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1

THE OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS OF SHELLFISH By Philip H. Mitchell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS OF SHELLFISH ~ By Philip H. Mitchell 2Ā°7 #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;THE OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS OF SHELLFISH. By PHILIP H. MITCHELL. J1, The respiratory exchanges to temperature changes, a smaller utili- zation of oxygen in proportion to the body weight with increase in size

2

Discovery of Critical Oxygen Content for Glass Formation in Zr80Pt20 Melt Spun Ribbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zr{sub 80}Pt{sub 20} alloys may form meta-stable quasicrystals either during devitrification of an amorphous phase or directly upon cooling from a liquid depending on processing conditions. To date, little attention has been given to the role of oxygen on the glass formation or devitrification behavior of Zr-Pt and similar alloys. This study reveals that oxygen content during melt spinning indeed strongly influences the formation of the as-quenched structure. A critical amount of oxygen was found to be required to form amorphous ribbons at a fixed quench rate. At lower oxygen levels (i.e., <500 ppm mass), a fully crystallized is formed; the structure is composed mainly of meta-stable {beta}-Zr with a small fraction of a quasicrystalline phase. At higher oxygen levels, the as-quenched structure transitions to a fully amorphous structure ({approx}1000 ppm mass), and with further oxygen addition forms a mixture of amorphous and quasicrystalline ({approx}1500 ppm mass) or crystalline phases (>2500 ppm mass). Details regarding the structure of the meta-stable {beta}-Zr phase in the low-oxygen ribbons are provided along with a discussion of the structural similarity between this phase and the quasicrystal structure that formed in this alloy.

D.J. Sordelet; E.A. Rozhkova; X. Yang; M.J. Kramer

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Local Content Requirements in British Columbia's Wind Power Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Content Requirements in British Columbia's Wind Power Industry May Hao, Matt Mackenzie, Alex..................................................................................8 4.1 Current Wind Power Projects

Pedersen, Tom

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterio-venous oxygen content Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analysis of the factors limiting Summary: in the blood can also influ- ence oxygen transport at altitude. Increased Hb content often accompanies altitude... , and pH(a - v) is...

5

Structure Evolution of Graphene Oxide during Thermally Driven Phase Transformation: Is the Oxygen Content Really Preserved?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mild annealing procedure was recently proposed for the scalable enhancement of graphene oxide (GO) properties with the oxygen content preserved, which was demonstrated to be attributed to the thermally driven phase separation. In this work, the structure evolution of GO with mild annealing is closely investigated. It reveals that in addition to phase separation, the transformation of oxygen functionalities also occurs, which leads to the slight reduction of GO membranes and further the enhancement of GO properties. These results are further supported by the density functional theory based calculations. The results also show that the amount of chemically bonded oxygen atoms on graphene decreases gradually and we propose that the strongly physisorbed oxygen species constrained in the holes and vacancies on GO lattice might be responsible for the preserved oxygen content during the mild annealing procedure. The present experimental results and calculations indicate that both the diffusion and transformation of...

Sun, Pengzhan; Liu, He; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents Return to Download Page The DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index includes: NEPA Guidance and Requirements Documents Issued by Published A Brief Guide - DOE-wide Contracts For NEPA Documentation DOE 2003 A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA - Having Your Voice Heard CEQ 2007 A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment DOE 2002 Actions During the NEPA Process - Interim Actions DOE 2003 Administrative Record Guidance DOJ 1991 Aligning the NEPA Process with EMS CEQ 2007 Alternative Actions For Analysis in Site-wide NEPA Reviews DOE 1992 Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance EPA 2012 Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands and NEPA

7

DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Table of Table of Contents DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents Return to Download Page The DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index includes: NEPA Guidance and Requirements Documents Issued by Published A Brief Guide - DOE-wide Contracts For NEPA Documentation DOE 2003 A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA - Having Your Voice Heard CEQ 2007 A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment DOE 2002 Actions During the NEPA Process - Interim Actions DOE 2003 Administrative Record Guidance DOJ 1991 Aligning the NEPA Process with EMS CEQ 2007 Alternative Actions For Analysis in Site-wide NEPA Reviews DOE 1992 Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance EPA 2012 Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands and NEPA

8

DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - List of Contents |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

List of List of Contents DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - List of Contents Return to Download Page The NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index includes: A Brief Guide - DOE-wide Contracts For NEPA Documentation [DOE][2003] A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA - Having Your Voice Heard [CEQ][2007] A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment [DOE][2002] Actions During the NEPA Process - Interim Actions [DOE][2003] Administrative Record Guidance [DOJ][1991] Aligning the NEPA Process with EMS [CEQ][2007] Alternative Actions For Analysis in Site-wide NEPA Reviews [DOE][1992] Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance [EPA][2012] Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands and NEPA [CEQ][1980] Analysis of Impacts to Workers in NEPA Documentation [DOE][1988]

9

Effects of altitude and fuel oxygen content on the performance of a high pressure common rail diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The change of intake oxygen content caused by altitude variation and the change of fuel oxygen content both affect the performance of diesel engines. In this paper, comparative experiments were performed on a high pressure common rail diesel engine fueled with pure diesel and biodiesel–ethanol–diesel (abbreviated as BED) blends with oxygen content of 2%, 2.5%, and 3.2% in mass percentage at different atmospheric pressures of 81 kPa, 90 kPa, and 100 kPa. Moreover, in order to study the effect of different fuel blends with the same oxygen content on the performance of the diesel engine, tests were conducted on the diesel engine fueled with the BED blend and a biodiesel–diesel (abbreviated as BD) blend at 81 kPa ambient pressure. The experimental results indicate that the influence of altitude variation on the full-load engine brake torque is not significant when the pure diesel fuel is used. With the increase of BED fuel oxygen content, the engine brake torque reduces. When the pure diesel fuel is used, with the increase of atmospheric pressure, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) decreases. As the fuel oxygen content increases, there is no significant difference in brake specific fuel consumption of the BED blends. And the values of brake specific energy consumption (BSEC) gradually decrease. Soot emissions of the diesel engine decrease with the increase of atmospheric pressure and fuel oxygen content. The effect of soot emission reduction by increasing the oxygen content of the fuel is more significant than the effect of increasing atmospheric pressure. The effects of BD and BED fuels with basically the same oxygen content on the full-load performance, fuel economy, and soot emissions of the diesel engine are different. The BSFC and soot emissions of the BED fuel are lower than those of the BD fuel.

Shaohua Liu; Lizhong Shen; Yuhua Bi; Jilin Lei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hall effect in La0.7Ce0.3MnO3+? films with variable oxygen content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hall effects of the La0.7Ce0.3MnO3+? film, which is believed an electron-doped manganite, have been experimentally studied, and a positive normal Hall coefficient is observed below the Curie temperature when the oxygen content of the film varies in a wide range. These observations may be attributed to the presence of excessive oxygen and composition distribution in the film, which may occur companying tetravalent ion doping. Removing excessive oxygen drives the system into the electron-doping state, however, the resistivity increases monotonically with oxygen loss, and the metal-to-semiconductor transition typical for a hole-doped manganite disappears. These results suggest the determinative role of hole doping for the resistive and magnetic behaviors in La0.7Ce0.3MnO3+?.

D. J. Wang; J. R. Sun; S. Y. Zhang; G. J. Liu; B. G. Shen; H. F. Tian; J. Q. Li

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

11

Process for alternately steam reforming sulfur containing hydrocarbons that vary in oxygen content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the hydrotreating and steam reforming of an oxygen and sulfur bearing hydrocarbon fuel, the oxygen is first removed in an oxidizer containing a bed of platinum catalyst, the inlet temperature being well below 1000/sup 0/F and preferably on the order of 300/sup 0/F. The sulfur in the fuel does not harm the oxidizer catalyst and may be removed downstream by known hydrodesulfurization techniques prior to reforming. A process is described for removing oxygen from an oxygen and sulfur bearing hydrocarbon fuel, such as peak shared natural gas, upstream in the process so that sulfur can be removed later. The fuel and some hydrogen are introduced into an oxidizer at a temperature of 350/sup 0/F or less down to the minimum ignition temperature. The oxidizer consists of a platinum bed catalyst which catalyzes the oxidation of the oxygen to water with accompanying heat release to raise the exit gas temperature to less than 650/sup 0/F. The temperature desorbs the sulfur from the catalyst, and the exit gases are passed downstream to nickel subsulfide or molybdenum desfulfide catalysts where the hydrosulfurization process takes place. (BLM)

Lesieur, R.R.; Setzer, H.J.; Hawkins, J.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Office RPD relative percent difference RSD relative standard deviation TIC tentatively identified compound DOERL-96-68, HASQARD Table of Contents, Rev. 3 Volume...

13

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3.0 - CRITICAL, SPECIAL, & ENGINEERED LIFTS March 21, 2013 Rev 1 Page 1 CHAPTER 3.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 CRITICAL LIFTS ......

14

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assurancecontrol) 3. Responsible operations manager 4. Equipment custodian 5. Cognizant engineer. *Reviewapproval is mandatory. 18.3.3 Hostile Environment Plan Contents The plan...

15

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONTENTS CONTENTS Introduction ........................................................................................................3 ON THE HORIZON: Promising Research Efforts Currently Underway A Smarter Charge .........................................................................................4 Unlocking Fire Ice .........................................................................................5 CRISP Crunches Cyber Threats ....................................................................6 Gel Zeroes in on Cancer ...............................................................................7 Liquid Solvent: A Solid Solution for CO 2 .....................................................8 Real-time Grid Stability ................................................................................9

16

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency HASQARD Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents HEIS Hanford Environmental Information System QA quality...

17

Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lsr2 Is a Global Transcriptional Regulator Required for Adaptation to Changing Oxygen Levels and Virulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...containing ambient atmospheric oxygen or in an...However, under atmospheric oxygen, the mutant...oxygen (A), under atmospheric oxygen (~18...were exposed to water, 5-mM H2O2...is critical for recovery from anaerobiosis...to indicate DNA condensation. If Lsr2 was involved...

I. L. Bartek; L. K. Woolhiser; A. D. Baughn; R. J. Basaraba; W. R. Jacobs; Jr.; A. J. Lenaerts; M. I. Voskuil

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The effect of interface oxygen content on magnetoelectric effect of epitaxial La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3} bilayer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The epitaxial La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3} (LSMO/BTO) bilayer films are grown on (001) oriented LaAlO{sub 3} substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique. The oxygen-rich interface is obtained through in-situ annealing process in oxygen, and the oxygen-deficient interface is obtained without the annealing process. The results show that the ferromagnetic properties of the LSMO film and the magnetoelectric effect (ME) of the bilayer films strongly correlate to the oxygen content at the interface of LSMO/BTO. The saturated magnetization and the ME voltage coefficient of the oxygen-rich bilayer film are higher than that of oxygen-deficient one. It suggests a more effective ME coupling at the LSMO/BTO interface, which are generated through not only the interface strain but also the spin polarized carriers.

Tingxian, Li, E-mail: wxlltx@126.com [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455002 (China); Kuoshe, Li [National Engineering Research Central for Rare Earth Materials, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, The Grirem Advanced materials Co. Ltd., Beijing 100088 (China)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

Determination of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in high purity magnesium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF CARBON, NITROGEN, AND OXYGEN IN HIGH PURITY MAGNESIUM A Thesis by NEIL GERARD ROCHE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial i'ulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1981 Major Subject: Chemistry DETERMINATION OF CARBON, NITROGEN, AND OXYGEN IN HIGH PURITY MAGNESIUM A Thesis by NEIL GERARD ROCHE Approved as to style and content by: E. A. Schweikert (Chairman of Committee) G. J. Bastiaans (Member) L...

Roche, Neil Gerard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Oxygen consumption by asphalt films and resulting viscosity changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OXYGEN CONSUMPTION BY ASPHALT FILNS AND RESULTING VISCOSITY CHANGES A Thesis by FRANK LEE CARTER, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... Nay 1965 Major Subject: Chemistry OXYGEN CONSUMPTION BY ASPHALT FILMS AND RESULTING VISCOSITY CHANGES A Thesis by FRANK LEE CARTER, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairm of Committee) (H o Depa ( mb ) (Membe May 1965...

Carter, Frank Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Oxygen enriched fireflooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both pure oxygen and enriched air have been considered in fireflooding for enhanced oil recovery. Laboratory and field testing have conclusively shown that oxygen is practical and cost effective for this application. For reservoirs that require a large volume of high pressure gas, oxygen is cheaper than air simply based on compression costs. Additional process benefits with oxygen include: Faster Oil Production; Lower Injection Pressure; Greater Well Spacing; Increased Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure; Lower Gas-to-Oil Ratios; and Purer Produced Gas. These features provide a compelling case for oxygen, once the safety and materials compatibility issues are properly addressed.

Shahani, G.H.; Gunardson, H.H. [Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, PA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hydrogen and oxygen permeation through Nafion 117 and XUS 13204.10 fuel cell membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN AND OXYGEN PERMEATION THROUGH NAFION 117 AND XUS 13204. 10 FUEL CELL MEMBRANES A Thesis by STEVEN RAY LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject Chemical Engineering HYDROGEN AND OXYGEN PERMEATION THROUGH NAFION 117 AND XUS 13204. 10 FUEL CELL MEMBRANES A Thesis by STEVEN RAY LEE Approved as to style and content by: Ralph E. White (Chair...

Lee, Steven Ray

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Effects of oxygen and decreased pressure on the testicular function of the rabbit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND DECREASED PRESSURE ON THE TESTICULAR FUNCTION OF THE RABBIT A Thesis ROBERT JOHN RUSSELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree oi' MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1969 Major Subject: Laboratory Anima1 Medicine EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND DECREASED PRESSURE ON THE TESTICULAR FUNCTION OF THE RABBIT A Thesis ROBERT JOHN RUSSELL Approved as to style and content, by: Chai of Committee Head...

Russell, Robert John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE, Oxygenates, and MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline Contents * Introduction * Federal gasoline product quality regulations * What are oxygenates? * Who gets gasoline with oxygenates? * Which areas get MTBE? * How much has been invested in MTBE production capacity? * What does new Ethanol capacity cost? * What would an MTBE ban cost? * On-line information resources * Endnotes * Summary of revisions to this analysis Introduction The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an

25

Oxygen: From Environment to Genes. The periodic occurrence of oxygen minima can powerfully influence organisms living in near  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen: From Environment to Genes. The periodic occurrence of oxygen minima can powerfully to the winter of 2014. Their scholarly work is presented in this collection. #12;1 Oxygen: From Environment", 2013, 2014 Table of contents Page 2. Laura Lilly - Low-oxygen formation along the California current. 6

26

Microbial metatranscriptomics in a permanent marine oxygen minimum zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous characterization of taxonomic composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) has potential to broaden perspectives on the microbial and biogeochemical dynamics ...

Stewart, Frank J.

27

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

28

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300Ā°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300?F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NO{sub x} emissions below 5{times}10{sup -3} g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O{sub 2} dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300{degree}F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in- furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, with increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, requires additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by weight [6]. The potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

Boehman, Andre L.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Oxygen Isotope Exchange Between Refractory Inclusion in Allende and Solar Nebula Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in Fig. 2. Figure 2 Distribution of akermanite contents (mol %) and oxygen isotope...O-poor region, whereas an obvious akermanite content gap is not observed at the contact. The akermanite content increases near and at the grain...

Hisayoshi Yurimoto; Motoo Ito; Hiroshi Nagasawa

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Table of Contents Page i Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table of Contents Page i Table of Contents 4. Building HVAC Requirements ....................................................................................1 4.1.2 What's New for the 2013 Standards.............................................................................................3 4.1.4 California Appliance Standards and Equipment Certification

34

Optimization of Oxygen Purity for Coal Conversion Energy Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conversion of coal into gaseous and liquid fuels and chemical feedstock will require large quantities of oxygen. This oxygen will be produced in large multi-train air separation plants which will consume about 350 kilowatt hours of energy...

Baker, C. R.; Pike, R. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Oxygen and Nitroaen Contamination During Submerged Arc Wel ding of Titanium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) ) Ā·Ā·- -~ Oxygen and Nitroaen Contamination During Submerged Arc Wel ding of Titanium TĀ· \\vĀ· Eagar* The oxygen content of ti tanium submerged arc wel ~ metal is primaril y derendent uron the purity of the fluo1~ ide fluxes, but it is shown here that the oxygen content of the weld metal may be affected

Eagar, Thomas W.

36

Title (right click and ¨Remove Content Control? if any hard...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the oxygen from the organic compounds, producing a more stable compound with higher energy content (less oxidized) that also would be closer in structure to current...

37

Artificial oxygen transport protein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

Dutton, P. Leslie

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving Complex of Photosynthesis Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the evolution of complex aerobic life. Coupled to the reduction of carbon dioxide, biological photosynthesis contributes foodstuffs for nutrition while recycling CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with O2. By utilizing sunlight to power these energy-requiring reactions, photosynthesis also serves as a model for addressing societal energy needs as we enter an era of diminishing fossil fuel resources and climate change. Understanding, at the molecular level, the dynamics and mechanisms behind photosynthesis is of fundamental importance and will prove critical to the future design of devices aimed at converting sunlight into electrochemical energy and transportable fuel.

40

Coking of coal batch with different content of oxidized coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of oxidized coal in coking batch increases the analytical moisture content and ... increases the oxygen content; reduces the gross coke yield and the yield of tar, benzene ... of carbon dioxide, pyrogenet...

D. V. Miroshnichenko; I. D. Drozdnik; Yu. S. Kaftan; N. B. Bidolenko…

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table of Contents  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENTS COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENTS OF SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES October 5, 2010 i Table of Contents I. Introduction and Executive Summary.......................................................... 1 a. Overview of Smart Grid Benefits and Communications Needs................. 2 b. Summary of Recommendations .................................................................... 5 II. Federal Government Smart Grid Initiatives ................................................ 7 a. DOE Request for Information ....................................................................... 7 b. Other Federal Government Smart Grid Initiatives .................................... 9 III. Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Applications .................. 11 a. Advanced Metering Infrastructure ............................................................12

42

Covalency in Metal-Oxygen Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Covalency in Metal-Oxygen Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen K-edge Spectroscopy and Electronic Structure Theory . Covalency in Metal-Oxygen Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using...

43

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic...

44

energy content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

energy content, (weight) strength ? Arbeitsvermögen n (im ballistischen Mörser gemessen), Sprengenergie f (im ballistischen Mörser gemessen) [Mit 10 g Sprengstoff ermittelt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

46

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

222014 5:11:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" "Sourcekey","EMMEPM0PTENUSDPG","EMMEPM0UPTENUSDPG","EMMEPM0RPTENUS...

48

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:08:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9012MO2" "Date","Missouri...

49

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9262014 3:44:37 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use " "Sourcekey","N9170US2","NA1480SAL2","NA1480SAK2","NA1480SAZ...

50

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Russia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ERENUS-NRSDMCF"...

51

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

52

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas...

53

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

54

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:11:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

55

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:32:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

56

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia...

57

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:26:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama...

58

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Rhode...

59

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

60

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Vermont...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

62

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon...

63

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:53 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah...

64

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:06:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan...

65

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New...

66

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

67

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:24:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas...

68

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S....

69

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South...

70

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee...

71

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana...

72

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New...

73

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:54 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

74

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah...

75

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

76

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma...

77

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:08:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Illinois...

78

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:06:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland...

79

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent...

80

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:54 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia...

82

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S....

83

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

84

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:05:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

85

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

86

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming...

87

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Vermont...

88

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:57 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

89

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West...

90

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:00:57 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Iowa...

91

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South...

92

On the solar nickel and oxygen abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determinations of the solar oxygen content relying on the neutral forbidden transition at 630 nm depend upon the nickel abundance, due to a Ni I blend. Here we rederive the solar nickel abundance, using the same ab initio 3D hydrodynamic model of the solar photosphere employed in the recent revision of the abundances of C, N, O and other elements. Using 17 weak, unblended lines of Ni I together with the most accurate atomic and observational data available we find log epsilon_Ni = 6.17 +/- 0.02 (statistical) +/- 0.05 (systematic), a downwards shift of 0.06 to 0.08 dex relative to previous 1D-based abundances. We investigate the implications of the new nickel abundance for studies of the solar oxygen abundance based on the [O I] 630 nm line in the quiet Sun. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the oxygen abundance implied by the recent sunspot spectropolarimetric study of Centeno & Socas-Navarro needs to be revised downwards from log epsilon_O = 8.86 +/- 0.07 to 8.71 +/- 0.10. This revision is based on the new nickel abundance, application of the best available gf-value for the 630 nm forbidden oxygen line, and a more transparent treatment of CO formation. Determinations of the solar oxygen content relying on forbidden lines now appear to converge around log epsilon_O = 8.7.

Pat Scott; Martin Asplund; Nicolas Grevesse; A. Jacques Sauval

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

CEDR Content  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CEDR Content" CEDR Content" "The Consolidated Energy Data Report (CEDR) consists of 27 worksheets that should be completed by each site, as applicable, and included as part each site's SSP in a MS Excel electronic format. The CEDR is due to the SPO no later than December 9th." "Worksheet",,"Overview","Action" 1.1,"Content","Stand-alone overview of the CEDR tabs.","None" 2.1,"Funds, Meters, Training","Collects information on energy and water spending, and metering status.","If applicable, complete cells highlighted in orange. Edited and new data cells should be highlighted in light blue." 3.1,"BTU & Gal Key","Reference tab containing all factors and dropdown menu information for all tabs starting with ""3"". If you need to divide up the CEDR, please keep all tabs starting with ""3"" together to ensure calculation links are not broken. ","None"

94

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Workbook Contents" Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. State-to-State capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","Units of Measurement","Frequency","Updated Date" ,"Pipeline State-to-State Capacity","State-to-State capacity","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"State Inflow Capacity","Inflow capacity from other States","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"State Outflow Capacity","Outflow capacity to other States","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel"

95

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices for Motor Gasoline" Prices for Motor Gasoline" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Gasoline, All Formulations",4,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","Conventional Gasoline",4,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Data 3","Oxygenated Gasoline",4,"Monthly","12/2006","1/15/1994" ,"Data 4","Reformulated Gasoline",4,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014"

96

Assessment of the use of oxygenated fuels on emissions and performance of a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Requirements as torque, power, specific fuel consumption and emitted compounds are highly influenced by the chemical composition of the fuel being burned. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the use of oxygenated fuels on emissions of NOx, CO, HC, CO2 and particle number and size distribution (11.5 diesel engine coupled to a dynamometer bench was used, where three types of fuels were employed, B5 (diesel with 5% of biodiesel); B5E6 (ternary composition containing 89% diesel, 5% of biodiesel and 6% of ethanol); and B100 (100% of biodiesel). The performance of a diesel engine was also evaluated to see the impact of the oxygenated fuels in this kind of engine. The use of ethanol with high latent heat of vaporization and low cetane number added to the binary blend (B5) shown an increase in the HC emissions and a reduction in \\{NOx\\} emissions when compared to B5. The use of pure biodiesel (B100) with high oxygen content showed a reduction in the HC emissions, but presented the highest emissions for both \\{NOx\\} and particle number of smaller diameter among the studied fuels. The use of more oxygenated fuels reduced the power output and increased the fuel consumption, but the exergy analysis showed that the energy efficiency of these fuels could be considered similar to the B5 fuel.

Lķlian Lefol Nani Guarieiro; Egķdio Teixeira de Almeida Guerreiro; Keize Katiane dos Santos Amparo; Victor Bonfim Manera; Ana Carla D. Regis; Aldenor Gomes Santos; Vitor P. Ferreira; Danilo J. Lećo; Ednildo A. Torres; Jailson B. de Andrade

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Plants making oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plants making oxygen Plants making oxygen Name: Doug Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How many plants are needed to make enough oxygen for one person for one hour? We are experimenting with Anacharis plants. Replies: The problem can be solved when broken down into smaller questions: 1. How much oxygen does a person need in an hour? 2. How much oxygen does a plant produce in an hour? 3. Based on the above, how many plants will provide the oxygen needs of the person for the hour? Here is the solution to the first question: A resting, healthy adult on an average, cool day breathes in about 53 liters of oxygen per hour. An average, resting, health adult breathes in about 500 mL of air per breath. This is called the normal tidal volume. Now, 150 mL of this air will go to non- functioning areas of the lung, called the "dead space." The average breath rate for this average person is 12 breaths per minute. So, the amount of air breathed in by the person which is available for use is 12 x (500 mL -150 mL) = 4,200 mL/minute. Multiply by 60 to get 252,000 mL/hour. That is, every hour, the person will breathe in 252 L of air. Now, on an average, cool, clear day, only 21% of that air is oxygen. So, 21% of 252 L is 53 L. So, in an hour, the person breathes in about 53 L of oxygen.

98

Algae for Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Algae for Oxygen Algae for Oxygen Name: Pam Burkardt Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I am Pam Burkardt, a seventh grader at Fox Chapel School. I have a question on algae. I read somewhere that someday people might take bath tubs full of algae onto spaceships to provide oxygen for the crew. How much oxygen does algae give off, is this really possible? Replies: I think that most of the oxygen in the atmosphere comes in fact from one-celled plants in the oceans, like algae. They are likely to produce a lot of oxygen per unit weight because they don't have non-photosynthesizing bark, roots, branches, etc., nor (I think) a major dormant period like temperate-zone plants. The cost of space travel at present is dominated by the expense of heaving weight up into Earth orbit (it costs very little extra to send it to the Moon, for example, or Mars). For missions of short duration the weight of the compressed oxygen you need to carry is less than the weight of algae, water and extra plumbing you'd need to carry if you relied on algae to produce your oxygen. The important use of green plants would be in very long duration space flight (years) or permanent inhabitation of worlds like the Moon, where you need an unlimited supply of oxygen. Now if you want to fantasize, Venus' atmosphere is almost all carbon dioxide. Suppose you dropped a whole lot of specially gene-tailored one-celled plants into the atmosphere (not the surface, it's too hot). Why then they might eat up all the carbon dioxide and produce a breathable atmosphere. The "greenhouse effect" would go away, and Venus would become a nice habitable if tropical world only 50 million miles away.

99

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this concept offers substantial savings over SCR and is an economically attractive alternative to purchasing NOx credits or installing other conventional technologies. In conjunction with the development of oxygen based low NOx technology, Praxair also worked on developing the economically enhancing oxygen transport membrane (OTM) technology which is ideally suited for integration with combustion systems to achieve further significant cost reductions and efficiency improvements. This OTM oxygen production technology is based on ceramic mixed conductor membranes that operate at high temperatures and can be operated in a pressure driven mode to separate oxygen with infinite selectivity and high flux. An OTM material was selected and characterized. OTM elements were successfully fabricated. A single tube OTM reactor was designed and assembled. Testing of dense OTM elements was conducted with promising oxygen flux results of 100% of target flux. However, based on current natural gas prices and stand-alone air separation processes, ceramic membranes do not offer an economic advantage for this application. Under a different DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement, Praxair is continuing to develop oxygen transport membranes for the Advanced Boiler where the economics appear more attractive.

David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased environmental regulations will require utility boilers to reduce NO{sub x} emissions to less than 0.15lb/MMBtu in the near term. Conventional technologies such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) are unable to achieve these lowered emission levels without substantially higher costs and major operating problems. Oxygen enhanced combustion is a novel technology that allows utilities to meet the NO{sub x} emission requirements without the operational problems that occur with SCR and SNCR. Furthermore, oxygen enhanced combustion can achieve these NO{sub x} limits at costs lower than conventional technologies. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the use of oxygen enhanced combustion as a technical and economical method of meeting the EPA State Implementation Plan for NO{sub x} reduction to less than 0.15lb/MMBtu for a wide range of boilers and coal. The oxygen enhanced coal combustion program (Task 1) focused this quarter on the specific objective of exploration of the impact of oxygen enrichment on NO{sub x} formation utilizing small-scale combustors for parametric testing. Research efforts toward understanding any limitations to the applicability of the technology to different burners and fuels such as different types of coal are underway. The objective of the oxygen transport membrane (OTM) materials development program (Task 2.1) is to ascertain a suitable material composition that can be fabricated into dense tubes capable of producing the target oxygen flux under the operating conditions. This requires that the material have sufficient oxygen permeation resulting from high oxygen ion conductivity, high electronic conductivity and high oxygen surface exchange rate. The OTM element development program (Task 2.2) objective is to develop, fabricate and characterize OTM elements for laboratory and pilot reactors utilizing quality control parameters to ensure reproducibility and superior performance. A specific goal is to achieve a material that will sinter to desired density without compromising other variables such as reaction to binder systems or phase purity. Oxygen-enhanced combustion requires a facility which is capable of supplying high purity oxygen (>99.5%) at low costs. This goal can be achieved through the thermal integration of high temperature air separation with ceramic OTM. The objective of the OTM process development program (Task 2.3) is to demonstrate successfully the program objectives on a lab-scale single OTM tube reactor under process conditions comparable to those of an optimum large-scale oxygen facility. This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the first quarter April--June 2000 in the following task areas: Task 1 Oxygen Enhanced Coal Combustion; Task 2 Oxygen Transport Membranes; and Task 4 Program Management.

Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen; David R. Thompson

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet Fall 2010 #12;Contents Course Requirements Bioinformatics and Genomics Curriculum -------------------------------------------------------8 General #12;Bioinformatics and Genomics Option (BG

dePamphilis, Claude

102

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present quarter, oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

SG Network System Requirements Specification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SG Network System Requirements Specification SG Network System Requirements Specification Interim Release 3 5/17/2010 - 2 - Table of Contents Document History ....................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Revision History .......................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Preface........................................................................................................................................................ - 4 - Authors........................................................................................................................................................ - 6 -

104

Hydrous oxide species as inhibitors of oxygen reduction at platinum activated fuel cell cathodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The successful development of a methanol/air fuel cell requires optimum performance of the air/ oxygen cathode at about 0.8 V vs RHE. ... oxygen gas reduction on platinum (the best electrocatalyst for this reacti...

L. D. Burke; J. K. Casey; J. A. Morrissey…

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Glacier Oxygen-18 Content and Pleistocene Ocean Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CENTURIES OF CLIMATIC RECORD FROM CAMP CENTURY ON GREENLAND ICE SHEET, SCIENCE...the inland ice to the bed rock at Camp Century has recently been measured (16...of the glaciated areas. In the Camp Century core this effect was measured to-12...

W. Dansgaard; Henrik Tauber

1969-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

106

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) " "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGC_SKY_MMCF" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) "

107

Oxygen generator for medical applications (USIC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall Project objective is to develop a portable, non-cryogenic oxygen generator capable of supplying medical grade oxygen at sufficient flow rates to allow the field application of the Topical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (THOT{reg_sign}) developed by Numotech, Inc. This project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) and is managed by collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Numotech, Inc, and LLC SPE 'Spektr-Conversion.' The project had two phases, with the objective of Phase I being to develop, build and test a laboratory prototype of the membrane-pressure swing adsorber (PSA) system producing at 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum of 98% oxygen purity. Phase II objectives were to further refine and identify the pre-requisites needed for a commercial product and to determine the feasibility of producing 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum oxygen purity of 99%. In Phase I, Spektr built up the necessary infrastructure to perform experimental work and proceeded to build and demonstrate a membrane-PSA laboratory prototype capable of producing 98% purity oxygen at a flow rate of 5 L/min. Spektr offered a plausible path to scale up the process for 15 L/min. Based on the success and experimental results obtained in Phase I, Spektr performed work in three areas for Phase II: construction of a 15 L/min PSA; investigation of compressor requirements for the front end of the membrane/PSA system; and performing modeling and simulation of assess the feasibility of producing oxygen with a purity greater than 99%. Spektr successfully completed all of the tasks under Phase II. A prototype 15 L/min PSA was constructed and operated. Spektr determined that no 'off the shelf' air compressors met all of the specifications required for the membrane-PSA, so a custom compressor will likely need to be built. Modeling and simulation concluded that production of oxygen with purities greater than 99% was possible using a Membrane-PSA system.

Staiger, C. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Solar energy: Hydrogen and oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar energy: Hydrogen and oxygen ... Demonstrating the electrolysis of water with solar energy. ...

John J. Farrell

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Oxygen in Underwater Cave  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen in Underwater Cave Oxygen in Underwater Cave Name: Natalie Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: HI Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Is it possible for there to be free oxygen in an underwater cave? If it is, then how does it work? Replies: Yes it is possible as I have personally experienced. If the cave roof rises to a level above the water, air dissolved in the water will slowly out gas until the water is at the same level at all places. A pocket of breathable air will form. In many caves the roof dips below water level in one place but it above it on both sides. Think of a U shaped tube where the bottom of the U is blocked by water. This is called a siphon and I have passed through many of these to find breathable air on the other side. R. W. "Bob" Avakian Oklahoma State Univ. Inst. of Technology

111

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,279817 25019,285978 25384,295027 25749,297022 26114,304327

112

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Bcf)" Bcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Bcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9070us1m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9070us1m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Bcf)"

113

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1504_nus_4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1504_nus_4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:46:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" 37271,98.3 37302,98.5 37330,98.4 37361,98.1

114

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5050US2" "Date","U.S. Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799

115

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010hi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010hi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010HI2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,1416 29767,1289 30132,1197 30497,1121 30863,1048 31228,625 31593,579 31958,591

116

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:59 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,201407 25019,211763 25384,220728 25749,232189 26114,237387 26480,240662

117

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040ND2" "Date","North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,232 35110,193 35139,232 35170,176 35200,230 35231,258 35261,269

118

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010de3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010de3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010DE3" "Date","Delaware Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

119

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020fl2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020fl2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Florida (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020FL2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Florida (MMcf)"

120

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Connecticut (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CT2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Connecticut (MMcf)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arizona (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AZ2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arizona (MMcf)"

122

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ca2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ca2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CA2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (MMcf)"

123

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020dc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020dc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the District of Columbia (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020DC2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the District of Columbia (MMcf)"

124

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Colorado (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CO2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Colorado (MMcf)"

125

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010md2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010md2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MD2" "Date","Maryland Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,77130 25019,79015 25384,84406 25749,86811 26114,87617 26480,89042

126

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040or2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040or2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079 35110 35139 35170 35200 35231 35261 35292 35323 35353 35384 35414 35445,0

127

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wv3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wv3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WV3" "Date","West Virginia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

128

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,74386 25019,77762 25384,82965 25749,86148 26114,79893 26480,82847

129

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL3" "Date","Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

130

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nm3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nm3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NM3" "Date","New Mexico Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

131

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010id2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010id2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010ID2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,6179 25019,6545 25384,6980 25749,7711 26114,8455 26480,10887 26845,9947 27210,9652

132

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,23160 25019,26342 25384,30479 25749,31929 26114,33934 26480,38631

133

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ok2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ok2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079 35110 35139 35170 35200 35231 35261 35292 35323 35353 35384 35414 35445,0

134

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9132US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 35445,4.08

135

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nm2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nm2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NM2" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,5992 25019,5987 25384,4058 25749,2909 26114,2823 26480,5696 26845,3791 27210,1227

136

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040sd2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040sd2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,0 26480,0 26845,0 27210,0 27575,4 27941,5

137

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,2656 25019,1514 25384,1326 25749,7126 26114,2843 26480,4758 26845,3008 27210,2957

138

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3035US4" "Date","Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

139

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ny2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ny2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NY2" "Date","New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,1 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

140

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ma2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ma2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MA2" "Date","Massachusetts Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,73471 25019,74919 25384,78451 25749,82646 26114,83434 26480,86171

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mt2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mt2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,32 35110,38 35139,34 35170,40 35200,43 35231,27 35261,63 35292,59 35323,60

142

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 13331,392528 13696,526159 14061,649106 14426,677311 14792,655967 15157,630212 15522,626782 15887,684115

143

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mi2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,277 35110,277 35139,277 35170,277 35200,277 35231,277 35261,277

144

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1997" Annual",2012,"6/30/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

145

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9012us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9012us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9012US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" 33253,475614 33526,500196 33984,513068 34015,462218

146

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ne2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

147

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0

148

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9050us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9050us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9050US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" 26679,1948000 26710,1962000 26738,1907000 26769,1814000 26799,1898000 26830,1839000

149

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_a.xls" mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 9:07:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPVA1","MCRFPWV1","MCRFPP21","MCRFPIL1","MCRFPIN1","MCRFPKS1","MCRFPKY1","MCRFP_SMI_1","MCRFPMO1","MCRFPNE1","MCRFPND1","MCRFPOH1","MCRFPOK1","MCRFPSD1","MCRFPTN1","MCRFPP31","MCRFPAL1","MCRFPAR1","MCRFPLA1","MCRFPMS1","MCRFPNM1","MCRFPTX1","MCRFP3FM1","MCRFPP41","MCRFPCO1","MCRFPMT1","MCRFPUT1","MCRFPWY1","MCRFPP51","MCRFPAK1","MCRFPAKS1","MANFPAK1","MCRFPAZ1","MCRFPCA1","MCRFPNV1","MCRFP5F1"

150

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alabama (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AL2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alabama (MMcf)"

151

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9100us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9100us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9100US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,3.21 31593,2.43 31958,1.95 32324,1.84

152

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC1" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34515,1.934 34880,1.692 35246,2.502 35611,2.475 35976,2.156 36341,2.319

153

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9130US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" 26679,5808 26710,6079 26738,4021 26769,8017 26799,8741 26830,4131 26860,5744 26891,8726 26922,6403 26952,5473

154

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ks3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010KS3" "Date","Kansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

155

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ca2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ca2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,97 35110,103 35139,109 35170,107 35200,107 35231,104 35261,108

156

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103US2" "Date","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" 35445,9977 35476,7667 35504,2530 35535,2557 35565,5007 35596,5059 35626,5026 35657,7535

157

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,5022 25019,12551 25384,26458 25749,5203 26114,4917 26480,4222 26845,3691 27210,3901

158

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tx2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,2478 33284,2147 33312,2113 33343,2353 33373,3203 33404,2833 33434,3175

159

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9130US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,4.77 31593,2.81 31958,3.07 32324,2.74

160

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ny2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ny2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NY2" "Date","New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,0 26480,0 26845,0 27210,0 27575,0 27941,0 28306,0 28671,0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,2630 25019,2529 25384,2666 25749,2713 26114,2669 26480,2681 26845,2377 27210,889 27575,846

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,23 33284,13 33312,12 33343,7 33373,13 33404,28 33434,28 33465,30

163

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010DE2" "Date","Delaware Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,6844 25019,7068 25384,7475 25749,7843 26114,8172 26480,8358 26845,7514

164

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_a.xls" mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 9:07:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS2","MCRFPP12","MCRFPFL2","MCRFPNY2","MCRFPPA2","MCRFPVA2","MCRFPWV2","MCRFPP22","MCRFPIL2","MCRFPIN2","MCRFPKS2","MCRFPKY2","MCRFP_SMI_2","MCRFPMO2","MCRFPNE2","MCRFPND2","MCRFPOH2","MCRFPOK2","MCRFPSD2","MCRFPTN2","MCRFPP32","MCRFPAL2","MCRFPAR2","MCRFPLA2","MCRFPMS2","MCRFPNM2","MCRFPTX2","MCRFP3FM2","MCRFPP42","MCRFPCO2","MCRFPMT2","MCRFPUT2","MCRFPWY2","MCRFPP52","MCRFPAK2","MCRFPAKS2","MANFPAK2","MCRFPAZ2","MCRFPCA2","MCRFPNV2","MCRFP5F2"

165

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) " "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGC_SKY_MMCF" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) "

166

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020hi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020hi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020HI3" "Date","Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

167

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.xls" poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:44 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Total Exports " "Sourcekey","N9132US2","N9132US3","N9133US2","N9133US3" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)","Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

168

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ms2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ms2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,7098 25019,5910 25384,8097 25749,7233 26114,5090 26480,3672 26845,10767 27210,10787

169

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ok3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ok3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010OK3" "Date","Oklahoma Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

170

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nd3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nd3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:40 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ND3" "Date","North Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

171

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35246 35611,0 35976,0 36341,0 36707,0 37072,0 37437,0 37802,0 38168,0 38533,0 38898,0 39263,0

172

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ky2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ky2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010KY2" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,69542 25019,75824 25384,83815 25749,86473 26114,84197 26480,85881

173

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9160us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9160us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9160US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 29235,93000 29266,87000 29295,93000 29326,85000

174

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9030US2" "Date","U.S. Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891

175

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MI3" "Date","Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

176

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9070us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9070us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9070US2" "Date","U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (MMcf)" 35445,1617923 35476,1465907 35504,1627602 35535,1551268 35565,1610527 35596,1525325

177

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9102us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9102us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9102US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports (MMcf)" 35445,268310 35476,232878 35504,254455 35535,235621 35565,236725 35596,227059 35626,230567

178

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,11939 25019,12592 25384,16592 25749,17984 26114,19463 26480,22242 26845,13868

179

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alaska (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AK2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alaska (MMcf)"

180

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 26679,843900 26710,747331 26738,648504 26769,465867 26799,326313

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181

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,19756 25019,19711 25384,21463 25749,24794 26114,25379 26480,23787 26845,24923

182

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 35445,3 35476,3

183

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9132US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)" 35445,6424 35476,6846 35504,10601 35535,8211 35565,6284 35596,5741 35626,6380 35657,10101

184

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3035US4" "Date","Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

185

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WI3" "Date","Wisconsin Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

186

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040al2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040al2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,194 35110,200 35139,140 35170,132 35200,106 35231,82 35261,205 35292,152

187

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040wv2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040wv2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0

188

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_pct_dc_nus_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_pct_dc_nus_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:23:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Yield" "Sourcekey","MLRRYUS3","MGFRYUS3","MGARYUS3","MKJRYUS3","MKERYUS3","MDIRYUS3","MRERYUS3","MNFRYUS3","MOTRYUS3","MNSRYUS3","MLURYUS3","MWXRYUS3","MCKRYUS3","MAPRYUS3","MSGRYUS3","MMSRYUS3","MPGRYUS3"

189

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:36 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the U.S. (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020US2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the U.S. (MMcf)"

190

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891 26922 26952 26983 27013 27044 27075 27103

191

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1997" Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Monthly","11/2013","12/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU"

192

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010pa3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010pa3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010PA3" "Date","Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

193

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ut3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ut3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010UT3" "Date","Utah Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

194

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010dc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010dc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: District of Columbia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010DC2" "Date","District of Columbia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,13730 29767,13686 30132,13041 30497,13007

195

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tx3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tx3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010TX3" "Date","Texas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

196

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skn_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skn_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Processing Plant " "Sourcekey","MAOSNUS1","MPPSNUS1","MLPSNUS1","METSNUS1","MPRSNUS1","MBNSNUS1","MBISNUS1"

197

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AZ2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26114,347 26480,367 26845,277 27210,26 27575,47 27941,32 29036,101 29402,143 29767,106 30132,162

198

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ca3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ca3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020CA3" "Date","California Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

199

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010oh3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010oh3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:49 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010OH3" "Date","Ohio Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

200

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020fl3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020fl3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020FL3" "Date","Florida Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,63 35110,63 35139,63 35170,61 35200,62 35231,57 35261,57 35292,55 35323,56

202

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nv2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nv2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NV2" "Date","Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0 33526,0

203

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ms2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,217 35110,199 35139,223 35170,219 35200,237 35231,234 35261,239

204

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,4.6 31593,4.62 32324,2.71

205

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9130US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 32523,2.69 32554,2.4

206

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,129403 25019,124584 25384,111499 25749,100305 26114,70222 26480,59821 26845,36133 27210,34431

207

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,45543 25019,51708 25384,54804 25749,55779 26114,54867 26480,53397 26845,55685

208

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,302472 25019,315694 25384,333264 25749,340033 26114,343773 26480,355266

209

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010co3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010co3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CO3" "Date","Colorado Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

210

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wa3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wa3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WA3" "Date","Washington Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

211

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,1958 25019,2293 25384,4573 25749,6211 26114,6893 26480,8394 26845,5024

212

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,52777 25019,56346 25384,58322 25749,59792 26114,48737 26480,47387

213

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,126629 25019,129408 25384,130766 25749,129629 26114,39799 26480,38797 26845,36411

214

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3020US4" "Date","Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

215

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK3" "Date","Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

216

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ca3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ca3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CA3" "Date","California Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

217

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040la2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,1788 33284,1684 33312,1571 33343,1593 33373,1807 33404,1690 33434,2042

218

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

219

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WI2" "Date","Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,90994 25019,93425 25384,101124 25749,105208 26114,109758 26480,104648

220

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3020US4" "Date","Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nh3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nh3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:43 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Hampshire Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NH3" "Date","New Hampshire Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

222

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010in2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010in2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,139519 25019,145955 25384,156699 25749,158699 26114,162747 26480,169267

223

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ct3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ct3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020CT3" "Date","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

224

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mo3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mo3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:36 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MO3" "Date","Missouri Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

225

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,161849 25019,166439 25384,158852 25749,154089 26114,103564 26480,63667 26845,102091

226

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ut2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 34592,646 34834,696 34865,4590 34895,4767 34926,4382 34957,4389 34987,4603 35018,4932

227

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AZ2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,25376 25019,26681 25384,28426 25749,29679 26114,32619 26480,34259 26845,36280

228

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK3" "Date","Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

229

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9132US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,3.92 31593,2.35

230

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010id3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010id3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ID3" "Date","Idaho Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

231

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010me2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010me2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010ME2" "Date","Maine Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,3967 25019,3571 25384,4910 25749,5247 26114,5591 26480,6036 26845,6027 27210,6174

232

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ne3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ne3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NE3" "Date","Nebraska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

233

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:47 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,1498 25019,13038 25384,17632 25749,18419 26114,3860 26480,8376 26845,6618 27210,6102

234

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mn3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mn3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MN3" "Date","Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

235

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ca2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ca2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,522122 25019,517636 25384,562127 25749,552544 26114,630998 26480,637289

236

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040sd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040sd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,384 33284,350 33312,382 33343,380 33373,382 33404,376 33434,405

237

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nm2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nm2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NM2" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,236 35110,220 35139,240 35170,230 35200,241 35231,229 35261,217

238

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,75351 25019,78371 25384,81068 25749,82595 26114,84864 26480,89187

239

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc2d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc2d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:40 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC2" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34346,2.13 34347,2.072 34348,2.139 34351,2.196 34352,2.131

240

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR3" "Date","Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mo2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mo2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MO2" "Date","Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

242

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc4d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc4d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC4" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34323,1.894 34324,1.83 34325,1.859 34326,1.895 34330,1.965

243

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9010us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9010us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:17 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891 26922 26952 26983 27013 27044 27075 27103

244

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ut2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ut2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,3000 25019,2906 25384,2802 25749,2852 26114,2926 26480,5506 26845,7664 27210,5259 27575,1806

245

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,1793 32554,2148 32582,1566 32613,1223 32643,858 32674,638

246

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nd2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nd2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040ND2" "Date","North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,25795 25019,22050 25384,22955 25749,19862 26114,2686 26480,20786 26845,22533

247

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL3" "Date","Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

248

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR3" "Date","Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

249

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010va2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010va2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,41495 25019,43582 25384,46663 25749,49554 26114,49488 26480,55427

250

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040co2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,112 35110,77 35139,78 35170,91 35200,100 35231,89 35261,100 35292,106

251

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010GA2" "Date","Georgia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,80322 25019,84072 25384,87878 25749,87359 26114,88319 26480,85256 26845,86191

252

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020hi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020hi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Hawaii (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020HI2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Hawaii (MMcf)"

253

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Georgia (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020GA2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Georgia (MMcf)"

254

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arkansas (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AR2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arkansas (MMcf)"

255

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CT2" "Date","Connecticut Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,26177 25019,26437 25384,29048 25749,31187 26114,31878 26480,32879

256

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010dc3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010dc3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010DC3" "Date","District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

257

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ri3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ri3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:54 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010RI3" "Date","Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

258

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sd3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sd3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010SD3" "Date","South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

259

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Delaware (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020DE2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Delaware (MMcf)"

260

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tn3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tn3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010TN3" "Date","Tennessee Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ny3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ny3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NY3" "Date","New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

262

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,13427 25019,15126 25384,20507 25749,19742 26114,21217 26480,23331 26845,22271

263

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9140us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9140us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9140US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" 36906,2676998 36937,2309464 36965,2246633 36996,1807170 37026,1522382 37057,1444378

264

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc1d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc1d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC1" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34347,2.194 34348,2.268 34351,2.36 34352,2.318 34353,2.252

265

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010fl3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010fl3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010FL3" "Date","Florida Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

266

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" 36906,686540 36937,640026 36965,664918 36996,622054 37026,576532 37057,536820

267

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040fl2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040fl2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040FL2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26114,355 26480,284 27941,837 28306,607 29402,677 29767,428 30132,435 30497,198 30863,34

268

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,67395 25019,74782 25384,75310 25749,77460 26114,75238 26480,77608

269

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,997 25019,895 25384,1326 25749,226 26114,1734 26480,2649 26845,1947 27210,1716 27575,1318

270

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010me3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010me3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ME3" "Date","Maine Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

271

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3060us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3060us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:27:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the U.S. (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3060US2" "Date","Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the U.S. (MMcf)" 36906,2505011 36937,2156873 36965,2086568 36996,1663832

272

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 11139,295700 11504,294406 11870,298520 12235,283197 12600,288236 12965,313498 13331,343346

273

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010in3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010in3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010IN3" "Date","Indiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

274

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9011us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9011us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9011US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" 33253,1482053 33526,1363737 33984,1452098 34015,1305490

275

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:37 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020US3" "Date","U.S. Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

276

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nv3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nv3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NV3" "Date","Nevada Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

277

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9133us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9133us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9133US3" "Date","Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

278

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sc3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sc3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010SC3" "Date","South Carolina Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

279

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010vt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010vt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Vermont Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010VT2" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,1301 29767,1290 30132,1278 30497,1252 30863,1352 31228,1456 31593,1595

280

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly","12/13/2013","1/10/1997" Weekly","12/13/2013","1/10/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Weekly","12/13/2013","12/24/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040in2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9040IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0

282

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ga3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ga3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020GA3" "Date","Georgia Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

283

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010hi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010hi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010HI3" "Date","Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

284

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,84912 25019,89372 25384,94320 25749,97317 26114,98644 26480,100720 26845,96468

285

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9100us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9100us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9100US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" 26679,92694 26710,83870 26738,91581 26769,88407 26799,85844 26830,79121 26860,79428 26891,84400 26922,81157

286

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ga3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ga3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010GA3" "Date","Georgia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

287

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9133us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9133us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9133US2" "Date","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" 35445,5604 35476,5596 35504,5675 35535,5660 35565,3812 35596,3786 35626,3756 35657,7532

288

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9170us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9170us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9170US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use (MMcf)" 36906,76386 36937,65770 36965,63626 36996,50736

289

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1504_nus_4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1504_nus_4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:46:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" 32689,99.9 33054,99.2 33419,99.2 33785,99.1 34150,99.1 34515,99.1

290

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ct3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ct3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CT3" "Date","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

291

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010US3" "Date","U.S. Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

292

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040fl2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040fl2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040FL2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079 35110 35139 35170 35200 35231 35261 35292 35323 35353 35384 35414 35445,0

293

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,1861 25019,1120 25384,808 25749,809 26480,1032 26845,1117 27210,1268 27575,1612

294

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,6774 32554,7118 32582,6736 32613,3835 32643,1927 32674,1402

295

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010la3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010la3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010LA3" "Date","Louisiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

296

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9100us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9100us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9100US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 32523,1.72 32554,1.88

297

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ne2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ne2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,1558 26480,1263 26845,834 27210,2137 27575,1398 27941,797

298

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9020us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9020us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:13 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9020US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891 26922 26952 26983 27013 27044 27075 27103 27134 27164

299

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,0 26480,0 26845,0 27210,98 27575,96 27941,99

300

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010oh2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010oh2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,442360 25019,444964 25384,456414 25749,459972 26114,460820 26480,478331 26845,439212

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ca2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ca2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,3565 25019,2780 25384,3074 25749,2499 26114,575 26845,1999 27210,1560 27575,1537

302

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010US3" "Date","U.S. Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

303

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","11/2013" Monthly","11/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc1m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc1m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC1" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34349,2.347 34380,2.355 34408,2.109 34439,2.111 34469,1.941

304

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010az3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010az3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AZ3" "Date","Arizona Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

305

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3045us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3045us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:26:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" 36906,340292 36937,312843 36965,362843

306

New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful April 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies. ITM Oxygen will enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, as well as other gasification-based processes. The technology will also enhance the economics of oxy-fired combustion technologies, making it an attractive option for the capture of carbon

307

Oxygen isotope records of carboniferous seasonality on the Russian platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OXYGEN ISOTOPE RECORDS OF CARBONIFEROUS SEASONALITY ON THE RUSSIAN PLATFORM A Thesis by HUAYU WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1998 Major Subject: Geology OXYGEN ISOTOPE RECORDS OF CARBONIFFROUS SEASONALITY ON THE RUSSIAN PLATFORM A Thesis by HUAYU WANG Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Wang, Huayu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

308

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

i i ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................... 4 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 6 COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) .................... 6

309

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1997" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1997" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:41:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition) " "Sourcekey","N9070US2","NA1160_R3FM_2","NA1160_SAL_2","NA1160_SAK_2","NA1160_SAZ_2","NA1160_SAR_2","NA1160_SCA_2","NA1160_SCO_2","NA1160_SFL_2","NA1160_SIL_2","NA1160_SIN_2","NA1160_SKS_2","NA1160_SKY_2","NA1160_SLA_2","NA1160_SMD_2","NA1160_SMI_2","NA1160_SMS_2","NA1160_SMO_2","NA1160_SMT_2","NA1160_SNE_2","NA1160_SNV_2","NA1160_SNM_2","NA1160_SNY_2","NA1160_SND_2","NA1160_SOH_2","NA1160_SOK_2","NA1160_SOR_2","NA1160_SPA_2","NA1160_SSD_2","NA1160_STN_2","NA1160_STX_2","NA1160_SUT_2","NA1160_SVA_2","NA1160_SWV_2","NA1160_SWY_2"

312

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_snd_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_snd_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:08:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition) " "Sourcekey","N9070US2","NA1160_SAL_2","NA1160_SAK_2","NA1160_SAZ_2","NA1160_SAR_2","NA1160_SCA_2","NA1160_SCO_2","NA1160_SFL_2","NA1160_R3FM_2","NA1160_SIL_2","NA1160_SIN_2","NA1160_SKS_2","NA1160_SKY_2","NA1160_SLA_2","NA1160_SMD_2","NA1160_SMI_2","NA1160_SMS_2","NA1160_SMO_2","NA1160_SMT_2","NA1160_SNE_2","NA1160_SNV_2","NA1160_SNM_2","NA1160_SNY_2","NA1160_SND_2","NA1160_SOH_2","NA1160_SOK_2","NA1160_SOR_2","NA1160_SPA_2","NA1160_SSD_2","NA1160_STN_2","NA1160_STX_2","NA1160_SUT_2","NA1160_SVA_2","NA1160_SWV_2","NA1160_SWY_2"

313

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_m.xls" mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:27:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS2","MCREXUS2","MNGEXUS2","MPPEXUS2","MLPEXUS2","METEXUS2","MPREXUS2","MBNEXUS2","MBIEXUS2","MOLEXUS2","MOHEXUS2","M_EPOOXXFE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MMTEX_NUS-Z00_2","MOOEX_NUS-Z00_2","M_EPOOR_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOOXE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOORDB_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MBCEXUS2","MO1EX_NUS-Z00_2","MO5EX_NUS-Z00_2","MBAEXUS2","MTPEXUS2","MGFEXUS2","MGREXUS2","MG4EX_NUS-Z00_2","MGAEXUS2","MKJEXUS2","MKEEXUS2","MDIEXUS2","M_EPDXL0_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MD1EX_NUS-Z00_2","MDGEXUS2","MREEXUS2","MNFEXUS2","MOTEXUS2","MNSEXUS2","MLUEXUS2","MWXEXUS2","MCKEXUS2","MAPEXUS2","MMSEXUS2"

314

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_m.xls" mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:26:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTUPUS1","MCRUPUS1","MNGUPUS1","MPPUPUS1","MLPUPUS1","METUPUS1","MPRUPUS1","MBNUPUS1","MBIUPUS1","MOLUPUS1","MOHUPUS1","MUOUPUS1","MBCUPUS1","MO1UP_NUS_1","MO5UP_NUS_1","MBAUPUS1","MTPUPUS1","MGFUPUS1","MGRUPUS1","MG4UP_NUS_1","MGAUPUS1","MKJUPUS1","MKEUPUS1","MDIUPUS1","MD0UP_NUS_1","MD1UP_NUS_1","MDGUPUS1","MREUPUS1","MPCUP_NUS_1","MNFUPUS1","MOTUPUS1","MNSUPUS1","MLUUPUS1","MWXUPUS1","MCKUPUS1","MCMUP_NUS_1","MCOUP_NUS_1","MAPUPUS1","MSGUPUS1","MMSUPUS1"

315

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_unc_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_unc_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:30:03 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity" "Sourcekey","MGIRIUS2","MOCLEUS2","MOCGGUS2","MOCIDUS2","MOPUEUS2" "Date","U.S. Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels Per Day)","U. S. Operable Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Calendar Day)","U. S. Operating Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U. S. Idle Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity"

316

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.xls" capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6/20/2013 4:20:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total " "Sourcekey","8_NA_8SW0_NUS_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R10_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R20_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R30_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R40_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R50_MBBL" "Date","U.S. Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)"

317

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_m.xls" mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:26:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTUPUS2","MCRUPUS2","MNGUPUS2","MPPUPUS2","MLPUPUS2","METUPUS2","MPRUPUS2","MBNUPUS2","MBIUPUS2","MOLUPUS2","MOHUPUS2","MUOUPUS2","MBCUPUS2","MO1UP_NUS_2","MO5UP_NUS_2","MBAUPUS2","MTPUPUS2","MGFUPUS2","MGRUPUS2","MG4UP_NUS_2","MGAUPUS2","MKJUPUS2","MKEUPUS2","MDIUPUS2","MD0UP_NUS_2","MD1UP_NUS_2","MDGUPUS2","MREUPUS2","MPCUP_NUS_2","MNFUPUS2","MOTUPUS2","MNSUPUS2","MLUUPUS2","MWXUPUS2","MCKUPUS2","MCMUP_NUS_2","MCOUP_NUS_2","MAPUPUS2","MSGUPUS2","MMSUPUS2"

318

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.xls" capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6/20/2013 4:17:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total " "Sourcekey","8_NA_8SS0_NUS_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R10_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R20_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R30_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R40_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R50_MBBL" "Date","U.S. Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)"

319

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1936" Annual",2012,"6/30/1936" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:25:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRPUS1","MLPRPUS1","METRPUS1","MENRPUS1","MEYRPUS1","MPRRPUS1","MPARP_NUS_1","MPLRPUS1","MBNRPUS1","MBURPUS1","MBYRPUS1","MBIRPUS1","MIIRPUS1","MIYRPUS1","MGFRPUS1","MGRRPUS1","MG1RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RP_NUS_1","MG5RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RP_NUS_1","MGARPUS1","MKJRPUS1","MKERPUS1","MDIRPUS1","MD0RP_NUS_1","MD1RP_NUS_1","MDGRPUS1","MRERPUS1","MRLRPUS1","MRMRPUS1","MRGRPUS1","MPCRPUS1","MNFRPUS1","MOTRPUS1","MNSRPUS1","MLURPUS1","MWXRPUS1","MCKRPUS1","MCMRPUS1","MCORPUS1","MAPRPUS1","MSGRPUS1","MMSRPUS1","MPGRPUS1"

320

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:19:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRIUS1","MCRRIUS1","MNGRIUS1","MPPRIUS1","MLPRIUS1","METRIUS1","MBNRIUS1","MBIRIUS1","MOLRIUS1","MOHRIUS1","M_EPOOOH_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRIUS1","MOORIUS1","M_EPOOR_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MFERIUS1","M_EPOORD_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MUORIUS1","MNLRI_NUS_1","MKORI_NUS_1","MH1RI_NUS_1","MRURI_NUS_1","MBCRIUS1","MO1RI_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RI_NUS_1","MO4RI_NUS_1","MO2RI_NUS_1","MO5RI_NUS_1","MO6RI_NUS_1","MO7RI_NUS_1","MO9RI_NUS_1","MBARIUS1"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1936" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1936" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:25:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRPUS1","MLPRPUS1","METRPUS1","MENRPUS1","MEYRPUS1","MPRRPUS1","MPARP_NUS_1","MPLRPUS1","MBNRPUS1","MBURPUS1","MBYRPUS1","MBIRPUS1","MIIRPUS1","MIYRPUS1","MGFRPUS1","MGRRPUS1","MG1RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RP_NUS_1","MG5RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RP_NUS_1","MGARPUS1","MKJRPUS1","MKERPUS1","MDIRPUS1","MD0RP_NUS_1","MD1RP_NUS_1","MDGRPUS1","MRERPUS1","MRLRPUS1","MRMRPUS1","MRGRPUS1","MPCRPUS1","MNFRPUS1","MOTRPUS1","MNSRPUS1","MLURPUS1","MWXRPUS1","MCKRPUS1","MCMRPUS1","MCORPUS1","MAPRPUS1","MSGRPUS1","MMSRPUS1","MPGRPUS1"

322

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_m.xls" mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:27:47 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MCREXUS1","MNGEXUS1","MPPEXUS1","MLPEXUS1","METEXUS1","MPREXUS1","MBNEXUS1","MBIEXUS1","MOLEXUS1","MOHEXUS1","M_EPOOXXFE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MMTEX_NUS-Z00_1","MOOEX_NUS-Z00_1","M_EPOOR_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORDB_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MBCEXUS1","MO1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MO5EX_NUS-Z00_1","MBAEXUS1","MTPEXUS1","MGFEXUS1","MGREXUS1","MG4EX_NUS-Z00_1","MGAEXUS1","MKJEXUS1","MKEEXUS1","MDIEXUS1","M_EPDXL0_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MD1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MDGEXUS1","MREEXUS1","MNFEXUS1","MOTEXUS1","MNSEXUS1","MLUEXUS1","MWXEXUS1","MCKEXUS1","MAPEXUS1","MMSEXUS1"

323

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Marketed Production ",35,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" Natural Gas Marketed Production ",35,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_prod_whv_a_epg0_vgm_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_prod_whv_a_epg0_vgm_mmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:54:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Marketed Production " "Sourcekey","N9050US2","N9050FX2","N9050AL2","N9050AK2","N9050AZ2","N9050AR2","N9050CA2","N9050CO2","N9050FL2","N9050IL2","N9050IN2","N9050KS2","N9050KY2","N9050LA2","N9050MD2","N9050MI2","N9050MS2","N9050MO2","N9050MT2","N9050NE2","N9050NV2","N9050NM2","N9050NY2","N9050ND2","N9050OH2","N9050OK2","N9050OR2","N9050PA2","N9050SD2","N9050TN2","N9050TX2","N9050UT2","N9050VA2","N9050WV2","N9050WY2"

324

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1870" Annual",2012,"6/30/1870" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:27:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MCREXUS1","MNGEXUS1","MPPEXUS1","MLPEXUS1","METEXUS1","MPREXUS1","MBNEXUS1","MBIEXUS1","MOLEXUS1","MOHEXUS1","M_EPOOXXFE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MMTEX_NUS-Z00_1","MOOEX_NUS-Z00_1","M_EPOOR_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORDB_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MBCEXUS1","MO1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MO5EX_NUS-Z00_1","MBAEXUS1","MTPEXUS1","MGFEXUS1","MGREXUS1","MG4EX_NUS-Z00_1","MGAEXUS1","MKJEXUS1","MKEEXUS1","MDIEXUS1","M_EPDXL0_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MD1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MDGEXUS1","MREEXUS1","MNFEXUS1","MOTEXUS1","MNSEXUS1","MLUEXUS1","MWXEXUS1","MCKEXUS1","MAPEXUS1","MMSEXUS1"

325

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2002" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2002" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:00:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices " "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4","NA1504_SAL_4","NA1504_SAK_4","NA1504_SAZ_4","NA1504_SAR_4","NA1504_SCA_4","NA1504_SCO_4","NA1504_SCT_4","NA1504_SDE_4","NA1504_SDC_4","NA1504_SFL_4","NA1504_SGA_4","NA1504_SHI_4","NA1504_SID_4","NA1504_SIL_4","NA1504_SIN_4","NA1504_SIA_4","NA1504_SKS_4","NA1504_SKY_4","NA1504_SLA_4","NA1504_SME_4","NA1504_SMD_4","NA1504_SMA_4","NA1504_SMI_4","NA1504_SMN_4","NA1504_SMS_4","NA1504_SMO_4","NA1504_SMT_4","NA1504_SNE_4","NA1504_SNV_4","NA1504_SNH_4","NA1504_SNJ_4","NA1504_SNM_4","NA1504_SNY_4","NA1504_SNC_4","NA1504_SND_4","NA1504_SOH_4","NA1504_SOK_4","NA1504_SOR_4","NA1504_SPA_4","NA1504_SRI_4","NA1504_SSC_4","NA1504_SSD_4","NA1504_STN_4","NA1504_STX_4","NA1504_SUT_4","NA1504_SVT_4","NA1504_SVA_4","NA1504_SWA_4","NA1504_SWV_4","NA1504_SWI_4","NA1504_SWY_4"

326

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery " "Sourcekey","MTTRSUS1","MCRRSUS1","MPERSUS1","MPPRSUS1","MLPRSUS1","METRSUS1","MPRRSUS1","MBNRSUS1","MBIRSUS1","M_EPOOOXH_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRSUS1","MOORSUS1","M_EPOOR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MFERSUS1","M_EPOORD_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MUORSUS1","MNLRSUS1","MKORSUS1","MH1RSUS1","MRURSUS1","MBCRSUS1","MO1RS_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RS_NUS_1","MO4RS_NUS_1","MO5RS_NUS_1","MO6RS_NUS_1","MO7RS_NUS_1","MO9RS_NUS_1","MBARSUS1","MGFRSUS1","MGRRSUS1","MG1RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RS_NUS_1","MG5RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RS_NUS_1","MGARSUS1","MKJRSUS1","MKERSUS1","MDIRSUS1","MD0RS_NUS_1","MD1RS_NUS_1","MDGRSUS1","MRERSUS1","MRLRSUS1","MRMRSUS1","MRGRSUS1","MPCRS_NUS_1","MNFRSUS1","MOTRSUS1","MNSRSUS1","MLURSUS1","MWXRSUS1","MCKRSUS1","MAPRSUS1","MMSRSUS1"

327

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

56,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 56,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery " "Sourcekey","MTTRSUS1","MCRRSUS1","MPERSUS1","MPPRSUS1","MLPRSUS1","METRSUS1","MPRRSUS1","MBNRSUS1","MBIRSUS1","M_EPOOOXH_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRSUS1","MOORSUS1","M_EPOOR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MFERSUS1","M_EPOORD_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MUORSUS1","MNLRSUS1","MKORSUS1","MH1RSUS1","MRURSUS1","MBCRSUS1","MO1RS_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RS_NUS_1","MO5RS_NUS_1","MO6RS_NUS_1","MO9RS_NUS_1","MBARSUS1","MGFRSUS1","MGRRSUS1","MG1RS_NUS_1","MG4RS_NUS_1","MG5RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RS_NUS_1","MGARSUS1","MKJRSUS1","MKERSUS1","MDIRSUS1","MD0RS_NUS_1","MD1RS_NUS_1","MDGRSUS1","MRERSUS1","MRLRSUS1","MRMRSUS1","MRGRSUS1","MPCRS_NUS_1","MNFRSUS1","MOTRSUS1","MNSRSUS1","MLURSUS1","MWXRSUS1","MCKRSUS1","MAPRSUS1","MMSRSUS1"

328

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" 2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_enp_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_enp_mmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit " "Sourcekey","N9132US2","N9132CN2","NA1287_YEPRT-NCA_2","NGA_EPG0_ENP_YCAL-NCA_MMCF","NA1287_YDTW-NCA_2","NA1287_YMARY-NCA_2","NA1287_YSSM-NCA_2","NA1287_YCHRE-NCA_2","NA1287_YNOYS-NCA_2","NA1287_YBAB-NCA_2","NA1287_YHVR-NCA_2","NGA_EPG0_ENP_YPITT-NCA_MMCF","NGM_EPG0_ENP_YGRIS-NCA_MMCF","NGM_EPG0_ENP_YMSS-NCA_MMCF","NA1287_YUSNI-NCA_2","NGM_EPG0_ENP_YWADD-NCA_MMCF","NA1287_YSUMS-NCA_2","N9132MX2","NA1287_YDUG-NMX_2","NA_EPG0_ENP_YNOGS-NMX_MMCF","NA1287_YCAX-NMX_2","NA1287_YOESA-NMX_2","NA1287_YALA-NMX_2","NA1287_YCLI-NMX_2","NA_EPG0_ENP_YDRT-NMX_MMCF","NA1287_YEGP-NMX_2","NA1287_YELP-NMX_2","NA1287_YHDGO-NMX_2","NA1287_YMFE-NMX_2","NA1287_YPENI-NMX_2","NA1287_Y44RB-NMX_2","NA1287_Y44RM-NMX_2"

329

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

65,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" 65,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbbl_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbbl_m_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 6:57:53 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Supply and Disposition" "Sourcekey","MTTFPUS1","M_EP00_YNP_NUS_MBBL","MTTRPUS1","MTTIMUS1","MTTUA_NUS_1","MTTSCUS1","MTTRIUS1","MTTEXUS1","MTTUPUS1","MTTSTUS1","MTTFPP11","M_EP00_YNP_R10_MBBL","MTTRPP11","MTTIMP11","MTTNRP11","MTTUA_R10_1","MTTSCP11","MTTRIP11","MTTEXP11","MTTUPP11","MTTSTP11","MTTFPP21","M_EP00_YNP_R20_MBBL","MTTRPP21","MTTIMP21","MTTNRP21","MTTUA_R20_1","MTTSCP21","MTTRIP21","MTTEXP21","MTTUPP21","MTTSTP21","MTTFPP31","M_EP00_YNP_R30_MBBL","MTTRPP31","MTTIMP31","MTTNRP31","MTTUA_R30_1","MTTSCP31","MTTRIP31","MTTEXP31","MTTUPP31","MTTSTP31","MTTFPP41","M_EP00_YNP_R40_MBBL","MTTRPP41","MTTIMP41","MTTNRP41","MTTUA_R40_1","MTTSCP41","MTTRIP41","MTTEXP41","MTTUPP41","MTTSTP41","MTTFPP51","M_EP00_YNP_R50_MBBL","MTTRPP51","MTTIMP51","MTTNRP51","MTTUA_R50_1","MTTSCP51","MTTRIP51","MTTEXP51","MTTUPP51","MTTSTP51"

330

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1963" 59,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1963" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbblpd_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbblpd_m_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 6:57:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Supply and Disposition" "Sourcekey","MTTFPUS2","M_EP00_YNP_NUS_MBBLD","MTTRPUS2","MTTIMUS2","MTTUA_NUS_2","MTTSCUS2","MTTRIUS2","MTTEXUS2","MTTUPUS2","MTTFPP12","M_EP00_YNP_R10_MBBLD","MTTRPP12","MTTIMP12","MTTNRP12","MTTUA_R10_2","MTTSCP12","MTTRIP12","MTTEXP12","MTTUPP12","MTTFPP22","M_EP00_YNP_R20_MBBLD","MTTRPP22","MTTIMP22","MTTNRP22","MTTUA_R20_2","MTTSCP22","MTTRIP22","MTTEXP22","MTTUPP22","MTTFPP32","M_EP00_YNP_R30_MBBLD","MTTRPP32","MTTIMP32","MTTNRP32","MTTUA_R30_2","MTTSCP32","MTTRIP32","MTTEXP32","MTTUPP32","MTTFPP42","M_EP00_YNP_R40_MBBLD","MTTRPP42","MTTIMP42","MTTNRP42","MTTUA_R40_2","MTTSCP42","MTTRIP42","MTTEXP42","MTTUPP42","MTTFPP52","M_EP00_YNP_R50_MBBLD","MTTRPP52","MTTIMP52","MTTNRP52","MTTUA_R50_2","MTTSCP52","MTTRIP52","MTTEXP52","MTTUPP52"

331

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" 2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_pnp_dpmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_pnp_dpmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit " "Sourcekey","N9132US3","N9132CN3","NA1287_YEPRT-NCA_3","NGA_EPG0_PNP_YCAL-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YDTW-NCA_3","NA1287_YMARY-NCA_3","NA1287_YSSM-NCA_3","NA1287_YCHRE-NCA_3","NA1287_YNOYS-NCA_3","NA1287_YBAB-NCA_3","NA1287_YHVR-NCA_3","NGA_EPG0_PNP_YPITT-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YGRIS-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YMSS-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YUSNI-NCA_3","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YWADD-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YSUMS-NCA_3","N9132MX3","NA1287_YDUG-NMX_3","NA_EPG0_PNP_YNOGS-NMX_DMCF","NA1287_YCAX-NMX_3","NA1287_YOESA-NMX_3","NA1287_YALA-NMX_3","NA1287_YCLI-NMX_3","NA_EPG0_PNP_YDRT-NMX_DMCF","NA1287_YEGP-NMX_3","NA1287_YELP-NMX_3","NA1287_YHDGO-NMX_3","NA1287_YMFE-NMX_3","NA1287_YPENI-NMX_3","NA1287_Y44RB-NMX_3","NA1287_Y44RM-NMX_3"

332

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1989" Annual",2012,"6/30/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:00:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices " "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4","NA1504_SAL_4","NA1504_SAK_4","NA1504_SAZ_4","NA1504_SAR_4","NA1504_SCA_4","NA1504_SCO_4","NA1504_SCT_4","NA1504_SDE_4","NA1504_SDC_4","NA1504_SFL_4","NA1504_SGA_4","NA1504_SHI_4","NA1504_SID_4","NA1504_SIL_4","NA1504_SIN_4","NA1504_SIA_4","NA1504_SKS_4","NA1504_SKY_4","NA1504_SLA_4","NA1504_SME_4","NA1504_SMD_4","NA1504_SMA_4","NA1504_SMI_4","NA1504_SMN_4","NA1504_SMS_4","NA1504_SMO_4","NA1504_SMT_4","NA1504_SNE_4","NA1504_SNV_4","NA1504_SNH_4","NA1504_SNJ_4","NA1504_SNM_4","NA1504_SNY_4","NA1504_SNC_4","NA1504_SND_4","NA1504_SOH_4","NA1504_SOK_4","NA1504_SOR_4","NA1504_SPA_4","NA1504_SRI_4","NA1504_SSC_4","NA1504_SSD_4","NA1504_STN_4","NA1504_STX_4","NA1504_SUT_4","NA1504_SVT_4","NA1504_SVA_4","NA1504_SWA_4","NA1504_SWV_4","NA1504_SWI_4","NA1504_SWY_4"

333

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:11:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Pipeline" "Sourcekey","MTTMPP2P11","MCRMPP2P11","MPEMPP2P11","MPPMP_R20-R10_1","MLPMPP2P11","MBCMPP2P11","MO5MP_R20-R10_1","MO6MP_R20-R10_1","MO7MP_R20-R10_1","MO9MP_R20-R10_1","M_EPOOR_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","M_EPOORD_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","MGFMPP2P11","MGRMPP2P11","MG4MP_R20-R10_1","MG6MP_R20-R10_1","MKJMPP2P11","MKEMPP2P11","MDIMPP2P11","MD0MP_R20-R10_1","MD1MP_R20-R10_1","MDGMPP2P11"

334

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1913" Annual",2012,"6/30/1913" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_sae_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_sae_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:10 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Total Stocks " "Sourcekey","MTTSTUS1","MCRSTUS1","MAOSTUS1","MPPSTUS1","MLPSTUS1","METSTUS1","MPRSTUS1","MBNSTUS1","MBISTUS1","M_EPOOOXH_SAE_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MMTSTUS1","MOOSTUS1","M_EPOOR_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MFESTUS1","M_EPOORD_SAE_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MUOSTUS1","MNLST_NUS_1","MKOST_NUS_1","MH1ST_NUS_1","MRUST_NUS_1","MBCSTUS1","MO1ST_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MO3ST_NUS_1","MO4ST_NUS_1","MO2ST_NUS_1","MO5ST_NUS_1","MO6ST_NUS_1","MO7ST_NUS_1","MO9ST_NUS_1","MBASTUS1","MGFSTUS1","MGRSTUS1","MG1ST_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MG4ST_NUS_1","MG5ST_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MG6ST_NUS_1","MGASTUS1","MKJSTUS1","MKESTUS1","MDISTUS1","MD0ST_NUS_1","MD1ST_NUS_1","MDGSTUS1","MRESTUS1","MRLSTUS1","MRMSTUS1","MRGSTUS1","MPCST_NUS_1","MNFSTUS1","MOTSTUS1","MNSSTUS1","MLUSTUS1","MWXSTUS1","MCKSTUS1","MAPSTUS1","MMSSTUS1"

335

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:11:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Pipeline" "Sourcekey","MTTMPP2P11","MCRMPP2P11","MPEMPP2P11","MPPMP_R20-R10_1","MLPMPP2P11","MBCMPP2P11","MO5MP_R20-R10_1","MO6MP_R20-R10_1","MO7MP_R20-R10_1","MO9MP_R20-R10_1","M_EPOOR_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","M_EPOORD_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","MGFMPP2P11","MGRMPP2P11","MG4MP_R20-R10_1","MG6MP_R20-R10_1","MKJMPP2P11","MKEMPP2P11","MDIMPP2P11","MD0MP_R20-R10_1","MD1MP_R20-R10_1","MDGMPP2P11"

336

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

53,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1949" 53,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1949" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_cons_sum_a_epg0_vc0_mmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_cons_sum_a_epg0_vc0_mmcf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:50:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Consumption " "Sourcekey","N9140US2","NA1490_SAL_2","NA1490_SAK_2","NA1490_SAZ_2","NA1490_SAR_2","NA1490_SCA_2","NA1490_SCO_2","NA1490_SCT_2","NA1490_SDE_2","NA1490_SDC_2","NA1490_SFL_2","NA1490_SGA_2","NA1490_R3FM_2","NA1490_SHI_2","NA1490_SID_2","NA1490_SIL_2","NA1490_SIN_2","NA1490_SIA_2","NA1490_SKS_2","NA1490_SKY_2","NA1490_SLA_2","NA1490_SME_2","NA1490_SMD_2","NA1490_SMA_2","NA1490_SMI_2","NA1490_SMN_2","NA1490_SMS_2","NA1490_SMO_2","NA1490_SMT_2","NA1490_SNE_2","NA1490_SNV_2","NA1490_SNH_2","NA1490_SNJ_2","NA1490_SNM_2","NA1490_SNY_2","NA1490_SNC_2","NA1490_SND_2","NA1490_SOH_2","NA1490_SOK_2","NA1490_SOR_2","NA1490_SPA_2","NA1490_SRI_2","NA1490_SSC_2","NA1490_SSD_2","NA1490_STN_2","NA1490_STX_2","NA1490_SUT_2","NA1490_SVT_2","NA1490_SVA_2","NA1490_SWA_2","NA1490_SWV_2","NA1490_SWI_2","NA1490_SWY_2"

337

Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

Cassano, A.A.

1985-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

339

INTRODUCTION A general problem for all animals is the supply of oxygen to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION A general problem for all animals is the supply of oxygen to internal tissues. The common structural solution is formation of a branched tubular network that transports air or oxygenated (respiratory) system, fine branches ramify on or near the oxygen-requiring tissues, with the extent

Krasnow, Mark A.

340

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13Ā± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6Ā± 0.2 for urban and 2.1Ā± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Oxidation Kinetics of Cu2O in Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(7) Application to CLC was first demonstrated by Mattisson et al.,(8) who showed that the release of oxygen allows conversion of petcoke by CLOU to be as much as 50 times faster than conversion by conventional CLC with an iron-based carrier, which requires in situ conversion of petcoke to syngas by relatively slow gasification reactions. ...

Christopher K. Clayton; H. Y. Sohn; Kevin J. Whitty

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1985" 6,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1985" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_pnp_dpmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_pnp_dpmcf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit " "Sourcekey","N9132US3","N9132CN3","NA1287_YEPRT-NCA_3","NGA_EPG0_PNP_YCAL-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YDTW-NCA_3","NA1287_YMARY-NCA_3","NA1287_YSSM-NCA_3","NA1287_YCHRE-NCA_3","NA1287_YNOYS-NCA_3","NA1287_YWARR-NCA_3","NA1287_YBAB-NCA_3","NA1287_YHVR-NCA_3","NA1287_YPMOR-NCA_3","NA1287_YSHER-NCA_3","NGA_EPG0_PNP_YPITT-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YGRIS-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YMSS-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YUSNI-NCA_3","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YWADD-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YSUMS-NCA_3","N9132MX3","NA1287_YDUG-NMX_3","NA_EPG0_PNP_YNOGS-NMX_DMCF","NA1287_YCAX-NMX_3","NA1287_YOESA-NMX_3","NA1287_YOTAY-NMX_3","NA1287_YALA-NMX_3","NA1287_YCLI-NMX_3","NA_EPG0_PNP_YDRT-NMX_DMCF","NA1287_YEGP-NMX_3","NA1287_YELP-NMX_3","NA1287_YHDGO-NMX_3","NA1287_YMFE-NMX_3","NA1287_YPENI-NMX_3","NA1287_Y44RB-NMX_3","NA1287_Y44RM-NMX_3"

343

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

32,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1992" 32,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1992" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_png_dpmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_png_dpmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit " "Sourcekey","N9133US3","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NBR_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-NBR_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NBR_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSWGR-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NCI_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NCI_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NCH_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YENA-NCH_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NCH_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NIN_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-NIN_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NIN_DMCF","N9133JA3","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YCAM-NJA_DMCF","NA1288_YENA-NJA_3","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NJA_DMCF","N9133MX3","NA1288_YNOGS-NMX_3","NA1288_YOTAY-NMX_3","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NPO_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NPO_DMCF","N9133RU3","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NKS_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-NKS_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NKS_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NSP_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YCAM-NSP_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NSP_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NUK_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NUK_DMCF"

344

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:09:56 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" "Sourcekey","MTTNRP11","MCRNRP11","MPEMNP11","MPPNRP11","MLPNRP11","METNRP11","MPRNRP11","MBNNRP11","MBINRP11","MUONRP11","MBCNRP11","MO1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOBGRR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MO3NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO2NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO5NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO7NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO9NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOOR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORD_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MGFNRP11","MGRNRP11","MG1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0RO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MG5NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0CAL55_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MGANRP11","MKJNRP11","MKENRP11","MDINRP11","MD0NR_R10-Z0P_1","MD1NR_R10-Z0P_1","MDGNRP11","MRENRP11","MPFNRP11","MPNNR_R10-Z0P_1","MPONR_R10-Z0P_1","MNSNRP11","MLUNRP11","MWXNRP11","MAPNRP11","MMSNRP11"

345

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

36,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1985" 36,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1985" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe1_a_epg0_prp_dpmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe1_a_epg0_prp_dpmcf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:57:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry " "Sourcekey","N9102US3","N9102CN3","NA1277_YEPRT-NCA_3","NA1277_YCAL-NCA_3","NA1277_YDTW-NCA_3","NA1277_YMARY-NCA_3","NA1277_YCHRE-NCA_3","NA1277_YINL-NCA_3","NA1277_YNOYS-NCA_3","NA1277_YWARR-NCA_3","NA1277_YBAB-NCA_3","NA1277_YHVR-NCA_3","NA1277_YPDEB-NCA_3","NA1277_YPMOR-NCA_3","NA1277_YSWGR-NCA_3","NA1277_YWHIH-NCA_3","NA1277_YPORT-NCA_3","NA1277_YSHER-NCA_3","NA1277_YPITT-NCA_3","NA1277_YCHAP-NCA_3","NA1277_YGRIS-NCA_3","NA1277_YMSS-NCA_3","NA1277_YUSNI-NCA_3","NA1277_YWADD-NCA_3","NA1277_YSUMS-NCA_3","NA1277_YHGSP-NCA_3","NA1277_YNTRY-NCA_3","N9102MX3","NGA_EPG0_PRP_YOESA-NMX_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PRP_YOTAY-NMX_DMCF","NA1277_YALA-NMX_3","NA1277_YELP-NMX_3","NGA_EPG0_PRP_YGRT-NMX_DMCF","NA1277_YHDGO-NMX_3","NA1277_YMFE-NMX_3","NA1277_YPENI-NMX_3"

346

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" 43,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe1_a_epg0_pml_dpmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe1_a_epg0_pml_dpmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:57:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry " "Sourcekey","N9103US3","NGM_EPG0_NUS-NCA_PML_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PML_YHGSP-NCA_DMCF","N9103AG3","N9103AU3","N9103BX3","N9103EG3","NGM_EPG0_PML_YCAM-NEG_DMCF","NA_EPG0_PML_YELBA-NEG_DPMCF","NGA_EPG0_PML_YFPT-NEG_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PML_YGLN-NEG_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_NUS-NEK_PML_DMCF","N9103ID3","N9103MY3","N9103NG3","NA_EPG0_PML_YCPT-NNI_3","NGM_EPG0_NUS-NNO_PML_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PML_YCPT-NNO_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PML_YFPT-NNO_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PML_YSPL-NNO_DMCF","N9103MU3","NGM_EPG0_NUS-NPE_PML_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PML_YCAM-NPE_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PML_YFPT-NPE_DMCF","N9103QR3","NGM_EPG0_PML_YELBA-NQA_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PML_YGPT-NQA_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PML_YSPL-NQA_DMCF","N9103TD3","NGA_EPG0_PML_YCAM-NTD_DMCF","NA1278_YCPT-NTD_3","NA1278_YELBA-NTD_3","NA1278_YEVTT-NTD_3","NGA_EPG0_PML_YFPT-NTD_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PML_YGLN-NTD_DMCF","NA1278_YLCH-NTD_3","NGA_EPG0_PML_YSPL-NTD_DMCF","N9103UA3","NGM_EPG0_PML_NUS-NYE_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PML_YEVTT-NYE_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PML_YFPT-NYE_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PML_YSPL-NYE_DMCF","N9103983"

347

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:09:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" "Sourcekey","MTTNRP11","MCRNRP11","MPEMNP11","MPPNRP11","MLPNRP11","METNRP11","MPRNRP11","MBNNRP11","MBINRP11","MUONRP11","MBCNRP11","MO1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOBGRR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MO3NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO2NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO5NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO7NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO9NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOOR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORD_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MGFNRP11","MGRNRP11","MG1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0RO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MG5NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0CAL55_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MGANRP11","MKJNRP11","MKENRP11","MDINRP11","MD0NR_R10-Z0P_1","MD1NR_R10-Z0P_1","MDGNRP11","MRENRP11","MPFNRP11","MPNNR_R10-Z0P_1","MPONR_R10-Z0P_1","MNSNRP11","MLUNRP11","MWXNRP11","MAPNRP11","MMSNRP11"

348

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

36,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" 36,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe1_a_epg0_irp_mmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe1_a_epg0_irp_mmcf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:56:59 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry " "Sourcekey","N9102US2","N9102CN2","NA1277_YEPRT-NCA_2","NA1277_YCAL-NCA_2","NA1277_YDTW-NCA_2","NA1277_YMARY-NCA_2","NA1277_YCHRE-NCA_2","NA1277_YINL-NCA_2","NA1277_YNOYS-NCA_2","NA1277_YWARR-NCA_2","NA1277_YBAB-NCA_2","NA1277_YHVR-NCA_2","NA1277_YPDEB-NCA_2","NA1277_YPMOR-NCA_2","NA1277_YSWGR-NCA_2","NA1277_YWHIH-NCA_2","NA1277_YPORT-NCA_2","NA1277_YSHER-NCA_2","NA1277_YPITT-NCA_2","NA1277_YCHAP-NCA_2","NA1277_YGRIS-NCA_2","NA1277_YMSS-NCA_2","NA1277_YUSNI-NCA_2","NA1277_YWADD-NCA_2","NA1277_YSUMS-NCA_2","NA1277_YHGSP-NCA_2","NA1277_YNTRY-NCA_2","N9102MX2","NGA_EPG0_IRP_YOESA-NMX_MMCF","NGM_EPG0_IRP_YOTAY-NMX_MMCF","NA1277_YALA-NMX_2","NA1277_YELP-NMX_2","NGA_EPG0_IRP_YGRT-NMX_MMCF","NA1277_YHDGO-NMX_2","NA1277_YMFE-NMX_2","NA1277_YPENI-NMX_2"

349

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Oxygen abundances in the most oxygen-rich spiral galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen abundances in the spiral galaxies expected to be richest in oxygen are estimated. The new abundance determinations are based on the recently discovered ff-relation between auroral and nebular oxygen line fluxes in HII regions. We find that the maximum gas-phase oxygen abundance in the central regions of spiral galaxies is 12+log(O/H)~8.75. This value is significantly lower than the previously accepted value. The central oxygen abundance in the Milky Way is similar to that in other large spirals.

L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan; J. M. Vilchez

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

354

Oxygen Concentration Microgradients for Cell Culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Chemotactic Effect of Oxygen on Bacteria,” J. Pathol.Measurement and Control of Oxygen Levels in MicrofluidicA Microfabricated Electrochemical Oxygen Generator for High-

Park, Jaehyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1910" Annual",2012,"6/30/1910" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 8:04:15 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTIMUS1","MCRIMUS1","MNGIMUS1","MPPIMUS1","MLPIMUS1","MENIMUS1","MEYIMUS1","MPAIM_NUS-Z00_1","MPLIMUS1","MBUIM_NUS-Z00_1","MBYIMUS1","MIIIM_NUS-Z00_1","MIYIMUS1","MOLIMUS1","MOHIMUS1","M_EPOOXXFE_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MMTIMUS1","MOOIMUS1","M_EPOOR_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MFEIMUS1","M_EPOORDB_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORDO_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORO_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MUOIMUS1","MNLIMUS1","MKOIMUS1","MHOIMUS1","MRUIMUS1","MBCIMUS1","M_EPOBGRR_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MO5IM_NUS-Z00_1","MO6IM_NUS-Z00_1","MO7IM_NUS-Z00_1","MO9IM_NUS-Z00_1","MBAIMUS1","MTPIMUS1","MGFIMUS1","MGRIMUS1","MG1IM_NUS-Z00_1","MG4IM_NUS-Z00_1","MG5IM_NUS-Z00_1","M_EPM0CAL55_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MG6IM_NUS-Z00_1","MGAIMUS1","MKJIMUS1","MKBIMUS1","MK1IMUS1","MKEIMUS1","MDIIMUS1","MD0IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB0IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB5IM_NUS-Z00_1","MD1IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB1IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB6IM_NUS-Z00_1","MDGIMUS1","MD2IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB2IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB7IM_NUS-Z00_1","MD3IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB3IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB8IM_NUS-Z00_1","MREIMUS1","MRXIMUS1","MRYIMUS1","MRZIMUS1","MPFIM_NUS-Z00_1","MNFIMUS1","MOTIMUS1","MNSIMUS1","MLUIMUS1","MWXIMUS1","MCKIMUS1","MAPIMUS1","MMSIMUS1"

356

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_m.xls" mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 8:04:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTIMUS1","MCRIMUS1","MNGIMUS1","MPPIMUS1","MLPIMUS1","MENIMUS1","MEYIMUS1","MPAIM_NUS-Z00_1","MPLIMUS1","MBUIM_NUS-Z00_1","MBYIMUS1","MIIIM_NUS-Z00_1","MIYIMUS1","MOLIMUS1","MOHIMUS1","M_EPOOXXFE_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MMTIMUS1","MOOIMUS1","M_EPOOR_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MFEIMUS1","M_EPOORDB_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORDO_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORO_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MUOIMUS1","MNLIMUS1","MKOIMUS1","MHOIMUS1","MRUIMUS1","MBCIMUS1","M_EPOBGRR_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MO5IM_NUS-Z00_1","MO6IM_NUS-Z00_1","MO7IM_NUS-Z00_1","MO9IM_NUS-Z00_1","MBAIMUS1","MTPIMUS1","MGFIMUS1","MGRIMUS1","MG1IM_NUS-Z00_1","MG4IM_NUS-Z00_1","MG5IM_NUS-Z00_1","M_EPM0CAL55_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MG6IM_NUS-Z00_1","MGAIMUS1","MKJIMUS1","MKBIMUS1","MK1IMUS1","MKEIMUS1","MDIIMUS1","MD0IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB0IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB5IM_NUS-Z00_1","MD1IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB1IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB6IM_NUS-Z00_1","MDGIMUS1","MD2IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB2IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB7IM_NUS-Z00_1","MD3IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB3IM_NUS-Z00_1","MB8IM_NUS-Z00_1","MREIMUS1","MRXIMUS1","MRYIMUS1","MRZIMUS1","MPFIM_NUS-Z00_1","MNFIMUS1","MOTIMUS1","MNSIMUS1","MLUIMUS1","MWXIMUS1","MCKIMUS1","MAPIMUS1","MMSIMUS1"

357

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

45,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1985" 45,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1985" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_png_dpmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_png_dpmcf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit " "Sourcekey","N9133US3","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NBR_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-NBR_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NBR_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NCA_DMCF","NA_EPG0_PNG_YBUF-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSWGR-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NCI_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NCI_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NCH_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YENA-NCH_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NCH_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NIN_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-NIN_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NIN_DMCF","N9133JA3","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YCAM-NJA_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-NJA_DMCF","NA1288_YENA-NJA_3","NA1288_YPNIK-NJA_3","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NJA_DMCF","N9133MX3","NA1288_YNOGS-NMX_3","NA1288_YOTAY-NMX_3","NA1288_YSAN-NMX_3","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NPO_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NPO_DMCF","N9133RU3","NA_EPG0_PNG_YENA-NRS_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NKS_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-NKS_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NKS_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NSP_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YCAM-NSP_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NSP_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_NUS-NUK_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-NUK_DMCF","NGA_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-NUK_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YCAM-Z00_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YENA-Z00_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YFPT-Z00_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YNOGS-Z00_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YOTAY-Z00_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSPL-Z00_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNG_YSWGR-Z00_DMCF"

358

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_m.xls" mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 8:05:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTIMUS2","MCRIMUS2","MNGIMUS2","MPPIMUS2","MLPIMUS2","MENIMUS2","MEYIMUS2","MPAIM_NUS-Z00_2","MPLIMUS2","MBUIM_NUS-Z00_2","MBYIMUS2","MIIIM_NUS-Z00_2","MIYIMUS2","MOLIMUS2","MOHIMUS2","M_EPOOXXFE_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MMTIMUS2","MOOIMUS2","M_EPOOR_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MFEIMUS2","M_EPOORDB_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOORDO_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOORO_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOOOXH_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MUOIMUS2","MNLIMUS2","MKOIMUS2","MHOIMUS2","MRUIMUS2","MBCIMUS2","M_EPOBGRR_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MO5IM_NUS-Z00_2","MO6IM_NUS-Z00_2","MO7IM_NUS-Z00_2","MO9IM_NUS-Z00_2","MBAIMUS2","MTPIMUS2","MGFIMUS2","MGRIMUS2","MG1IM_NUS-Z00_2","MG4IM_NUS-Z00_2","MG5IM_NUS-Z00_2","M_EPM0CAL55_IM0_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MG6IM_NUS-Z00_2","MGAIMUS2","MKJIMUS2","MKBIMUS2","MK1IMUS2","MKEIMUS2","MDIIMUS2","MD0IM_NUS-Z00_2","MB0IM_NUS-Z00_2","MB5IM_NUS-Z00_2","MD1IM_NUS-Z00_2","MB1IM_NUS-Z00_2","MB6IM_NUS-Z00_2","MDGIMUS2","MD2IM_NUS-Z00_2","MB2IM_NUS-Z00_2","MB7IM_NUS-Z00_2","MD3IM_NUS-Z00_2","MB3IM_NUS-Z00_2","MB8IM_NUS-Z00_2","MREIMUS2","MRXIMUS2","MRYIMUS2","MRZIMUS2","MPFIM_NUS-Z00_2","MNFIMUS2","MOTIMUS2","MNSIMUS2","MLUIMUS2","MWXIMUS2","MCKIMUS2","MAPIMUS2","MMSIMUS2"

359

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FC26-98FT40343 Project Description Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing, scaling-up, and demonstrating a novel air separation technology for large-scale production of oxygen (O2) at costs that are approximately one-third lower than conventional cryogenic plants. An Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen plant co-produces power and oxygen. A phased technology RD&D effort is underway to demonstrate all necessary technical and economic requirements for scale-up and industrial commercialization. The ITM Oxygen production technology is a radically different approach to producing high-quality tonnage oxygen and to enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle and other advanced power generation systems. Instead of cooling air to cryogenic temperatures, oxygen is extracted from air at temperatures synergistic with power production operations. Process engineering and economic evaluations of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants comparing ITM Oxygen with a state-of-the-art cryogenic air separation unit are aimed to show that the installed capital cost of the air separation unit and the installed capital of IGCC facility are significantly lower compared to conventional technologies, while improving power plant output and efficiency. The use of low-cost oxygen in combustion processes would provide cost-effective emission reduction and carbon management opportunities. ITM Oxygen is an enabling module for future plants for producing coal derived shifted synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen [H2] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) ultimately for producing clean energy and fuels. Oxygen-intensive industries such as steel, glass, non-ferrous metallurgy, refineries, and pulp and paper may also realize cost and productivity benefits as a result of employing ITM Oxygen.

360

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (<10{sup -5} atm). The anomalies are due to non-equilibrium effects and can be avoided by using very strict criteria for the attainment of equilibrium. The slowness of the oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 10:47:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country" "Sourcekey","MTTNTUS2","MTTNTUSPG2","MTTNT_NUS-ME0_2","MTTNTUSAG2","MTTNTUSAO2","MTTNTUSEC2","MTTNTUSIR2","MTTNT_NUS-NIZ_2","MTTNTUSKU2","MTTNT_NUS-NLY_2","MTTNTUSNI2","MTTNTUSQA2","MTTNTUSSA2","MTTNTUSTC2","MTTNTUSVE2","MTTNTUSVV2","MTTNT_NUS-NAF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAC_2","MTTNTUSAR2","MTTNT_NUS-NAE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAA_2","MTTNTUSAS2","MTTNT_NUS-NAU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAJ_2","MTTNTUSBF2","MTTNT_NUS-NBA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBO_2","MTTNTUSBE2","MTTNT_NUS-NBH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBK_2","MTTNTUSBR2","MTTNTUSBX2","MTTNT_NUS-NBU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCB_2","MTTNTUSCM2","MTTNTUSCA2","MTTNT_NUS-NCJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCI_2","MTTNTUSCH2","MTTNTUSCO2","MTTNTUSCF2","MTTNTUSCG2","MTTNT_NUS-NCW_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDR_2","MTTNTUSEG2","MTTNT_NUS-NES_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NET_2","MTTNT_NUS-NER_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFI_2","MTTNTUSFR2","MTTNT_NUS-NFP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFG_2","MTTNTUSGB2","MTTNT_NUS-NGG_2","MTTNTUSBZ2","MTTNT_NUS-NGH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGI_2","MTTNTUSGR2","MTTNT_NUS-NGL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGJ_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NGP_2","MTTNTUSGT2","MTTNT_NUS-NGV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIC_2","MTTNTUSIN2","MTTNTUSID2","MTTNT_NUS-NEI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIS_2","MTTNTUSIT2","MTTNT_NUS-NIV_2","MTTNTUSJM2","MTTNTUSJA2","MTTNT_NUS-NJO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKE_2","MTTNTUSKS2","MTTNT_NUS-NKT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMA_2","MTTNTUSMY2","MTTNT_NUS-NMV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NML_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NRM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMP_2","MTTNTUSMX2","MTTNT_NUS-NFM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMQ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMG_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NMJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNP_2","MTTNTUSNL2","MTTNTUSNA2","MTTNT_NUS-NNC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNE_2","MTTNTUSNO2","MTTNTUSMU2","MTTNT_NUS-NPK_2","MTTNTUSPM2","MTTNT_NUS-NPP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPA_2","MTTNTUSPE2","MTTNT_NUS-NRP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPO_2","MTTNTUSRQ2","MTTNTUSRO2","MTTNT_NUS-NRS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NST_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NYI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSF_2","MTTNTUSSP2","MTTNT_NUS-NPG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWZ_2","MTTNTUSSW2","MTTNT_NUS-NSZ_2","MTTNTUSSY2","MTTNTUSTW2","MTTNT_NUS-NTZ_2","MTTNTUSTH2","MTTNT_NUS-NTO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTN_2","MTTNTUSTD2","MTTNT_NUS-NTS_2","MTTNTUSTU2","MTTNT_NUS-NTX_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUR_2","MTTNTUSUK2","MTTNT_NUS-NUY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVI_2","MTTNTUSVQ2","MTTNTUSYE2","MTTNT_NUS-NYO_2","MTTNTUSWW2"

363

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:12:12 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP31","MTTIPP3PG1","MTTIP_R30-ME0_1","MTTIPP3AG1","MTTIPP3AO1","MTTIPP3EC1","MTTIP_R30-NIZ_1","MTTIPP3KU1","MTTIP_R30-NLY_1","MTTIPP3NI1","MTTIP_R30-NQA_1","MTTIPP3SA1","MTTIPP3TC1","MTTIPP3VE1","MTTIPP3VV1","MTTIP_R30-NAL_1","MTTIPP3AR1","MTTIP_R30-NAA_1","MTTIPP3AS1","MTTIP_R30-NAU_1","MTTIP_R30-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R30-NBF_1","MTTIP_R30-NBA_1","MTTIP_R30-NBO_1","MTTIPP3BE1","MTTIP_R30-NBH_1","MTTIP_R30-NBN_1","MTTIP_R30-NBL_1","MTTIP_R30-NBR_1","MTTIP_R30-NBX_1","MTTIP_R30-NBU_1","MTTIP_R30-NBM_1","MTTIP_R30-NCM_1","MTTIPP3CA1","MTTIP_R30-NCD_1","MTTIP_R30-NCI_1","MTTIP_R30-NCH_1","MTTIPP3CO1","MTTIPP3CF1","MTTIPP3CG1","MTTIP_R30-NCW_1","MTTIP_R30-NCS_1","MTTIP_R30-NHR_1","MTTIP_R30-NCY_1","MTTIP_R30-NCZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NDA_1","MTTIPP3EG1","MTTIP_R30-NES_1","MTTIP_R30-NEK_1","MTTIP_R30-NEN_1","MTTIP_R30-NFI_1","MTTIPP3FR1","MTTIPP3GB1","MTTIP_R30-NGG_1","MTTIP_R30-NGM_1","MTTIP_R30-NGH_1","MTTIP_R30-NGR_1","MTTIP_R30-NGT_1","MTTIP_R30-NGV_1","MTTIP_R30-NHU_1","MTTIP_R30-NIN_1","MTTIPP3ID1","MTTIP_R30-NEI_1","MTTIP_R30-NIS_1","MTTIPP3IT1","MTTIP_R30-NIV_1","MTTIP_R30-NJM_1","MTTIP_R30-NJA_1","MTTIP_R30-NKZ_1","MTTIPP3KS1","MTTIP_R30-NKG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLI_1","MTTIP_R30-NLH_1","MTTIP_R30-NMY_1","MTTIP_R30-NMT_1","MTTIP_R30-NMR_1","MTTIPP3MX1","MTTIP_R30-NMQ_1","MTTIP_R30-NMO_1","MTTIP_R30-NNL_1","MTTIPP3NA1","MTTIP_R30-NNZ_1","MTTIPP3NO1","MTTIP_R30-NMU_1","MTTIP_R30-NPK_1","MTTIP_R30-NPM_1","MTTIP_R30-NPP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPE_1","MTTIP_R30-NRP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPL_1","MTTIP_R30-NPO_1","MTTIP_R30-NPZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NRO_1","MTTIP_R30-NRS_1","MTTIP_R30-NSN_1","MTTIP_R30-NSK_1","MTTIP_R30-NSF_1","MTTIPP3SP1","MTTIPP3SW1","MTTIP_R30-NSZ_1","MTTIPP3SY1","MTTIP_R30-NTW_1","MTTIPP3TH1","MTTIP_R30-NTO_1","MTTIPP3TD1","MTTIP_R30-NTS_1","MTTIP_R30-NTU_1","MTTIP_R30-NTX_1","MTTIP_R30-NUR_1","MTTIPP3UK1","MTTIP_R30-NUY_1","MTTIP_R30-NUZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NVM_1","MTTIPP3VQ1","MTTIPP3YE1"

364

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:29:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAC_1","MTTEXAR1","MTTEX_NUS-NAE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAA_1","MTTEXAS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAJ_1","MTTEXBF1","MTTEXBA1","MTTEX_NUS-NBB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBO_1","MTTEXBE1","MTTEX_NUS-NBH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBK_1","MTTEXBR1","MTTEX_NUS-NBX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCM_1","MTTEXCA1","MTTEX_NUS-NCJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCD_1","MTTEXCI1","MTTEXCH1","MTTEXCO1","MTTEX_NUS-NCF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCG_1","MTTEXCS1","MTTEX_NUS-NHR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCZ_1","MTTEXDA1","MTTEX_NUS-NDJ_1","MTTEXDO1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NDR_1","MTTEXEC1","MTTEXEG1","MTTEXES1","MTTEX_NUS-NEK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NER_1","MTTEX_NUS-NEN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NET_1","MTTEX_NUS-NFJ_1","MTTEXFI1","MTTEXFR1","MTTEX_NUS-NFG_1","MTTEXFP1","MTTEX_NUS-NGB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGG_1","MTTEXBZ1","MTTEXGH1","MTTEX_NUS-NGI_1","MTTEXGR1","MTTEX_NUS-NGL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGJ_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NGP_1","MTTEXGT1","MTTEX_NUS-NGV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NHA_1","MTTEXHO1","MTTEXHK1","MTTEX_NUS-NHU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIC_1","MTTEXIN1","MTTEXID1","MTTEX_NUS-NIR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIZ_1","MTTEXEI1","MTTEXIS1","MTTEXIT1","MTTEX_NUS-NIV_1","MTTEXJM1","MTTEXJA1","MTTEX_NUS-NJO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKE_1","MTTEXKS1","MTTEX_NUS-NKN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMA_1","MTTEXMY1","MTTEX_NUS-NMV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NML_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMP_1","MTTEXMX1","MTTEX_NUS-NFM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMQ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMG_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NMJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNP_1","MTTEXNL1","MTTEXNA1","MTTEX_NUS-NNC_1","MTTEXNZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NNU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNG_1","MTTEXNI1","MTTEX_NUS-NNE_1","MTTEXNO1","MTTEX_NUS-NMU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPK_1","MTTEXPM1","MTTEX_NUS-NPP_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPA_1","MTTEXPE1","MTTEXRP1","MTTEXPL1","MTTEXPO1","MTTEXRQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NQA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NST_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSM_1","MTTEXSA1","MTTEX_NUS-NSG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NYI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSL_1","MTTEXSN1","MTTEX_NUS-NSK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBP_1","MTTEXSF1","MTTEXSP1","MTTEX_NUS-NPG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSU_1","MTTEXNS1","MTTEX_NUS-NWZ_1","MTTEXSW1","MTTEXSZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NSY_1","MTTEXTW1","MTTEX_NUS-NTZ_1","MTTEXTH1","MTTEX_NUS-NTN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTO_1","MTTEXTD1","MTTEX_NUS-NTS_1","MTTEXTU1","MTTEX_NUS-NTX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUR_1","MTTEXTC1","MTTEXUK1","MTTEXUY1","MTTEX_NUS-NUZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNH_1","MTTEXVE1","MTTEX_NUS-NVM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVI_1","MTTEXVQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NYE_1","MTTEXYO1","MTTEX_NUS-NZA_1"

365

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:03:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIP_R10-NMR_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

366

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:02:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIP_R10-NTN_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

367

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

98,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 98,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r50_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r50_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:20:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Coast (PADD 5) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP51","MTTIPP5PG1","MTTIP_R50-ME0_1","MTTIP_R50-NAG_1","MTTIP_R50-NAO_1","MTTIPP5EC1","MTTIP_R50-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NKU_1","MTTIP_R50-NLY_1","MTTIP_R50-NNI_1","MTTIP_R50-NQA_1","MTTIPP5SA1","MTTIP_R50-NTC_1","MTTIPP5VE1","MTTIPP5VV1","MTTIPP5AR1","MTTIP_R50-NAA_1","MTTIPP5AS1","MTTIP_R50-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R50-NBF_1","MTTIP_R50-NBA_1","MTTIP_R50-NBO_1","MTTIP_R50-NBE_1","MTTIP_R50-NBN_1","MTTIP_R50-NBL_1","MTTIP_R50-NBR_1","MTTIP_R50-NBX_1","MTTIP_R50-NCM_1","MTTIPP5CA1","MTTIP_R50-NCD_1","MTTIP_R50-NCI_1","MTTIPP5CH1","MTTIPP5CO1","MTTIPP5CF1","MTTIP_R50-NCG_1","MTTIP_R50-NCS_1","MTTIP_R50-NHR_1","MTTIP_R50-NDA_1","MTTIP_R50-NDR_1","MTTIP_R50-NEG_1","MTTIP_R50-NES_1","MTTIP_R50-NEK_1","MTTIP_R50-NEN_1","MTTIP_R50-NFI_1","MTTIP_R50-NFR_1","MTTIP_R50-NGB_1","MTTIP_R50-NGM_1","MTTIP_R50-NGR_1","MTTIP_R50-NGT_1","MTTIP_R50-NGV_1","MTTIP_R50-NHK_1","MTTIP_R50-NHU_1","MTTIP_R50-NIN_1","MTTIPP5ID1","MTTIP_R50-NIS_1","MTTIP_R50-NIT_1","MTTIP_R50-NIV_1","MTTIP_R50-NJM_1","MTTIP_R50-NJA_1","MTTIP_R50-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NKS_1","MTTIP_R50-NLH_1","MTTIP_R50-NMY_1","MTTIP_R50-NMT_1","MTTIPP5MX1","MTTIP_R50-NMO_1","MTTIP_R50-NNL_1","MTTIP_R50-NNA_1","MTTIP_R50-NNZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NNU_1","MTTIP_R50-NNO_1","MTTIP_R50-NMU_1","MTTIP_R50-NPM_1","MTTIP_R50-NPP_1","MTTIPP5PE1","MTTIP_R50-NRP_1","MTTIP_R50-NPL_1","MTTIP_R50-NPO_1","MTTIP_R50-NRO_1","MTTIP_R50-NRS_1","MTTIPP5SN1","MTTIP_R50-NSF_1","MTTIP_R50-NSP_1","MTTIP_R50-NPG_1","MTTIP_R50-NSW_1","MTTIP_R50-NSY_1","MTTIP_R50-NTW_1","MTTIP_R50-NTH_1","MTTIP_R50-NTD_1","MTTIP_R50-NTS_1","MTTIP_R50-NTU_1","MTTIP_R50-NTX_1","MTTIP_R50-NUR_1","MTTIPP5UK1","MTTIP_R50-NUY_1","MTTIP_R50-NVM_1","MTTIPP5VQ1","MTTIP_R50-NYE_1"

368

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:28:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAC_1","MTTEXAR1","MTTEX_NUS-NAE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAA_1","MTTEXAS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAJ_1","MTTEXBF1","MTTEXBA1","MTTEX_NUS-NBB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBO_1","MTTEXBE1","MTTEX_NUS-NBH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBK_1","MTTEXBR1","MTTEX_NUS-NBX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCM_1","MTTEXCA1","MTTEX_NUS-NCJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCD_1","MTTEXCI1","MTTEXCH1","MTTEXCO1","MTTEX_NUS-NCF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCG_1","MTTEXCS1","MTTEX_NUS-NHR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCZ_1","MTTEXDA1","MTTEX_NUS-NDJ_1","MTTEXDO1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NDR_1","MTTEXEC1","MTTEXEG1","MTTEXES1","MTTEX_NUS-NEK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NER_1","MTTEX_NUS-NEN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NET_1","MTTEX_NUS-NFJ_1","MTTEXFI1","MTTEXFR1","MTTEX_NUS-NFG_1","MTTEXFP1","MTTEX_NUS-NGB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGG_1","MTTEXBZ1","MTTEXGH1","MTTEX_NUS-NGI_1","MTTEXGR1","MTTEX_NUS-NGL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGJ_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NGP_1","MTTEXGT1","MTTEX_NUS-NGV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NHA_1","MTTEXHO1","MTTEXHK1","MTTEX_NUS-NHU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIC_1","MTTEXIN1","MTTEXID1","MTTEX_NUS-NIZ_1","MTTEXEI1","MTTEXIS1","MTTEXIT1","MTTEX_NUS-NIV_1","MTTEXJM1","MTTEXJA1","MTTEX_NUS-NJO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKE_1","MTTEXKS1","MTTEX_NUS-NKN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMA_1","MTTEXMY1","MTTEX_NUS-NMV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NML_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMP_1","MTTEXMX1","MTTEX_NUS-NFM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMQ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMG_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NMJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNP_1","MTTEXNL1","MTTEXNA1","MTTEX_NUS-NNC_1","MTTEXNZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NNU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNG_1","MTTEXNI1","MTTEX_NUS-NNE_1","MTTEXNO1","MTTEX_NUS-NMU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPK_1","MTTEXPM1","MTTEX_NUS-NPP_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPA_1","MTTEXPE1","MTTEXRP1","MTTEXPL1","MTTEXPO1","MTTEXRQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NQA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NST_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSM_1","MTTEXSA1","MTTEX_NUS-NSG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NYI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSL_1","MTTEXSN1","MTTEX_NUS-NSK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBP_1","MTTEXSF1","MTTEXSP1","MTTEX_NUS-NPG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSU_1","MTTEXNS1","MTTEX_NUS-NWZ_1","MTTEXSW1","MTTEXSZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NSY_1","MTTEXTW1","MTTEX_NUS-NTZ_1","MTTEXTH1","MTTEX_NUS-NTN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTO_1","MTTEXTD1","MTTEX_NUS-NTS_1","MTTEXTU1","MTTEX_NUS-NTX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUR_1","MTTEXTC1","MTTEXUK1","MTTEXUY1","MTTEX_NUS-NUZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNH_1","MTTEXVE1","MTTEX_NUS-NVM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVI_1","MTTEXVQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NYE_1","MTTEXYO1","MTTEX_NUS-NZA_1"

369

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:11:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP31","MTTIPP3PG1","MTTIP_R30-ME0_1","MTTIPP3AG1","MTTIPP3AO1","MTTIPP3EC1","MTTIP_R30-NIZ_1","MTTIPP3KU1","MTTIP_R30-NLY_1","MTTIPP3NI1","MTTIP_R30-NQA_1","MTTIPP3SA1","MTTIPP3TC1","MTTIPP3VE1","MTTIPP3VV1","MTTIP_R30-NAL_1","MTTIPP3AR1","MTTIP_R30-NAA_1","MTTIPP3AS1","MTTIP_R30-NAU_1","MTTIP_R30-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R30-NBF_1","MTTIP_R30-NBA_1","MTTIP_R30-NBO_1","MTTIPP3BE1","MTTIP_R30-NBH_1","MTTIP_R30-NBN_1","MTTIP_R30-NBL_1","MTTIP_R30-NBR_1","MTTIP_R30-NBX_1","MTTIP_R30-NBU_1","MTTIP_R30-NBM_1","MTTIP_R30-NCM_1","MTTIPP3CA1","MTTIP_R30-NCD_1","MTTIP_R30-NCI_1","MTTIP_R30-NCH_1","MTTIPP3CO1","MTTIPP3CF1","MTTIPP3CG1","MTTIP_R30-NCW_1","MTTIP_R30-NCS_1","MTTIP_R30-NHR_1","MTTIP_R30-NCY_1","MTTIP_R30-NCZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NDA_1","MTTIPP3EG1","MTTIP_R30-NES_1","MTTIP_R30-NEK_1","MTTIP_R30-NEN_1","MTTIP_R30-NFI_1","MTTIPP3FR1","MTTIPP3GB1","MTTIP_R30-NGG_1","MTTIP_R30-NGM_1","MTTIP_R30-NGH_1","MTTIP_R30-NGR_1","MTTIP_R30-NGT_1","MTTIP_R30-NGV_1","MTTIP_R30-NHU_1","MTTIP_R30-NIN_1","MTTIPP3ID1","MTTIP_R30-NEI_1","MTTIP_R30-NIS_1","MTTIPP3IT1","MTTIP_R30-NIV_1","MTTIP_R30-NJM_1","MTTIP_R30-NJA_1","MTTIP_R30-NKZ_1","MTTIPP3KS1","MTTIP_R30-NKG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLI_1","MTTIP_R30-NLH_1","MTTIP_R30-NMY_1","MTTIP_R30-NMT_1","MTTIP_R30-NMR_1","MTTIPP3MX1","MTTIP_R30-NMQ_1","MTTIP_R30-NMO_1","MTTIP_R30-NNL_1","MTTIPP3NA1","MTTIP_R30-NNZ_1","MTTIPP3NO1","MTTIP_R30-NMU_1","MTTIP_R30-NPK_1","MTTIP_R30-NPM_1","MTTIP_R30-NPP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPE_1","MTTIP_R30-NRP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPL_1","MTTIP_R30-NPO_1","MTTIP_R30-NPZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NRO_1","MTTIP_R30-NRS_1","MTTIP_R30-NSN_1","MTTIP_R30-NSK_1","MTTIP_R30-NSF_1","MTTIPP3SP1","MTTIPP3SW1","MTTIP_R30-NSZ_1","MTTIPP3SY1","MTTIP_R30-NTW_1","MTTIPP3TH1","MTTIP_R30-NTO_1","MTTIP_R30-NTN_1","MTTIPP3TD1","MTTIP_R30-NTS_1","MTTIP_R30-NTU_1","MTTIP_R30-NTX_1","MTTIP_R30-NUR_1","MTTIPP3UK1","MTTIP_R30-NUY_1","MTTIP_R30-NUZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NVM_1","MTTIPP3VQ1","MTTIPP3YE1"

370

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 10:46:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country" "Sourcekey","MTTNTUS2","MTTNTUSPG2","MTTNT_NUS-ME0_2","MTTNTUSAG2","MTTNTUSAO2","MTTNTUSEC2","MTTNTUSIR2","MTTNT_NUS-NIZ_2","MTTNTUSKU2","MTTNT_NUS-NLY_2","MTTNTUSNI2","MTTNTUSQA2","MTTNTUSSA2","MTTNTUSTC2","MTTNTUSVE2","MTTNTUSVV2","MTTNT_NUS-NAF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAC_2","MTTNTUSAR2","MTTNT_NUS-NAE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAA_2","MTTNTUSAS2","MTTNT_NUS-NAU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAJ_2","MTTNTUSBF2","MTTNT_NUS-NBA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBO_2","MTTNTUSBE2","MTTNT_NUS-NBH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBK_2","MTTNTUSBR2","MTTNTUSBX2","MTTNT_NUS-NBU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCB_2","MTTNTUSCM2","MTTNTUSCA2","MTTNT_NUS-NCJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCI_2","MTTNTUSCH2","MTTNTUSCO2","MTTNTUSCF2","MTTNTUSCG2","MTTNT_NUS-NCW_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDR_2","MTTNTUSEG2","MTTNT_NUS-NES_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NET_2","MTTNT_NUS-NER_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFI_2","MTTNTUSFR2","MTTNT_NUS-NFP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFG_2","MTTNTUSGB2","MTTNT_NUS-NGG_2","MTTNTUSBZ2","MTTNT_NUS-NGH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGI_2","MTTNTUSGR2","MTTNT_NUS-NGL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGJ_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NGP_2","MTTNTUSGT2","MTTNT_NUS-NGV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIC_2","MTTNTUSIN2","MTTNTUSID2","MTTNT_NUS-NEI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIS_2","MTTNTUSIT2","MTTNT_NUS-NIV_2","MTTNTUSJM2","MTTNTUSJA2","MTTNT_NUS-NJO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKE_2","MTTNTUSKS2","MTTNT_NUS-NKT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMA_2","MTTNTUSMY2","MTTNT_NUS-NMV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NML_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NRM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMP_2","MTTNTUSMX2","MTTNT_NUS-NFM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMQ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMG_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NMJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNP_2","MTTNTUSNL2","MTTNTUSNA2","MTTNT_NUS-NNC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNE_2","MTTNTUSNO2","MTTNTUSMU2","MTTNT_NUS-NPK_2","MTTNTUSPM2","MTTNT_NUS-NPP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPA_2","MTTNTUSPE2","MTTNT_NUS-NRP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPO_2","MTTNTUSRQ2","MTTNTUSRO2","MTTNT_NUS-NRS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NST_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NYI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSF_2","MTTNTUSSP2","MTTNT_NUS-NPG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWZ_2","MTTNTUSSW2","MTTNT_NUS-NSZ_2","MTTNTUSSY2","MTTNTUSTW2","MTTNT_NUS-NTZ_2","MTTNTUSTH2","MTTNT_NUS-NTO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTN_2","MTTNTUSTD2","MTTNT_NUS-NTS_2","MTTNTUSTU2","MTTNT_NUS-NTX_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUR_2","MTTNTUSUK2","MTTNT_NUS-NUY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVI_2","MTTNTUSVQ2","MTTNTUSYE2","MTTNT_NUS-NYO_2","MTTNTUSWW2"

371

Polymer/Silica Composite Films as Luminescent Oxygen Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

10-14 In this technique, an object (a model airplane or wing, a turbine blade, or an automobile) coated with an oxygen-sensing polymer coating (“pressure-sensitive paint,” PSP) is examined in a wind tunnel. ... To examine the influence of the silica particles on oxygen diffusion and oxygen permeation in these films, we carried out both time-scan and pulsed-laser experiments as a function of silica content on films containing PtOEP. ... We rationalize this result by imagining that oxygen adsorption onto the silica surface is diffusion-controlled. Fickian diffusion through the PDMS matrix controls the rate of quenching of dye molecules bound to the silica particles. ...

Xin Lu; Ian Manners; Mitchell A. Winnik

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

372

NETL: News Release - New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

22, 2009 22, 2009 New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful Ceramic Membrane Enables Efficient, Cost-Effective Co-Production of Power and Oxygen Washington, D.C. -The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies. ITM Oxygen will enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, as well as other gasification-based processes. The technology will also enhance the economics of oxy-fired combustion technologies, making it an attractive option for the capture of carbon dioxide from existing coal-fired power plants.

373

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs. log pO{sub 2} is {approx} 1/5 in the p-type region, pO{sub 2} = 10{sup -5} {approx} 10{sup -1} atm. The pO{sub 2} at which the p-n transition is observed increases with increasing temperature. The activation energy for ionic conduction was estimated to be 0.86 eV from an Arrhenius plot of the minimum conductivity vs. reciprocal temperature. At temperatures below 940 C, a plateau in the conductivity isotherm suggests the presence of a two-phase region. Most likely, phase separation occurs to form a mixture of a perovskite phase and an oxygen vacancy ordered phase related to brownmillerite. Additional data for the oxygen non stoichiometry are presented.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Surveillance Guides - Training Program Content  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRAINING PROGRAM CONTENT TRAINING PROGRAM CONTENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for establishing the content of training programs. The process to be evaluated includes (1) determining the tasks individuals must perform; (2) specifying the required knowledge, skills, and abilities for performing tasks; (3) selecting knowledge skills and abilities for training; and (4) selecting appropriate training settings. The Facility Representative reviews records and interviews personnel to evaluate the effectiveness of the process. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with DOE requirements and implementation of best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.18A, Accreditation of Performance-Based

375

Table of Contents Chapter and Content Pages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Page 2 Table of Contents Chapter and Content Pages 1. Field Trip Itinerary ................................................................................. 7 4. Geologic Framework of the Netherlands Antilles 5. Coral Reefs of the Netherlands Antilles

Fouke, Bruce W.

376

Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Using Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride). Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...

377

Composite oxygen transport membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V., E-mail: luck@fafnir.astr.cwru.edu, E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua, E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua, E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua [Department of Astronomy and Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, Shevchenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Delegation Procedures - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accessibility Text size: (Requires JavaScript) Large Normal Small This site uses the Open Source Content Management System Plone and has been designed to be completely accessible...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Site Content and Metadata  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metadata is data about data, and is essentially the categorization of the content within a content management system. A good example of metadata is in the classification of documents in a Content Man...

Robert Garrett

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report, measurements of the chemical and thermal expansion as a function of temperature and p{sub O2} are described.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Caloric content of phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jul 10, 1972 ... from carbon content, enabling much smaller ... surement of the energy efficiency of primary ... caloric content of the tissues of organisms.

1999-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

384

BWR oxygen control demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of cracks have occurred recently in certain BWR piping systems. The operating environment associated with oxidizing species such as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide is considered one of the factors in the mechanism of cracking. In April 1976, NWT Corporation was contracted to perform a BWR oxygen control demonstration program. Means for reducing reactor water oxygen and hydrogen peroxide concentrations during startup and shutdown transients were defined and demonstrated at Vermont Yankee and Browns Ferry Unit 3. Results of the demonstrations and an analytical review of impacts of major system variables on oxygen transients are discussed herein.

Pearl, W.L.; Kassen, W.R.; Sawochka, S.G.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Oxygen to the core  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-01 1-01 For immediate release: 01/10/2013 | NR-13-01-01 Oxygen to the core Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly An artist's conception of Earth's inner and outer core. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- An international collaboration including researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has discovered that the Earth's core formed under more oxidizing conditions than previously proposed. Through a series of laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments at high pressure (350,000 to 700,000 atmospheres of pressure) and temperatures (5,120 to 7,460 degrees Fahrenheit), the team demonstrated that the depletion of siderophile (also known as "iron loving") elements can be produced by core formation under more oxidizing conditions than earlier

386

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Pool octanes via oxygenates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasingly stringent antipollution regulations placed on automobile exhaust gases with consequent reduction or complete lead ban from motor gasoline result in octane shortage at many manufacturing sites. Attractive solutions to this problem, especially in conjunction with abundant methanol supplies, are the hydration and etherification of olefins contained in light product streams from cracking unit or produced by field gas dehydrogenation. A comparison is made between oxygenates octane-volume pool contributions and established refinery technologies. Process reviews for bulk manufacture of fuel-grade isopropanol (IPA), secondary butanol (SBA), tertiary butanol (TBA), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME) are presented together with the characteristic investment and operating data. The implantation of these processes into a typical FCCU refinery complex with the resulting octane-pool improvement possibilities is descried.

Prezelj, M.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Template:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ContentAssist ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This is the ContentAssist template. It is intended for inclusion on any page and will highlight extracted energy-related terms from the page, presenting their definitions to users on mouse-over. Additionally, the template will generate a list of recommended additional reading based on the content of the page. This template requires the ContentAssist widget to be functional. Parameters No parameters Dependencies Widget:ContentAssist Usage It should be called in the following format: {{ContentAssist}} Example In addition to highlighting extracted energy terms and presenting their definitions, this template will produce the following: Dictionary.png Error loading definition! OpenEI-ribbon.png Edit the page to see the template text.

390

Content is not King  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Internet is widely regarded as primarily a content delivery system. Yet historically, connectivity

Odlyzko, Andrew

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

12/20/12 7:50 AMHuman Vitreous: MR Imaging of Oxygen Partial Pressure Page 1 of 12http://radiology.rsna.org/content/early/2012/11/30/radiol.12120777.full?sid=5b36cf57-91be-4a3f-ad97-afc0a8744edb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/20/12 7:50 AMHuman Vitreous: MR Imaging of Oxygen Partial Pressure Page 1 of 12http method to measure the longitudinal relaxation rate, or R1, of water was implemented with a 3.0-T MR.rsna.org Published online before print December 6, 2012, doi: 10.1148/radiol.12120777 Human Vitreous: MR Imaging

Duong, Timothy Q.

392

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Plants and Night Oxygen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plants and Night Oxygen Production Plants and Night Oxygen Production Name: Ashar Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: India Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: I would like to know if there are any plants which produces oxygen at night (without photosynthesis). I was told by a friend that Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) produces oxygen even at night and I'm not convinced. I would like to get confirmation from experts. Replies: Some plants (particularly those of dry regions, e.g., deserts) only open their stomates at night to avoid drying out to intake CO2 (and output O2) (CAM photosynthesis) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crassulacean_acid_metabolism Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, PhD Missouri Botanical Garden Bringing oxygen producing plants into your home is a way to mimic the healthy lifestyle factors of longevity in humans from the longest lived cultures.

394

Oxygen detection using evanescent fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for the detection of oxygen using optical fiber based evanescent light absorption. Methylene blue was immobilized using a sol-gel process on a portion of the exterior surface of an optical fiber for which the cladding has been removed, thereby forming an optical oxygen sensor. When light is directed through the optical fiber, transmitted light intensity varies as a result of changes in the absorption of evanescent light by the methylene blue in response to the oxygen concentration to which the sensor is exposed. The sensor was found to have a linear response to oxygen concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale within the oxygen concentration range between 0.6% and 20.9%, a response time and a recovery time of about 3 s, ant to exhibit good reversibility and repeatability. An increase in temperature from 21.degree. C. to 35.degree. C. does not affect the net absorption of the sensor.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Weenqing (Los Alamos, NM)

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

395

Reducing the Emission of Particles from a Diesel Engine by Adding an Oxygenate to the Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small reduction of the engine power was also observed; however, the net effect was nevertheless a reduction in the emission of CO2 per European stationary cycle. ... A general finding is that the reduction of particles seems to be linearly dependent on the oxygen content, and, thus, the blend with the highest oxygen content results in the highest reduction of particles (14?16). ... Measure ments of NOx, HC, and CO content were performed in accordance with the ESC test cycles and were repeated nine times when the engine was operating on EC-1 diesel and five times when the engine was operating on A-diesel. ...

Kent E. Nord; Dan Haupt

2005-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

Home: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

content. | Skip to navigation content. | Skip to navigation Site Map Contact Us Current Documents Archived Documents Entire Site only in current section Advanced Search... U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Sections Home Directives Current Directives Draft Directives Archives Delegations Current Delegations Current Designations Rescinded Organizations' Assignment of Responsibility Development & Review RevCom Writers' Tools DPC Corner References News and Updates Help Personal tools You are here: Office of Management Ā» Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Info Home Directives are the Department of Energy's primary means of establishing policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. Directive

397

Flammability of selected heat resistant alloys in oxygen gas mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within recent years, the use of oxygen has increased in applications where elevated temperatures and corrosion may be significant factors. In such situations, traditional alloys used in oxygen systems will not be adequate. Where alternative alloys must be utilized, based upon environmental requirements, it is essential that they may be characterized with respect to their ignition and combustion resistance in oxygen. Promoted ignition and promoted ignition-combustion are terms which have been used to describe a situation where a substance with low oxygen supports the combustion of a compatibility ignites and more ignition resistant material. In this paper, data will be presented on the promoted ignition-combustion behavior of selected heat resistant engineering alloys that may be considered for gaseous oxygen applications in severe environments. In this investigation, alloys have been evaluated via both flowing and static (fixed volume) approaches using a rod configuration. Oxygen-nitrogen gas mixtures with compositions ranging from approximately 40 to 99.7% oxygen at pressures of 3.55 to 34.6 MPa were used in the comparative studies.

Zawierucha, R.; McIlroy, K.; Million, J.F. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and initial studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. In addition, studies were also begun to obtain reliable estimates of fracture toughness and stable crack growth in specific environments. Newer composition of Ti doped LSF membranes were characterized by neutron diffraction analysis. Quench studies indicated an apparent correlation between the unit cell volume and oxygen occupancy. The studies however, indicated an anomaly of increasing Fe/Ti ratio with change in heat treatment. Ti doped LSF was also characterized for stoichiometry as a function of temp and pO{sub 2}. The non stoichiometry parameter {delta} was observed to increase almost linearly on lowering pO{sub 2} until a ideal stoichiometric composition of {delta} = 0.175 was approached.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; W.B. Yelon; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Low Oxygen Environments in Chesapeake Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Oxygen Environments in Chesapeake Bay Jeremy Testa Chesapeake Biological Laboratory University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Why we care about low oxygen? What causes low oxygen? Where and When does Chesapeake Bay lose oxygen? #12;#12;Hypoxia and Chesapeake Animals Low dissolved oxygen

Boynton, Walter R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Competition Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the

402

Competition Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

----------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- Chapter 6.1 (February 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must

403

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Oxygen vs. Liquid Nitrogen - Liquid Oxygen and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Paramagnetism) Paramagnetism Liquid Oxygen and Fire! What happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a test tube of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a test tube of liquid oxygen! Joanna: Let's see what happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire. Steve: Fire?! Joanna: Yeah! Steve: Really?! Joanna: Why not! Steve: Okay! Joanna: As nitrogen boils, it changes into nitrogen gas. Because it's so cold, it's denser than the air in the room. The test tube fills up with

404

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase IV Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel furnace designs based on Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) technology were developed under subcontract by Techint Technologies, Coraopolis, PA, to fully exploit the energy and environmental capabilities of DOC technology and to provide a competitive offering for new furnace construction opportunities. Capital cost, fuel, oxygen and utility costs, NOx emissions, oxide scaling performance, and maintenance requirements were compared for five DOC-based designs and three conventional air5-fired designs using a 10-year net present value calculation. A furnace direct completely with DOC burners offers low capital cost, low fuel rate, and minimal NOx emissions. However, these benefits do not offset the cost of oxygen and a full DOC-fired furnace is projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is roughly $6/lb NOx, compared with an estimated $3/lb. NOx for equ8pping a conventional furnace with selective catalytic reduction (SCCR) technology. A furnace fired with DOC burners in the heating zone and ambient temperature (cold) air-fired burners in the soak zone offers low capital cost with less oxygen consumption. However, the improvement in fuel rate is not as great as the full DOC-fired design, and the DOC-cold soak design is also projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The NOx improvement with the DOC-cold soak design is also not as great as the full DOC fired design, and the incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is nearly $9/lb NOx. These results indicate that a DOC-based furnace design will not be generally competitive with conventional technology for new furnace construction under current market conditions. Fuel prices of $7/MMBtu or oxygen prices of $23/ton are needed to make the DOC furnace economics favorable. Niche applications may exist, particularly where access to capital is limited or floor space limitations are critical. DOC technology will continue to have a highly competitive role in retrofit applications requiring increases in furnace productivity.

Riley, M.F.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the current research, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature in air. Based on these measurements, the charge carrier concentration, net acceptor dopant concentration, activation energy of conduction and mobility were estimated. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature have been completed and reported previously. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affects the mechanical properties. To study the effect of temperature on the membranes when exposed to an inert environment, the membranes (LAFT and Dual phase) were heat treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} atmosphere and hardness and fracture toughness of the membranes were studied after the treatment. The indentation method was used to find the fracture toughness and the effect of the heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the membranes. Further results on the investigation of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appears to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model will serve to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

2003-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

Oxygen transfer in the implant environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature dependence of oxygen diffusion and consumptionRN. Influence of temperature on oxygen diffusion in hamster341-347, 1988. Cox ME. Oxygen Diffusion in Poly(dimethyl

Goor, Jared Braden

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN UO2-x  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ K.C. K:i.m, "Oxygen Diffusion in Hypostoichiometricsystem for enriching uo 2 in oxygen-18 or for stoichiometry+nal of Nuclear Materials OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN U0 2 _:x K.C.

Kim, K.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology advancements offer significant reductions in power requirements, which would improve plant efficiency and economics for the oxygen-fired technology. The second phase consisted of pilot-scale testing followed by a refined performance and economic evaluation of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. As a part of this workscope, ALSTOM modified its 3 MW{sub th} (9.9 MMBtu/hr) Multiuse Test Facility (MTF) pilot plant to operate with O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures of up to 70 percent O{sub 2} by volume. Tests were conducted with coal and petroleum coke. The test objectives were to determine the impacts of oxygen firing on heat transfer, bed dynamics, potential agglomeration, and gaseous and particulate emissions. The test data results were used to refine the design, performance, costs, and economic models developed in Phase-I for the O{sub 2}-fired CFB with CO{sub 2} capture. Nsakala, Liljedahl, and Turek reported results from this study in 2004. ALSTOM identified several items needing further investigation in preparation for large scale demonstration of the oxygen-fired CFB concept, namely: (1) Operation and performance of the moving bed heat exchanger (MBHE) to avoid recarbonation and also for cost savings compared to the standard bubbling fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE); (2) Performance of the back-end flash dryer absorber (FDA) for sulfur capture under high CO{sub 2}/high moisture flue gas environment using calcined limestone in the fly ash and using fresh commercial lime directly in the FDA; (3) Determination of the effect of recarbonation on fouling in the convective pass; (4) Assessment of the impact of oxygen firing on the mercury, other trace elements, and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; and (5) Develop a proposal-level oxygen-fired retrofit design for a relatively small existing CFB steam power plant in preparation for a large-scale demonstration of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. Hence, ALSTOM responded to a DOE Solicitation to address all these issues with further O{sub 2} fired MTF pilot testing and a subsequent retrofit design study of oxygen firing and CO{s

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Water column oxygen demand and sediment oxygen flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Water column oxygen demand and sediment oxygen flux: patterns of oxygen dissolved oxygen (DO) levels often occur during summer in tidal creeks along the southeastern coast of the USA. We analyzed rates of oxygen loss as water-column biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) and sediment

Mallin, Michael

411

Polycyclic Aromatic Triptycenes: Oxygen Substitution Cyclization Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cyclization and planarization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with concomitant oxygen substitution was achieved through acid catalyzed transetherification and oxygen-radical reactions. The triptycene scaffold ...

VanVeller, Brett

412

Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified...

413

Angling chromium to let oxygen through | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which enable facile oxygen anion diffusion at low temperature. Brighter spheres are strontium ions; less-bright spheres are chromium ions. Oxygen anions are barely visible, and...

414

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation...

415

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Division OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC11905 -DISCLAIMER - OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRICc o n e e n i g woroxygen self-diffusion coefficient

Kim, Kee Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

417

Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Presentation slides from the June 19, 2012, Fuel...

418

It's Elemental - The Element Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine The Element Oxygen [Click for Isotope Data] 8 O Oxygen 15.9994 Atomic Number: 8 Atomic Weight: 15.9994 Melting Point: 54.36 K (-218.79Ā°C or -361.82Ā°F) Boiling Point: 90.20 K (-182.95Ā°C or -297.31Ā°F) Density: 0.001429 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the greek words oxys and genes, which together mean "acid forming." Say what? Oxygen is pronounced as OK-si-jen. History and Uses: Oxygen had been produced by several chemists prior to its discovery in 1774, but they failed to recognize it as a distinct element. Joseph

419

The System Boron—Oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This presentation covers the years 1985 to 1988 and, in part, to 1992. It continues the previous discussion of the system boron—oxygen in “Boron Compounds” 3rd Suppl. Vol. 2, 1987, pp. 1/184, and earlier liter...

Gert Heller

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared with the results from the previous batch.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Required Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Required Documents Required Documents Required Documents All foreign nationals, including students and postdocs, must select the foreign nationals employment category to complete the new-hire process. Contact (505) 665-7158 Email Complete following forms before New-Hire Orientation Be sure to bring the forms with you for the orientation event, but do not sign and date: Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification (pdf) - original, unexpired documents for verification of employment eligibility. Please refer to the I-9 verification form titled, "Lists of Acceptable Documents", which was included with your offer letter. (Laminated documents or hospital/temporary birth certificates are not accepted.) Note: Failure to provide required documents will result in delay and/or

422

Competition Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is

423

Competition Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is identified in FAR

424

Effect of syngas composition and CO2-diluted oxygen on performance of a premixed swirl-stabilized combustor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future energy systems based on gasification of coal or biomass for co-production of electrical power and fuels may require gas turbine operation on unusual gaseous fuel mixtures. In addition, global climate change concerns may dictate the generation of a CO{sub 2} product stream for end-use or sequestration, with potential impacts on the oxidizer used in the gas turbine. In this study the operation at atmospheric pressure of a small, optically accessible swirl-stabilized premixed combustor, burning fuels ranging from pure methane to conventional and H{sub 2}-rich and H{sub 2}-lean syngas mixtures is investigated. Both air and CO{sub 2}-diluted oxygen are used as oxidizers. CO and NO{sub x} emissions for these flames have been determined from the lean blowout limit to slightly rich conditions ({phi} - 1.03). In practice, CO{sub 2}-diluted oxygen systems will likely be operated close to stoichiometric conditions to minimize oxygen consumption while achieving acceptable NO{sub x} performance. The presence of hydrogen in the syngas fuel mixtures results in more compact, higher temperature flames, resulting in increased flame stability and higher NO{sub x} emissions. Consistent with previous experience, the stoichiometry of lean blowout decreases with increasing H{sub 2} content in the syngas. Similarly, the lean stoichiometry at which CO emissions become significant decreases with increasing H{sub 2} content. For the mixtures investigated, CO emissions near the stoichiometric point do not become significant until {phi} > 0.95. At this stoichiometric limit, CO emissions rise more rapidly for combustion in O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixtures than for combustion in air.

Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The generation of singlet Delta oxygen - A technology overview. [For use in chemical oxygen iodine lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of generation of O2(1Delta g) using the chlorine-basic-hydrogen-peroxide reaction is a key element to predict the performance of the chemical oxygen iodine laser. O2(1Delta g) carries the energy in the laser, and thus is one of the prime determinants of power in the flow. To predict the performance of O2(1Delta g) generators requires the prediction of the utilization of chlorine, the yield of excited oxygen, and the concentration of potential contaminants in the chemical exhaust of the generator. This paper describes an approach to the analysis of O2(1Delta g) generators. 6 refs.

Mcdermott, W.E. (Rockwell International Corp., Rocketdyne Div., Canoga Park, CA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Water column oxygen demand and sediment oxygen flux: patterns of oxygen depletion in tidal creeks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five study sites were chosen in Futch Creek, Hewletts Creek and Pages Creek,...1). Sites were chosen to reflect a range in the values of dissolved oxygen levels, chlorophyll a concentrations and nutrient (nitroge...

Tara A. MacPherson; Lawrence B. Cahoon; Michael A. Mallin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped Ti-substituted perovskites, La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3}, with 0 {le} x {le} 0.20, were investigated by neutron diffraction, magnetization, electric resistivity, and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. All samples show a rhombohedral structure (space group R3C) from 10 K to room temperature. At room temperature, the cell parameters a, c and the unit cell volume increase with increasing Ti content. However, at 10 K, the cell parameter a has a maximum value for x = 0.10, and decreases for x > 0.10, while the unit cell volume remains nearly constant for x > 0.10. The average (Mn,Ti)-O bond length increases up to x = 0.15, and the (Mn,Ti)-O-(Mn,Ti) bond angle decreases with increasing Ti content to its minimum value at x = 0.15 at room temperature. Below the Curie temperature TC, the resistance exhibits metallic behavior for the x {le} 0.05 samples. A metal (semiconductor) to insulator transition is observed for the x {ge} 0.10 samples. A peak in resistivity appears below TC for all samples, and shifts to a lower temperature as x increases. The substitution of Mn by Ti decreases the 2p-3d hybridization between O and Mn ions, reduces the bandwidth W, and increases the electron-phonon coupling. Therefore, the TC shifts to a lower temperature and the resistivity increases with increasing Ti content. A field-induced shift of the resistivity maximum occurs at x {le} 0.10 compounds. The maximum MR effect is about 70% for La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}. The separation of TC and the resistivity maximum temperature T{sub {rho},max} enhances the MR effect in these compounds due to the weak coupling between the magnetic ordering and the resistivity as compared with La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}. The bulk densities of the membranes were determined using the Archimedes method. The bulk density was 5.029 and 5.57 g/cc for LSFT and dual phase membranes, respectively. The microstructure of the dual phase membrane was analyzed using SEM. It is evident from the micrograph that the microstructure is composed of dual phases. The dense circular regions are enclosed by the less dense, continuous phase which accommodates most of the pores. The pores are normally aggregated and found clustered along the dense regions where as the dense regions do not have pores. Upon closer observation of the micrograph it is revealed that the dense region has a clear circular cleavage or crack as their boundary. The circular cleavage clearly encompasses a dense region and which consists of no pore or any flaw that is visible. The size distribution of the dense, discontinuous regions is varying from 5 to 20 {micro}m with a D{sub 50} of 15 {micro}m. The grain size distribution was estimated from the micrographs using image analysis and a unimodal distribution of grains was observed with an average grain size of 1.99 {micro}m. The chemical compositions of the membranes were analyzed using EDS analysis and no other impurities were observed. The XRD analysis was carried out for the membranes and the phase purity was confirmed. The fracture toughness of LSFT membranes at room temperature has to be calculated using the Vickers indentation method. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the ionic conductivity by the use of blocking electrodes. Preliminary measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Modifications to the apparatus to improve the data quality have been completed. Electron microscopy studies of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been initiated. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradient

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C in N{sub 2}. Space group of R3c was found to result in a better refinement and is used in this study. The difference for crystal structure, lattice parameters and local crystal chemistry for LSFT nearly unchanged when gas environment switched from air to N{sub 2}. Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at room temperature in air. A bridge-compression fixture was fabricated to achieve stable pre-cracks from Vickers indents. Post fracture evaluation indicated stable crack growth from the indent and a regime of fast fracture. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. The thermal and chemical expansion of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were studied at 800 {le} T {le} 1000 C and at {approx} 1 x 10{sup -15} {le} pO{sub 2} {le} 0.21 atm. The thermal expansion coefficient of the sample was calculated from the dilatometric analysis in the temperature range between room temperature and 1200 C in air. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-conducting membranes have the ability to conduct oxygen with perfect selectivity at elevated temperatures, which makes them an extremely attractive alternative for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. The ability to reliably fabricate these membranes in thin or thick films would enable solid-state divisional limitations to be minimized, thus providing higher oxygen flux. Based on that motivation, the overall objective for this project is to develop and demonstrate a strategy for the fabrication of supported Wick film ceramic mixed conducting membranes, and improve the understanding of the fundamental issues associated with reliable fabrication of these membranes. The project has focused on the mixed-conducting ceramic composition SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} because of its superior permeability and stability in reducing atmospheres. The fabrication strategy employed involves the deposition of SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} thick films onto porous supports of the same composition. In the second year of this project, we completed characterization of the sintering and phase behavior of the porous SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} supports, leading to a standard support fabrication methodology. Using a doctor blade method, pastes made from aerosol-derived SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} powder dispersed with polyethylene glycol were applied to the supports, and the sintering behavior of the thick film membranes was examined in air and nitrogen atmospheres. It has been demonstrated that the desired crystalline phase content can be produced in the membranes, and that the material in the membrane layer can be highly densified without densifying the underlying support. However, considerable cracking and opening of the film occurred when films densified to a high extent. The addition of MgO into the SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} supports was shown to inhibit support sintering so that temperatures up to 1300 C, where significant liquid formation occurs, could be used for film sintering. This successfully reduced cracking, however the films retained open porosity. The investigation of this concept will be continued in the final year of the project. Investigation of a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method for defect mending in dense membranes was also initiated. An appropriate metal organic precursor (iron tetramethylheptanedionate) was identified whose deposition can be controlled by access to oxygen at temperatures in the 280-300 C range. Initial experiments have deposited iron oxide, but only on the membrane surface; thus refinement of this method will continue.

Timothy L. Ward

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to ?16% and then bombarded with deuterium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

Taylor, C. N. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625-7113, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States) [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625-7113, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Allain, J. P. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Luitjohan, K. E. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Krstic, P. S. [Institute for Advanced Computational Science, Stony Brook University, New York 11794 (United States) [Institute for Advanced Computational Science, Stony Brook University, New York 11794 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); TheoretiK, Knoxville, Tennessee 379XX (United States); Dadras, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Competition Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

--------------------------- Chapter 6.5 (January 2011) 1 Competition Advocate Responsibilities [Reference: FAR 6.5, FAR 7 and DEAR 906.501] Overview This section discusses the competition advocate requirements and provides a Federal Procurement Data System-New Generation (FPDS-NG) coding assistance sheet and screen shots for the FPDS-NG Competition Report. Background FAR Part 6.5, -Competition Advocates,ā€– implements section 20 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, which requires the head of each executive agency to designate an Agency Competition Advocate and Procuring Activity Advocates (hereafter referred to as Activity Competition Advocates). In accordance with DEAR 906.501, the Secretary of

432

Examination of oxygen uncoupling behaviour and reactivity towards methane for manganese silicate oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cheap and environmental friendly Mn–Si oxygen carriers manufactured from Mn3O4 and SiO2 by spray-drying have been investigated with respect to properties for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) and chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU). Fifteen oxygen carriers with SiO2 content varying from 2 wt% to 75 wt% were prepared and calcined at 1050 °C and 1150 °C. The ability of material to release O2 and their reactivity towards CH4 were examined in the temperature range 900–1100 °C. Particles with a SiO2 content of more than 45 wt% and calcined at 1150 °C showed limited CLOU behaviour and poor reactivity towards CH4 at all temperatures investigated. The rest of the materials had significant CLOU properties and provided high conversion of CH4 under the experimental conditions chosen. Increasing the temperature of operation enhanced the CLOU behaviour and reactivity towards CH4. At temperatures above 950 °C, the CH4 conversion was 90–100% for these materials. Crystalline phases identified by XRD in the oxidized samples with more than 45 wt% SiO2 and calcined at 1150 °C were mainly rhodonite MnSiO3. For materials with SiO2 content below 45 wt%, braunite Mn7SiO12 was detected as the main phase in most of the samples after oxidation. This indicates that braunite Mn7SiO12 is the main active phase for oxygen transfer in CLC and CLOU, which is supported by thermodynamic calculations. The reactivity of all of the materials were also studied with syngas (50% CO and 50% H2), showing complete gas conversion at 950 °C, except for materials with a SiO2 content of more than 45 wt% and calcined at 1150 °C. The mechanical integrity and attrition resistance of the oxygen carriers were examined in a jet-cup attrition rig, and although the attrition rates varied, some reactive material showed low rates of attrition, making them very promising oxygen carrier materials for applications related to CLC and CLOU. However, measures should probably be taken to improve the crushing strength to some extent.

Dazheng Jing; Mehdi Arjmand; Tobias Mattisson; Magnus Rydén; Frans Snijkers; Henrik Leion; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Effect of Oxygenated Fuel on Combustion and Emissions in a Light-Duty Turbo Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of fuel oxygen content on soot reduction in diesel engines is well-known. ... Fuel consumption was determined by weighing the fuel at the beginning and end of each test mode or each fuel blend through a Sartorius precision scale, with an accuracy of ±2 g. ... studies on effects of oxygenated fuels in conjunction with single and split fuel injections were conducted at high and low loads on a Caterpillar SCOTE DI diesel engine. ...

Juhun Song; Kraipat Cheenkachorn; Jinguo Wang; Joseph Perez; André L. Boehman; Philip John Young; Francis J. Waller

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

OXYGEN ADSORPTION ON NITROGEN CONTAINING CARBON SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OXYGEN ADSORPTION ON NITROGEN CONTAINING CARBON SURFACES Alejandro Montoya, Jorge O. Gil, Fanor-rich site of the carbon basal plane of graphite and then, it dissociates into oxygen atoms.1,2 Oxygen atoms at the edge of the carbon surface can form covalent bonds with oxygen. These sites can chemisorb

Truong, Thanh N.

435

Subtask 3.12 - Oxygen-Fired CFBC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, air is used as the source of oxygen for firing a combustion system. A fully oxygen-fired circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system would result in the production of a flue gas stream consisting of mostly carbon dioxide and water. The concentrated carbon dioxide stream would be available for sequestering or other purposes. Temperatures in an oxygen-blown CFBC system would be controlled by a combination of flue gas recycle, solids recirculation, and by appropriately sizing and locating the amount of heat-transfer surface required. Flue gas recycle provides the additional gas required for adequate fluidization and circulation of solids replacing the nitrogen that would be present in an air-blown system. The amount of flue gas recycle will determine how much of the remaining heat from the coal combustion will have to be removed. If the amount of flue gas recycle required by increasing solids recirculation and oxygen staging is limited, introducing the pure oxygen at multiple locations in the combustor to result in a more even temperature profile should result in a more compact system, thus reducing initial capital costs for construction. The overall efficiency of the process should be greater than that of an air-blown system since less fuel is required for the creation of the same amount of energy. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is in a unique position to advance this technology. It has a world-class CFBC pilot plant, has experience with firing a wide range of fuels in our air-fired CFBC pilot plant, has prior experience with oxygen-firing a slagging furnace system in a pulverized coal-fired mode with a bituminous coal, and has all of the components required for oxygen-firing right next to the CFBC pilot plant already in place. An engineering study was performed to identify methods, an overall appropriate configuration, and an operating strategy for a fully oxygen-fired CFBC pilot plant by: (1) developing a plan to optimize the amount of flue gas recycle required to control bed temperature; (2) determining how to best utilize the heat-transfer surfaces in a CFBC pilot plant, such as increased external bed surface, to more beneficially use increased solids recycle; (3) identifying appropriate methods for staged addition of the oxygen/recycled flue gas streams to maintain a good temperature profile in the combustor; and (4) determining the level of effort required to convert the EERC CFBC pilot plant to one that is oxygen-blown. The EERC additionally used its experience to consider what would be required for firing a wide range of fuels from biomass to low-rank coals to high-rank coals and petroleum cokes. These proposed modifications will be performed based upon obtaining the required funding.

Douglas Hajicek; Mark Musich; Ann Henderson

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

Oxygen isotopic exchange: A useful tool for characterizing oxygen conducting oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen isotopic exchange: A useful tool for characterizing oxygen conducting oxides Bassat J we obtain in both cases data concerning the oxygen diffusion in the bulk and the oxygen exchange with regards to the oxygen reduction reaction. Detailed experimental and analytical processes are given

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitƩ de

437

Competition Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) - Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) Synopsizing Proposed Non-Competitive Contract Actions Citing the Authority of FAR 6.302-1 [Reference: FAR 5 and DEAR 905] Overview This section discusses publicizing sole source actions as part of the approval of a Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC) using the authority of FAR 6.302-1. Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. One exception permits contracting without full and open competition when the required supplies or services are available from only one responsible source (FAR 6.302-1). This exception is

438

Magnetism of solid oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic susceptibilities of single-crystal ?-O2 and preferentially oriented polycrystalline samples of ?-O2 and ?-O2 have been measured, employing a mutual-inductance bridge method. The susceptibility of paramagnetic ?-O2 is isotropic and exhibits a temperature dependence which is not strictly Curie-Weiss, due to short-range correlations and partially hindered rotation. The susceptibility of ?-O2 exhibits very little anisotropy, but has an unusual temperature dependence which is probably due to the novel behavior of the lattice constants, modulation of inplane and out-of-plane exchange interactions, and short-range order. The susceptibility of anti-ferromagnetic ?-O2 is anisotropic, and data from five differently oriented samples have been analyzed in terms of principal antiferromagnetic susceptibilities. The data are consistent with the assumption that the easy axis is the twofold axis, b??, though the direction a?? cannot be excluded. A comprehensive analysis of the present susceptibility results and other magnetic, spectroscopic, and thermal measurements is made, with special reference to ?-O2. The perpendicular susceptibility implies an unreasonably large Néel temperature, 211 K, and a correspondingly large intersublattice exchange interaction, |J2|k=19.8 K. The effects of anisotropy and zeropoint spin deviations do not reduce this estimate by more than 15%. The temperature dependence of the parallel susceptibility suggests a much smaller value for the effective exchange interaction, |J|k=5.3 K, and appears to be well accounted for assuming a single spin-wave excitation. Antiferromagnetic resonance frequencies are analyzed and shown to yield, on assuming a dominant anisotropy equal to that of the free molecule, |J2|k=4.3 K. An approximate separation of lattice and magnetic heat capacities is effected, and a value |J|k=3.0 K deduced. The data appear to require the assumption of two spin-wave modes. Except for the perpendicular susceptibility, experimental results suggest a Néel temperature between 30 and 40 K. Meanfield and other theories lead to similar estimates, assuming that |J|k is between 3 and 4 K. The effect of the anisotropy on TN is minor, and no significant spin-shortening effect is predicted. Other experimental results are considered, and a disparate set of estimates for the exchange interaction and zone-boundary spin-wave energies is discussed. Including the effects of intrasublattice exchange interactions within the context of a two-sublattice model does not seem sufficient to remove the various discrepancies. An approximate calculation of relative overlap integrals and exchange interactions between different pairs of molecules in ?-O2 is made. It is suggested that a multisublattice model for the magnetic structure, and possibly one involving noncollinear sublattices, may provide an eventual resolution of the various difficulties. A "quasi-two-dimensional" description of ?-O2 is also considered, but appears not to offer a satisfactory explanation of the unusual and imperfectly correlated properties of this phase.

Gary C. DeFotis

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

Grula, J W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE APPLICATIONS AND VALIDITY OF BODE'S LAW CAN WE EXPLAIN BODE'S LAW USING GRAVITY? 8 Law of Gravitation 8 Centre#12;#12;CONTENTS CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION WHO, HOW AND WHEN IS THE BODE'S LAW DISCOVERED? 1 THE BODE'S LAW HOW THE BODE'S LAW SATISFIED URANUS 3 HOW THE BODE'S LAW LED TO THE DISCOVERY OF CERES

Aslaksen, Helmer

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441

Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. The use of natural minerals as oxygen carriers has advantages, such as lower cost and availability. Eight materials, based on copper or iron oxides, were selected for screening tests of CLC processes using coal and methane as fuels. Thermogravimetric experiments and bench-scale fixed-bed reactor tests were conducted to investigate the oxygen transfer capacity, reaction kinetics, and stability during cyclic reduction/oxidation reaction. Most natural minerals showed lower combustion capacity than pure CuO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to low-concentrations of active oxide species in minerals. In coal CLC, chryscolla (Cu-based), magnetite, and limonite (Fe-based) demonstrated better reaction performances than other materials. The addition of steam improved the coal CLC performance when using natural ores because of the steam gasification of coal and the subsequent reaction of gaseous fuels with active oxide species in the natural ores. In methane CLC, chryscolla, hematite, and limonite demonstrated excellent reactivity and stability in 50-cycle thermogravimetric analysis tests. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ores possess greater oxygen utilization but require an activation period before achieving full performance in methane CLC. Particle agglomeration issues associated with the application of natural ores in CLC processes were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Tian, Hanjing; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Quantifying the areal extent and dissolved oxygen concentrations of Archean oxygen oases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Several lines of evidence indicate that the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis preceded the oxygenation of the atmosphere—perhaps by as much as 300 million years. The… (more)

Olson, Stephanie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

Chandel, Navdeep S

444

Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

Ulloa, Osvaldo

445

The Role of Oxygen in Coal Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Products supplies oxygen to a number of coal gasification and partial oxidation facilities worldwide. At the high operating pressures of these processes, economics favor the use of 90% and higher oxygen purities. The effect of inerts...

Klosek, J.; Smith, A. R.; Solomon, J.

446

Oxygen reduction on platinum : an EIS study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on platinum over yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is examined via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for oxygen partial pressures between 10-4 and 1 atm and at temperatures ...

Golfinopoulos, Theodore

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Microchemical systems for singlet oxygen generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Lasers (COIL) are a technology of interest for industrial and military audiences. COILs are flowing gas lasers where the gain medium of iodine atoms is collisionally pumped by singlet delta oxygen ...

Hill, Tyrone F. (Tyrone Frank), 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Imaging Oxygen Molecules Up Close | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Oxygen Molecules Up Close Imaging Oxygen Molecules Up Close ARRA-enabled upgrades enhance research capabilities STM images of the same TiO2(110) area upon O2 chemisorption...

449

Composite oxygen ion transport element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

450

Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Table of Contents  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

E N N E E R R A A L L Semiannual Report toCongress DOEIG-0065 April 1 - September 30, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS From the Desk of the Inspector General ......

452

Respiration, photosynthesis, and oxygen isotope fractionation in ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 25, 1971 ... Respiration, photosynthesis, and oxygen isotope fractionation in oceanic surface water1. Peter M. Kroopnick. Department of Oceanography,.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

of the earth, but both oxygen and carbon dioxide con-tent have changed dramatically through time. Oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, OVERVIEW KARINA J. NIELSEN Sonoma State University Marine algae are photosynthetic organisms that fuel algae and other plants, as evidenced by paleontological analyses of stomatal density and other proxies. Vogel, S. 1994. Life in moving fluids, 2nd ed. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ALGAE

Nielsen, Karina J.

454

Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators Ruby N. Ghosh Dept. of Physics Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA weekschr@msu.edu Abstract--Oxygen plays a ubiquitous role in terrestrial developed an optical technique for monitoring oxygen in both gas and liquid phases utilizing nanoscale metal

Ghosh, Ruby N.

455

8, 22252248, 2008 Detection of oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 2225Ā­2248, 2008 Detection of oxygen emission related to spring bloom H. Yamagishi et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Detection of regional scale sea-to-air oxygen emission related to spring bloom near Japan by using in-situ measurements of atmospheric oxygen/nitrogen ratio H. Yamagishi 1 , Y

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitƩ de

456

Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) : ,- Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding T. W. Eagar Department of }faterials, mechanisms, and expected levels of oxygen and nitrogen contamination during gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc indicating the importance of dec9mposition of SiOz into silicon monoxide and oxygen are presented, indicating

Eagar, Thomas W.

457

The Mechanisms of Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanisms of Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions in Nonaqueous Lithium-Oxygen Batteries. The Mechanisms of Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions in Nonaqueous...

458

Oxygen consumption of bovine granulosa cells in vitro.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The oxygen consumption rate of granulosa cells is considered to be a key determinant of oocyte oxygenation in follicles. The oxygen status of the oocyte… (more)

Li, Dongxing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thickness Dependency of Thin Film Samaria Doped Ceria for Oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dependency of Thin Film Samaria Doped Ceria for Oxygen Sensing . Thickness Dependency of Thin Film Samaria Doped Ceria for Oxygen Sensing . Abstract: High temperature oxygen...

460

Method of controlling injection of oxygen into hydrogen-rich fuel cell feed stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of operating a H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 fuel cell fueled by hydrogen-rich fuel stream containing CO. The CO content is reduced to acceptable levels by injecting oxygen into the fuel gas stream. The amount of oxygen injected is controlled in relation to the CO content of the fuel gas, by a control strategy that involves (a) determining the CO content of the fuel stream at a first injection rate, (b) increasing the O.sub.2 injection rate, (c) determining the CO content of the stream at the higher injection rate, (d) further increasing the O.sub.2 injection rate if the second measured CO content is lower than the first measured CO content or reducing the O.sub.2 injection rate if the second measured CO content is greater than the first measured CO content, and (e) repeating steps a-d as needed to optimize CO consumption and minimize H.sub.2 consumption.

Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Gutowski, Stanley (Pittsford, NY); Weisbrod, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microbial oxygen uptake in sludge as influenced by compost physical parameters1 Ardavan Mohajer1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Microbial oxygen uptake in sludge as influenced by compost physical parameters1 Ardavan Mohajer1 uptake rate (OUR) in 16 sludge waste recipes, offering a4 range of moisture content (MC), waste to 14 days to20 evaluate the overall O2 consumption or biodegradability of a sludge mixture.21 Keywords

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitƩ de

462

Singlet Oxygen Singlet oxygen generation and detection are growing fields with applications in such areas as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singlet Oxygen Singlet oxygen generation and detection are growing fields with applications in such areas as cancer treatment, photosensitized oxidations, and biomolecular degradation. Ground state oxygen state of an oxygen molecule is a singlet state, which can readily react with other singlet molecules

Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

463

Oxygen permeation in bismuth-based materials part I: Sintering and oxygen permeation fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Oxygen permeation in bismuth-based materials part I: Sintering and oxygen permeation fluxes E;2 Abstract Oxygen permeation measurements were performed on two layered bismuth based oxide ceramics. Oxygen permeability for these systems was compared to permeability of the cubic fluorite type structure

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitƩ de

464

Expanded Content Envelope For The Model 9977 Packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Addendum was written to the Model 9977 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging adding a new content consisting of DOE-STD-3013 stabilized plutonium dioxide materials to the authorized Model 9977 contents. The new Plutonium Oxide Content (PuO{sub 2}) Envelope will support the Department of Energy shipment of materials between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Savannah River Site facilities. The new content extended the current content envelope boundaries for radioactive material mass and for decay heat load and required a revision to the 9977 Certificate of Compliance prior to shipment. The Addendum documented how the new contents/configurations do not compromise the safety basis presented in the 9977 SARP Revision 2. The changes from the certified package baseline and the changes to the package required to safely transport this material is discussed.

Abramczyk, G. A.; Loftin, B. M.; Nathan, S. J.; Bellamy, J. S.

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

Structure and transformation of the metastable boron- and oxygen-related defect center in crystalline silicon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the core structure of the carrier-lifetime-reducing boron- and oxygen-related metastable defect center in crystalline silicon by measuring the correlation of the defect concentration with the boron and the oxygen contents on a large number of different silicon materials. The experimental results indicate that the defect is composed of one substitutional boron and two interstitial oxygen atoms. Formation and annihilation of the metastable boron-oxygen complex are found to be thermally activated processes, characterized by two strongly differing activation energies. Measurements of the defect generation rate as a function of light intensity show that the defect generation rate increases proportionally with light intensity below 1 mW/cm2 and saturates at higher intensities. All experimental results can be consistently explained using a defect reaction model based on fast-diffusing oxygen dimers (O2i), which are captured by substitutional boron (Bs) to form a metastable Bs-O2i complex. Based on this model, new strategies for an effective reduction of the light degradation of solar cells made on oxygen-rich silicon materials are derived. The model also explains why no lifetime degradation is observed in aluminum-, gallium-, and indium-doped oxygen-rich silicon.

Jan Schmidt and Karsten Bothe

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Muon Capture in Oxygen-16  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The muon capture rate in oxygen is used as a means for measuring the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant (CP) of weak interactions. The capture rate between the JP=0+ ground state of O16 and the 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3- states of N16 are calculated as a function of CP with different nuclear models. Using the experimental values of the transition rates, we then determine CP. We find that the transition rate, and therefore CP, depends strongly on the nuclear model. We conclude that 5

Vincent Gillet and David A. Jenkins

1965-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

467

Exhibit C Table of Contents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exhibit C Schedules and Lists Exhibit C Schedules and Lists Dated 5-20-13 Subcontract No. 241314 Page 1 of 5 EXHIBIT "C" SCHEDULES AND LISTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Form Title A Schedule of Quantities and Prices B Milestone and Payment Schedule C Lower-Tier Subcontractor and Vendor List Exhibit C Schedules and Lists Dated 5-20-13 Subcontract No. 241314 Page 2 of 5 EXHIBIT "C" FORM A SCHEDULE OF QUANTITIES AND PRICES NOTE: This Exhibit "C" Form A is part of the model subcontract for Trinity and is provided to Offerors for informational purposes only. It is not intended that this form be returned with the Offeror's proposal. 1.0 WORK TO BE PERFORMED Work shall be performed strictly in accordance with requirements of the Subcontract

468

Content first in markup demo  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9/2/11 9/2/11 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) eBuy Questions Apple Safari issues Approvals Customer identification Getting information Invoices Logins Packing lists Project IDs Purchase order numbers Remote Access Restricted items Returns Where do I get information about eBuy? A: The best place for eBuy information is on the Procurement Web site. Read the contents of this document and its various links like eBuy Help and Merchant information to get an idea of what eBuy is about. How are eBuy requisitions approved? A: eBuy requisition authorization uses eProcurement's basic approval engine with some rule changes. In general, requisitions $350 or less will self-approve when submitted and do not require an approver.In the following cases, however, the eBuy user needs to enter an Authorized Signer (from

469

Vitamin A Content of Foods and Feeds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY, A & 341 CUL ,A%lBU TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERI~~N I *SI A I I A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 477 JULY, 1933 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Vitamin A Content of Foods and Feeds AGRICULTURAL... required by animals and man 28 Vitamin A in some feeds for animals 29 Summary 30 References .......................... --- 31 BULLETIN NO. 477 July, 1933 VITAMIN A CONTENT OF FOODS AND FEEDS By G. S. FRAPS AND RAY TREICHLER The importance of small...

Treichler, Ray; Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/2011 /2011 Decades of Discovery Decades of Discovery Page 2 6/1/2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 6 2 BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES .................................................................................................. 7 2.1 Adenosine Triphosphate: The Energy Currency of Life .............................................. 7 2.2 Making Better Catalysts .............................................................................................. 8 2.3 Understanding Chemical Reactions............................................................................ 9 2.4 New Types of Superconductors ................................................................................ 10

471

The quantification of oxygen toxicity by the technique of cellulose acetate electrophoresis of rat serum proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE QUANTIFICATION OF OXYGEN TOXICITY BY THE TECHNIQUE OF CELLULOSE ACETATE ELECTROPHORESIS OF RAT SERUM PROTEINS A Thesis by MARCIA WAGNER BARKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&ii University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Biology THE QUANTIFICATION OF OXYGEN TOXICITY BY THE TECHNIQUE OF CELLULOSE ACETATE ELECTROPHORESIS OF RAT SERUM PROTEINS A Thesis by MARCIA WAGNER BARKER Approved...

Barker, Marcia Wagner

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

The effect of humidity on the collection efficiency for oxygenated compounds adsorbed on activated charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EPPECT OP HUMIDITY ON THE COLIECTION EFFICIENCY POR OXYGENATED COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CHARCOAL A Thesis by ROBERT BRUCE WALTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE EFFECT OF HUMIDITY ON THE COLLECTIOM EFFICIENCY FOR OXYGENATED COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CHARCOAL A Thesis by ROBERT BRUCE WALTON Approved...

Walton, Robert Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

Effect of bacterium Oceanospirillum on the corrosion potential and oxygen reduction of AISI 4340 steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF BACTERIUM OCEANOSPIRILLUM ON THE CORROSION POTENTIAL AND OXYGEN REDUCI1ON OF AISI 4340 STEEL A Thesis by SNEZANA N. POPOVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering EFFECT OF BACTERIUM OCEANOSPIRILLUM ON THE CORROSION POTENTIAL AND OXYGEN REDUCTION OF AISI 4340 STEEL A Thesis by SNEZANA N. POPOVA Appmved as to style...

Popova, Snezana N.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

474

Effect of co-precipitation and impregnation on K-decorated Fe2O3/Al2O3 oxygen carrier in Chemical Looping Combustion of bituminous coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) of coal is an innovative combustion technology for CO2 inherent capture, which uses oxygen carrier (OC) to transfer lattice oxygen to coal. However, coal gasification is the rate-limiting process for CLC of coal. Although carbon conversion and gasification rate are substantially improved with oxygen carriers in the presence of alkali additives, alkali loss in oxygen carrier is still a serious problem in the process of CLC of coal. The present work focuses on the OC–potassium interaction for two preparation methods of K-decorated OC. Different contents of catalyst (K2CO3) were added into the preparation of Fe-based oxygen carrier by both co-precipitation and impregnation. And the effect of K-decorated methods on oxygen carriers was investigated in a fluidized bed reactor. For co-precipitated oxygen carriers, CO2 gas yields (fCO2) were higher and CO gas yields (fCO) were lower than the ones for impregnated oxygen carriers. Total carbon conversions for co-precipitated oxygen carriers were also higher than those for impregnated oxygen carriers, and a shorter time of fast reaction stage always corresponded to co-precipitated oxygen carrier. 9 redox cycles were also conducted to investigate the stability of oxygen carrier reactivity and the potassium loss with cycle number. It was concluded that the reactivity of co-precipitated oxygen carriers was more stable during 9 redox cycles. Especially for K10-cp (oxygen carriers of 10% potassium content by co-precipitation), fCO2 increased slightly and fCO changed very little with cycle number. According to morphological features of oxygen carriers, co-precipitation was superior to impregnation in preventing oxygen carrier particle sintering. On the other hand, although potassium contents of all K-decorated oxygen carriers decreased with cycle number, the potassium loss for co-precipitated oxygen carriers was smaller. K10-cp performed the best characteristic in avoiding potassium loss: the potassium content decreased from 8.47% (fresh oxygen carrier) to 7.79% (after 9 cycles). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis showed that the potassium ferrite, K2Fe22O34, was presented in K-decorated oxygen carriers. Based on the peak intensity ratio of I K 2 Fe 22 O 34 / I Fe 2 O 3 , the higher the content of \\{K2Fe22O34\\} in K-decorated Fe2O3/Al2O3 oxygen carrier was, the larger the conversion of CO to CO2 was, and the shorter the time of fast reaction stage was. Therefore, it was inferred that \\{K2Fe22O34\\} acted as a support with catalytic effect. In addition, the content of \\{K2Fe22O34\\} was higher in co-precipitated oxygen carriers than that in impregnation oxygen carriers. It can be used to explain that why a better reactivity was always found for co-precipitated oxygen carriers.

Huijun Ge; Laihong Shen; Haiming Gu; Shouxi Jiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Table of Contents  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(AVL). The ability to track and direct vehicles in the field to locations needing repair is a critical need, but one which does not necessarily require next generation...

476

Device and method for separating oxygen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for separating oxygen isotopes with an ArF laser which produces coherent radiation at approximately 193 nm. The output of the ArF laser is filtered in natural air and applied to an irradiation cell where it preferentially photodissociates molecules of oxygen gas containing .sup.17 O or .sup.18 O oxygen nuclides. A scavenger such as O.sub.2, CO or ethylene is used to collect the preferentially dissociated oxygen atoms and recycled to produce isotopically enriched molecular oxygen gas. Other embodiments utilize an ArF laser which is narrowly tuned with a prism or diffraction grating to preferentially photodissociate desired isotopes. Similarly, desired mixtures of isotopic gas can be used as a filter to photodissociate enriched preselected isotopes of oxygen.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Sander, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

A survey of alternative oxygen production technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Utilization of the Martian atmosphere for the production of fuel and oxygen has been extensively studied. The baseline fuel production process is a Sabatier reactor which produces methane and water from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The oxygen produced from the electrolysis of the water is only half of that needed for methane-based rocket propellant and additional oxygen is needed for breathing air fuel cells and other energy sources. Zirconia electrolysis cells for the direct reduction of CO 2 are being developed as an alternative means of producing oxygen but present many challenges for a large-scale oxygen production system. The very high operating temperatures and fragile nature of the cells coupled with fairly high operating voltages leave room for improvement. This paper will survey alternative oxygen production technologies present data on operating characteristics materials of construction and some preliminary laboratory results on attempts to implement each.

Dale E. Lueck; Clyde F. Parrish; William J. Buttner; Jan M. Surma

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Diiron proteins represent a diverse class of structures involved in the binding and activation of oxygen. This review explores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the hemerythrins are relatively rigid and are rich in nitrogen-containing ligands, which specifically stabilize is reversible, as required for oxygen transport. The active sites of hemerythrins are distinct from those

Summa, Christopher M.

479

Electrocatalysis of anodic and cathodic oxygen-transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrocatalysis of oxygen-transfer reactions is discussed in two parts. In Part I, the reduction of iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) is examined as an example of cathodic oxygen transfer. On oxide-covered Pt electrodes (PtO), a large cathodic current is observed in the presence of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to coincide with the reduction of PtO. The total cathodic charge exceeds the amount required for reduction of PtO and IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to produce an adsorbed product. An electrocatalytic link between reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and reduction of PtO is indicated. In addition, on oxide-free Pt electrodes, the reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} is determined to be sensitive to surface treatment. The electrocatalytic oxidation of CN{sup {minus}} is presented as an example of anodic oxygen transfer in Part II. The voltametric response of CN{sup {minus}} is virtually nonexistent at PbO{sub 2} electrodes. The response is significantly improved by doping PbO{sub 2} with Cu. Cyanide is also oxidized effectively at CuO-film electrodes. Copper is concluded to serve as an adsorption site for CN{sup {minus}}. It is proposed that an oxygen tunneling mechanism comparable to electron tunneling does not occur at the electrode-solution interface. The adsorption of CN{sup {minus}} is therefore considered to be a necessary prerequisite for oxygen transfer. 201 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

Wels, B.R.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

480

Oxygen penetration into the bulk of palladium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxygen penetration into the bulk of palladium ... During heating, the reaction rate exhibited an activity maximum at 650 K, whereas no activity maximum was found during the ... ...

C. T. Campbell; D. C. Foyt; J. M. White

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxygen content requirement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Oxygen-Enriched Combustion | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

tip sheet discusses how an increase in oxygen in combustion air can reduce the energy loss in the exhaust gases and increase process heating system efficiency. PROCESS HEATING...

482

Renewable Oxygenate Blending Effects on Gasoline Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable Oxygenate Blending Effects on Gasoline Properties ... National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States ... Energy Fuels, 2011, 25 (10), ...

Earl Christensen; Janet Yanowitz; Matthew Ratcliff; Robert L. McCormick

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

483

Oxygen Concentration Microgradients for Cell Culture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??There is a growing need for technology that can control microscale oxygen gradients onto a tissue or culture sample in vitro. This dissertation introduces the… (more)

Park, Jaehyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Oxygen ion-beam microlithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

Tsuo, Y.S.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

485

Oxygen ion-beam microlithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Interaction of iron-copper mixed metal oxide oxygen carriers with simulated synthesis gas derived from steam gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to prepare supported bimetallic Fe–Cu oxygen carriers and to evaluate their performance for the chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process with simulated synthesis gas derived from steam gasification of coal/air. Ten-cycle CLC tests were conducted with Fe–Cu oxygen carriers in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer utilizing simulated synthesis gas derived from the steam gasification of Polish Janina coal and Illinois #6 coal as fuel. The effect of temperature on reaction rates, chemical stability, and oxygen transport capacity were determined. Fractional reduction, fractional oxidation, and global rates of reactions were calculated from the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data. The supports greatly affected reaction performance. Data showed that reaction rates and oxygen capacities were stable during the 10-cycle TGA tests for most Fe–Cu/support oxygen carriers. Bimetallic Fe–Cu/support oxygen carriers showed higher reduction rates than Fe-support oxygen carriers. The carriers containing higher Cu content showed better stabilities and better reduction rates. An increase in temperature from 800 °C to 900 °C did not have a significant effect on either the oxygen capacity or the reduction rates with synthesis gas derived from Janina coal. Oxidation reaction was significantly faster than reduction reaction for all supported Fe–Cu oxygen carriers. Carriers with higher Cu content had lower oxidation rates. Ten-cycle TGA data indicated that these oxygen carriers had stable performances at 800–900 °C and might be successfully used up to 900 °C for coal CLC reaction in the presence of steam.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. [U.S. DOE; Ksepko, Ewelina; Tian, Hanging [URS

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Microsoft Word - contents  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2001-272-TAR GJO-2001-272-TAR MAC-GWDUR 1.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Site Observational Work Plan for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site January 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW 511-0006-10-000 Document Number U0143200 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0143200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan -Durango, Colorado January 2002 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Purpose and Scope .................................................................................................1-1

488

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AC05-00OR22800 AC05-00OR22800 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents Page # TOC - i SECTION A - SOLICITATION/OFFER AND AWARD ......................................................................... A-i SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS ........................................................ B-i B.1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................B-2 B.2 TRANSITION COST, ESTIMATED COST, MAXIMUM AVAILABLE FEE, AND AVAILABLE FEE (Modification 295, 290, 284, 280, 270, 257, 239, 238, 219, M201, M180, M162, M153, M150, M141, M132, M103, M092, M080, M055, M051, M049, M034, M022, M003, A002) ..........................................................B-2 SECTION C - DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/WORK STATEMENT DESCRIPTION OF

489

Fermilab Today - Related Content  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Content Related Content Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Classifieds Director's Corner Physics in a Nutshell Frontier Science Result Tip of the Week Archive User University Profiles Experiment Profiles Current Archive Current Fermilab Today Archive of 2014 Archive of 2013 Archive of 2012 Archive of 2011 Archive of 2010 Archive of 2009 Archive of 2008 Archive of 2007 Archive of 2006 Archive of 2005 Archive of 2004 Archive of 2003 CERN Courier Published by CERN Contact: cern.courier@cern.ch Computing Bits Published by Fermilab's Computing Sector Contact: http://computing.fnal.gov/news/feedback/feedback.html DPF Newsletter Published by the APS Division of Particles and Fields Contact: mcbride@fnal.gov Fermilab Friends of Science Published by Fermilab's Office of Education

490

Oxygen supply for oxyfuel CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study to develop Air Products’ air separation unit (ASU) offerings for oxyfuel coal CO2 capture projects. A scalable “reference plant” concept is described to match particular sizes of power generation equipment, taking into account factors such as safety, reliability, operating flexibility, efficiency, and low capital cost. We describe the selection of a process cycle to exploit the low purity requirements, as well as the options for compression machinery and drivers as the scale of the plant increases and the sizes of referenced equipment limit the possibilities. We also explore integration with other elements of the system, such as preheating condensate or heating and expanding pressurised nitrogen. In addition, we consider how the ASU affects the flexibility of the oxyfuel system and discuss how its power consumption can be reduced during periods of high power demand. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of different execution strategies for air separation unit projects are discussed, as well as alternative commercial models for the supply of oxygen.

Paul Higginbotham; Vince White; Kevin Fogash; Galip Guvelioglu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray spectroscopy identification and DFT simulations of oxygenated intermediates on a platinum fuel-cell cathode. The study shows that two types of hydroxyl intermediates (non-hydrated OH and hydrated OH) with distinct activities coexist on a fuel-cell cathode. The performance of polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) fuel cells is limited by the reduction at the cathode of various oxygenated intermediates in the four-electron pathway of the oxygen reduction reaction. A research team led by SLAC scientists performed x-ray spectroscopy identification and DFT simulations of oxygenated intermediates on a platinum fuel-cell cathode

492

Transient oxygen consumption rate measurements with the BDT?M? oxygen biosensor system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) is a reliable indicator of tissue health. Recently, the OCR of isolated human islets has been shown to predict transplant outcome in diabetic mice. The Oxygen Biosensor System (OBS) is a ...

Low, Clarke Alan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Towards Techniques for Easy-to-Read Web Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Requirements for Easy-to-Read Web content can be derived from various sources. The requirements cover linguistic properties as well as aspects of presentation and interaction. This paper compares different approaches to check that the Web content is understandable. A major challenge is that many guidelines are language-dependent. We describe a method to extend the coverage of an existing author support tool across multiple languages and show how this can be a first step towards common Techniques for Easy-to-Read Web content.

Annika Nietzio; Daniel Naber; Christian Bühler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

T-544: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway 4: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway Vulnerabilities T-544: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway Vulnerabilities January 27, 2011 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Cisco IOS Software Release 12.4(24)MD1 on the Cisco CSG2 ABSTRACT: Cisco IOS Software Release 12.4(24)MD1 on the Cisco CSG2 contains two vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a remote, unauthenticated attacker to create a denial of service condition that prevents traffic from passing through the CSG2. These vulnerabilities require only a single content service to be active on the Cisco CSG2 and can be exploited via crafted TCP packets. A three-way handshake is not required to exploit either of these

495

T-544: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway 4: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway Vulnerabilities T-544: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway Vulnerabilities January 27, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Cisco IOS Software Release 12.4(24)MD1 on the Cisco CSG2 ABSTRACT: Cisco IOS Software Release 12.4(24)MD1 on the Cisco CSG2 contains two vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a remote, unauthenticated attacker to create a denial of service condition that prevents traffic from passing through the CSG2. These vulnerabilities require only a single content service to be active on the Cisco CSG2 and can be exploited via crafted TCP packets. A three-way handshake is not required to exploit either of these

496

High density adsorbed oxygen on Rh,,111... and enhanced routes to metallic oxidation using atomic oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High density adsorbed oxygen on Rh,,111... and enhanced routes to metallic oxidation using atomic oxygen K. D. Gibson, Mark Viste, Errol C. Sanchez, and S. J. Sibener The James Franck Institute; accepted 30 November 1998 Exposure of Rh 111 to atomic oxygen leads to the facile formation of a full

Sibener, Steven

497

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the fourth quarter January-March 2001 in the following task areas: Task 1 - Oxygen Enhanced Combustion, Task 2 - Oxygen Transport Membranes and Task 4 - Program Management. This report will also recap the results of the past year. The program is proceeding in accordance with the objectives for the first year. OTM material characterization was completed. 100% of commercial target flux was demonstrated with OTM disks. The design and assembly of Praxair's single tube high-pressure test facility was completed. The production of oxygen with a purity of better than 99.5% was demonstrated. Coal combustion testing was conducted at the University of Arizona. Modest oxygen enhancement resulted in NOx emissions reduction. The injector for oxygen enhanced coal based reburning was conducted at Praxair. Combustion modeling with Keystone boiler was completed. Pilot-scale combustion test furnace simulations continued this quarter.

David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Naperville, IL); Kobylinski, Thaddeus P. (Lisle, IL); Morissette, Sherry L. (Las Cruces, NM); Pei, Shiyou (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Naperville, IL); Kobylinski, Thaddeus P. (Lisle, IL); Morissette, Sherry L. (Las Cruces, NM); Pei, Shiyou (Naperville, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

NESEA Newsletter Content  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NESEA Newsletter Content Middle School Curriculum Created by Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) Click on the links below to take you to the Chapter heading: Solar Panels: The Basics Solar Cells: P-N Junction Solar Panels: Amps, Volts and Power Solar Panels: Manufacture Solar Panels: PV