxygen

Moyle, Peter B; Knight, Ned K

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS Oxygen PrOductiOn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen PrOductiOn Oxygen PrOductiOn B-500 Oxygen PrOductiOn u.S. dePartment Of energy advanced carbOn diOxide caPture r&d PrOgram: technOlOgy uPdate, may 2013 itm Oxygen technOlOgy fOr integratiOn in igcc and Other advanced POwer generatiOn SyStemS primary project goals Air Products and Chemicals set out to design and develop an ion transport membrane (ITM) based on ceramics that selectively transport oxygen (O 2 ) ions when operated at high temperature. This high-temperature process may be integrated with advanced power genera- tion processes that require O 2 as a feedstock, such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean energy and industrial applications. technical goals * Design, construct, and operate a 0.1-ton/day (TPD) technology development unit

240

Requirements dependencies: the emergence of a requirements network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We believe that the requirements at the leaf-node level of the requirements tree structure cannot be viewed in isolation and that dependencies between them exist. We pursued this notion in order to find a coherent set of requirement dependencies that ...

Vishwajeet Kulshreshtha; John Boardman; Dinesh Verma

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-3 Burn Pit Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-058  

SciTech Connect

The 128-B-3 waste site is a former burn and disposal site for the 100-B/C Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River. The 128-B-3 waste site has been remediated to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results of sampling at upland areas of the site also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

242

Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by natural circulation to the waterwalls and divisional wall panels. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) without over-fire air and (2) with 20% over-fire air. The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from carbon steel to T91. The total heat transfer surface required in the oxygen-fired heat recovery area (HRA) is 25% less than the air-fired HRA due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are practically the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are very similar.

Andrew Seltzer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

4.5 Audit Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Requirements Audit Requirements Audit requirements are now contained in 2 separate sub-sections. Subsection 4.5.1 contains the audit requirements for States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations while subsection 4.5.2 contains the audit requirements for For-Profit Organizations. 4.5.1 Audit Requirements for States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations (a) General. All States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations that expend over $500,000 in Federal funds in any year are required to have a single audit conducted in accordance with OMB Circular A-133. This requirement flows down to subrecipients that meet the dollar threshold. An independent auditor shall perform the audit in accordance with the Government Auditing Standards and must: 1) audit and provide opinions on the fair presentation of the

244

SG Network System Requirements Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SG Network System Requirements Specification SG Network System Requirements Specification Interim Release 3 5/17/2010 - 2 - Table of Contents Document History ....................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Revision History .......................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Preface........................................................................................................................................................ - 4 - Authors........................................................................................................................................................ - 6 -

245

Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 1 figure

Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

Building security requirements with CLASP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, security requirements have been derived in an ad hoc manner. Recently, commercial software development organizations have been looking for ways to produce effective security requirements.In this paper, we show how to build security ... Keywords: application security, security process, security requirements

John Viega

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Direct Observation of Oxygen Superstructures in Manganites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the observation of superstructures associated with the oxygen 2p states in two prototypical manganites using x-ray diffraction at the oxygen K edge. In the stripe order system Bi{sub 0.31}Ca{sub 0.69}MnO{sub 3}, hole-doped O states are orbitally ordered, at the same propagation vector as the Mn orbital ordering, but no oxygen charge stripes are found at this periodicity. In La{sub 7/8}Sr{sub 1/8}MnO{sub 3}, we observe a 2p charge ordering described by alternating hole-poor and hole-rich MnO planes that is consistent with some of the recent predictions.

Grenier, S.; Tonnerre, J. M. [Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Thomas, K. J.; Hill, J. P. [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Staub, U.; Bodenthin, Y.; Garcia-Fernandez, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Sherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Scagnoli, V. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Kiryukhin, V.; Cheong, S-W.; Kim, B. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

248

Data Requirements from NERSC Requirements Reviews Richard Gerber...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Scientists represented by the NERSC user community have growing requirements for data storage, IO bandwidth, networking bandwidth, and data software and services. Over the...

249

Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group  

SciTech Connect

Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

Ronald R. Barden

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Electrolysis method for producing hydrogen and oxygen  

SciTech Connect

A novel electrolytic cell produces a mixture of highly ionized hydrogen and oxygen gases by a method combining electrolysis and radiolysis of an aqueous electrolyte. The electrolyte, which may be 25 percent of potassium hydroxide, is introduced into the cell and is simultaneously subjected to an electrolyting current and intense irradiation by electromagnetic radiation of frequency less than 10/sup -10/ meters.

Horvath, S.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a Bloom baffle burner at GTI. The results are positive and confirm that oxygen-enriched combustion can be carried out without producing higher levels of NOx than normal air firing, if lancing of combustion air is used and the excess air levels are controlled. A simple economic study shows that the membrane processes can produce O{sub 2} at less than $40/ton EPO{sub 2} and an energy cost of 1.1-1.5 MMBtu/ton EPO{sub 2}, which are very favorable compared with conventional technologies such as cryogenics and vacuum pressure swing adsorption processes. The benefits of integrated membrane processes/combustion process trains have been evaluated, and show good savings in process costs and energy consumption, as well as reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. For example, if air containing 30% oxygen is used in natural gas furnaces, the net natural gas savings are an estimated 18% at a burner temperature of 2,500 F, and 32% at a burner temperature of 3,000 F. With a 20% market penetration of membrane-based oxygen-enriched combustion in all combustion processes by 2020, the energy savings would be 414-736 TBtu/y in the U.S. The comparable net cost savings are estimated at $1.2-2.1 billion per year by 2020, calculated as the value of fuel savings subtracted from the cost of oxygen production. The fuel savings of 18%-32% by the membrane/oxygen-enriched combustion corresponds to an 18%-32% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions, or 23-40 MM ton/y less CO{sub 2} from natural gas-fired furnaces by 2020. In summary, results from this project (Concept Definition phase) are highly promising and clearly demonstrate that membrane processes can produce oxygen-enriched air in a low cost manner that will lower operating costs and energy consumption in industrial combustion processes. Future work will focus on proof-of-concept bench-scale demonstration in the laboratory.

Lin, Haiqing

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Project X functional requirements specification  

SciTech Connect

Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support intensity frontier research in elementary particle physics, with possible applications to nuclear physics and nuclear energy research, at Fermilab. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions. This paper will describe the Functional Requirements for the Project X facility and the rationale for these requirements.

Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Requirements Specifications For Hybrid Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to present a formal framework for representing and reasoning about the requirements of hybrid systems. As background, the paper briefly reviews an abstract model for specifying system and software requirements, called the Four Variable Model [12], and a related requirements method, called SCR (Software Cost Reduction) [10, 1]. The paper then introduces a special discrete version of the Four Variable Model, the SCR requirements model [8] and proposes an extension of the SCR model for specifying and reasoning about hybrid systems. 2 Background

Constance Heitmeyer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Neutron knockout in neutral-current neutrino-oxygen interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ongoing and future searches for diffuse supernova neutrinos and sterile neutrinos carried out with large water-Cherenkov detectors require a precise determination of the backgrounds, especially those involving gamma rays. Of great importance, in this context, is the process of neutron knockout through neutral-current (NC) scattering of atmospheric neutrinos on oxygen. Nuclear reinteractions of the produced neutron may in fact lead to the production of gamma rays of energies high enough to mimic the processes of interest. In this Letter, we focus on the kinematical range suitable for simulations of atmospheric-neutrino interactions and provide the neutron-knockout cross sections computed using the formalism based on realistic nuclear spectral function. The role of the strange-quark contribution to the NC axial form factor is also analyzed. Based on the available experimental information, we give an estimate of the associated uncertainty.

Artur M. Ankowski; Omar Benhar

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-50 Stormwater Runoff Culvert, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-001  

SciTech Connect

The 100-F-50 waste site, part of the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, is a steel stormwater runoff culvert that runs between two railroad grades in the south-central portion of the 100-F Area. The culvert exiting the west side of the railroad grade is mostly encased in concrete and surrounded by a concrete stormwater collection depression partially filled with soil and vegetation. The drain pipe exiting the east side of the railroad grade embankment is partially filled with soil and rocks. The 100-F-50 stormwater diversion culvert confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to no action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

J. M. Capron

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Structural determination of fluorite-type oxygen excess uranium oxides using EXAFS spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been carried out at 77 K at the uranium L/sub III/ edge for UO/sub 2/, ..beta..-U/sub 3/O/sub 7/, and U/sub 4/O/sub 9/ with the aim of determining the structure of these highly defective (oxygen excess) uranium oxide phases, which are of industrial importance. Use has been made of a difference Fourier technique for U/sub 3/O/sub 7/, in which the EXAFS of a perfect lattice model is subtracted. U--O bond lengths calculated from the remaining EXAFS signal, assumed to result only from interstitial oxygens, have been used to determine the atomic coordinates of these interstitials. The analysis of EXAFS data in terms of coordination number has allowed an insight into the defect aggregate arrangement of oxygens in U/sub 3/O/sub 7/ and U/sub 4/O/sub 9/. Furthermore, EXAFS data indicate that the uranium sublattice is perturbed by the incorporation of additional oxygen atoms.

Jones, D.J.; Roziere, J.; Allen, G.C.; Tempest, P.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE: This version of the Handbook must be used by students who start during or after the Spring 2012 semester is a central activity. 1.2 Purpose and Content of the Handbook. A detailed account of the academic requirements

Kounaves, Samuel P.

258

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE: This version of the Handbook can be used by students who started during or before the Fall 2011 semester activity. 1.2 Purpose and Content of the Handbook. A detailed account of the academic requirements

Kounaves, Samuel P.

259

Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

Evans, R.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the gases or vapors, liquids with volatility need sensors near the potential sources of release, nature and concentration of gas releases, natural and mechanical ventilation, detector installation locations not vulnerable to mechanical or water damage from normal operations, and locations that lend themselves to convenient maintenance and calibration. The guidance also states that sensors should be located in all areas where hazardous accumulations of gas may occur. Such areas might not be close to release points but might be areas with restricted air movement. Heavier than air gases are likely to accumulate in pits, trenches, drains, and other low areas. Lighter than air gases are more likely to accumulate in overhead spaces, above drop ceilings, etc. In general, sensors should be located close to any potential sources of major release of gas. The paper gives data on monitor sensitivity and expected lifetimes to support the monitor selection process. Proper selection of indoor and outdoor locations for monitors is described, accounting for the vapor densities of hydrogen and oxygen. The latest information on monitor alarm setpoint selection is presented. Typically, monitors require recalibration at least every six months, or more frequently for inhospitable locations, so ready access to the monitors is an important issue to consider in monitor siting. Gas monitors, depending on their type, can be susceptible to blockages of the detector element (i.e., dus

Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Dependence of waterflood remaining oil saturation on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters in mixed-wet turbidite sands  

SciTech Connect

The dependence of waterflood oil recovery on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters was investigated by numerical simulation. The relative permeability and capillary pressure curves were based on laboratory measurements on unconsolidated sands. The water-wet case is based on the assumption that the system is water-wet and measurements were made with refined oil. The mixed-wet case assumed that the system is mixed-wet and restored-state measurements were made with crude oil. The reservoir model was a prototype turbidite sand with a range of thickness and permeability values. The economic oil recovery was based on an economic limit water cut of 50%. The remaining oil saturation (ROS) in the swept region for the water-wet cases was close to the residual oil saturation. The ROS of the mixed-wet cases ranged from low values near the residual oil saturation to far above the residual oil saturation. It is dependent on the reservoir parameters that govern (1) the vertical film surface drainage of oil by gravity, (2) accumulation of a high oil saturation and thus a high relative permeability under the caprock, and (3) up-dip migration of the oil that accumulated under the caprock. The dependence on the reservoir parameters can be summarized by dimensionless groups. There is a dimensionless time for the vertical displacement of oil by gravity. The accumulation of a high oil saturation under the caprock is dependent on the ratio of the capillary transition zone and the sand thickness. The updip migration is dependent on a combination of the gravity number and the endpoint mobility ratio.

Hirasaki, G.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Old Socorro Mission: an osteobiological analysis of the skeletal remains from the 1982-1985 field excavations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The skeletal remains of 51 individuals from the Old Socorro Mission (OSM) were analyzed to provide both a demographic profile and an assessment of their health. According to Spanish documents, the mission, which was in use from 1684 to 1829, served the Spanish families and Piro Indians who were living at the settlement. Of the 51 burials recovered, 23 of the adults were identifiable as to sex: 15 males and 8 females. All age categories were represented: one fetal, 15 infants, five in early childhood, three in late childhood, one adolescent/adult, 19 adults, and seven old adults. Physical characteristics, such as stature and robusticity were also determined. Stature estimates of the OSM sample did not differ significantly from other Indian groups from the region. Visual observation of the OSM sample indicated that the population appeared to be sexually robust. The males and females displayed a pronounced degree of skeletal dimorphism both in stature and other discrete traits. Examination of the dentition revealed numerous pathological conditions. The OSM population displayed a high frequency of cariogenic activity, enamel hypoplasia, abscessing, antemortem tooth loss, alveolar resorption, and periodontal infection. Dental anomalies, shoveling and enamel wrinkling, were also present. The OSM sample revealed numerous skeletal pathological conditions. Degenerative joint disease, infectious disease, neoplasias, traumatic injuries, and skeletal dysplasias were evident in both sexes. Anomalous features were also identified, such as developmental and cultural modifications. The high frequency of developmental variations is suggestive of a small breeding population with restricted gene flow. The lack of skeletal lesions with dietary imbalances suggests that the OSM people were well nourished. However, the high incidence of degenerative joint disease suggests that the Piro Indians. suffered a great amount of physical stress.

Raisor, Michelle Jeanette

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Oxygen transport by oxygen potential gradient in dense ceramic oxide membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been conducted in recent years on the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas: CO + H{sub 2}) with air as the oxidant. In partial oxidation, a mixed-oxide ceramic membrane selectively transports oxygen from the air; this transport is driven by the oxygen potential gradient. Of the several ceramic materials the authors have tested, a mixed oxide based on the Sr-Fe-Co-O system has been found to be very attractive. Extensive oxygen permeability data have been obtained for this material in methane conversion experiments carried out in a reactor. The data have been analyzed by a transport equation based on the phenomenological theory of diffusion under oxygen potential gradients. Thermodynamic calculations were used to estimate the driving force for the transport of oxygen ions. The results show that the transport equation deduced from the literature describes the permeability data reasonably well and can be used to determine the diffusion coefficients and the associated activation energy of oxygen ions in the ceramic membrane material.

Maiya, P.S.; Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A. [Amoco Exploration/Production, Naperville, IL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Possible evidence for fluid-rock oxygen isotope disequilibrium in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is ample evidence from geothermal systems that isotope temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope fractionation between alteration phases and coexisting aquifer fluids agree closely with measured bore-hole temperatures. Similar, but limited evidence is found in epithermal vein deposits where isotopes temperature agree well with fluid inclusion homogenization temperature. Conversely, many hydrothermal systems exhibit varying degrees of fluid-rock oxygen isotope equilibration. There appears to be a crude relationship between increasing degree of equilibrium and increasing temperature and salinity. The observed variations in the degree of exchange may have resulted from local, self-sealing of the fracture network prior to equilibration. The ability for fracture to remain open or to propogate allowing continued fluid flow may be the deciding factor in the attainment of isotopic equilibration.

Cole, D.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Possible evidence for fluid-rock oxygen isotope disequilibrium in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is ample evidence from geothermal systems that isotope temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope fractionation between alteration phases and coexisting aquifer fluids agree closely with measured bore-hole temperatures. Similar, but limited evidence is found in epithermal vein deposits where isotopes temperature agree well with fluid inclusion homogenization temperature. Conversely, many hydrothermal systems exhibit varying degrees of fluid-rock oxygen isotope equilibration. There appears to be a crude relationship between increasing degree of equilibrium and increasing temperature and salinity. The observed variations in the degree of exchange may have resulted from local, self-sealing of the fracture network prior to equilibration. The ability for fracture to remain open or to propogate allowing continued fluid flow may be the deciding factor in the attainment of isotopic equilibration.

Cole, D.R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Home: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

content. | Skip to navigation content. | Skip to navigation Site Map Contact Us Current Documents Archived Documents Entire Site only in current section Advanced Search... U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Sections Home Directives Current Directives Draft Directives Archives Delegations Current Delegations Current Designations Rescinded Organizations' Assignment of Responsibility Development & Review RevCom Writers' Tools DPC Corner References News and Updates Help Personal tools You are here: Office of Management » Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Info Home Directives are the Department of Energy's primary means of establishing policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. Directive

268

Cyber Security Issues and Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program (SGIG) Cyber Security Issues and Requirements Jeff Dagle November 19, 2009 Communication and Information Technology will be Central to Smart Grid Deployment Final Interim Smart Grid Roadmap, prepared by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cyber Security Requirements Associated with ARRA Projects Proposals were required to include:  Discussion of how cyber security risks will be mitigated  What criteria will be used for vendor and technology selection  Relevant cyber security standards that will be followed (or industry best practices)  How emerging smart grid cyber security standards that are currently being developed will be adopted Cyber Security Objectives for Smart

269

Oxygen electrode in molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oxygen reduction reaction on a gold electrode in lithium carbonate melt was investigated to determine the influence of partial pressure of carbon dioxide and temperature on electrode kinetics and oxygen solubility by using cyclic Voltammetry and impedance analysis techniques. During this quarter, the impedance data were analyzed by a Complex Nonlinear Least Square (CNLS) Parameter estimation program to determine the kinetic and the mass transfer related parameters such as charge transfer resistance, double layer capacitance, solution resistance, and Warburg coefficient. The estimated parameters were used to obtain the C0{sub 2} reaction orders and apparent activation energies for the exchange current density and the mass transfer parameter (D{sub o}{sup {1/2}}C{sub o}*).

Dave, B.B.; Srinivasan, S.; White, R.E.; Appleby, A.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-voltage electrical insulator for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall of a heat exchanger filled with liquid lithium while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl[sub 2]O[sub 3], sapphire) with a niobium foil layer bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal facing the heat exchanger wall, and a molybdenum layer bonded to the niobium layer to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface. 3 figures.

Van Der Beck, R.R.; Bond, J.A.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

271

Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-voltage electrical insulator (21) for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module (17) in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall (11) of a heat exchanger (13) filled with liquid lithium (16) while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator (21) has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl.sub.2 O.sub.3, sapphire) with a niobium foil layer (32) bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal (26) facing the heat exchanger wall (11), and a molybdenum layer (31) bonded to the niobium layer (32) to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface.

Van Der Beck, Roland R. (Lansdale, PA); Bond, James A. (Exton, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

On the reduction of oxygen from dispersed media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reduction of oxygen from an organic phase dispersed in a concentrated electrolyte is investigated. Dispersed organic phases are used to enhance oxygen transport in fermenters and artificial blood substitutes. This work ...

Roushdy, Omar H., 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Application of Oxygen Eddy Correlation in Aquatic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eddy correlation technique is rapidly becoming an established method for resolving dissolved oxygen fluxes in natural aquatic systems. This direct and noninvasive determination of oxygen fluxes close to the sediment by simultaneously ...

Claudia Lorrai; Daniel F. McGinnis; Peter Berg; Andreas Brand; Alfred Wüest

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Molecular oxygen in the rho Ophiuchi cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular oxygen, O2 has been expected historically to be an abundant component of the chemical species in molecular clouds and, as such, an important coolant of the dense interstellar medium. However, a number of attempts from both ground and from space have failed to detect O2 emission. The work described here uses heterodyne spectroscopy from space to search for molecular oxygen in the interstellar medium. The Odin satellite carries a 1.1 m sub-millimeter dish and a dedicated 119 GHz receiver for the ground state line of O2. Starting in 2002, the star forming molecular cloud core rho Oph A was observed with Odin for 34 days during several observing runs. We detect a spectral line at v(LSR) = 3.5 km/s with dv(FWHM) = 1.5 km/s, parameters which are also common to other species associated with rho Ohp A. This feature is identified as the O2 (N_J = 1_1 - 1_0) transition at 118 750.343 MHz. The abundance of molecular oxygen, relative to H2,, is 5E-8 averaged over the Odin beam. This abundance is consistently lower than previously reported upper limits.

B. Larsson; R. Liseau; L. Pagani; P. Bergman; P. Bernath; N. Biver; J. H. Black; R. S. Booth; V. Buat; J. Crovisier; C. L. Curry; M. Dahlgren; P. J. Encrenaz; E. Falgarone; P. A. Feldman; M. Fich; H. G. Flore'n; M. Fredrixon; U. Frisk; G. F. Gahm; M. Gerin; M. Hagstroem; J. Harju; T. Hasegawa; Aa. Hjalmarson; C. Horellou; L. E. B. Johansson; K. Justtanont; A. Klotz; E. Kyroelae; S. Kwok; A. Lecacheux; T. Liljestroem; E. J. Llewellyn; S. Lundin; G. Me'gie; G. F. Mitchell; D. Murtagh; L. H. Nordh; L. -Aa. Nyman; M. Olberg; A. O. H. Olofsson; G. Olofsson; H. Olofsson; G. Persson; R. Plume; H. Rickman; I. Ristorcelli; G. Rydbeck; Aa. Sandqvist; F. v. Sche'ele; G. Serra; S. Torchinsky; N. F. Tothill; K. Volk; T. Wiklind; C. D. Wilson; A. Winnberg; G. Witt

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

275

Probing brain oxygenation with near infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamentals of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) are reviewed. This technique allows to measure the oxygenation of the brain tissue. The particular problems involved in detecting regional brain oxygenation (rSO2) are discussed. The dominant chromophore (light absorber) in tissue is water. Only in the NIR light region of 650-1000 nm, the overall absorption is sufficiently low, and the NIR light can be detected across a thick layer of tissues, among them the skin, the scull and the brain. In this region, there are many absorbing light chromophores, but only three are important as far as the oxygenation is concerned. They are the hemoglobin (HbO2), the deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) and cytochrome oxidase (CtOx). In the last 20 years there was an enormous growth in the instrumentation and applications of NIRS. . The devices that were used in our experiments were : Somanetics's INVOS Brain Oximeter (IBO) and Toomim's HEG spectrophotometer. The performances of both devices were compared including their merits and draw...

Gersten, Alexander; Raz, Amir; Fried, Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Practice of Parking Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of the required parking is thus $20 per square foot$40 per square foot of floor area, or twice the cost in aper 1,000 square feet in a TOD, and the developer's cost of

Shoup, Donald C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

land requirements | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

requirements requirements Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

278

Manifest requirements. RCRA Information Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specific pretransport regulatory requirements must be met by DOE prior to shipment of hazardous waste, low-level wastes (LLW), and radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The pretransport requirements are intended to help reduce the risk of loss or leakage of, or exposure to, hazardous wastes, LLW, and RMW during shipment; and to communicate information on potential hazards to shippers, carriers, or receivers of waste shipments, and emergency response personnel in the event of an accident, spill, or leak. These goals are accomplished through tracking of shipments, correct packaging and labeling, and communication of potential hazards. Specific requirements include manifesting, packaging, marking and labeling of waste packages, placarding of vehicles, and selecting appropriate waste transporters and shipment destinations. This Information Brief focuses on the manifesting requirements associated with domestic transport of hazardous wastes, LLW, and RMW.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Physics and detector simulation requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

‘‘This document describes the computing environment needed to meet the requirements for high energy physics Monte Carlo Calculations for the simulation of Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory physics and detectors.’’ (AIP)

Computer Acquisition Working Group

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

SofTV Viewer Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may be required to view all features in a presentations where build steps and animations are published. (This feature can be turned off) Netscape 7.1+ Presentations created...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OpenEI - land requirements  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4180 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

282

Fusion technology status and requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

Thomassen, K.I.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

283

DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire ... Electronic Materials Science Challenges in Renewable Energy.

284

Renewable Energy Requirement Status: 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential impacts of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and other requirements are significant for electricity generation, transmission, and distribution companies, especially for those that depend on coal and other fossil fuels to supply the power delivered to their customers. this Technical Update is to update the information presented in the previous EPRI report, Renewable Energy Requirement Status and Compliance Strategies: 2004 (1008374, December 2004). Although the assessment focuses on state ...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Functional Requirements for Customer Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Customer communications infrastructures could support a wide variety of useful utility operations and industry-wide applications. However, these systems will require a substantial investment, which necessitates viewing customer communications with multiple stakeholders and applications in mind. This report describes the development of requirements for customer interface applications such as revenue metering, communications gateways, and remote equipment operations that can provide the basis for powerful ...

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

Spent nuclear fuel project detonation phenomena of hydrogen/oxygen in spent fuel containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Movement of Spent N Reactor fuels from the Hanford K Basins near the Columbia River to Dry interim storage facility on the Hanford plateau will require repackaging the fuel in the basins into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), drying of the fuel, transporting the contained fuel, hot conditioning, and finally interim storage. Each of these functions will be accomplished while the fuel is contained in the MCOs by several mechanisms. The principal source of hydrogenand oxygen within the MCOs is residual water from the vacuum drying and hot conditioning operations. This document assesses the detonation phenomena of hydrogen and oxygen in the spent fuel containers. Several process scenarios have been identified that could generate detonation pressures that exceed the nominal 10 atmosphere design limit ofthe MCOS. Only 42 grams of radiolized water are required to establish this condition.

Cooper, T.D.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

E.L. Grossman Chapter 10 Oxygen Isotope Stratigraphy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the mineral and water respectively. Oxygen isotopic ratios are The Geologic Time Scale 2012. DOI: 10.1016/B978E.L. Grossman Chapter 10 Oxygen Isotope Stratigraphy Abstract:Variations in the 18 O/16 O ratios for global correlation. Relying on previous compilations and new data, this chapter presents oxygen isotope

Grossman, Ethan L.

288

Session 35 - Panel: Remaining US Disposition Issues for Orphan or Small Volume Low Level and Low Level Mixed Waste Streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Faced with closure schedules as a driving force, significant progress has been made during the last 2 years on the disposition of DOE mixed waste streams thought previously to be problematic. Generators, the Department of Energy and commercial vendors have combined to develop unique disposition paths for former orphan streams. Recent successes and remaining issues will be discussed. The session will also provide an opportunity for Federal agencies to share lessons learned on low- level and mixed low-level waste challenges and identify opportunities for future collaboration. This panel discussion was organized by PAC member Dick Blauvelt, Navarro Research and Engineering Inc who served as co-chair along with Dave Eaton from INL. In addition, George Antonucci, Duratek Barnwell and Rich Conley, AFSC were invited members of the audience, prepared to contribute the Barnwell and DOD perspective to the issues as needed. Mr. Small provide information regarding the five year 20K M3 window of opportunity at the Nevada Test Site for DOE contractors to dispose of mixed waste that cannot be received at the Energy Solutions (Envirocare) site in Utah because of activity levels. He provided a summary of the waste acceptance criteria and the process sites must follow to be certified to ship. When the volume limit or time limit is met, the site will undergo a RCRA closure. Ms. Gelles summarized the status of the orphan issues, commercial options and the impact of the EM reorganization on her program. She also announced that there would be a follow-on meeting in 2006 to the very successful St. Louis meeting of last year. It will probably take place in Chicago in July. Details to be announced. Mr. McKenney discussed progress made at the Hanford Reservation regarding disposal of their mixed waste inventory. The news is good for the Hanford site but not good for the rest of the DOE complex since shipment for out of state of both low level and low level mixed waste will continue to be prohibited until the completion of a new NEPA study. This is anticipated to take several years. Bill Franz from Portsmouth and Dave Eaton representing the INL provided the audience with information regarding some of the problematic mixed waste streams at their respective sites. Portsmouth has some unique radiological issues with isotopes such as Tc-99 while the INL is trying to deal with mixed waste in the 10-100 nCi/g range. Kaylin Loveland spoke of the new,Energy Solutions organization and provided information on mixed waste treatment capabilities at the Clive site. Mike Lauer described the licensing activities at the WCS site in Texas where they are trying to eventually have disposal capabilities for Class A, B and C mixed waste from both DOE and the commercial sector. The audience included about 75 WM'06 attendees who asked some excellent questions and provided an active and informative exchange of information on the topic. (authors)

Blauvelt, Richard [Navarro Engineering Research Inc. (United States); Small, Ken [Doe Nevada (United States); Gelles, Christine [DOE EM HQ (United States); McKenney, Dale [Fluor Hanford (United States); Franz, Bill [LATA Portsmouth (United States); Loveland, Kaylin [Energy Solutions Inc. (United States); Lauer, Mike [Waste Control Specialists (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

First principles calculations of oxygen adsorption on the UN (001) surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication, handling and disposal of nuclear fuel materials require comprehensive knowledge of their surface morphology and reactivity. Due to unavoidable contact with air components (even at low partial pressures), UN samples contain considerable amount of oxygen impurities affecting fuel properties. The basic properties of O atoms adsorbed on the UN(001) surface are simulated here combining the two first principles calculation methods based on the plane wave basis set and that of the localized atomic orbitals.

Zhukovskii, Yuri F; Kotomin, Eugene; Evarestov, Robert; Bandura, Andrey V; 10.1016/j.susc.2008.10.019

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

OMB Requirements | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OMB Requirements OMB Requirements OMB Requirements Acquisitions OMB Circular A-109, Acquisition of Major Systems (04-05-76) (Available in hard copy only) OMB M-04-08, Maximizing Use of SmartBuy and Avoiding Duplication of Agency Activities with with the President's 24 E-Gov Initiatives (02-25-2004) (pdf) OMB M-04-16, Software Acquisition (07-01-2004) Budget/Capital Planning OMB Circular A-11 OMB M-05-23, Improving Informational Technology (IT) Project Planning and Execution (8-04-2005) (pdf) Cyber Security & Privacy OMB M-00-07, Incorporating and Funding Security in Information Systems Investments (02-28-2000) OMB M-02-01, Guidance for Preparing and Submitting Security Plans of Action and Milestones(10-19-2001) OMB M-02-09, Reporting Instructions for the Government Information

291

Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control  

SciTech Connect

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology advancements offer significant reductions in power requirements, which would improve plant efficiency and economics for the oxygen-fired technology. The second phase consisted of pilot-scale testing followed by a refined performance and economic evaluation of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. As a part of this workscope, ALSTOM modified its 3 MW{sub th} (9.9 MMBtu/hr) Multiuse Test Facility (MTF) pilot plant to operate with O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures of up to 70 percent O{sub 2} by volume. Tests were conducted with coal and petroleum coke. The test objectives were to determine the impacts of oxygen firing on heat transfer, bed dynamics, potential agglomeration, and gaseous and particulate emissions. The test data results were used to refine the design, performance, costs, and economic models developed in Phase-I for the O{sub 2}-fired CFB with CO{sub 2} capture. Nsakala, Liljedahl, and Turek reported results from this study in 2004. ALSTOM identified several items needing further investigation in preparation for large scale demonstration of the oxygen-fired CFB concept, namely: (1) Operation and performance of the moving bed heat exchanger (MBHE) to avoid recarbonation and also for cost savings compared to the standard bubbling fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE); (2) Performance of the back-end flash dryer absorber (FDA) for sulfur capture under high CO{sub 2}/high moisture flue gas environment using calcined limestone in the fly ash and using fresh commercial lime directly in the FDA; (3) Determination of the effect of recarbonation on fouling in the convective pass; (4) Assessment of the impact of oxygen firing on the mercury, other trace elements, and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; and (5) Develop a proposal-level oxygen-fired retrofit design for a relatively small existing CFB steam power plant in preparation for a large-scale demonstration of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. Hence, ALSTOM responded to a DOE Solicitation to address all these issues with further O{sub 2} fired MTF pilot testing and a subsequent retrofit design study of oxygen firing and CO{s

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

RPAM & Energy Order Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

430.1C, Real Property Asset Management 430.1C, Real Property Asset Management and DOE O 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management Requirements, Overlap & Differences Office of Engineering and Construction Management September 2009 2 10/27/2009 Energy Order & RPAM Order Requirements DOE O 430.1C - RPAM DOE O 430.2B ENERGY ORDER Energy Efficiency Water Consumption Utility Metering ESPCs & USPCs Personnel - Energy Training Environmental Management System (EMS) Real Property Performance Indicators Sustainable Buildings Facilities Information Management System (FIMS) Personnel - Certified Realty Specialists Ten Year Site Plans Sustainable & Integrated Design TEAM Executable Plans High Performance Building Plan OVERLAP Real Property

293

New Solutions Require New Thinking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solutions Require Solutions Require New Thinking America's demand for power threatens to overburden an already congested electric system. The U.S. Department of Energy is addressing these energy challenges with innovative solutions to energy generation. Its Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration (RDSI) Program is helping to alleviate congestion, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve reliability by investigating answers such as * Microgrid technologies * Distributed generation * Two-way communication systems * Demand response programs Reducing Peak Demand The RDSI program aims to reduce peak load on distribution feeders 20% by 2015. To help achieve this goal, RDSI is sponsoring demonstration projects nationwide. From California to New York, these projects are

294

Meeting Federal Energy Security Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Markel Markel SRA International Lawrence_Markel@sra.com Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Fall 2012 - October 16-17 Mobile, AL Sponsored by Alabama Power Theme Meeting energy security requirements in federal facilities provides opportunities for additional types of cooperation between utilities and the federal agencies. However, there are significant barriers to pursuing these opportunities - constraints on utilities and on federal agencies, as well as sometimes-competing objectives. Energy security encompasses sufficiency, surety, and sustainability.  Above all, energy security means having adequate power to conduct critical operations for the duration required (sufficiency).  Secondarily, and leading to sufficiency, is ensuring resilient energy supplies that are accessible when

295

Stellar Astrophysics Requirements NERSC Forecast  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements for Requirements for m461:Stellar Explosions in Three Dimensions Tomek Plewa (Florida State University) + 3 graduate students, Artur Gawryszczak (Warsaw), Konstantinos Kifonidis (Munich), Andrzej Odrzywolek (Cracow), Ju Zhang (FIT), Andrey Zhiglo (Kharkov) 1. m461: Stellar Explosions in Three Dimensions * Summarize your projects and expected scientific objectives through 2014 * Modeling and simulations of transient phenomena in stellar astrophysics driven by either radiation or thermonuclear processes * Numerical solution of a coupled system of PDEs and ODEs * Tame nonlinearity! * Our goal is to ... * Explain observed properties of exploding stellar objects * Present focus is ... * Neutrino-driven core-collapse supernova explosions * In the next 3 years we expect to ...

296

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations, Papers, and Publications Presentations, Papers, and Publications ITM Oxygen Development for Advanced Oxygen Supply (Oct 2011) Ted Foster, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. presented at the Gasification Technologies Conference, San Francisco, CA Oct 9-12, 2011. ASU/IGCC Integration Strategies (Oct 2009), David McCarthy, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2009 Gasification Technologies Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. ITM Oxygen: Taking the Next Step (Oct 2009), VanEric Stein, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2009 Gasification Technologies Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. ITM Oxygen: Scaling Up a Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Technology (Oct 2006) Philip Armstrong, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2006 Gasification Technologies Conference, Washington, D.C. ITM Oxygen: The New Oxygen Supply for the New IGCC Market (Oct 2005)

297

(Selective carbon oxygen bond scission during reactions of oxygenates on single crystal catalysts)  

SciTech Connect

We have discovered that the carbon-oxygen bond in methanol can be selectively broken if the surface structure of the platinum catalyst is appropriately tailored. The objective of this project is to determine if variations in surface structure allow one to selectively break C-O and C-H bonds. The decomposition of a wide range of oxygenates on several carefully chosen faces of group VIII metals will be examined to see when C-O bond scission occurs and what new chemistry we can find on stepped surfaces.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

[Selective carbon oxygen bond scission during reactions of oxygenates on single crystal catalysts]. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

We have discovered that the carbon-oxygen bond in methanol can be selectively broken if the surface structure of the platinum catalyst is appropriately tailored. The objective of this project is to determine if variations in surface structure allow one to selectively break C-O and C-H bonds. The decomposition of a wide range of oxygenates on several carefully chosen faces of group VIII metals will be examined to see when C-O bond scission occurs and what new chemistry we can find on stepped surfaces.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Oxygen stabilized zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy  

SciTech Connect

An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula (Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.2-u (V.sub.1-y Fe.sub.y)O.sub.z where x=0.0 to 0.9, y=0.01 to 0.9, z=0.25 to 0.5 and u=0 to 1. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from -196.degree. C. to 200.degree. C. at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices.

Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ALLOCATION OF REACTIVE SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the voltage setting point s kV of each bus Qk and the voltage profile for the buses c j Q . Recall that Q for these transactions so that all bus voltages meet the specified voltage profile requirements. Consequently load is locally met at the bus. In other words, we assume that at each load bus the power factor is 1

Gross, George

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Enhanced oil recovery water requirements  

SciTech Connect

Water requirements for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) are evaluated using publicly available information, data from actual field applications, and information provided by knowledgeable EOR technologists in 14 major oil companies. Water quantity and quality requirements are estimated for individual EOR processes (steam drive; in situ combustion; and CO/sub 2/, micellar-polymer, polymer, and caustic flooding) in those states and specific geographic locations where these processes will play major roles in future petroleum production by the year 2000. The estimated quantity requirements represent the total water needed from all sources. A reduction in these quantities can be achieved by reinjecting all of the produced water potentially available for recycle in the oil recovery method. For injection water quality requirements, it is noted that not all of the water used for EOR needs to be fresh. The use of treated produced water can reduce significantly the quantities of fresh water that would be sought from other sources. Although no major EOR project to date has been abandoned because of water supply problems, competing regional uses for water, drought situations, and scarcity of high quality surface water and ground water could be impediments to certain projects in the near future.

Royce, B.; Kaplan, E.; Garrell, M.; Geffen, T.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Science-Driven Network Requirements for ESnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron Source Network Requirements Six DOE laboratories arehas networking requirements which differ from many other DOEhas networking requirements which differ from many other DOE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A CENSUS OF OXYGEN IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL LINKING METALLICITIES, STAR FORMATION RATES, AND OUTFLOWS  

SciTech Connect

In this contribution, we present the first census of oxygen in star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We examine three samples of galaxies with metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) at z = 0.07, 0.8, and 2.26, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and DEEP2 survey. We infer the total mass of oxygen produced and mass of oxygen found in the gas-phase from our local SDSS sample. The star formation history is determined by requiring that galaxies evolve along the relation between stellar mass and SFR observed in our three samples. We show that the observed relation between stellar mass and SFR for our three samples is consistent with other samples in the literature. The mass-metallicity relation is well established for our three samples, and from this we empirically determine the chemical evolution of star-forming galaxies. Thus, we are able to simultaneously constrain the SFRs and metallicities of galaxies over cosmic time, allowing us to estimate the mass of oxygen locked up in stars. Combining this work with independent measurements reported in the literature, we conclude that the loss of oxygen from the interstellar medium of local star-forming galaxies is likely to be a ubiquitous process with the oxygen mass loss scaling (almost) linearly with stellar mass. We estimate the total baryonic mass loss and argue that only a small fraction of the baryons inferred from cosmological observations accrete onto galaxies.

Zahid, H. J.; Dima, G. I.; Kewley, L. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Erb, D. K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, WI 53211 (United States); Dave, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Rm. N204 Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study: Volume 3, Burner tests and combustion modeling: Final report, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen enriched combustion (OEC) has been shown to have significant energy savings potential in industrial furnace applications. High temperature industrial furnaces, such as glass melting furnaces, appear to be the most promising applications for oxygen enriched combustion. In these applications, the principal energy savings result from minimizing the fuel energy required to heat the diluent nitrogen in air. The results of technical and economic assessment of OEC and market assessment were reported in Volume 1 and 2 of the current study. This report describes the results of burner evaluation tests over a range of oxygen enrichment and a numerical simulation study. The first part refers to the experimental results of both conventional air-fired burners and specially designed oxygen-fuel burners, evaluated at two scales. Part 2 of this report is concerned with the application of a computer code to extrapolate the results from small scale combustion tests to industrial furnaces. The experiments were designed as a comparative evaluation to: determine the operating range of different burner designs with oxygen enrichment; measure detailed flame characteristics for both air and enriched oxygen conditions; and estimate expected performance from research furnace results to actual industrial applications. 14 refs., 76 figs., 20 tabs.

Kwan, Y.; Abele, A.R.; Richter, W.; Chen, S.L.; Payne, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Silver, S.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thickness Dependency of Thin Film Samaria Doped Ceria for Oxygen Sensing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature oxygen sensors are widely used for exhaust gas monitoring in automobiles. This particular study explores the use of thin film single crystalline samaria doped ceria as the oxygen sensing material. Desired signal to noise ratio can be achieved in a material system with high conductivity. From previous studies it is established that 6 atomic percent samarium doping is the optimum concentration for thin film samaria doped ceria to achieve high ionic conductivity. In this study, the conductivity of the 6 atomic percent samaria doped ceria thin film is measured as a function of the sensing film thickness. Hysteresis and dynamic response of this sensing platform is tested for a range of oxygen pressures from 0.001 Torr to 100 Torr for temperatures above 673 K. An attempt has been made to understand the physics behind the thickness dependent conductivity behavior of this sensing platform by developing a hypothetical operating model and through COMSOL simulations. This study can be used to identify the parameters required to construct a fast, reliable and compact high temperature oxygen sensor.

Sanghavi, Rahul P.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Jiang, Weilin; Varga, Tamas; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Kayani, Asghar N.; Prasad, Shalini

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electrochemical oxygen pumps. Final CRADA report.  

SciTech Connect

All tasks of the Work Plan of ISTC Project 2277p have been completed, thus: (1) techniques of chemical synthesis were developed for more than ten recipes of electrolyte based on cerium oxide doped with 20 mole% of gadolinium (CeGd)O{sub 2}, doped by more than 10 oxide systems including 6 recipes in addition to the Work Plan; (2) electric conductivity and mechanical strength of CeGd specimens with additions of oxide systems were performed, two candidate materials for the electrolyte of electrochemical oxygen pump (pure CeGd and CeGd doped by 0.2 wt% of a transition metal) were chosen; (3) extended studies of mechanical strength of candidate material specimens were performed at room temperature and at 400, 600, 800 C; (4) fixtures for determination of mechanical strength of tubes by external pressure above 40 atmospheres at temperature up to 700 C were developed and fabricated; and (5) technology of slip casting of tubes from pure (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} and of (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} doped by 0.2 wt% of a transition metal, withstanding external pressure of minimum 40 atmospheres at temperature up to 700 C was developed, a batch of tubes was sent for testing to Argonne National Laboratory; (6) technology of making nanopowder from pure (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} was developed based on chemical synthesis and laser ablation techniques, a batch of nanopowder with the weight 1 kg was sent for testing to Argonne National Laboratory; (7) a business plan for establishing a company for making powders of materials for electrochemical oxygen pump was developed; and (8) major results obtained within the Project were reported at international conferences and published in the Russian journal Electrochemistry. In accordance with the Work Plan a business trip of the following project participants was scheduled for April 22-29, 2006, to Tonawanda, NY, USA: Manager Victor Borisov; Leader of technology development Gennady Studenikin; Leader of business planning Elena Zadorozhnaya; Leader of production Vasily Lepalovsky; and Translator Vladimir Litvinov. During this trip project participants were to discuss with the project Technical Monitor J.D. Carter and representative of Praxair Inc. J. Chen the results of project activities (prospects of transition metal-doped material application in oxygen pumps), as well as the prospects of cooperation with Praxair at the meeting with the company management in the following fields: (1) Deposition of thin films of oxide materials of complex composition on support by magnetron and ion sputtering, research of coatings properties; (2) Development of block-type structure technology (made of porous and dense ceramics) for oxygen pump. The block-type structure is promising because when the size of electrolyte block is 2 x 2 inches and assembly height is 10 inches (5 blocks connected together) the area of active surface is ca. 290 square inches (in case of 8 slots), that roughly corresponds to one tube with diameter 1 inch and height 100 inches. So performance of the system made of such blocks may be by a factor of two or three higher than that of tube-based system. However one month before the visit, J. Chen notified us of internal changes at Praxair and the cancellation of the visit to Tonawanda, NY. During consultations with the project Technical Monitor J.D. Carter and Senior Project Manager A. Taylor a decision was made to extend the project term by 2 quarters to prepare proposals for follow-on activities during this extension (development of block-type structures made of dense and porous oxide ceramics for electrochemical oxygen pumps) using the funds that were not used for the trip to the US.

Carter, J. D. Noble, J.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ambiguities of the Rate of Oxygen Formation During Stellar Helium Burning in the 12C(a,g) Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rate of oxygen formation determines the C/O ratio during stellar helium burning. It is the single most important nuclear input of stellar evolution theory including the evolution of Type II and Type Ia supernova. Yet the low energy cross section of the fusion of 4He + 12C denoted as the 12C(a,g)16O reaction still remains uncertain after forty years of extensive work. We analyze and critically review the most recent measurements of complete angular distributions of the outgoing gamma-rays at very low energies (Ecm > 1.0 MeV). Our analysis of the angular distribution measured with the EUROGAM/GANDI arrays lead us to conclude considerably larger error bars than published hence they are excluded from the current sample of "world data". We show that the current sample of "world data" of the measured E2 cross section factors below 1.7 MeV cluster to two distinct groups that lead to two distinct extrapolations of SE2(300) ~ 60 or ~ 154 keVb. We point to a much neglected discrepancy between the measured E1-E2 phase difference (phi_12) and unitarity as required by the Watson theorem, suggesting systematic problem(s) of some of the measured gamma-ray angular distributions. The ambiguity of the extrapolated SE2(300) together with a previously observed ambiguity of SE1(300) represent the current state of the art of the field and they must be resolved by future measurements of complete and detailed angular distributions of the 12C(a,g) reaction at very low energies (Ecm < 1.0 MeV).

Moshe Gai

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

310

Quality Assurance Requirements and Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QjCivilianRadioactive QjCivilianRadioactive Was'fe Management QA: QA QVALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS AND DESCRIPTION DOEIRW-0333P Revisiol1 20 Effective Date: 10-01-2008 LarrY Newman, DlrectQr Office of Quality As,surance ~~--~-_._._- Edward F. Spr at III, Di or Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Date I/Jf/4t' , . - - - Date OCRWM Title: Quality Assurance Requirements and Description DOEIRW-0333P, Revision 20 Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Quality Assurance Policy Page: 2 of 160 Successful implementation of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Quality Assurance (QA) program is essential for the OCRWM to carry out its mission. Our mission is to manage and dispose ofbigh-Ievel radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits

311

Nano-science Safety Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano-science Safety Requirements Effective Date 12/6/2011 Nano-science Safety Requirements Effective Date 12/6/2011 The only official copy of this file is the one on-line. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the effective date. Page 1 of 3 Prepared By: L. Stiegler Low Risk - Embedded or Fixed Nanostructures (nanomaterials, incapable as a practical matter, of becoming airborne) Ensure that fixed nanomaterials are not subjected to actions that may generate Unbound NanoParticles (UNP). * For work outside of a HEPA filtered exhaust hood: o No Mechanical stresses e.g., (grinding, scraping, or pressing). o No thermal stresses o Cover samples when practical e.g., (slide cover, Kapton tape, Mylar tape, or cellophane tape). Samples/container must be labeled if not used immediately.

312

Requirements for signaling channel authentication  

SciTech Connect

This contribution addresses requirements for ATM signaling channel authentication. Signaling channel authentication is an ATM security service that binds an ATM signaling message to its source. By creating this binding, the message recipient, and even a third party, can confidently verify that the message originated from its claimed source. This provides a useful mechanism to mitigate a number of threats. For example, a denial of service attack which attempts to tear-down an active connection by surreptitiously injecting RELEASE or DROP PARTY messages could be easily thwarted when authenticity assurances are in place for the signaling channel. Signaling channel authentication could also be used to provide the required auditing information for accurate billing which is impervious to repudiation. Finally, depending on the signaling channel authentication mechanism, end-to-end integrity of the message (or at least part of it) can be provided. None of these capabilities exist in the current specifications.

Tarman, T.D.

1995-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

313

Functional Requirements and Use Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iously also beneficial in information systems development, staging core functionality for early releases and adding features over the course of several subsequent releases. In many industries, companies produce product lines with different cost/feature variations per product in the line, and product families that include a number of product lines targeted at somewhat different markets or usage situations. What makes these product lines part of a family, are some common elements of functionality and identity. A platform-based development approach leverages this commonality, utilizing a set of reusable assets across the family. These strategies have important implications for software architecture. In particular, it is not just the functional requirements of the first product or release that must be supported by the architecture. The functional requirements of early (nearly concurrent) releases need to be explicitly taken into account. Later releases are accommodated through architectu

System Has Properties; Ruth Malan; Dana Bredemeyer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Evaluate deaerator steam requirements quickly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam plant engineers frequently have to perform energy balance calculations around the deaerator to estimate the steam required to preheat and deaerate the make-up water and condensate returns. This calculation involves solving two sets of equations, one for mass and the other for energy balance. Reference to steam tables is also necessary. However, with the help of this program written in BASIC, one can arrive at the make-up water and steam requirements quickly, without referring to steam tables. This paper shows the mass and energy balance equations for the deaerator. This paper gives the program listing. An number of condensate returns can be handled. An example illustrates the use of the program.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Present and Future Computing Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Computational Cosmology for Computational Cosmology DES LSST Presenter: Salman Habib Argonne National Laboratory Jim Ahrens (LANL) Scott Dodelson (FNAL) Katrin Heitmann (ANL) Peter Nugent (LBNL) Anze Slosar (BNL) Risa Wechsler (SLAC) 1 Cosmic Frontier Computing Collaboration Computational Cosmology SciDAC-3 Project Ann Almgren (LBNL) Nick Gnedin (FNAL) Dave Higdon (LANL) Rob Ross (ANL) Martin White (UC Berkeley/ LBNL) Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics Research A DOE Technical Program Review November 27-28, 2012

316

Oxygen Atoms Display Novel Behavior on Common Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11, 2008 11, 2008 Oxygen Atoms Display Novel Behavior on Common Catalyst Like waltzing dancers, the two atoms of an oxygen molecule usually behave identically when they separate on the surface of a catalyst. However, new research from the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory reveals that on a particular catalyst, the oxygen atoms act like a couple dancing the tango: one oxygen atom plants itself while the other shimmies away, probably with energy partially stolen from the stationary one. Scientists from EMSL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory discovered this unanticipated behavior while studying how oxygen interacts with reduced titanium oxide, a popular catalyst and a model oxide. Their research began with a slice of titanium oxide crystal, oriented so that titanium and oxygen

317

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov December 2012 This patent-pending technology, "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process," provides a metal-oxide oxygen carrier for application in fuel combustion processes that use oxygen. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Patent Details U.S. Non-Provisional Patent Application No. 13/159,553; titled "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid

318

Hydrogen (H2) Production by Oxygenic Phototrophs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production by Oxygenic Phototrophs Eric L. Hegg Michigan State University Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Bioresour. Technol. 2011, 102, 8589-8604 Major Challenges to H 2 Photoproduction Biological Challenges * Poor efficiency of H 2 production * Poor heterologous expression of H 2 -forming enzymes * Low quantum yields * Competition for reducing equivalents; poor electron coupling * Sensitivity of H 2 -forming enzymes to O 2 M. Ghirardi, Abstract #1751, Honolulu PRiME 2012 Technical Challenges * Mixture of H 2 and O 2 ; H 2 separation and storage * CO 2 addition and overall reactor design Overcoming Low Efficiency: Improving ET * Eliminate or down-regulate pathways competing for ele * Production of organic acids * Formation of NADPH/carbon fixation

319

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine Isotopes of the Element Oxygen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 16 99.757% STABLE 17 0.038% STABLE 18 0.205% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 12 1.139×10-21 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available 13 8.58 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 14 70.620 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 15 122.24 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 16 STABLE - - 17 STABLE - - 18 STABLE - - 19 26.88 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

320

METHOD OF COMBINING HYDROGEN AND OXYGEN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the catalytic recombination of radiolytic hydrogen and/or deulerium and oxygen resulting from the subjection or an aqueous thorium oxide or thorium oxide-uranium oxide slurry to ionizing radiation. An improved catalyst is prepared by providing paliadium nitrate in an aqueous thorium oxide sol at a concentration of at least 0.05 grams per gram of thorium oxide and contacting the sol with gaseous hydrogen to form flocculated solids. The solids are then recovered and added to the slurry to provide a palladium concentration of 100 to 1000 parts per million. Recombination is effected by the calalyst at a rate sufficient to support high nuclear reactor power densities. (AEC)

McBride, J.P.

1962-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

Riley, Michael F.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oxygen isotope compositions of cores and cuttings from Long Valley exploration wells show that the Bishop Tuff has been an important reservoir for both fossil and active...

325

Causes for the Ferromagnetism in Oxygen-Deficient Perovskite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Multifunctional Oxides. Presentation Title, Causes for the Ferromagnetism in Oxygen-Deficient Perovskite Sr3YCo4O10+d and the Ultrafast Redox ...

326

Molecular oxygen sensors based on photoluminescent silica aerogels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular oxygen sensors based on photoluminescent silica aerogels Molecular oxygen sensors based on photoluminescent silica aerogels Title Molecular oxygen sensors based on photoluminescent silica aerogels Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1998 Authors Ayers, Michael R., and Arlon J. Hunt Journal Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids Volume 225 Pagination 343-347 Keywords aerogel, air pressure, oxygen concentration, oxygen molecules, photoluminescence Abstract Photoluminescent silica aerogel acts as the active element of an optical sensor for molecular oxygen. The luminescent aerogel is prepared by the action of energized reducing gases on a standard silica aerogel. Intensity of aerogel photoluminescence decreases as the collision frequency between oxygen molecules and the luminescent carriers in the aerogel matrix increases. This behavior is a characteristic of many photoluminescent materials and arises from a transfer of energy from the aerogel to surrounding oxygen molecules. A sensor for oxygen concentration or air pressure can therefore be simply constructed utilizing an ultraviolet source for excitation and a suitable detector for the emitted visible signal. Stern-Volmer quenching constants for the aerogel sensing element are 1.55×10-2 Torr-1 for hydrophilic aerogel and 2.4×10-3 Torr-1 for hydrophobic aerogel.

327

Development of Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems Background The Gasification Technologies Program at the National...

328

Calorimetric Investigation of the Lithium–Manganese–Oxygen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Calorimetric Investigation of the Lithium–Manganese–Oxygen Cathode Material System for Lithium Ion Batteries. Author(s), Damian M. Cupid, ...

329

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen ...  

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group

330

Microbial metatranscriptomics in a permanent marine oxygen minimum zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simultaneous characterization of taxonomic composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) has potential to broaden perspectives on the microbial and biogeochemical dynamics ...

Stewart, Frank J.

331

Effect of Dopants on Interdiffusion of Aluminum and Oxygen through ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the mutual GB transport of aluminum and oxygen in RE-doped polycrystalline ... Secondary Transport Phenomena in Ceramic Membranes under ...

332

First-Principles Study of the Oxygen Evolution Reaction and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this talk, we present our study of the mechanisms of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) ... Secondary Transport Phenomena in Ceramic Membranes under ...

333

Oxygen Consumption Analysis for Life Prediction of Elastomers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxygen Consumption Analysis for Life Prediction of Elastomers. Author(s), Elizabeth Hoffman, T. Eric Skidmore, Donald L Fisher, William L ...

334

Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of diesel combustion with oxygenated fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of oxygenated hydrocarbons as additives to diesel fuels on ignition, NOx emissions and soot production has been examined using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. N-heptane was used as a representative diesel fuel, and methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether and dimethoxymethane were used as oxygenated fuel additives. It was found that addition of oxygenated hydrocarbons reduced NOx levels and reduced the production of soot precursors. When the overall oxygen content in the fuel reached approximately 25% by mass, production of soot precursors fell effectively to zero, in agreement with experimental studies. The kinetic factors responsible for these observations are discussed.

Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Fisher, E; Glaude, P A; Marinov, N M; Westbrook, C K

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

ORNL-grown oxygen 'sponge' presents path to better catalysts...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

presents path to better catalysts, energy materials This schematic depicts a new ORNL-developed material that can easily absorb or shed oxygen atoms. This schematic depicts...

336

Oxygen Exchange Kinetics on SOFC Cathode Materials: Importance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxygen Exchange Kinetics on SOFC Cathode Materials: Importance of Ionic and Electronic Carriers. Author(s), Rotraut Merkle, Lei Wang,

337

NETL: Novel Oxygen Carriers for Coal-Fueled Chemical Looping...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Looping Combustion Project No.: DE-FE0001808 NETL has partnered with Western Kentucky University to develop a series of advanced oxygen carriers for coal-fueled...

338

Oxygen diffusion in UO2+x and (U,Pu)O2+-x  

SciTech Connect

In the first part of this report we revisit an earlier study of oxygen diffusion in UO{sub 2+x}, in which we used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to parameterize a kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model. The results from these earlier kMC simulations are reproduced in Fig. 1 and they indicate fairly good agreement with available experiments. This work was later expanded to include a larger temperature range. However, since the publication of this study there have been a number of advancements in DFT methodology for UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2+x} providing increased accuracy. We have also gained better understanding of the oxygen clustering phenomena occurring in UO{sub 2+x}. For these two reasons, the DFT calculations of the migration barriers of single oxygen interstitials and di-interstitial clusters have been repeated using the LDA+U and GGA+U methodologies. The earlier study used regular GGA and, even though this method captures similar trends as the more advanced LDA+U and GGA+U techniques, it does not fulfill the quantitative requirements set by some applications. Additionally, we have identified a mechanism for the most stable quad-interstitial clusters to migrate and here we calculate the corresponding barriers within both the LDA+U and GGA+U methodologies. The new LDA+U and GGA+U data sets are analyzed in terms of available experiments. In the second part of this report we present initial results for the impact of Pu on oxygen diffusion in UO{sub 2}. The first step in understanding this process is to calculate the binding energies of oxygen vacancies and interstitials to a Pu ion in the UO{sub 2} matrix. Possible diffusion mechanisms are discussed for (U,Pu)O{sub 2-x}, (U,Pu)O{sub 2} and (U,Pu)O{sub 2+x}.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal is presently the world's primary fuel for generating electrical power and, being more abundant and less expensive than oil or natural gas, is expected to continue its dominance into the future. Coal, however, is more carbon intensive than natural gas and oil and consequently coal-fired power plants are large point source emitters of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Since CO{sub 2} is a greenhouse gas, which may have an adverse impact on the world's climate/weather patterns, studies have been conducted to determine the feasibility and economic impact of capturing power plant CO{sub 2} emissions for pipeline transport to a sequestration/storage site. The stack gas that exhausts from a modern coal-fired power plant typically contains about 15% CO{sub 2} on a dry volume basis. Although there are numerous processes available for removing CO{sub 2} from gas streams, gas scrubbing with amine solvent is best suited for this application because of the large gas volumes and low CO{sub 2} concentrations involved. Unfortunately the energy required to regenerate the solvent for continued use as a capturing agent is large and imposes a severe energy penalty on the plant. In addition this ''back end'' or post combustion cleanup requires the addition of large vessels, which, in retrofit applications, are difficult to accommodate. As an alternative to post combustion scrubbing, Foster Wheeler (FW) has proposed that the combustion process be accomplished with oxygen rather than air. With all air nitrogen eliminated, a CO{sub 2}-water vapor rich flue gas will be generated. After condensation of the water vapor, a portion of the flue gas will be recirculated back to the boiler to control the combustion temperature and the balance of the CO{sub 2} will be processed for pipeline transport. This proposed oxygen-carbon dioxide (O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}) combustion process eliminates the need for CO{sub 2} removal/separation and reduces the cost of supplying a CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration. FW has developed a conceptual design of an O{sub 2} fired boiler to determine overall plant performance and economics. Five subtasks were conducted: (1) a literature review, (2) a system design and analysis, (3) a low NOx burner design and analysis, (4) a furnace and heat recovery area design analysis, and (5) an economic analysis. The objective of the literature search is to locate any data/information relevant to the Oxygen-Based PC Boiler conceptual design. The objective of the system design and analysis task is to optimize the PC boiler plant by maximizing system efficiency within practical considerations. Simulations of the oxygen-fired plant with CO{sub 2} sequestration were conducted using Aspen Plus and were compared to a reference air-fired 460 MW plant. Flue gas recycle is used in the O{sub 2}-fired PC to control the flame temperature. Parametric runs were made to determine the effect of flame temperature on system efficiency and required waterwall material and thickness. The degree of improvement on system efficiency of various modifications including hot gas recycle, purge gas recycle, flue gas feedwater recuperation, and recycle purge gas expansion were investigated. The selected O{sub 2}-fired design case has a system efficiency of 30.6% compared to the air-fired system efficiency of 36.7%. The design O{sub 2}-fired case requires T91 waterwall material and has a waterwall surface area of only 65% of the air-fired reference case. The objective of the low NOx burner design and analysis task is to optimize the burner design to ensure stable ignition, to provide safe operation, and to minimize pollutant formation. The burners were designed and analyzed using the Fluent CFD computer program. Four burner designs were developed: (1) with no OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (2) with 20% OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (3) with no OFG and 56% flue gas recycle and (4) with 20% OFG and 56% flue gas recycle. A 3-D Fluent simulation was made of a single wall-fired burner and horizontal portion of the furnace from the wall to the center. Without primary gas sw

Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A ROLE FOR MANGANESE IN OXYGEN EVOLUTION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The prospects are shrinking rapidly for a future for society based on liquid hydrocarbons as a major source of energy. Among the wide array of alternative sources that are currently undergoing scrutiny, much attention is attracted to the photolysis of water to produce hydrogen and oxygen gases. Water, the starting material, does not suffer from lack of abundance, and there is every likelihood that the environmental consequences of water splitting will be negligible. Solar radiation is the obvious candiate for the ultimate energy source, but of course water cannot be photolyzed directly by the relatively low-energy wave-lengths, greater than 300 nm, that penetrate the earth's atmosphere. Nevertheless, the photolysis of water to produce O{sub 2} and reduced substances, with reduction potentials equivalent to that of H{sub 2}, is accomplished efficiently using sunlight by higher plant photosynthesis. There are even organisms that, under special conditions, will evolve H{sub 2} gas photosynthetically, but not efficiently when coupled with O{sub 2} production. To produce a molecule of O{sub 2} from water requires the removal of four electrons from two H{sub 2}O molecules.

Sauer, Kenneth

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Outlook and Related Information Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This procedure provides the steps required for market participants to submit the information required for the 18-Month Outlook, and specifies the information to be contained in the Outlook. Public Disclaimer The posting of documents on this Web site is done for the convenience of market participants and other interested visitors to the IESO Web site. Please be advised that, while the IESO attempts to have all posted documents conform to the original, changes can result from the original, including changes resulting from the programs used to format the documents for posting on the Web site as well as from the programs used by the viewer to download and read the documents. The IESO makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, that the documents on this Web site are exact reproductions of the original documents listed. In addition, the documents and information posted on this Web site are subject to change. The IESO may revise, withdraw or make final these materials at any time at its sole discretion without further notice. It is solely your responsibility to ensure that you are using up-to-date documents and information.

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Discriminating between west-side sources of nutrients and organiccarbon contributing to algal growth and oxygen demand in the San JoaquinRiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the Salt and Mud Slough tributaries as sources of oxygen demanding materials entering the San Joaquin River (SJR). Mud Slough and Salt Slough are the main drainage arteries of the Grasslands Watershed, a 370,000-acre area west of the SJR, covering portions of Merced and Fresno Counties. Although these tributaries of the SJR are typically classified as agricultural, they are also heavily influenced by Federal, State and private wetlands. The majority of the surface water used for both irrigation and wetland management in the Grassland Watershed is imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta through the Delta-Mendota Canal. In this study, they measured algal biomass (as chlorophyll a), organic carbon, ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and other measures of water quality in drainage from both agricultural and wetland sources at key points in the Salt Slough and Mud Slough tributaries. This report includes the data collected between June 16th and October 4th, 2001. The objective of the study was to compare agricultural and wetland drainage in the Grasslands Watershed and to determine the relative importance of each return flow source to the concentration and mass loading of oxygen demanding materials entering the SJR. Additionally, they compared the quality of water exiting our study area to water entering our study area. This study has demonstrated that Salt and Mud Sloughs both contribute significant amounts of oxygen demand to the SJR. Together, these tributaries could account for 35% of the oxygen demand observed below their confluence with the SJR. This study has characterized the sources of oxygen demanding materials entering Mud Slough and evaluated the oxygen demand conditions in Salt Slough. Salt Slough was found to be the dominant source of oxygen demand load in the study area, because of the higher flows in this tributary. The origins of oxygen demand in Salt Slough still remain largely uninvestigated and the seasonal oxygen demand loading pattern remains unexplained. An expanded investigation of the Salt Slough watershed is warranted, because of the importance of this watershed to the oxygen demand load entering the SJR.

Wstringfellow@lbl.gov

2002-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

Dissolution of oxygen reduction electrocatalysts in acidic environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Platinum (Pt) alloy nanoparticles are used as catalysts in electrochemical cells to reduce oxygen to water and to oxidize hydrogen; the overall reaction converts chemical energy into electrical energy. These nanocatalysts are deposited on a carbon substrate and their catalytic function takes place in acid medium. This harsh environment causes an undesired reaction, which is the dissolution of the metal atoms into the acid medium; thus affecting the catalyst life. This dissertation aims to investigate the dissolution mechanism of fuel cell cathode catalysts at the atomic level starting from the oxygen reaction intermediates on the cathode catalyst surface and propose guidelines to improve cathode catalysts durability based on our proposed mechanism. Density functional theory is employed to study various possible scenarios with the goals of understanding the mechanism of the metal atom dissolution process and establishing some guidelines that permit a rational design of catalysts with better stability against dissolution. A thermodynamic analysis of potential metal dissolution reactions in acid medium is presented first, using density functional theory calculations to explore the relative stabilities of transition metals in relation to that of Pt. The study is performed by comparing the change in reaction Gibbs free energies for different metals in a given dissolution reaction. Then, a series of density functional theory studies, tending to investigate the adsorbed atomic oxygen absorption process from cathode catalyst surface into its subsurface, includes: 1) the oxygen adsorption on various catalyst surfaces and oxygen absorption in subsurface sites to figure out the minimum energy pathway and energy barrier of on-surface oxygen migration and absorption into subsurface; 2) the oxygen coverage, the other oxygen reduction reaction intermediates, and water effects on the oxygen absorption process according to reaction pathways, energy barriers, and thermodynamic analysis; 3) the oxygen absorption process on several Pt-based alloys with various compositions and components to find out the best alloy to inhibit atomic oxygen absorption including both kinetic and thermodynamic analyses, and the effects of such alloyed species on the inhibition process.

Gu, Zhihui

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Microsoft Word - Requirements 0819.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Studying the ) DOE-HQ-2009-0003-0819 Studying the ) DOE-HQ-2009-0003-0819 Communications Requirements of Electric ) (Noticed May 11, 2010) Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy ) ) Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company San Diego Gas & Electric Company ("SDG&E") files these comments in response to the above-enumerated Request for Information noticed by the Department on May 11, 2010. SDG&E is a regulated public electric and gas utility operating pursuant to authorities granted to it by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the State of California. SDG&E serves 3.4 million consumers in the San Diego and southern Orange County areas of California via 1.4 million electric meters and 830,000 gas meters. SDG&E's sister company, the Southern California Gas

345

Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

Adzic, Radoslav (East Setauket, NY); Huang, Tao (Manorville, NY)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Device for measuring the total concentration of oxygen in gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a CO equilibrium in a device for measuring the total concentration of oxygen impurities in a fluid stream. To this end, the CO equilibrium is produced in an electrochemical measuring cell by the interaction of a carbon element in the cell with the chemically combined and uncombined oxygen in the fluid stream at an elevated temperature.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Romano, Anthony J. (Kings Park, NY)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effect of Feedwater Oxygen Control at the Vermont Yankee BWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests in an operating BWR show that routine injection of oxygen into the feedwater to control radiation buildup is not warranted under normal operating conditions. However, since oxygen injection reduces the nickel release rate, it might be considered on a plant-by-plant basis for BWRs experiencing high nickel corrosion levels.

1985-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

348

Maintaining and Monitoring Dissolved Oxygen at Hydroelectric Projects: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update of EPRI's 1990 report, "Assessment and Guide for Meeting Dissolved Oxygen Water Quality Standards for Hydroelectric Plant Discharges" (GS-7001). The report provides an updated review of technologies and techniques for enhancing dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in reservoirs and releases from hydroelectric projects and state-of-the-art methods, equipment, and techniques for monitoring DO.

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Photolithographic patterning of polymer-encapsulated optical oxygen sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we show a novel fabrication process capable of yielding arbitrarily-shaped optical oxygen sensor patterns at micron resolution. The wafer-level process uses a thin-film sacrificial metal layer as intermediate mask, protecting the sensor ... Keywords: Optical oxygen sensor, Photolithography, PtOEPK/PS, Sensor patterning

Volker Nock; Maan Alkaisi; Richard J. Blaikie

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Demonstration of oxygen-enriched combustion system on a light-duty vehicle to reduce cold-start emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oxygen content in the ambient air drawn by combustion engines can be increased by polymer membranes. The authors have previously demonstrated that 23 to 25% (concentration by volume) oxygen-enriched intake air can reduce hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), air toxics, and ozone-forming potential (OFP) from flexible-fueled vehicles (FFVs) that use gasoline or M85. When oxygen-enriched air was used only during the initial start-up and warm-up periods, the emission levels of all three regulated pollutants [CO, nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC), and NO{sub x}] were lower than the U.S. EPA Tier II (year 2004) standards (without adjusting for catalyst deterioration factors). In the present work, an air separation membrane module was installed on the intake of a 2.5-L FFV and tested at idle and free acceleration to demonstrate the oxygen-enrichment concept for initial start-up and warm-up periods. A bench-scale, test set-up was developed to evaluate the air separation membrane characteristics for engine applications. On the basis of prototype bench tests and from vehicle tests, the additional power requirements and module size for operation of the membrane during the initial period of the cold-phase, FTP-75 cycle were evaluated. A prototype membrane module (27 in. long, 3 in. in diameter) supplying about 23% oxygen-enriched air in the engine intake only during the initial start-up and warm-up periods of a 2.5-L FFV requires additional power (blower) of less than one horsepower. With advances in air separation membranes to develop compact modules, oxygen enrichment of combustion air has the potential of becoming a more practical technique for controlling exhaust emissions from light-duty vehicles.

Sekar, R.; Poola, R.B.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils According to 20 NMAC 9.1.704 704. REQUIRED), or other applicable statutes. Page 1 of 1Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils 4

352

A Requirements Analyst's Apprentice: A Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Requirements Analyst's APprentice (RAAP) partially automates the modeling process involved in creating a software requirement. It uses knowledge of the specific domain and general experience regarding software requirements ...

Reubenstein, Howard

353

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential- Program Design and Implementation Working Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required “Implementation Proposal for the National Action...

354

Supervisory Training Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supervisory Training Requirements Supervisory Training Requirements Supervisory Training Requirements The Office of Learning and Workforce Development has developed an inventory of training and developmental activities that will meet the supervisory training requirements. The DOE courses, Supervisory Essentials and Navigating the Federal Hiring Process are required to fulfill the first 40-hour of the probationary period mandatory training requirement for new supervisors. All other courses listed in the training framework are suggested to meet overall continual learning requirements. Supervisory Training Requirements More Documents & Publications EM's Development Program for New Managers/Supervisors Presentation DOE F 3315.1 Supervisory - Non-Supervisory Employee Performance Management and

355

Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ALS Beamline Design Requirements - Revision 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the beamline including: • Electrical power requirements e.at the ALS include: • Electrical power: 480VAC, 208VAC, 120terminations, and electrical power requirements. Beamline

Heimann, Phil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

358

Supervisory Training Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supervisory Training Requirements Supervisory Training Requirements The Office of Learning and Workforce Development has developed an inventory of training and developmental...

359

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal...

360

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Requirements by Subject to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Subject on Facebook Tweet about Federal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement 2011.09.02 OECM-NBI Record Data Submission Req.pdf More...

362

NERSC/DOE HEP Requirements Workshop Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements for Science: Target 2014 High Energy Physics (HEP) Logistics Workshop Logistics Workshop Location Hilton Washington...

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Petroleum Reduction Petroleum Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Petroleum Reduction Requirements The Wisconsin Department of Administration's fleet management policy

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Registration Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Registration Vehicle Registration Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Registration Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Registration Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Registration Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Registration Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Registration Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Registration Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vehicle Registration Requirement Motor vehicle registration applicants must provide proof of compliance with

365

Renewable Generation Requirement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Requirement Renewable Generation Requirement Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Savings For Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Heating &...

366

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...

367

Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies This report sets forth the findings of the U.S. Department of Energy...

368

Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (7001100 m)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen) on the bathyal Pakistan margin, where sediments grade from fully laminated sediment at 700 m (0.12 mL LÃ?1 O2 [5 m matter to generate abrupt faunal transitions on the Pakistan margin. & 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

Levin, Lisa

369

Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs). Each REC represents a specified amount of renewable electricity production and provides an offset of environmental externalities associated with non-renewable electricity production. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible issues with RECs and comparable alternative compliance options. Existing codes have been examined to determine energy equivalence between the energy generation requirement and the RECs alternative over the life of the building. The price equivalence of the requirement and the alternative are determined to consider the economic drivers for a market decision. This research includes case studies that review how the few existing codes have incorporated RECs and some of the issues inherent with REC markets. Section 1 of the report reviews compliance options including RECs, green energy purchase programs, shared solar agreements and leases, and other options. Section 2 provides detailed case studies on codes that include RECs and community based alternative compliance methods. The methods the existing code requirements structure alternative compliance options like RECs are the focus of the case studies. Section 3 explores the possible structure of the renewable energy generation requirement in the context of energy and price equivalence. The price of RECs have shown high variation by market and over time which makes it critical to for code language to be updated frequently for a renewable energy generation requirement or the requirement will not remain price-equivalent over time. Section 4 of the report provides a maximum case estimate for impact to the PV market and the REC market based on the Kaufmann et al. proposed requirement levels. If all new buildings in the commercial sector complied with the requirement to install rooftop PV arrays, nearly 4,700 MW of solar would be installed in 2012, a major increase from EIA estimates of 640 MW of solar generation capacity installed in 2009. The residential sector could contribute roughly an additional 2,300 MW based on the same code requirement levels of 4 W/ft{sup 2} of r

Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Control of Oxygen Delamination in Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cells via Modifying Operational Regime  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Possible modifications of operational regimes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOEC) devices for hydrogen production are discussed. It is shown that applying alternating current (AC) voltage pulses at a certain frequency range to SOECs could reduce oxygen delamination degradation in these devices and significantly increase their lifetime. This operational scheme provides wide possibilities to increase longevity of SOEC devices required for their use in commercial hydrogen production processes, without any significant modification of used materials and/or cell design. Developed simulation method possesses a broad generality and be employed in a number of other industrial processes.

Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Interactions of Oxygen and Hydrogen on Pd(111) surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coadsorption and interactions of oxygen and hydrogen on Pd(1 1 1) was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. In the absence of hydrogen oxygen forms a (2 x 2) ordered structure. Coadsorption of hydrogen leads to a structural transformation from (2 x 2) to a ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 degree structure. In addition to this transformation, hydrogen enhances the mobility of oxygen. To explain these observations, the interaction of oxygen and hydrogen on Pd(1 1 1) was studied within the density functional theory. In agreement with the experiment the calculations find a total energy minimum for the oxygen (2 x 2) structure. The interaction between H and O atoms was found to be repulsive and short ranged, leading to a compression of the O islands from (2 x 2) to ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 degree ordered structure at high H coverage. The computed energy barriers for the oxygen diffusion were found to be reduced due to the coadsorption of hydrogen, in agreement with the experimentally observed enhancement of oxygen mobility. The calculations also support the finding that at low temperatures the water formation reaction does not occur on Pd(1 1 1).

Demchenko, D.O.; Sacha, G.M.; Salmeron, M.; Wang, L.-W.

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

372

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements 1 Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 6000BSE RG 6412 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING no exceptions here) RG 6521 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RESIDENCY, GPA REQUIREMENTS Effective

Shyy, Wei

373

A systematic review of security requirements engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important aspects in the achievement of secure software systems in the software development process is what is known as Security Requirements Engineering. However, very few reviews focus on this theme in a systematic, thorough and unbiased ... Keywords: Requirements engineering, Secure development, Security, Security engineering, Security requirements, Security requirements engineering, Systematic review

Daniel Mellado; Carlos Blanco; Luis E. Sánchez; Eduardo Fernández-Medina

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

throughout the city. In California, one solar-coveredcommuters’ electric cars. California requires that, by 2025,

Shoup, Donald

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated several coal fired power plant configurations designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for use or sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB units results in significant Boiler Island cost savings. Additionally, ALSTOM has identified several advanced/novel plant configurations, which improve the efficiency and cost of the CO{sub 2} product cleanup and compression process. These advanced/novel concepts require long development efforts. An economic analysis indicates that the proposed oxygen-firing technology in circulating fluidized boilers could be developed and deployed economically in the near future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications or enhanced gas recovery (EGR), such as coal bed methane recovery. ALSTOM received a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) in 2001 to carry out a project entitled ''Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control by Oxygen Firing in Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers.'' This two-phased project is in effect from September 28, 2001, to October 27, 2004. (U.S. DOE NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41146). Phase I consisted of an evaluation of the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants, and supporting bench-scale testing. And Phase II consists of pilot-scale testing, supporting a refined performance and economic evaluation of the oxygen-fired AFC concept. Phase I, detailed in this report, entails a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen separate but related cases (listed below), representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated as described herein. The first seven cases represent coal combustion cases in CFB type equipment. The next four cases represent Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The last two cases represent advanced Chemical Looping systems, which were completely paid for by ALSTOM and included herein for completeness.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

ON THE OXYGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O ratio of the solar system is 5.2 while that of the interstellar medium (ISM) and young stellar objects is approx4. This difference cannot be explained by pollution of the Sun's natal molecular cloud by {sup 18}O-rich supernova ejecta because (1) the necessary B-star progenitors live longer than the duration of star formation in molecular clouds, (2) the delivery of ejecta gas is too inefficient and the amount of dust in supernova ejecta is too small compared to the required pollution (2% of total mass or approx20% of oxygen), and (3) the predicted amounts of concomitant short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) conflicts with the abundances of {sup 26}Al and {sup 41}Ca in the early solar system. Proposals for the introduction of {sup 18}O-rich material must also be consistent with any explanation for the origin of the observed slope-one relationship between {sup 17}O/{sup 16}O and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O in the high-temperature components of primitive meteorites. The difference in {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O ratios can be explained by enrichment of the ISM by the {sup 17}O-rich winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, the sequestration of comparatively {sup 18}O-rich gas from star-forming regions into long-lived, low-mass stars, and a monotonic decrease in the {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O ratio of interstellar gas. At plausible rates of star formation and gas infall, Galactic chemical evolution does not follow a slope-one line in a three-isotope plot, but instead moves along a steeper trajectory toward an {sup 17}O-rich state. Evolution of the ISM and star-forming gas by AGB winds also explains the difference in the carbon isotope ratios of the solar system and ISM.

Gaidos, Eric [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R., E-mail: gaidos@hawaii.ed, E-mail: sasha@higp.hawaii.ed, E-mail: huss@higp.hawaii.ed [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

378

Hydrogen Production Using Hydrogenase-Containing Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Melis, A.; Zhang, L.; Benemann, J. R.; Forestier, M.; Ghirardi, M.; Seibert, M.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

The emergence of requirements networks: the case for requirements inter-dependencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Do system requirements depend on each other? Or, do system requirements live in an isolated world of their own and act independently by being completely oblivious to the presence of other requirements? Since a singular requirement does ...

Vishwajeet Kulshreshtha; John Boardman; Dinesh Verma

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Indium oxide atomic layer deposition facilitated by the synergy between oxygen and water.  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films using cyclopentadienyl indium (InCp) and combinations of both molecular oxygen and water as the co-reactants. When either O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O were used individually as the oxygen source the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth was negligible over the temperature range 100-250 C. However, when oxygen and water were used in combination either as a simultaneous exposure or supplied sequentially, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited at growth rates of 1.0-1.6 {angstrom}/cycle over the full range of deposition temperatures. In situ quadrupole mass spectrometry and quartz crystal microbalance measurements revealed that water serves the function of releasing ligands from the surface while oxygen performs the role of oxidizing the indium. Since both processes are necessary for sustained growth, both O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O are required for the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD. The electrical resistivity, mobility, and carrier concentration of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films varied dramatically with both the deposition temperature and co-reactant sequence and correlated to a crystallization occurring at {approx}140 C observed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Using this new process we successfully deposited ALD In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films over large area substrates (12 in. x 18 in.) with very high uniformity in thickness and resistivity.

Libera, J. A.; Hryn, J. N.; Elam, J. W. (Energy Systems)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 118-C-3:3, 105-C French Drains, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-016  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 118-C-3:3 french drains received condensate from the steam heating system in the 105-C Reactor Building. The 118-C-3:3 french drain meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

382

Magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxygen consumption is an essential process of the functioning brain. The rate at which the brain consumes oxygen is known as the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO?). CMRO? is intimately related to brain health and ...

Bolar, Divya Sanam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can reliably supply oxygen for glass melting with low electrical power consumption. The tests constituted Phase 2 of a cooperative project between the United States Department of Energy, and Praxair, Inc. Phase 1 of the project involved market and technical feasibility assessments of oxygen enriched combustion for a range of high temperature industrial heating applications. An assessment of oxygen supply options for these applications was also performed during Phase 1, which included performance evaluation of a pilot scale 1 ton per day PSA oxygen plant. Two regenerative container glass melters were converted to 100% OEC operation and served as host sites for Phase 2. A 75 ton per day end-fired melter at Carr-Lowrey Glass Company in Baltimore, Maryland, was temporarily converted to 100% OEC in mid- 1990. A 350 tpd cross-fired melter at Gallo Glass Company in Modesto, California was rebuilt for permanent commercial operation with 100% OEC in mid-1991. Initially, both of these melters were supplied with oxygen from liquid storage. Subsequently, in late 1992, a Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant was installed at Gallo to supply oxygen for 100% OEC glass melting. The particular PSA plant design used at Gallo achieves maximum efficiency by cycling the adsorbent beds between pressurized and evacuated states, and is therefore referred to as a Vacuum/Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant.

Tuson, G.B.; Kobayashi, H.; Campbell, M.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. VI. Dissolved oxygen concentrations below operating dams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an effort aimed at determining whether or not water quality degradation, as exemplified by dissolved oxygen concentrations, is a potentially significant issue affecting small-scale hydropower development in the US. The approach was to pair operating hydroelectric sites of all sizes with dissolved oxygen measurements from nearby downstream US Geological Survey water quality stations (acquired from the WATSTORE data base). The USGS data were used to calculate probabilities of non-compliance (PNCs), i.e., the probabilities that dissolved oxygen concentrations in the discharge waters of operating hydroelectric dams will drop below 5 mg/l. PNCs were estimated for each site, season (summer vs remaining months), and capacity category (less than or equal to 30 MW vs >30 MW). Because of the low numbers of usable sites in many states, much of the subsequent analysis was conducted on a regional basis. During the winter months (November through June) all regions had low mean PNCs regardless of capacity. Most regions had higher mean PNCs in summer than in winter, and summer PNCs were greater for large-scale than for small-scale sites. Among regions, the highest mean summer PNCs were found in the Great Basin, the Southeast, and the Ohio Valley. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the effects of season and capacity on potential dissolved oxygen problems, cumulative probability distributions of PNC were developed for selected regions. This analysis indicates that low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the tailwaters below operating hydroelectric projects are a problem largely confined to large-scale facilities.

Cada, G.F.; Kumar, K.D.; Solomon, J.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of molecular oxygen ions in the upper-most atmosphere of Dione. March 3, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

387

Calibration and Stability of Oxygen Sensors on Autonomous Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration accuracy and stability of three Aanderaa 3835 optodes and three Seabird SBE-43 oxygen sensors were evaluated over four years using in situ and laboratory calibrations. The sensors were mostly in storage, being in the ocean for ...

Eric A. D’Asaro; Craig McNeil

388

Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above

389

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199°C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The Δ18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, α-cristobalite, and β-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8‰. About one

390

Modeling Terrestrial Biogenic Sources of Oxygenated Organic Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, oxygenated volatile organic chemicals (OVOCs) likeacetone have been recognized as important atmospheric constituents due to their ability to sequester reactive nitrogen in the form peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and to be a source ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; David Bubenheim; Hanwant B. Singh; Ranga Myneni

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nano- sized strontium titanate metal oxide semiconductor oxygen gas sensors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The project focuses on strontium titanate (SrTiO3> material, a very important material for oxygen sensors. The advantages of the material are low cost and stability… (more)

Hu, Ying.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

IMPACT OF OXYGEN CONCENTRATION ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY  

SciTech Connect

These tests have indicated that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels in environments having dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations ranging from very low to very high. The results suggest that the highest mussel kill can be achieved in moderately to highly aerated environments, while kill may be 0-20% lower under conditions of very low oxygen. For example, under highly oxygenated conditions 97% kill was achieved while conditions having low DO produced 79% mussel kill. Service water measured in a local power plant indicated that DO concentrations were in the range of 8-9 ppm (e.g., highly aerated) within their pipes. Therefore, we will not expect to see decreases in the efficacy of CL0145A treatments due to oxygen levels within such power plant pipes.

Daniel P. Molloy

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

Calibration and Stability of Oxygen Sensors on Autonomous Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration accuracy and stability of three Aanderaa 3835 optodes and three Sea-Bird Electronics SBE-43 oxygen sensors were evaluated over four years using in situ and laboratory calibrations. The sensors were mostly in storage, being in the ...

Eric A. D'Asaro; Craig McNeil

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hybrid membrane--PSA system for separating oxygen from air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable, non-cryogenic, oxygen generation system capable of delivering oxygen gas at purities greater than 98% and flow rates of 15 L/min or more is described. The system consists of two major components. The first component is a high efficiency membrane capable of separating argon and a portion of the nitrogen content from air, yielding an oxygen-enriched permeate flow. This is then fed to the second component, a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit utilizing a commercially available, but specifically formulated zeolite compound to remove the remainder of the nitrogen from the flow. The system is a unique gas separation system that can operate at ambient temperatures, for producing high purity oxygen for various applications (medical, refining, chemical production, enhanced combustion, fuel cells, etc . . . ) and represents a significant advance compared to current technologies.

Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vaughn, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, A. Keith (Albuquerque, NM); Cornelius, Christopher J. (Blackburg, VA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effect of Oxygen Potential on Crack Growth in Alloy 617  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Static crack growth rate increases from 4 x 10-9 m/sec to 4 x 10-8 m/sec when the oxygen concentration decreases from .001 to .0000001 atm. Proceedings ...

396

ZERO EMISSION POWER PLANTS USING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS AND OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over 16,700 hours of operational experience was gained for the Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) elements of the proposed SOFC/OTM zero-emission power generation concept. It was repeatedly demonstrated that OTMs with no additional oxidation catalysts were able to completely oxidize the remaining depleted fuel in a simulated SOFC anode exhaust at an O{sub 2} flux that met initial targets. In such cases, neither residual CO nor H{sub 2} were detected to the limits of the gas chromatograph (<10 ppm). Dried OTM afterburner exhaust streams contained up to 99.5% CO{sub 2}. Oxygen flux through modified OTMs was double or even triple that of the standard OTMs used for the majority of testing purposes. Both the standard and modified membranes in laboratory-scale and demonstration-sized formats exhibited stable performance over extended periods (2300 to 3500 hours or 3 to 5 months). Reactor contaminants, were determined to negatively impact OTM performance stability. A method of preventing OTM performance degradation was developed and proven to be effective. Information concerning OTM and seal reliability over extended periods and through various chemical and thermal shocks and cycles was also obtained. These findings were used to develop several conceptual designs for pilot (10 kWe) and commercial-scale (250 kWe) SOFC/OTM zero emission power generation systems.

G. Maxwell Christie; Troy M. Raybold

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Selected Guidance & Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selected Guidance & Requirements Selected Guidance & Requirements Selected Guidance & Requirements This page contains the most requested NEPA guidance and requirement documents and those most often recommended by the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance. Documents are listed by agency, in reverse chronological order. More extensive collections of documents are available on the individual pages for Guidance and Requirements pages. Requirements - Statutes National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 Clean Air Act, Section 309 Guidance - Council on Environmental Quality NEPA at 19: A Primer on an "Old" Law with Solutions to New Problems 40 Most Asked Questions Concerning CEQ's NEPA Regulations Guidance - Department of Energy DOE, NEPA, and You

398

Part B - Requirements & Funding Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B - Requirements & Funding Information B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements & Funding Information .......................................................................................... 2 PART B - Requirements & Funding Information B.1. Purpose This Part of the IA (hereinafter 'Part B') serves as the funding document. It provides specific information on the requirements of the Department of Energy, hereinafter 'the Requesting Agency' sufficient to demonstrate a bona fide need and identifies funds associated with the requirement to allow [insert the name of agency/organization that will provide acquisition services for the Department of Energy], hereinafter 'the Servicing Agency,' to provide acquisition assistance and conduct an interagency acquisition.

399

Oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mixed-conducting oxides have a wide range of applications, including fuel cells, gas separation systems, sensors, and electrocatalytic equipment. Dense ceramic membranes made of mixed-conducting oxides are particularly attractive for gas separation and methane conversion processes. Membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, i.e., CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have fabricated tubular Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes and tested them (some for more than 1,000 h) in a methane conversion reactor that was operating at 850--950 C. An oxygen permeation flux of {approx} 10 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained at 900 C in a tubular membrane with a wall thickness of 0.75 mm. Using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors have also measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of flat Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure(pO{sub 2}). Steady-state oxygen permeability increases with increasing temperature and with the difference in pO{sub 2} on the two sides of the membrane. At 900 C, an oxygen permeability of {approx} 2.5 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained in a 2.9-mm-thick membrane. This value agrees with that obtained in methane conversion reactor experiments. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics determined in the gas-tight cell indicate that bulk effect, rather than surface exchange effect, is the main limiting factor for oxygen permeation of {approx} 1-mm-thick Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes at elevated temperatures (> 650 C).

Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Picciolo, J.J.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Reactive Air Brazing of Nicrofer-6025HT to BSCF for Oxygen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Oxygen separation membranes can be used to provide oxygen for ... with an oxide component that promotes wetting of ceramic materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

3D modeling of effects of increased oxygenation and activity concentration in tumors treated with radionuclides and antiangiogenic drugs  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in response to hypoxia is a fundamental event in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. However, abnormalities in tumor neovasculature often induce increased interstitial pressure (IP) and further reduce oxygenation (pO{sub 2}) of tumor cells. In radiotherapy, well-oxygenated tumors favor treatment. Antiangiogenic drugs may lower IP in the tumor, improving perfusion, pO{sub 2} and drug uptake, by reducing the number of malfunctioning vessels in the tissue. This study aims to create a model for quantifying the effects of altered pO{sub 2}-distribution due to antiangiogenic treatment in combination with radionuclide therapy. Methods: Based on experimental data, describing the effects of antiangiogenic agents on oxygenation of GlioblastomaMultiforme (GBM), a single cell based 3D model, including 10{sup 10} tumor cells, was developed, showing how radionuclide therapy response improves as tumor oxygenation approaches normal tissue levels. The nuclides studied were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 211}At. The absorbed dose levels required for a tumor control probability (TCP) of 0.990 are compared for three different log-normal pO{sub 2}-distributions: {mu}{sub 1} = 2.483, {sigma}{sub 1} = 0.711; {mu}{sub 2} = 2.946, {sigma}{sub 2} = 0.689; {mu}{sub 3} = 3.689, and {sigma}{sub 3} = 0.330. The normal tissue absorbed doses will, in turn, depend on this. These distributions were chosen to represent the expected oxygen levels in an untreated hypoxic tumor, a hypoxic tumor treated with an anti-VEGF agent, and in normal, fully-oxygenated tissue, respectively. The former two are fitted to experimental data. The geometric oxygen distributions are simulated using two different patterns: one Monte Carlo based and one radially increasing, while keeping the log-normal volumetric distributions intact. Oxygen and activity are distributed, according to the same pattern. Results: As tumor pO{sub 2} approaches normal tissue levels, the therapeutic effect is improved so that the normal tissue absorbed doses can be decreased by more than 95%, while retaining TCP, in the most favorable scenario and by up to about 80% with oxygen levels previously achieved in vivo, when the least favourable oxygenation case is used as starting point. The major difference occurs in poorly oxygenated cells. This is also where the pO{sub 2}-dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio is maximal. Conclusions: Improved tumor oxygenation together with increased radionuclide uptake show great potential for optimising treatment strategies, leaving room for successive treatments, or lowering absorbed dose to normal tissues, due to increased tumor response. Further studies of the concomitant use of antiangiogenic drugs and radionuclide therapy therefore appear merited.

Lagerloef, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg, Sweden and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen in the presence of sulfite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emission from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. We studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDTA are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use. 33 figures, 9 tables.

Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

1983-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence ofSulfite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One Mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. The authors studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDT are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use.

Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A commercial vehicle or gasoline powered vehicle may not idle for more than five minutes during any 60-minute period. Exemptions are allowed for the

405

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Warranty Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Warranty Warranty Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Warranty Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Warranty Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Warranty Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Warranty Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Warranty Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Warranty Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Warranty Requirement All new state government diesel vehicles must have a manufacturer's warranty that allows the use of biodiesel blends of 20% (B20) in the

406

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Blender Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Blender Biofuels Blender Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Blender Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Blender Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Blender Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Blender Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Blender Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Blender Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Blender Requirements Blenders of ethanol and gasoline and biodiesel and diesel fuels outside of the bulk transfer terminal system must obtain a blender's license and are

407

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A gasoline-fueled motor vehicle is not allowed to operate for more than three consecutive minutes when the vehicle is not in motion, with the

408

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Sales Biodiesel Sales Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Sales Requirements It is unlawful for any person to sell, offer for sale, assist in the sale of, deliver, or permit to be sold or offered for sale any biodiesel,

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A vehicle may not idle at a loading zone, parking or service area, route terminal, or other off-street areas, except for the following situations:

410

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A motor vehicle engine may not operate for more than five consecutive minutes when the vehicle is not in motion, with the following exceptions:

411

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirements Effective May 1, 2014, a driver may not idle his or her motor vehicle for more than five minutes in a 60-minute period. This limit does not apply if

412

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Diesel vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating over 10,000 pounds may not idle for more than five minutes in any continuous 60 minute period.

413

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement Any motor vehicle fuel sold at retail containing more than 1% ethanol or methanol must be labeled according to Connecticut Department of Consumer

414

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles may not idle unnecessarily for longer than five consecutive minutes during any 60-minute period. This includes heavy-duty diesel

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Diesel truck or bus engines may not idle for more than 15 consecutive minutes. Exemptions apply to diesel trucks or buses for which the Nevada

416

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement All gasoline containing 1% or more ethanol by volume offered for sale must be conspicuously identified as "with ethanol" or "containing ethanol."

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A person that operates a diesel powered motor vehicle in certain counties and townships may not cause or allow the motor vehicle, when it is not in

418

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Use Biodiesel Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Use Requirement At least 75% of the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) vehicles and heavy equipment that use diesel fuel must be fueled with biodiesel

419

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Use Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Use Requirement State agencies must take all reasonable actions to develop the infrastructure necessary to increase the availability and use of E85 and biodiesel throughout the state. Employees using state-owned vehicles are

420

Mobile IP Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mobile IP and Authentication, Authorization, Accounting (AAA) working groups are currently looking at defining the requirements for Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting. This document contains the requirements which would have to be supported ...

S. Glass; T. Hiller; S. Jacobs; C. Perkins

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

422

Business System Planning Project System Requirements Specification  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Business Systems Planning Project System Requirements Specification (SRS) is to provide the outline and contents of the requirements for the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) integrated business and technical information systems. The SRS will translate proposed objectives into the statement of the functions that are to be performed and data and information flows that they require. The requirements gathering methodology will use (1) facilitated group requirement sessions; (2) individual interviews; (3) surveys; and (4) document reviews. The requirements will be verified and validated through coordination of the technical requirement team and CHG Managers. The SRS document used the content and format specified in Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. Organization Standard Software Practices in conjunction with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 8340-1984 for Systems Requirements Documents.

NELSON, R.E.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

Science-Driven Network Requirements for ESnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Network Requirements for ESnet Update to the 2002 Office ofNetwork Requirements for ESnet Update to the 2002 Office ofEdited by Eli Dart, ESnet Engineering Staff dart@es.net

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Functions and Requirements for the Transition Project  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the functional requirement baseline for the Transition of 100 K Area Facilities Project (Transition Project). This baseline information consists of top-level functions, requirements, concept description, interface description, issues, and enabling assumptions.

YANOCHKO, R.M.

2000-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Control Emissions Control Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Control Requirement Heavy-duty diesel vehicles used to perform federally funded state public works contracts must be powered by engines with Level 3 emissions control

426

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A diesel- or gasoline-powered motor vehicle may not idle for more than three consecutive minutes, except under the following conditions: 1) to

427

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement Motor fuel containing more than 1% ethanol or methanol may not be sold or offered for sale from a motor fuel dispenser unless the individual selling

428

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Use Biodiesel Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Use Requirement At least 20% of all diesel fuel used to fuel state agency vehicles, vessels, and construction equipment must be biodiesel. The Washington

429

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles licensed for commercial or public service may not idle for more than three minutes in commercial or residential urban areas, unless

430

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Labeling Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Labeling Requirement Biodiesel fuel retailers may not advertise or offer for sale fuel labeled as pure biodiesel unless the fuel contains no other type of petroleum

431

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Idling of any unattended vehicle is prohibited in Utah. Violators are subject to a penalty of up to $750 and/or up to 90 days imprisonment.

432

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement On-road heavy-duty motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or greater may not idle for more than three consecutive

433

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A motor vehicle may not idle for more than five consecutive minutes. This regulation does not apply to: 1) vehicles being serviced, provided that

434

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Vehicle operators may not idle any commercial diesel vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds for more than 10 minutes

435

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Use Biodiesel Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Use Requirement All diesel-powered motor vehicles, light trucks, and equipment owned or leased by a state agency must operate using diesel fuel that contains a

436

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Ethanol Blend Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Requirement Suppliers that import gasoline for sale in North Carolina must offer fuel that is not pre-blended with fuel alcohol but that is suitable for future

437

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Supplier Propane Supplier Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Propane Supplier Requirements A retail supplier may only distribute liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) if the supplier holds a license from the Wisconsin Department of

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement School bus operators may not idle a school bus engine for more than three consecutive minutes except under the following conditions: uncontrollable

439

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Feedstock Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Feedstock Biofuels Feedstock Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Feedstock Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Feedstock Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Feedstock Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Feedstock Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Feedstock Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Feedstock Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Feedstock Requirements Renewable fuel production plants operating in Louisiana and deriving ethanol from the distillation of corn must use corn crops harvested in

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Use Biofuels Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Use Requirement State-owned diesel-powered vehicles and equipment must use a biodiesel blend that contains at least 2% biodiesel (B2), where available, as long as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen requirement remains" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A commercial motor vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or more may not idle for more than 15 minutes in any 60-minute

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tire Inflation Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tire Inflation Tire Inflation Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tire Inflation Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tire Inflation Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tire Inflation Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tire Inflation Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tire Inflation Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tire Inflation Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Tire Inflation Requirement The California Air Resources Board (ARB) enforces regulations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles operating inefficiently with under

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Use Biofuel Use Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Use Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Use Requirements To reduce fossil fuel dependence and statewide greenhouse gas emissions, New Jersey state departments, agencies, offices, universities, and colleges

444

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Requirements Biodiesel is defined as a fuel that is composed of mono-alkyl esters of long-chain fatty acids derived from plant or animal matter, meets the

445

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A vehicle may not idle for more than five minutes from April through October in cities and counties where the local government has signed a

446

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement</