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1

Rigid particulate matter sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

An Introduction to Particulate Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Fiscal Year 2014. Title An Introduction to Particulate Matter Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2009 Authors Prisco, Joe, Rich Hill, Pam Lembke, D. Moore,...

3

Particulate Matter Standards (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency sets the standards for particulate emissions from a variety of sources, including facilities that generate power. ...

4

Just the Basics: Particulate Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is Particulate is Particulate Matter? One of the major components of air pollution is particulate matter, or PM. PM refers to airborne particles that include dust, dirt, soot, smoke, and liquid droplets. These particles can range in size from microscopic to large enough to be seen. PM is characterized by its size, with fine particles of less than 2.5 micrometers in size designated as PM 2.5 and coarser particles between 2.5 and 10 micrometers in size designated as PM 10 . PM arises from many sources, including combustion occurring in factories, power plants, cars, trucks, buses, trains, or wood fires; or through simple agitation of existing particulates by tilling of land, quarrying and stone-crushing, and off- road vehicular movement. Of particular interest is PM generated during diesel

5

NICKEL SPECIATION OF URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER  

SciTech Connect

A four-step sequential Ni extraction method, summarized in Table AB-1, was evaluated for identifying and quantifying the Ni species occurring in urban total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and fine particulate matter (<10 {micro}m [PM{sub 10}] and <2.5 {micro}m [PM{sub 2.5}] in aerodynamic diameter). The extraction method was originally developed for quantifying soluble, sulfidic, elemental, and oxidic forms of Ni that may occur in industrial atmospheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the Ni species selectivity of the extraction method. Uncertainties in the chemical speciation of Ni in urban PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} greatly affect inhalation health risk estimates, primarily because of the large variability in acute, chronic, and cancer-causing effects for different Ni compounds.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Charlene R. Crocker; Carolyn M. Nyberg; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced particulate matter control apparatus and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for collection and removal of particulate matter, including fine particulate matter, from a gas stream, comprising a unique combination of high collection efficiency and ultralow pressure drop across the filter. The apparatus and method utilize simultaneous electrostatic precipitation and membrane filtration of a particular pore size, wherein electrostatic collection and filtration occur on the same surface.

Miller, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, ND); Zhuang, Ye (Grand Forks, ND); Almlie, Jay C. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

7

Particulate matter sensor with a heater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus to detect particulate matter. The apparatus includes a sensor electrode, a shroud, and a heater. The electrode measures a chemical composition within an exhaust stream. The shroud surrounds at least a portion of the sensor electrode, exclusive of a distal end of the sensor electrode exposed to the exhaust stream. The shroud defines an air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud and an opening toward the distal end of the sensor electrode. The heater is mounted relative to the sensor electrode. The heater burns off particulate matter in the air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud.

Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ash reduction system using electrically heated particulate matter filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for reducing ash comprises a temperature estimator module that estimates a temperature of an electrically heated particulate matter (PM) filter. A temperature and position estimator module estimates a position and temperature of an oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter. An ash reduction control module adjusts at least one of exhaust flow, fuel and oxygen levels in the electrically heated PM filter to adjust a position of the oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter based on the oxidation wave temperature and position.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; He, Yongsheng [Sterling Heights, MI

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Method for removing particulate matter from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Particulate matter is removed from a stream of pressurized gas by directing the stream of gas upwardly through a bed of porous material, the porous bed being held in an open ended container and at least partially submerged in liquid. The passage of the gas through the porous bed sets up a circulation in the liquid which cleans the particulate matter from the bed.

Postma, Arlin K. (Benton City, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Microscopy investigations of ash and particulate matter accumulation in diesel particulate filter surface pores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been increased focus on the environmental impact of automobile emissions in recent years. These environmental concerns have resulted in the creation of more stringent particulate matter emissions regulations in ...

Beauboeuf, Daniel P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption of solar radiation Title Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption of solar radiation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., and Tracy L. Thatcher Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 12 Pagination 6067-6072 Abstract A spectroscopic analysis of 115 wintertime partic- ulate matter samples collected in rural California shows that wood smoke absorbs solar radiation with a strong spectral se- lectivity. This is consistent with prior work that has demon- strated that organic carbon (OC), in addition to black car- bon (BC), appreciably absorbs solar radiation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. We apportion light absorp-

12

Electrically heated particulate matter filter with recessed inlet end plugs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate matter (PM) filter includes filter walls having inlet ends and outlet ends. First adjacent pairs of the filter walls define inlet channels. Second adjacent pairs of the filter walls define outlet channels. Outlet end plugs are arranged in the inlet channels adjacent to the output ends. Inlet end plugs arranged in the outlet channels spaced from the inlet ends.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Ament, Frank (Troy, MI)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

14

Spatial and temporal distributions of particulate matter and particulate organic carbon, Northeast Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution of particulate matter (PM) and particulate organic carbon (POC) was determined during the Northeast Gulf of Mexico Chemical Oceanography and Hydro-graphy program (NEGOM). The hydrography and physical forcing functions were examined to explain particulate matter distribution. PM and POC were determined for discrete samples, and PM was also compared with in situ beam attenuation measure-ments in order to make estimations of continuous particle concentration profiles. Measurements were made three times per year for three years, during 1997-1998, 1998-1999, and 1999-2000, but only the first two years' worth of results are reported here. PM distributions vary seasonally and interannually. General patterns tend to be fairly consistent spatially and temporally during fall and spring, but intensity changes accord-ing to season. Differences present at the surface appear to be due mainly to riverine input of nutrients and particles from the several major rivers that flow into the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Wind-forced circulation appears to be a minor influence on surface particulate distribution. Secondary eddies can have an effect upon distribution, as seen with an anticyclonic feature over the upper slope during Summer 1998 which entrained less saline, high particulate river water offshore. A similar effect was noted during Summer 1999, but to a lesser degree. A shelf edge current associated with anticyclonic flow seems to be a mechanism responsible for the appearance of nepheloid layers on the outer shelf.

Bernal, Christina Estefana

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

State emissions limitations for boilers: particulate matter  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes regulations applicable to boilers as reflected in current state and local air regulations. Not all of these regulations are officially part of Federally-approved State Implementation Plans (SIPs). Several regulations have only recently been adopted by the State and are now undergoing EPA review for incorporation into the SIP. Each summary also contains local regulations more stringent than the State rules. Most local regulations in this handbook are included in the State Implementation Plan. Site-specific emission limits (variances from State limits or limits more stringent than State limits) are not included in these summaries. Appendix A contains maps showing the location of Air Quality Control Regions or other districts by which several States regulate emissions. Appendix B contains a summary of National Ambient Air Quality Standards, which States are required to meet as a minimum. Appendix C contains a description and summary of Federal New Source Performance Standards. Appendix D contains formulas for conversion of emmissions limits expressed in one set of units to the most common units - No. PM/MMBtu. Appendix E contains Figure 2 of ASME APS-1, used for determining particulate emissions limits in some States.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Research priorities for airborne particulates matter in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Despite substantial progress in reducing air pollution over the past 30 years, particulates remain a poorly understood health concern that requires further study. The article provides a brief overview of the work of an independent National Research Council (NRC) Committee on particulate matter (PM). It highlights the committee's process for developing during its deliberations. It reflects on the committee as a potential model to provide guidance on a broad research area in which findings may have significant policy implications. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Samet, J.; Wassle, R.; Holmes, K.J.; Abt, E.; Bakshi, K. [John Hopkins University (US). Bloomberg School of Public Health

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Title Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wang, Yungang, Philip K. Hopke, X. Xia, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, and M. J. Source Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 55 Start Page 525 Pagination 525-532 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords source apportionment positive matrix factorization (pmf) particulate matter (pm) molecular markers (mm) aethalometer delta-c Abstract Source apportionment is typically performed on chemical composition data derived from particulate matter (PM) samples. However, many common sources no longer emit significant amounts of characteristic trace elements requiring the use of more comprehensive chemical characterization in order to fully resolve the PM sources. Positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF, version 4.1) was used to analyze 24-hr integrated molecular marker (MM), secondary inorganic ions, trace elements, carbonaceous species and light absorption data to investigate sources of PM2.5 in Rochester, New York between October 2009 and October 2010 to explore the role of specific MMs. An eight-factor solutionwas found for which the factors were identified as isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA), airborne soil, other SOA, diesel emissions, secondary sulfate, wood combustion, gasoline vehicle, and secondary nitrate contributing 6.9%, 12.8%, 3.7%, 7.8%, 45.5%, 9.1%, 7.9%, and 6.3% to the average PM2.5 concentration, respectively Concentrations of pentacosane, hexacosane, heptacosane, and octacosane in the gasoline vehicles factor were larger compared to diesel emissions. Aethalometer Delta-C was strongly associated with wood combustion. The compounds, n-heptacosanoic acid and n-octacosanoic acid, occasionally used in the past as tracers for road dust, were found to largely associate with SOA in this study. In comparison with a standard PMF analyses without MM, inclusion of themwas necessary to resolve SOA and wood combustion factors in urban areas.

18

Modeling of Particulate Matter Emissions from Agricultural Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Air Pollution Regulation Agencies (SAPRAs) issue and enforce permits that limit particulate matter emissions from all sources including layer and broiler facilities, cattle feedyards, dairies, cotton gins, and grain elevators. In this research, a process was developed to determine distances from emitting sources to where the estimated concentrations were less than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). These distances are a function of emission rates and meteorological conditions. Different protocols were used to develop emission factors for cattle feedyards and layer houses. Dispersion modeling with American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) was conducted to determine the emissions of particulate matter. These data were used to determine the distances from the sources to where the concentrations of particulate matter (PM) would be less than the NAAQS. The current air-permitting process requires that concentrations from a source do not exceed the NAAQS at the property line and beyond for the facility to be in compliance with its permit conditions. Emission factors for particulate matter less than 10 micrometers (PM10) were developed for cattle feedyards using a reverse modeling protocol and Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) sampler data. Corrections were applied to the TEOM measurements to account for TEOM vs. filter-based low-volume (FBLV) sampler bias and over-sampling of PM10 pre-collectors. Invalid concentrations and dust peaks larger than mean ± 3 times the standard deviation were excluded from this study. AERMOD predictions of downwind concentrations at cotton gins were observed for compliance with 24-hour PM10 and PM2.5 NAAQS at property lines. The emissions from three cotton gins were analyzed at 50 m and 100 m distances. TEOM and FBLV samplers were used to collect 24-hour PM10 measurements inside a laying hen house. The distances to the property lines at which the emissions of PM10 were below the 24-hour average PM10 standards were estimated using AERMOD. The results suggested that the special use of the NAAQS for as the property-line concentration not to be exceeded, could be problematic to agriculture. Emission factors that were comparable of published emission factors were obtained in this study. Large distances to property lines were required when minimum flow rate recommendations were not considered. Emission factors that are representative of the emissions in a particular facility are essential; else facilities could be inappropriately regulated.

Bairy, Jnana 1988-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Low exhaust temperature electrically heated particulate matter filter system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, a sensor, a heating element, and a control module. The PM filter includes with an upstream end that receives exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. The sensor detects a temperature of the exhaust gas. The control module controls current to the heating element to convection heat one of the zones and initiate a regeneration process. The control module selectively increases current to the heating element relative to a reference regeneration current level when the temperature is less than a predetermined temperature.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI); Bhatia, Garima (Bangalore, IN)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Wireless zoned particulate matter filter regeneration control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An assembly includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. An absorbing layer absorbs microwave energy in one of N frequency ranges and is arranged with the upstream end. N is an integer. A frequency selective filter has M frequency selective segments and receives microwave energy in the N frequency ranges. M is an integer. One of the M frequency selective segments permits passage of the microwave energy in one of the N frequency ranges and does not permit passage of microwave energy in the other of the N frequency ranges.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Kirby, Kevin W [Calabasas Hills, CA; Phelps, Amanda [Malibu, CA

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Apparatus for removal of particulate matter from gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the removal of particulate matter from the gaseous product stream of an entrained flow coal gasifier which apparatus includes an initial screen, an intermediate screen which is aligned with the direction of flow of the gaseous product stream and a final screen transversely disposed to the flow of gaseous product and which apparatus is capable of withstanding at least a pressure differential of about 10 psi (68.95 kPa) or greater at the temperatures of the gaseous product stream.

Smith, Peyton L. (Baton Rouge, LA); Morse, John C. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Novel Concepts for Particulate Matter Control: 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latest regulatory challenge for U.S. utilities and the air pollution control industry is the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS). For existing coal-fired generating units, a maximum particulate matter (PM) emissions rate of 0.030 lb/mmBtu (filterable component only) must be met in conjunction with HCl emissions standards (0.002 lb/mmBtu) and mercury emissions standards (1.2 lb/mmBtu for non-low-rank virgin coals). MATS standards are ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Engineering analysis of fugitive particulate matter emissions from cattle feedyards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An engineering analysis of the fugitive particulate matter emissions from a feedyard is not simple. The presence of an evening dust peak in concentration measurements downwind of a feedyard complicates the calculation of an average 24-h emission flux for the feedyard. The evening dust peak is a recurring event that occurs during evening hours when particulate matter concentration measurements increase and decrease dramatically during a short period of time. The concentrations measured during the evening can be up to 8 times the concentrations measured throughout the rest of the day. There is a perception that these concentration increases are due to increases in cattle activity as the temperature decreases during the evening. The purpose of Objective 1 of this research was to quantify the changes in concentrations based on changes in meteorological conditions and/or cattle activity. Using ISCST3, a Gaussian-based EPAapproved dispersion model used to predict concentrations downwind of the feedyard , the results of this work indicate that up to 80% of the increase in concentrations can be attributed to changes in meteorological conditions (wind speed, stability class, and mixing height.)The total fugitive particulate matter emissions on a cattle feedyard are due to two sources: unpaved roads (vehicle traffic) and pen surfaces (cattle activity). Objective 2 of this research was to quantify the mass fraction of the concentration measurements that was due to unpaved road emissions (vehicle traffic). A recent finding by Wanjura et al. (2004) reported that as much as 80% of the concentrations measured after a rain event were due to unpaved road emissions. An engineering analysis of the potential of the unpaved road emissions versus the total feedyard emissions using ISCST3 suggests that it is possible for 70 to 80% of the concentration measurements to be attributed to unpaved road emissions. The purpose of Objective 3 was to demonstrate the science used by ISCST3 to predict concentrations downwind of an area source. Results from this study indicate that the ISCST3 model utilizes a form of the Gaussian line source algorithm to predict concentrations downwind of an area source.

Hamm, Lee Bradford

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

AIR QUALITY: MERCURY, TRACE ELEMENTS, AND PARTICULATE MATTER CONFERENCE  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the planning/preparation, facilitation, and outcome of the conference entitled ''Air Quality: Mercury, Trace Elements, and Particulate Matter'' that was held December 1-4, 1998, in McLean, Virginia (on the outskirts of Washington, DC). The goal of the conference was to bring together industry, government, and the research community to discuss the critical issue of how air quality can impact human health and the ecosystem, specifically hazardous air pollutants and fine airborne particles; available and developing control technologies; strategies and research needs; and an update on federal and state policy and regulations, related implementation issues, and the framework of the future.

John H. Pavlish; Steven A. Benson

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter from broiler Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations, ammonia (NH?) concentrations, and ventilation rates were measured in four commercial, tunnel ventilated broiler houses in June through December of 2000 in Brazos County, Texas. Particle size distributions were developed from TSP samplers collected and used to determine the mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples collected. Concentrations of TSP and ammonia measured were multiplied by the ventilation rates measured to obtain emission factors for PM?? and ammonia from tunnel ventilated commercial broiler houses. TSP and NH? concentrations ranged from 7,387 to 11,387 []g/m³ and 2.02 to 45 ppm, respectively. Ammonia concentration exhibited a correlation with the age of the birds. Mass median diameters (MMD) found using particle size analysis with a Coulter Counter Multisizer were between 24.0 and 26.7 mm aerodynamic equivalent diameter. MMD increased with bird age. The mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples was between 2.72% and 8.40% with a mean of 5.94%. Ventilation rates were measured between 0.58 and 89 m³/s. Ammonia emission rates varied from 38 to 2105 g/hr. TSP emission rates and PM?? emission rates ranged from 7.0 to 1673 g/hr 0.58 to 99 g/hr respectively. Emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter increased with the age of the birds. Error and sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation for the calculation of emission rates. Error for ammonia emission rates was 99 g/hr during tunnel ventilation and 6 g/hr during sidewall ventilation. Error for TSP emission rates was 79 g/hr and 11 g/hr for tunnel and sidewall ventilation respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that ventilation rate measurements and measurement of ammonia concentration had the most effect on the emission rates. Emission factors of NH? and PM?? estimated for these buildings were 1.32 ± 0.472 g/bird and 22.8 ± 9.28 g/bird, respectively. These emission factors take into account the variation of PM?? and NH? concentrations and ventilation rates with the age of the birds.

Redwine, Jarah Suzanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the research was to refine and complete development of an on-board particulate matter (PM) sensor for diesel, DISI, and HCCI engines, bringing it to a point where it could be commercialized and marketed.

Hall, Matt; Matthews, Ron

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Understanding the meteorological drivers of U.S. particulate matter concentrations in a changing climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a serious public health issue for the United States. While there is a growing body of evidence that climate change will partially counter the effectiveness of future precursor emission reductions to reduce ozone (O...

John P. Dawson; Bryan J. Bloomer; Darrell A. Winner; Christopher P. Weaver

28

Characterization of particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters: Visual and analytical approach in macro-, micro- and nano-scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale analytical investigations of particulate matter (soot and ash) of two loaded diesel particulate filters (DPF) from (a) a truck (DPF1) and (b) a passenger car (DPF2) reveal the following: in DPF1 (without fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 130-270 {mu}m thick, homogeneous porous cake with pronounced orientation. Soot aggregates consist of 15-30 nm large individual particles exhibiting relatively mature internal nanostructures, however, far from being graphite. Ash aggregates largely accumulate at the outlet part of DPF1, while minor amounts are deposited directly on the channel walls all along the filter length. They consist of crystalline phases with individual particles of sizes down to the nanoscale range. Chemically, the ash consists mainly of Mg, S, Ca, Zn and P, elements encountered in lubricating oil additives. In the passenger car DPF2 (with fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 200-500 {mu}m thick, inhomogeneous porous cake consisting of several superposed layers corresponding to different soot generations. The largest part of the soot cake is composed of unburned, oriented soot aggregates left behind despite repeated regenerations, while a small part constitutes a loose layer with randomly oriented aggregates, which was deposited last and has not seen any regeneration. Fe-oxide particles of micro- to nano-scale sizes, originating from the fuel-borne additive, are often dispersed within the part of the soot cake composed of the unburned soot leftovers. The individual soot nanoparticles in DPF2 are approximately 15-40 nm large and generally less mature than in the truck DPF1. The presence of soot leftovers in DPF2 indicates that the addition of fuel-borne material does not fully compensate for the temperatures needed for complete soot removal. Ash in DPF2 is filling up more than half of the filter volume (at the downstream part) and is dominated by Fe-oxide aggregates, due to the Fe-based fuel-borne additive, but otherwise its chemical composition reflects compounds of lubricating oil additives. (author)

Liati, Anthi; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for I.C. Engines, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Implications of Low Particulate Matter Emissions on System Fuel Efficiency for High Efficiency Clean Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced diesel combustion regimes such as High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) offer the benefits of reduced engine out NOX and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Lower PM emissions during advanced combustion reduce the demand on diesel particulate filters (DPFs) and can, thereby, reduce the fuel penalty associated with DPF regeneration. In this study, a SiC DPF was loaded and regenerated on a 1.7-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operated in conventional and advanced combustion modes at different speed and load conditions. A diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a lean NOX trap (LNT) were also installed in the exhaust stream. Five steady-state speed and load conditions were weighted to estimate Federal Test Procedure (FTP) fuel efficiency. The DPF was loaded using lean-rich cycling with frequencies that resulted in similar levels of NOX emissions downstream of the LNT. The pressure drop across the DPF was measured at a standard point (1500 rpm, 5.0 bar) before and after loading, and a P rise rate was determined for comparison between conventional and advanced combustion modes. Higher PM emissions in conventional combustion resulted in a higher rate of backpressure rise across the DPF at all of the load points leading to more frequent DPF regenerations and higher fuel penalty. The fuel penalty during conventional combustion was 4.2% compared with 3.1% for a mixture of conventional and advanced modes.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Kinetic Model Development for the Combustion of Particulate Matter from Conventional and Soy Methyl Ester Diesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research has been to investigate how the oxidation characteristics of diesel particulate matter (PM) are affected by blending soy-based biodiesel fuel with conventional ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. PM produced in a light duty engine from different biodiesel-conventional fuel blends was subjected to a range of physical and chemical measurements in order to better understand the mechanisms by which fuel-related changes to oxidation reactivity are brought about. These observations were then incorporated into a kinetic model to predict PM oxidation. Nanostructure of the fixed carbon was investigated by HR-TEM and showed that particulates from biodiesel had a more open structure than particulates generated from conventional diesel fuel, which was confirmed by BET surface area measurements. Surface area evolution with extent of oxidation reaction was measured for PM from ULSD and biodiesel. Biodiesel particulate has a significantly larger surface area for the first 40% of conversion, at which point the samples become quite similar. Oxidation characteristics of nascent PM and the fixed carbon portion were measured by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and it was noted that increased biodiesel blending lowered the light-off temperature as well as the temperature where the peak rate of oxidation occurred. A shift in the oxidation profiles of all fuels was seen when the mobile carbon fraction was removed, leaving only the fixed carbon, however the trend in temperature advantage of the biofuel blending remained. The mobile carbon fraction was measured by temperature programmed desorption found to generally increase with increasing biodiesel blend level. The relative change in the light-off temperatures for the nascent and fixed carbon samples was found to be related to the fraction of mobile carbon. Effective Arrhenius parameters for fixed carbon oxidation were directly measured with isothermal, differential oxidation experiments. Normalizing the reaction rate to the total carbon surface area available for reaction allowed for the definition of a single reaction rate with constant activation energy (112.5 {+-} 5.8 kJ/mol) for the oxidation of PM, independent of its fuel source. A kinetic model incorporating the surface area dependence of fixed carbon oxidation rate and the impact of the mobile carbon fraction was constructed and validated against experimental data.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous The government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC21-88MC 23174 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Cohen, Mitchell R. (Troy, NY); Gal, Eli (Lititz, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system are described for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous mixture.

Cohen, M.R.; Gal, E.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

33

Estimating long term urban exposure to particulate matter and ozone in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OFIS is a robust and efficient model for simulating the formation of photochemical pollutants in an urban plume. In this paper we present applications of the recent further development of OFIS for calculating both particulate matter and ozone concentrations. ... Keywords: Air quality model, Ozone exposure, PM exposure, Urban air pollution

Athanasios Arvanitis; Nicolas Moussiopoulos

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

5-Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory Five Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere FY2001-FY2005 NETL PM Research Program Ambient Sampling & Analysis Control Technology R&D Source Characterization Predictive Modeling -iii- TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B. Outlook for PM and the Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A. Program Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 B. Current Program Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1. The Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

35

Impacts of Particulate Matter on Human Health: An Updated Summary of EPRI Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundreds of toxicological and epidemiological studies have been conducted over the past 20 years to better understand the effects of particulate matter (PM), and air pollution in general, on human health. Examples of environmental regulations and policies driven by these health concerns include the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), as well as State Implementation Plans (SIPs) and multi-pollutant control legislation. EPRI's PM/Health Research Program...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Quantitative Aerosol Generator Designed for Particulate Matter (PM) Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A growing number of utilities are required to continuously monitor particulate matter (PM) emissions using continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS). Currently, simultaneous EPA manual reference method tests (EPA Reference Method 5) must be used to calibrate and audit these PM CEMS following EPA Performance Specification 11 guidelines (PS-11). These calibrations are not only difficult, time consuming, and expensive to perform, but are particularly onerous because they require the utility to modify p...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

37

SOURCE SIGNATURES OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PETROLEUM REFINING AND FUEL USE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The molecular structure and microstructure of a suite of fine particulate matter (PM) samples produced by the combustion of residual fuel oil and diesel fuel were investigated by an array of analytical techniques. Some of the more important results are summarized below. Diesel PM (DPM): A small diesel engine test facility was used to generate a suite of diesel PM samples from different fuels under engine load and idle conditions. C XANES, {sup 13}C NMR, XRD, and TGA were in accord that the samples produced under engine load conditions contained more graphitic material than those produced under idle conditions, which contained a larger amount of unburned diesel fuel and lubricating oil. The difference was enhanced by the addition of 5% of oxygenated compounds to the reference fuel. Scanning transmission x-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM) was able to distinguish particulate regions rich in C=C bonds from regions rich in C-H bonds with a resolution of {approx}50 nm. The former are representative of more graphitic regions and the latter of regions rich in unburned fuel and oil. The dominant microstructure observed by SEM and TEM consisted of complex chain-like structures of PM globules {approx}20-100 nm in mean diameter, with a high fractal dimension. High resolution TEM revealed that the graphitic part of the diesel soot consisted of onion-like structures made up of graphene layers. Typically 3-10 graphene layers make up the ''onion rings'', with the layer spacing decreasing as the number of layers increases. ROFA PM: Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) PM has been analyzed by a new approach that combines XAFS spectroscopy with selective leaching procedures. ROFA PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 2.5+} produced in combustion facilities at the U.S. EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRML) were analyzed by XAFS before and after leaching with water, acid (1N HCl), and pentane. Both water and acid leaching removed most of the metal sulfates, which were the dominant phase present for most metals (V, Ni, Zn, etc.). This allowed conclusive identification in the leaching residue of important secondary sulfide and oxide phases, including Ni sulfide, a toxic and carcinogenic phase observed in the leached PM{sub 2.5+} samples. Other significant secondary phases identified included V{sub 2}O{sub 4}, V sulfide, and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

Gerald P. Huffman; Frank E. Huggins; Naresh Shah; Artur Braun; Yuanzhi Chen; J. David Robertson; Joseph Kyger; Adel F. Sarofim; Ronald J. Pugmire; Henk L.C. Meuzelaar; JoAnn Lighty

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Measurements of particulate matter concentrations at a landfill site (Crete, Greece)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large amounts of solid waste are disposed in landfills and the potential of particulate matter (PM) emissions into the atmosphere is significant. Particulate matter emissions in landfills are the result of resuspension from the disposed waste and other activities such as mechanical recycling and composting, waste unloading and sorting, the process of coating residues and waste transport by trucks. Measurements of ambient levels of inhalable particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) were performed in a landfill site located at Chania (Crete, Greece). Elevated PM{sub 10} concentrations were measured in the landfill site during several landfill operations. It was observed that the meteorological conditions (mainly wind velocity and temperature) influence considerably the PM{sub 10} concentrations. Comparison between the PM{sub 10} concentrations at the landfill and at a PM{sub 10} background site indicates the influence of the landfill activities on local concentrations at the landfill. No correlation was observed between the measurements at the landfill and the background sites. Finally, specific preventing measures are proposed to control the PM concentrations in landfills.

Chalvatzaki, E.; Kopanakis, I. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Kontaksakis, M. [Municipal Company of Solid Waste Management, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Glytsos, T.; Kalogerakis, N. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Lazaridis, M., E-mail: lazaridi@mred.tuc.g [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Relating hygroscopicity and composition of organic aerosol particulate matter  

SciTech Connect

A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) was used to measure the water uptake (hygroscopicity) of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed during the chemical and photochemical oxidation of several organic precursors in a smog chamber. Electron ionization mass spectra of the non-refractory submicron aerosol were simultaneously determined with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), and correlations between the two different signals were investigated. SOA hygroscopicity was found to strongly correlate with the relative abundance of the ion signal m/z 44 expressed as a fraction of total organic signal (f44). m/z 44 is due mostly to the ion fragment CO+2 for all types of SOA systems studied, and has been previously shown to strongly correlate with organic O/C for ambient and chamber OA. The analysis was also performed on ambient OA from two field experiments at the remote site Jungfraujoch, and the megacity Mexico City, where similar results were found. A simple empirical linear relation between the hygroscopicity of OA at subsaturated RH, as given by the hygroscopic growth factor (GF) or “*org” parameter, and f44 was determined and is given by *org=2.2×f44?0.13. This approximation can be further verified and refined as the database for AMS and HTDMA measurements is constantly being expanded around the world. The use of this approximation could introduce an important simplification in the parameterization of hygroscopicity of OA in atmospheric models, since 20 f44 is correlated with the photochemical age of an air mass.

Duplissy, J.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Dommen, J.; Alfarra, M. R.; Metzger, A.; Barmpadimos, I.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Tritscher, Torsten; Gysel, Martin; Aiken, Allison; Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Collins, Donald R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Baltensperger, Urs

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Particulate matter emissions from combustion of wood in district heating applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utilization of wood biomass to generate district heat and power in communities that have access to this energy source is increasing. In this paper the effect of wood fuel properties, combustion condition, and flue gas cleaning system on variation in the amount and formation of particles in the flue gas of typical district heating wood boilers are discussed based on the literature survey. Direct measurements of particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood boilers with district heating applications are reviewed and presented. Finally, recommendations are given regarding the selection of wood fuel, combustion system condition, and flue gas cleaning system in district heating systems in order to meet stringent air quality standards. It is concluded that utilization of high quality wood fuel, such as wood pellets produced from natural, uncontaminated stem wood, would generate the least PM emissions compared to other wood fuel types. Particulate matter emissions from grate burners equipped with electrostatic precipitators when using wood pellets can be well below stringent regulatory emission limit such as particulate emission limit of Metro Vancouver, Canada.

Ghafghazi, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Arsenic, and Fine Particulate Matter From Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kevin crist Kevin crist Principal Investigator Ohio University Research and Technology Center Athens, OH 45701 740-593-4751 cristk@ohiou.edu Environmental and Water Resources Evaluation of thE Emission, transport, and dEposition of mErcury, arsEnic, and finE particulatE mattEr from coal-BasEd powEr plants in thE ohio rivEr vallEy rEgion Background The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established an aggressive research initiative to address the technical and scientific issues surrounding the impact of coal-based power systems on ambient levels of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), nitrogen oxides (NO X ), mercury/air toxics, and acid gases. Regulatory drivers such as the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the 1997 revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards, and the 2005 Clean Air

42

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Filterable Particulate Matter Stack Test Methods: Performance Characteristics and Potential Improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel-fired power plant owners are required to measure filterable particulate matter (fPM) in stack gases in order to comply with air permits that place limits on their emissions. Recent rulemakings by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have given power plant owners the option to comply with emission limits for non-mercury metals classified as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) by measuring fPM as a surrogate parameter. Compliance can be demonstrated either by quarterly sampling using ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

Program on Technology Innovation: An Alternate Framework for the Risk Assessment of Ambient Particulate Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on the protection of human health. PM2.5 is currently regulated on a mass concentration basis (particle mass per volume of air), with the standard providing limits on both 24-hour and annual average concentrations. A fundamental tenet of this mass-based approach to regulation is its implicit assumption that all particle components are equally harmful to health. In light of the complexity of t...

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

Impact of Biodiesel on the Oxidation Kinetics and Morphology of Diesel Particulate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We compare the oxidation characteristics of four different diesel particulates generated with a modern light-duty engine. The four particulates represent engine fueling with conventional ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), biodiesel, and two intermediate blends of these fuels. The comparisons discussed here are based on complementary measurements implemented in a laboratory micro-reactor, including temperature programmed desorption and oxidation, pulsed isothermal oxidation, and BET surface area. From these measurements we have derived models that are consistent with the observed oxidation reactivity differences. When accessible surface area effects are properly accounted for, the oxidation kinetics of the fixed carbon components were found to consistently exhibit an Arrhenius activation energy of 113 6 kJ/mol. Release of volatile carbon from the as-collected particulate appears to follow a temperaturedependent rate law.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Measuring Sub-micron Size Fractionated Particulate Matter on Aluminum Impactor Disks  

SciTech Connect

Sub-micron sized airborne particulate matter is not collected well on regular quartz or glass fiber filter papers. We used a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to size fractionate particulate matter (PM) into six size fractions and deposit it on specially designed high purity thin aluminum disks. The MOUDI separated PM into fractions 56-100 nm, 100-180 nm, 180-320 nm, 320-560 nm, 560-1000 nm, and 1000-1800 nm. Since MOUDI have low flow rates, it takes several days to collect sufficient carbon on 47 mm foil disks. The small carbon mass (20-200 microgram C) and large aluminum substrate ({approx}25 mg Al) presents several challenges to production of graphite targets for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis. The Al foil consumes large amounts of oxygen as it is heated and tends to melt into quartz combustion tubes, causing gas leaks. We describe sample processing techniques to reliably produce graphitic targets for {sup 14}C-AMS analysis of PM deposited on Al impact foils.

Buchholz, B A; Zermeno, P; Hwang, H; Young, T M

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

New Chemical Aerosol Characterization Methods- Examples Using Agricultural and Urban Airborne Particulate Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored different chemical characterization methods of agricultural and urban airborne particulate matter. Three different field campaigns are discussed. For the agricultural aerosols, measurement of the chemical composition of size-resolved agricultural aerosols collected from a ground site at the nominally downwind and upwind edge of a feedlot in West Texas were reported. High volume cascade impactor samplers were used for the collection of the particles, and two major analytical methods were applied to characterize different components of the aerosols, ion chromatography (IC ) was used to measure ionic composition with the main targets being ammonium (NH4 ), nitrate (NO3 -), and sulfate (SO4 2-), direct thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (GC-MS/FID) methodology was used to identify and quantify organic compounds in the aerosol particles. For the urban aerosols, I report the measurement of mass, and the chemical composition of size-resolved aerosols collected from two different locations in Houston, analyzed by the thermal desorption GC-MS/FID method. The investigation of single particle composition using RM is reported as well: RM and chemical mapping techniques have been applied for the qualitative analysis of components in the samples of air particulate matter collected in downtown Houston.

Zhou, Lijun

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Assessment of Contribution of Contemporary Carbon Sources to Size-Fractionated Particulate Matter and Time-Resolved Bulk Particulate Matter Using the Measurement of Radiocarbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was motivated by a desire to improve understanding of the sources contributing to the carbon that is an important component of airborne particulate matter (PM). The ultimate goal of this project was to lay a ground work for future tools that might be easily implemented with archived or routinely collected samples. A key feature of this study was application of radiocarbon measurement that can be interpreted to indicate the relative contributions from fossil and non-fossil carbon sources of atmospheric PM. Size-resolved PM and time-resolved PM{sub 10} collected from a site in Sacramento, CA in November 2007 (Phase I) and March 2008 (Phase II) were analyzed for radiocarbon and source markers such as levoglucosan, cholesterol, and elemental carbon. Radiocarbon data indicates that the contributions of non-fossil carbon sources were much greater than that from fossil carbon sources in all samples. Radiocarbon and source marker measurements confirm that a greater contribution of non-fossil carbon sources in Phase I samples was highly likely due to residential wood combustion. The present study proves that measurement of radiocarbon and source markers can be readily applied to archived or routinely collected samples for better characterization of PM sources. More accurate source apportionment will support ARB in developing more efficient control strategies.

Hwang, H M; Young, T M; Buchholz, B A

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

COMMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ON JUNE 2003 FOURTH EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR PARTICULATE MATTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/OFFICE OF FOSSIL COMMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY STAFF ON JUNE 2003 FOURTH EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR PARTICULATE MATTER Summary and Conclusions The Fourth External Review Draft Criteria Document for Particulate Matter (henceforth, the CD) is a very comprehensive review of both epidemiological and toxicological research into the health effects of particulate matter (PM) in ambient air. DOE/Office of Fossil Energy offers the following comments on it. OMB's "Principles and Procedures" memorandum to agencies states: "OIRA's [OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs] review also evaluates, on occasion in consultation with the Office of Science and Technology Policy, whether the agency has, in assessing exposure to a risk or an environmental

50

Carbon-centered free radicals in particulate matter emissions from wood and coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the free radicals in the particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood and coal combustion. The intensity of radicals in PM dropped linearly within two months of sample storage and stabilized after that. This factor of storage time was adjusted when comparing radical intensities among different PM samples. An inverse relationship between coal rank and free radical intensities in PM emissions was observed, which was in contrast with the pattern of radical intensities in the source coals. The strong correlation between intensities of free radical and elemental carbon in PM emissions suggests that the radical species may be carbon-centered. The increased g-factors, 2.0029-2.0039, over that of purely carbon-centered radicals may indicate the presence of vicinal oxygen heteroatom. The redox and biology activities of these carbon-centered radicals are worthy of evaluation. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Linwei Tian; Catherine P. Koshland; Junko Yano; Vittal K. Yachandra; Ignatius T.S. Yu; S.C. Lee; Donald Lucas [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China). School of Public Health

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Characteristics of inhalable particulate matter concentration and size distribution from power plants in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The collection efficiency of particulate emission control devices (PECDs), particulate matter (PM) emissions, and PM size distribution were determined experimentally at the inlet and outlet of PECDs at five coal-fired power plants. Different boilers, coals, and PECDs are used in these power plants. Measurement in situ was performed by an electrical low-pressure impactor with a sampling system, which consisted of an isokinetic sampler probe, precut cyclone, and two- stage dilution system with a sample line to the instruments. The size distribution was measured over a range from 0.03 to 10 {mu}m. Before and after all of the PECDs, the particle number size distributions display a bimodal distribution. The PM2.5 fraction emitted to atmosphere includes a significant amount of the mass from the coarse particle mode. The controlled and uncontrolled emission factors of total PM, inhalable PM (PM10), and fine PM (PM2.5) were obtained. Electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and baghouse total collection efficiencies are 96.38 99.89% and 99.94%, respectively. The minimum collection efficiency of the ESP and the baghouse both appear in the particle size range of 0.1 1 0 {mu}m. In this size range, ESP and baghouse collection efficiencies are 85.79 98.6% and 99.54%. Real- time measurement shows that the mass and number concentration of PM10 will be greatly affected by the operating conditions of the PECDs. The number of emitted particles increases with increasing boiler load level because of higher combustion temperature. During test run periods, the data reproducibility is satisfactory. 19 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Honghong Yi; Jiming Hao; Lei Duan; Xinghua Li; Xingming Guo [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Environmental Science and Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Back-calculating emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter from area sources using dispersion modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering directly impacts current and future regulatory policy decisions. The foundation of air pollution control and air pollution dispersion modeling lies in the math, chemistry, and physics of the environment. Therefore, regulatory decision making must rely upon sound science and engineering as the core of appropriate policy making (objective analysis in lieu of subjective opinion). This research evaluated particulate matter and ammonia concentration data as well as two modeling methods, a backward Lagrangian stochastic model and a Gaussian plume dispersion model. This analysis assessed the uncertainty surrounding each sampling procedure in order to gain a better understanding of the uncertainty in the final emission rate calculation (a basis for federal regulation), and it assessed the differences between emission rates generated using two different dispersion models. First, this research evaluated the uncertainty encompassing the gravimetric sampling of particulate matter and the passive ammonia sampling technique at an animal feeding operation. Future research will be to further determine the wind velocity profile as well as determining the vertical temperature gradient during the modeling time period. This information will help quantify the uncertainty of the meteorological model inputs into the dispersion model, which will aid in understanding the propagated uncertainty in the dispersion modeling outputs. Next, an evaluation of the emission rates generated by both the Industrial Source Complex (Gaussian) model and the WindTrax (backward-Lagrangian stochastic) model revealed that the calculated emission concentrations from each model using the average emission rate generated by the model are extremely close in value. However, the average emission rates calculated by the models vary by a factor of 10. This is extremely troubling. In conclusion, current and future sources are regulated based on emission rate data from previous time periods. Emission factors are published for regulation of various sources, and these emission factors are derived based upon back-calculated model emission rates and site management practices. Thus, this factor of 10 ratio in the emission rates could prove troubling in terms of regulation if the model that the emission rate is back-calculated from is not used as the model to predict a future downwind pollutant concentration.

Price, Jacqueline Elaine

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Novel Collection and Toxicological Analysis Techniques for IC Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project staff partnered with Costas Sioutas from the University of Southern California to apply the VACES (Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enhancement System) to a diesel engine test facility at West Virginia University Department of Mechanical Engineering and later the NIOSH Lake Lynn Mine facility. The VACES system was able to allow diesel exhaust particulate matter (DPM) to grow to sufficient particle size to be efficiently collected with the SKC Biosampler impinger device, directly into a suspension of simulated pulmonary surfactant. At the WVU-MAE facility, the concentration of the aerosol was too high to allow efficient use of the VACES concentration enhancement, although aerosol collection was successful. Collection at the LLL was excellent with the diluted exhaust stream. In excess of 50 samples were collected at the LLL facility, along with matching filter samples, at multiple engine speed and load conditions. Replicate samples were combined and concentration increased using a centrifugal concentrator. Bioassays were negative for all tested samples, but this is believed to be due to insufficient concentration in the final assay suspensions.

Michael Keane; Xiao-Chun Shi; Tong-man Ong

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

A science based emission factor for particulate matter emitted from cotton harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poor regional air quality in some states across the US cotton belt has resulted in increased pressure on agricultural sources of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution regulators. Moreover, inaccurate emission factors used in the calculation of annual emissions inventories led to the identification of cotton harvesting as a significant source of PM10 in California and Arizona. As a result, cotton growers in these states are now required to obtain air quality permits and submit management practice plans detailing the actions taken by the producer to reduce fugitive PM emissions from field operations. The objective of this work was to develop accurate PM emission factors for cotton harvesting in terms of total suspended particulate (TSP), PM10, and PM2.5. Two protocols were developed and used to develop PM emission factors from cotton harvesting operations on three farms in Texas during 2006 and 2007. Protocol one utilized TSP concentrations measured downwind of harvesting operations with meteorological data measured onsite in a dispersion model to back-calculate TSP emission flux values. Flux values, determined with the regulatory dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, were converted to emission factors and corrected with results from particle size distribution (PSD) analyses to report emission factors in terms of PM10 and PM2.5. Emission factors were developed for two-row (John Deere 9910) and sixrow (John Deere 9996) cotton pickers with protocol one. The uncertainty associated with the emission factors developed through protocol one resulted in no significant difference between the emission factors for the two machines. Under the second protocol, emission concentrations were measured onboard the six-row cotton picker as the machine harvested cotton. PM10 and PM2.5 emission factors were developed from TSP emission concentration measurements converted to emission rates using the results of PSD analysis. The total TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emission factors resulting from the source measurement protocol are 1.64 ± 0.37, 0.55 ± 0.12, and 1.58E- 03 ± 4.5E-04 kg/ha, respectively. These emission factors contain the lowest uncertainty and highest level of precision of any cotton harvesting PM emission factors ever developed. Thus, the emission factors developed through the source sampling protocol are recommended for regulatory use.

Wanjura, John David

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Temporal and spatial variation of particulate matter and chlorophyll in the Arabian Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arabian Sea is of special interest because of reversals in the extreme atmospheric forcing that lead to the greatest seasonal variability among the world's oceans. An intensive series of cruises was conducted in the Northern Arabian Sea as part of the 1995 U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study. Temporal and spatial variations of particulate matter (PM) and chlorophyll were determined via transrnissometers and fluorometers during a monsoonal cycle. Seasonal variations of the standing stock of PM and chlorophyll were on the same order of magnitude as spatial variations. The abundance and distribution of PM and chlorophyll varied throughout the monsoonal cycle. During the Spring Intermonsoonal period standing stocks of PM and chlorophyll in the upper 100m were -35% less than the SW Monsoon. The standing stocks during the SW Monsoon were only-1 0% greater than during the NE Monsoon. This difference was much smaller than expected. During the Spring Intermonsoon period conditions in the surface waters throughout the Arabian Sea became characteristically oligotrophic. Subsurface maxima of both PM and chlorophyll dominated during that time. Variations in the PM and chlorophyll were directly related to the biology and were greatly affected by nutrient concentrations and mixed layer depths. Convective mixing was prevalent during the NE Monsoon producing deep mixed layers (-70m) with large diel variations (as large as 90m). Wind-mixing and upwelling dominated the SW Monsoon producing deep nutrient-rich mixed layers (-50m) with little diel variation. Light winds during the Spring Intermonsoon allowed shallow mixed layers (10-20m) to persist with small diel variations. Spacial distribution throughout the year was high near the coast and decreased offshore. Horizontal frequent presence of mesoscale features.

Gundersen, Jan Scott

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ethanol Blend Effects On Direct Injection Spark-Ignition Gasoline Vehicle Particulate Matter Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct injection spark-ignition (DISI) gasoline engines can offer better fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected counterparts, and are now appearing increasingly in more U.S. vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged DISI engines are likely to be used in lieu of large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, to meet fuel economy standards for 2016. In addition to changes in gasoline engine technology, fuel composition may increase in ethanol content beyond the 10% allowed by current law due to the Renewable Fuels Standard passed as part of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). In this study, we present the results of an emissions analysis of a U.S.-legal stoichiometric, turbocharged DISI vehicle, operating on ethanol blends, with an emphasis on detailed particulate matter (PM) characterization. Gaseous species, particle mass, and particle number concentration emissions were measured for the Federal Test Procedure urban driving cycle (FTP 75) and the more aggressive US06 cycle. Particle number-size distributions and organic to elemental carbon ratios (OC/EC) were measured for 30 MPH and 80 MPH steady-state operation. In addition, particle number concentration was measured during wide open throttle accelerations (WOTs) and gradual accelerations representative of the FTP 75. For the gaseous species and particle mass measurements, dilution was carried out using a full flow constant volume sampling system (CVS). For the particle number concentration and size distribution measurements, a micro-tunnel dilution system was employed. The vehicles were fueled by a standard test gasoline and 10% (E10) and 20% (E20) ethanol blends from the same supplier. The particle mass emissions were approximately 3 and 7 mg/mile for the FTP75 and US06, respectively, with lower emissions for the ethanol blends. During steady-state operation, the geometric mean diameter of the particle-number size distribution remained approximately the same (50 nm) but the particle number concentration decreased with increasing ethanol content in the fuel. In addition, increasing ethanol content significantly reduced the number concentration of 50 and 100 nm particles during gradual and WOT accelerations.

Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Errors associated with particulate matter measurements on rural sources: appropriate basis for regulating cotton gins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural operations across the United States are encountering difficulties complying with current air pollution regulations for particulate matter (PM). PM is currently regulated in terms of particle diameters less than or equal to a nominal 10 ?m (PM10); however, current legislation is underway to regulate PM with diameters less than or equal to a nominal 2.5 ?m (PM2.5). The goals of this research were to determine the biases and uncertainties associated with current PM10 and PM2.5 sampling methods and to determine the extent to which these errors may impact the determination of cotton gin emission factors. Ideally, PM samplers would produce an accurate measure of the pollutant indicator; for instance, a PM10 sampler would produce an accurate measure of PM less than or equal to 10 ?m. However, samplers are not perfect and errors are introduced because of the established tolerances associated with sampler performance characteristics and the interaction of particle size and sampler performance characteristics. Results of this research indicated that a source emitting PM characterized by a mass median diameter (MMD) of 20 ?m and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 1.5 could be forced to comply with a 3.2 and 14 times more stringent regulation of PM10 and PM2.5, respectively, than a source emitting PM characterized by a MMD of 10 ?m and a GSD of 1.5. These estimates are based on both sources emitting the same concentrations of true PM or concentrations corresponding to the particle diameters less than the size of interest. Various methods were used to estimate the true PM10 and PM2.5 emission factors associated with cotton gin exhausts and the extent to which the sampler errors impacted the PM regulation. Results from this research indicated that current cotton gin emission factors could be over-estimated by about 40%. This over-estimation is a consequence of the relatively large PM associated with cotton gin exhausts. These PM sampling errors are contributing to the misappropriation of source emissions in State Implementation Plans, essentially forcing Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies to require additional controls on sources that may be incorrectly classified has high emitters.

Buser, Michael Dean

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

2008-01-1748 An Analysis of Methods for Measuring Particulate Matter Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission engine and was operated during testing with no exhaust aftertreatment devices. The engine of particulate emissions. This engine was operated under three conditions, with no aftertreatment, with a DPF as Engine 2 with the SCR aftertreatment device, the three mass measurement methods display comparable mass

Wu, Mingshen

59

Method for contamination control and barrier apparatus with filter for containing waste materials that include dangerous particulate matter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for hazardous waste materials that includes air or other gas carrying dangerous particulate matter has incorporated barrier material, preferably in the form of a flexible sheet, and one or more filters for the dangerous particulate matter sealably attached to such barrier material. The filter is preferably a HEPA type filter and is preferably chemically bonded to the barrier materials. The filter or filters are preferably flexibly bonded to the barrier material marginally and peripherally of the filter or marginally and peripherally of air or other gas outlet openings in the barrier material, which may be a plastic bag. The filter may be provided with a backing panel of barrier material having an opening or openings for the passage of air or other gas into the filter or filters. Such backing panel is bonded marginally and peripherally thereof to the barrier material or to both it and the filter or filters. A coupling or couplings for deflating and inflating the container may be incorporated. Confining a hazardous waste material in such a container, rapidly deflating the container and disposing of the container, constitutes one aspect of the method of the invention. The chemical bonding procedure for producing the container constitutes another aspect of the method of the invention. 3 figs.

Pinson, P.A.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hydrocarbon-enhanced particulate filter regeneration via microwave ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regeneration method for a particulate filter includes estimating a quantity of particulate matter trapped within the particulate filter, comparing the quantity of particulate matter to a predetermined quantity, heating at least a portion of the particulate filter to a combustion temperature of the particulate matter, and introducing hydrocarbon fuel to the particulate filter. The hydrocarbon fuel facilitates combustion of the particulate matter to regenerate the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Brown, David B. (Brighton, MI)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Laser-induced incandescence and elastic-scattering measurements of particulate-matter volume fraction changes during passage through a dilution tunnel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines produce far less mass of particulate matter than their predecessors, but this advance has been achieved at the expense of a significant increase in the number of sub-micron sized particles. This change in soot morphology has created the need for new instrumentation capable of measuring small volumes and sizes of particulate matter in a reasonable period of time, and preferably in real-time. Laser-induced incandescence and laser elastic scattering are complementary techniques suitable for this task. Optical measurements are presented for a diesel engine exhaust and compared with measurements performed using a scanning mobility particle sizer. This study investigates the effects of exhaust dilution and temperature control of the sampling system. It is also shown that laser-induced vaporization of low temperature volatile material is a potentially valuable technique for measuring the volatile component of exhaust particulate matter.

Robert M. Green; Peter O. Witze

2000-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

Grooved impactor and inertial trap for sampling inhalable particulate matter. [Patents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inertial trap and grooved impactor for providing a sharp cutoff for particles over 15 microns from entering an inhalable particulate sampler is disclosed. The impactor head has a tapered surface and is provided with V-shaped grooves. The tapered surface functions for reducing particle blow-off or reentrainment while the grooves prevent particle bounce. Water droplets and any resuspended material over the 15 micron size are collected by the inertial trap and deposited in a reservoir associated with the impactor.

Loo, B.W.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect

This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a complex urban environment; identification of a close correlation between

Luisa T. Molina, Rainer Volkamer, Benjamin de Foy, Wenfang Lei, Miguel Zavala, Erik Velasco; Mario J. Molina

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)  

SciTech Connect

Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, while associations with the sludge incineration factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAPs-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary factors and the majority of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased rMSSD in winter were difficult to determine due to lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. In Steubenville, we observed significant changes in HR (both increases and decreases), SDNN, and rMSSD in the summer, but not in the winter. We examined associations between individual source factors/PM components and HRV metrics segregated by predominant wind direction (NE or SW). Changes in HR (both increases and decreases) were linked with metal processing, waste incineration, and iron/steel factors along with most of their associated elemental constituents. Reductions in SDNN were associated with metal processing, waste incineration, and mobile source factors and the majority of elements loading onto these factors. There were no consistent associations between changes in rMSSD and source factors/components. Despite the large number of coal-fired power plants in the region, and therefore the large contribution of secondary sulfate to overall PM mass, we did not observe any associations with the coal/secondary factor or with the majority of its associated components. There were several inconsistencies in our results which make definitive conclusions difficult. For example, we observed opposing signs of effect estimates with some components depending on season, and with others depending on wind direction. In addition, our extensive dataset clearly would be subject to issues of multiple comparisons, and the 'true' significant results are unknown. Overall, however, our results suggest that acute changes in cardiac function were most strongly associated with local industrial sources. Results for coal-fired power plant-deriv

Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Turbulent Mixing due to Surface Waves Indicated by Remote Sensing of Suspended Particulate Matter and Its Implementation into Coupled Modeling of Waves, Turbulence, and Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the impact of the surface waves on the turbulent mixing. The satellite observations of suspended particulate matter (SPM) at the ocean surface as an indicator of turbulent quantities of the flow are used. In a water column, SPM ...

Andrey Pleskachevsky; Mikhail Dobrynin; Alexander V. Babanin; Heinz Günther; Emil Stanev

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Influence of fuel sulfur content on emissions from diesel engines equipped with oxidation catalysts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) are a viable exhaust aftertreatment alternative for alleviating regulated exhaust emissions of hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matter (PM)… (more)

Evans, Jason Carter.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Isotopic Tracing of Particulate Matter from a Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Ethanol-in-Diesel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to investigate the relative contribution to diesel engine particulate matter (PM) from the ethanol and diesel fractions of blended fuels. Four test fuels along with a diesel fuel baseline were investigated. The test fuels were comprised of {sup 14}C depleted diesel fuel mixed with contemporary grain ethanol (>400 the {sup 14}C concentration of diesel). An emulsifier (Span 85) or cosolvent (butyl alcohol) was used to facilitate mixing. The experimental test engine was a 1993 Cummins B5.9 diesel rated at 175 hp at 2500 rpm. Test fuels were run at steady-state conditions of 1600 rpm and 210 ft-lbs, and PM samples were collected on quartz filters following dilution of engine exhaust in a mini-dilution tunnel. AMS analysis of the filter samples showed that the ethanol contributed less to PM relative to its fraction in the fuel blend. For the emulsified blends, 6.4% and 10.3% contributions to PM were observed for 11.5% and 23.0% ethanol fuels, respectively. For the cosolvent blends, even lower contributions were observed (3.8% and 6.3% contributions to PM for 12.5% and 25.0% ethanol fuels, respectively).

Cheng, A.S.; Dibble, R.W.; Buchholz, B.

1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). One method is a thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented in an engine test cell with a spark ignited direct injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. SIDI is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency compared to other SI engines, however, the efficiency benefit comes with greater PM emissions and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based PM regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition.

Matthias, Nicholas; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Michael; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul M.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun S.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Technology for the control of particulates and sulfur oxides by electrostatic techniques. Final report, Aug 85-Jul 90  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report summarizes research performed by Southern Research Institute on several aspects of the E-SOx Process, invented by EPA to jointly control particulate matter and SO2 in coal-fired boiler emissions by retrofitting an existing electrostatic precipitator (ESP), formerly used only for particulate removal. The report covers research on potential ESP sites for process application, process economics, characterization of process solid waste collected in the ESP, measurement and modeling of prechargers in the retrofitted ESP, and effectiveness of the process with respect to SO2 removal. Experiment results described in the report confirm original EPA laboratory work and were influential in the decision to proceed with a large pilot evaluation of E-SOx. Research emphasis was on ESP performance, under E-SOx conditions, to verify that this essential equipment process component could retain its primary function of particle removal at a level equal to removal prior to modifications necessary for E-SOx. Further research is suggested.

Dismukes, E.B.; Gooch, J.P.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Recovery of semi-volatile organic compounds during sample preparation: Compilation for characterization of airborne particulate matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semi-volatile compounds present special analytical challenges not met by conventional methods for analysis of ambient particulate matter (PM). Accurate quantification of PM-associated organic compounds requires validation of the laboratory procedures for recovery over a wide volatility and polarity range. To meet these challenges, solutions of n-alkanes (nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 40}) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs (naphthalene to benzo[ghi]perylene) were reduced in volume from a solvent mixture (equal volumes of hexane, dichloromethane and methanol), to examine recovery after reduction in volume. When the extract solution volume reached 0.5 mL the solvent was entirely methanol, and the recovery averaged 60% for n-alkanes nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 25} and PAHs from naphthalene to chrysene. Recovery of higher MW compounds decreased with MW, because of their insolubility in methanol. When the walls of the flasks were washed with 1 mL of equal parts hexane and dichloromethane (to reconstruct the original solvent composition), the recovery of nC{sub 18} and higher MW compounds increased dramatically, up to 100% for nC{sub 22}-nC{sub 32} and then slowly decreasing with MW due to insolubility. To examine recovery during extraction of the components of the High Capacity Integrated Gas and Particle Sampler, the same standards were used to spike its denuders and filters. For XAD-4 coated denuders and filters, normalized recovery was > 95% after two extractions. Recovery from spiked quartz filters matched the recovery from the coated surfaces for alkanes nC{sub 18} and larger, and for fluoranthene and larger PAHs. Lower MW compounds evaporated from the quartz filter with the spiking solvent. This careful approach allowed quantification of organics by correcting for volatility- and solubility-related sample preparation losses. This method is illustrated for an ambient sample collected with this sampler during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000.

Swartz, Erick; Stockburger, Leonard; Gundel, Lara

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Impacts of Mid-level Biofuel Content in Gasoline on SIDI Engine-Out and Tailpipe Particulate Matter Emissions: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influences of ethanol and iso-butanol blended with gasoline on engine-out and post Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) particle size distribution and number concentration were studied using a GM 2.0L turbocharged Spark Ignition Direct Injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was operated using the production ECU with a dynamometer controlling the engine speed and the accelerator pedal position controlling the engine load. A TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) spectrometer was used to measure the particle size distribution in the range from 5.6 to 560 nm with a sampling rate of 1 Hz. US federal certification gasoline (E0), two ethanol-blended fuels (E10 and E20), and 11.7% iso-butanol blended fuel (BU12) were tested. Measurements were conducted at ten selected steady-state engine operation conditions. Bi-modal particle size distributions were observed for all operating conditions with peak values at particle sizes of 10 nm and 70 nm. Idle and low speed / low load conditions emitted higher total particle numbers than other operating conditions. At idle, the engine-out Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were dominated by nucleation mode particles, and the production TWC reduced these nucleation mode particles by more than 50%, while leaving the accumulation mode particle distribution unchanged. At engine load higher than 6 bar NMEP, accumulation mode particles dominated the engine-out particle emissions and the TWC had little effect. Compared to the baseline gasoline (E0), E10 does not significantly change PM emissions, while E20 and BU12 both reduce PM emissions under the conditions studied. Iso-butanol was observed to impact PM emissions more than ethanol, with up to 50% reductions at some conditions. In this paper, the issues related to PM measurement using FMPS are also discussed. While some uncertainties are due to engine variation, the FMPS must be operated under careful maintenance procedures in order to achieve repeatable measurement results.

He, X.; Ireland, J. C.; Zigler, B. T.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Knoll, K. E.; Alleman, T. L.; Tester, J. T.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

When Size Matters: Yttrium Oxide Breaking Down Under Pressure | Advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakthrough in Nanocrystals' Growth Breakthrough in Nanocrystals' Growth Next Step to Drought-Resistant Plants? A Boring Material "Stretched" Could Lead to an Electronics Revolution At the Crossroads of Chromosomes Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed When Size Matters: Yttrium Oxide Breaking Down Under Pressure NOVEMBER 2, 2010 Bookmark and Share Top: Pair distribution function (PDF) of 16 nm-sized Y2O3 at high pressures. Bottom: Lin Wang (left) and Wenge Yang (right) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington shown with the diamond anvil cell and x-ray instrumentation used to probe the PDF of the sample at high applied

73

Particulate matter and atherosclerosis: role of particle size, composition and oxidative stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Signaling pathway: Nrf2 MAPK NF-kB Genetic response:ARE AP NF-kB Mitochondrial perturbation PT pore Figure 4

Araujo, Jesus A; Nel, Andre E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Engines - 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates Diesel particulate matter has a very complex geometry Most studies have observed these three-dimensional structures in...

75

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley Region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley Region.

Kevin Crist

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2005-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2004-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This is accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results were compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory’s monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by the USEPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions provides critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal-fired power plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley Region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by the USEPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

82

OH-Initiated Heterogeneous Aging of Highly Oxidized Organic Aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The oxidative evolution (“aging”) of organic species in the atmosphere is thought to have a major influence on the composition and properties of organic particulate matter but remains poorly understood, particularly for ...

Kessler, Sean Herbert

83

Electrically heated particulate filter propagation support methods and systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control system that controls regeneration of a particulate filter is provided. The system generally includes a regeneration module that controls current to the particulate filter to initiate combustion of particulate matter in the particulate filter. A propagation module estimates a propagation status of the combustion of the particulate matter based on a combustion temperature. A temperature adjustment module controls the combustion temperature by selectively increasing a temperature of exhaust that passes through the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate matter using online High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using an online thermal-desorption electron-ionization high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the detection of particulate trace elements was investigated analyzing data from Mexico City obtained during the MILAGRO 2006 field campaign, where relatively high concentrations of trace elements have been reported. This potential application is of interest due to the real-time data provided by the AMS, its high sensitivity and time resolution, and the widespread availability and use of this instrument. High resolution mass spectral analysis, isotopic ratios, and ratios of different ions containing the same elements are used to constrain the chemical identity of the measured ions. The detection of Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sn, and Sb is reported. There was no convincing evidence for the detection of other trace elements commonly reported in PM. The elements detected tend to be those with lower melting and boiling points, as expected given the use of a vaporizer at 600oC in this instrument. Operation of the AMS vaporizer at higher temperatures is likely to improve trace element detection. The detection limit is estimated at approximately 0.3 ng m-3 for 5-min of data averaging. Concentration time series obtained from the AMS data were compared to concentration records determined from offline analysis of particle samples from the same times and locations by ICP (PM2.5) and PIXE (PM1.1 and PM0.3). The degree of correlation and agreement between the three instruments (AMS, ICP, and PIXE) varied depending on the element. The AMS shows promise for real-time detection of some trace elements, although additional work including laboratory calibrations with different chemical forms of these elements are needed to further develop this technique and to understand the differences with the ambient data from the other techniques. The trace elements peaked in the morning as expected for primary sources, and the many detected plumes suggest the presence of multiple point sources, probably industrial, in Mexico City which are variable in time and space, in agreement with previous studies.

Salcedo, D.; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V.; Jimenez, Jose L.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

NETL: News Release - Projects Selected to Study Coal Plant Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2004 5, 2004 Projects Selected to Study Coal Plant Particulate Matter, Human Health PITTSBURGH, PA - The Department of Energy has selected three projects to help determine whether fine particulates emitted from coal-fired power plants affect human health, and which components of the particulates may be most problematic. Past studies have established that particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter from all sources does affect human health, but there is scant information to provide a link between PM2.5 emitted specifically from coal plants and cardiac or respiratory health problems in humans. PM2.5 refers to particles-invisible to the eye-no more than 1/30th of the width of a human hair Coal plants emit only small quantities of "primary" PM2.5 (e.g., fly ash) because all plants have high-efficiency particulate-collection devices. However, coal plants are responsible for a great deal of "secondary" PM2.5, which forms in the atmosphere from emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Data collected in the new studies will be used to help design standards reviews and to devise strategies for controlling power plant emissions of PM2.5, SO2, and NOx.

86

Investigations of ash layer characteristics and ash distribution in a diesel particulate filter using novel lubricant additive tracers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are currently widely used in various applications as a means of collecting particulate matter in order to meet increasingly stringent particle… (more)

Morrow, Ryan (Ryan Michael)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) and first applications with a GC/MS-FID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to ...

Hohaus, T.

88

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Previous Semi-Annual Technical Progress Reports presented the following: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Analyses of data conducted during the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003 are presented in this Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report. Report Revision No. 1 includes the additions or removals of text presented in the previous version of this report.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Impact of Biofuel Blending on Diesel Soot Oxidation: Implications for Aftertreatment  

SciTech Connect

Control strategies for diesel particulate filters (DPFs) remain one of the most important aspects of aftertreatment research and understanding the soot oxidation mechanism is key to controlling regeneration. Currently, most DPF models contain simple, first order heterogeneous reactions oxidation models with empirically fit parameters. This work improves the understanding of fundamental oxidation kinetics necessary to advance the capabilities of predictive modeling, by leading to better control over regeneration of the device. This study investigated the effects of blending soybean-derived biodiesel fuel on diesel particulate emissions under conventional combustion from a 1.7L direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five biofuel blend levels were investigated and compared to conventional certification diesel for the nanostructure, surface chemistry and major constituents of the soluble organic fraction (SOF) of diesel particulate matter (PM), and the relationship between these properties and the particulate oxidation kinetics.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, David [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin; Vander Wal, Dr. Randy [NASA-Glenn Research Center, Cleveland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 4: Diesel Particulate Filters -- Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This is the fourth and final report for the DPF test program and covers the effect of diesel sulfur level on: a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), and a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF).

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ris-R-1053(EN) Particulate Air Pollution with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particulate matter in inner city air. The particle size distribution shows that 92 % of the mass of airborne91 F Main reaction pathways in non sulphur vulcanisation 94 G Flame atomic absorption spectrometer

93

Plasma Aftertreatment for Simultaneous Control of NOx and Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma reactors can be operated as a particulate trap or as a NO{sub x} converter. The soluble organic fraction (SOF) of the trapped particulates can be utilized for the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The NO{sub 2} can then be used to non-thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates. This paper examines the energy density required for oxidation of the SOF hydrocarbons and the fate of NO{sub 2} during the oxidation of the particulate carbon. The energy density required for complete oxidation of the SOF hydrocarbons is shown to be unacceptably large. The reaction of NO{sub 2} with carbon is shown to lead mainly to backconversion of NO{sub 2} to NO. These results suggest that the use of a catalyst in combination with the plasma will be required to efficiently reduce the NO{sub x} and oxidize the SOF hydrocarbons.

Penetrante, B.M.; Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Pitz, W.J.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Investigations of ash layer characteristics and ash distribution in a diesel particulate filter using novel lubricant additive tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are currently widely used in various applications as a means of collecting particulate matter in order to meet increasingly stringent particle emissions regulations. Over time, the DPF ...

Morrow, Ryan (Ryan Michael)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

X-Ray Absorption Characterization of Diesel Exhaust Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have characterized particulates from a 1993 11.1 Detroit Diesel Series 60 engine with electronic unit injectors operated using fuels with and without methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) and overbased calcium sulfonate added. X-ray photoabsorption (XAS) spectroscopy was used to characterize the diesel particulates. Results reveal a mixture of primarily Mn-phosphate with some Mn-oxide, and Ca-sulfate on the surface of the filtered particulates from the diesel engine.

Nelson, A J; Ferreira, J L; Reynolds, J G; Roos, J W

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

96

Optical Backscatter Probe for Sensing Particulate Matter  

By supplying light from the fiber optic probe into specific engine locations, ... systems to optimize engine performance • On-board diagnostics required by regulatory

97

Airborne Fine Particulate Matter (PM) Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for reducing the PM contribution from energy production, especially from coal fired power plants. The program was initiated in 1998 when Congress appropriated funds to the DOE...

98

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

99

Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1988-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

103

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

104

Airborne particulate discriminator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for rapid and accurate detection and discrimination of biological, radiological, and chemical particles in air. A suspect aerosol of the target particulates is treated with a taggant aerosol of ultrafine particulates. Coagulation of the taggant and target particles causes a change in fluorescent properties of the cloud, providing an indication of the presence of the target.

Creek, Kathryn Louise (San Diego, CA); Castro, Alonso (Santa Fe, NM); Gray, Perry Clayton (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

As the consumption of energy increases, its impact on ambient air quality has become a significant concern. Recent studies indicate that fine particles from coal combustion cause health problems as well as atmospheric visibility impairment. These problems are further compounded by the concentration of hazardous trace elements such as mercury, cadmium, selenium, and arsenic in fine particles. Therefore, a current need exists to develop superior, but economical, methods to control emissions of fine particles. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine- particle collection appears to be the best method of overall air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and cannot be collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, this project will focus on developing technology not only to provide ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxic emissions, but also to capture vapor- phase trace metals such as mercury and selenium. Currently, the primary state-of-the-art technologies for particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). However, they both have limitations that prevent them from achieving ultrahigh collection of fine particulate matter and vapor-phase trace metals. The objective of this project is to develop a highly reliable advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC) that can provide > 99.99 % particulate collection efficiency for all particle sizes between 0.01 and 50 14m, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, and is cost-0443competitive with existing technologies. Phase I of the project is organized into three tasks: Task I - Project Management, Reporting, and Subcontract Consulting Task 2 - Modeling, Design, and Construction of 200-acfm AHPC Model Task 3 - Experimental Testing and Subcontract Consulting

Miller, S.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Docket No. EO-05-01: TRC Environmental Corporation (TRC) of Lowell, Massachusetts was retained by Mirant Potomac River, LLC (Mirant) to provide sampling and analytical support in completing a Particulate Emission Test of Unit 1 of the Potomac River generating facility. The Test Program at the Potomac facility involved the completion of two series of emissions tests for particulate matter (PM), the first during normal unit operation and the second with the injection of TRONA upstream of hot side ESP fields. All tests were completed while Unit 1 was operating at 90% of full load (84MW)

107

Photochemical Oxidant Processes in the Presence of Dust: An Evaluation of the Impact of Dust on Particulate Nitrate and Ozone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of dust on the tropospheric photochemical oxidant cycle is studied through the use of a detailed coupled aerosol and gas-phase chemistry model. Dust is a significant component of the troposphere throughout Asia and provides a ...

Yang Zhang; Young Sunwoo; Veerabhadra Kotamarthi; Gregory R. Carmichael

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

PRODUCTION OF SHEET FROM PARTICULATE MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for forming coherent sheet material from particulate material such as granular or powdered metal, granular or powdered oxide, slurries, pastes, and plastic mixes which cohere under pressure. The primary object is to avoid the use of expensive and/ or short lived pressing tools, that is, dies and specially profiled rolls, and so to reduce the cost of the product and to prcvide in a simple manner for the making of the product in a variety of shapes or sizes. The sheet material is formed when the particulate material is laterally confined in a boundary material deformable in all lateral directions under axial pressure and then axially compressing the layer of particulate material together with the boundary material.

Blainey, A.

1959-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiant zone heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

112

OH-initiated heterogeneous aging of highly oxidized organic aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidative evolution (“aging”) of organic species in the atmosphere is thought to have a major influence on the composition and properties of organic particulate matter, but remains poorly understood, particularly for the most oxidized fraction of the aerosol. Here we measure the kinetics and products of the heterogeneous oxidation of highly oxidized organic aerosol, with an aim of better constraining such atmospheric aging processes. Submicron particles composed of model oxidized organics—1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}O{sub 8}), citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}), tartaric acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}), and Suwannee River fulvic acid—were oxidized by gas-phase OH in a flow reactor, and the masses and elemental composition of the particles were monitored as a function of OH exposure. In contrast to our previous studies of less-oxidized model systems (squalane, erythritol, and levoglucosan), particle mass did not decrease significantly with heterogeneous oxidation. Carbon content of the aerosol always decreased somewhat, but this mass loss was approximately balanced by an increase in oxygen content. The estimated reactive uptake coefficients of the reactions range from 0.37 to 0.51 and indicate that such transformations occur at rates corresponding to 1-2 weeks in the atmosphere, suggesting their importance in the atmospheric lifecycle of organic particulate matter.

Kessler, Sean H.; Nah, Theodora; Daumit, Kelly E.; Smith, Jared D.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fluidizing device for solid particulates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible whip or a system of whips with novel attachments is suspended in a hopper and is caused to impact against fibrous and irregularly shaped particulates in the hopper to fluidize the particulates and facilitate the flow of the particulates through the hopper. The invention provides for the flow of particulates at a substantially constant mass flow rate and uses a minimum of energy.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fluidizing device for solid particulates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible whip or a system of whips with novel attachments is suspended in a hopper and is caused to impact against fibrous and irregularly shaped particulates in the hopper to fluidize the particulates and facilitate the flow of the particulates through the hopper. The invention provides for the flow of particulates at a substantially constant mass flow rate and uses a minimum of energy.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Golden, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

JV Task 95-Particulate Control Consulting for Minnesota Ore Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to assist U.S. Steel in the evaluation, selection, planning, design, and testing of potential approaches to help meet U.S. Steel's goal for low-particulate matter emissions and regulatory compliance. The energy-intensive process for producing iron pellets includes treating the pellets in high-temperature kilns in which the iron is converted from magnetite to hematite. The kilns can be fired with either natural gas or a combination of gas and coal or biomass fuel and are equipped with wet venturi scrubbers for particulate control. Particulate measurements at the inlet and outlet of the scrubbers and analysis of size-fractionated particulate samples led to an understanding of the effect of process variables on the measured emissions and an approach to meet regulatory compliance.

Stanley Miller

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Triple-Path Denuder Instrument for Ambient Particulate Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field instrument for sampling sulfate and nitrate particulate matter in a controlled chemical environment has been constructed and field tested. The instrument contains HNO3 and NH3 denuders and an ambient air path, all connected by manifold to ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Bryan J. Johnson; Robert J. Hammer

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electrically heated particulate filter with reduced stress  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter comprising an inlet for receiving exhaust gas. A zoned heater is arranged in the inlet and comprises a resistive heater comprising N zones, where N is an integer greater than one. Each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates others of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

Void/particulate detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for detecting voids and particulates in a flowing stream of fluid contained in a pipe may comprise: (a) a transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal into the stream, coupled to the pipe at a first location; (b) a second transducer for detecting the through-transmission of said signal, coupled to the pipe at a second location; (c) a third transducer for detecting the back-scattering of said signal, coupled to the pipe at a third location, said third location being upstream from said first location; (d) circuit means for normalizing the back-scattered signal from said third transducer to the through-transmitted signal from said second transducer; which normalized signal provides a measure of the voids and particulates flowing past said first location.

Claytor, T.N.; Karplus, H.B.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Regenerable particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a three-dimensional lattice structure, such as a filter used to remove particulates from a gas stream, where the physical lattice structure is designed utilizing software simulation from pre-defined mass transfer and flow characteristics and the designed lattice structure is fabricated using a free-form fabrication manufacturing technique, where the periodic lattice structure is comprised of individual geometric elements.

Stuecker, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, James E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

120

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and recollection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hour parametric tests and 100-hour proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency.

Stanley J. Miller; Grant L. Schelkoph; Grant E. Dunham

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an ``air to cloth ratio``) for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

Goldsmith, R.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an air to cloth ratio'') for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

Goldsmith, R.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Methods for making lithium vanadium oxide electrode materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making vanadium oxide formulations is presented. In one method of preparing lithium vanadium oxide for use as an electrode material, the method involves: admixing a particulate form of a lithium compound and a particulate form of a vanadium compound; jet milling the particulate admixture of the lithium and vanadium compounds; and heating the jet milled particulate admixture at a temperature below the melting temperature of the admixture to form lithium vanadium oxide.

Schutts, Scott M. (Menomonie, WI); Kinney, Robert J. (Woodbury, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency Studies Using Laboratory Generated Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel offers higher fuel efficiency, but produces higher exhaust particulate matter. Diesel particulate filters are presently the most efficient means to reduce these emissions. These filters typically trap particles in two basic modes: at the beginning of the exposure cycle the particles are captured in the filter holes, and at longer times the particles form a "cake" on which particles are trapped. Eventually the "cake" removed by oxidation and the cycle is repeated. We have investigated the properties and behavior of two commonly used filters: silicon carbide (SiC) and cordierite (DuraTrap® RC) by exposing them to nearly-spherical ammonium sulfate particles. We show that the transition from deep bed filtration to "cake" filtration can easily be identified by recording the change in pressure across the filters as a function of exposure. We investigated performance of these filters as a function of flow rate and particle size. The filters trap small and large particles more efficiently than particles that are ~80 to 200 nm in aerodynamic diameter. A comparison between the experimental data and a simulation using incompressible lattice-Boltzmann model shows very good qualitative agreement, but the model overpredicts the filter’s trapping efficiency.

Yang, Juan; Stewart, Marc; Maupin, Gary D.; Herling, Darrell R.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Airborne Particulate Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurement Science and Standards 4 Page 5. Coal fly ash (~10 µm) Iron-oxide particles from arc welding (~10 µm) ... Coal combustion • • • ...

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

MERCURY CONTROL WITH ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addressed Technical Topical Area 4-Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team included the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Power Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and has been marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter also appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas--solid contactor. The objective of the project was to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach included bench-scale batch tests, larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, and field demonstration at the 2.5-MW (9000-acfm) scale at a utility power plant to prove scale-up and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. An additional task was included in this project to evaluate mercury oxidation upstream of a dry scrubber by using mercury oxidants. This project demonstrated at the pilot-scale level a technology that provides a cost-effective technique to control mercury and, at the same time, greatly enhances fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution for improved fine particulate control combined with effective mercury control for a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Engines - Emissions Control - cerium-oxide catalyst, diesel,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Control Heavy duty diesel vehicles product particulate matter emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that heavy-duty diesel vehicles have...

128

Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial velocity component of exhaust moving down the filter inlet channel. Soot mass collected in this way would have a smaller impact on backpressure than soot forced into the flow restrictions deeper in the porous wall structure. This project has focused on the development of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques that are generally applicable to a wide variety of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. By helping to develop improved fundamental understanding pore-scale phenomena affecting filtration, soot oxidation, and NOX abatement, this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has also assisted Dow Automotive in continuing development and commercialization of the ACM filter substrate. Over the course of this research project, ACM filters were successfully deployed on the Audi R10 TDI racecar which won the 24 Hours of LeMans endurance race in 2006, 2007, and 2008; and the 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race in 2006 and 2007. It would not have been possible for the R10 to compete in these traditionally gasoline-dominated events without reliable and effective exhaust particulate filtration. These successes demonstrated not only the performance of automotive diesel engines, but the efficacy of DPF technology as it was being deployed around the world to meet new emissions standards on consumer vehicles. During the course of this CRADA project, Dow Automotive commercialized their ACM DPF technology under the AERIFYTM DPF brand.

Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Microscale Quantification of the Absorption by Dissolved and Particulate Material in Coastal Waters with an ac-9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measuring coastal and oceanic absorption coefficients of dissolved and particulate matter in the visible domain usually requires a methodology for amplifying the natural signal because conventional spectrophotometers lack the necessary ...

Michael S. Twardowski; James M. Sullivan; Percy L. Donaghay; J. Ronald V. Zaneveld

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Home Standards DOE Workshops Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference Proceedings Qualified Filter List News Items Related Sites HEPA Related Lessons Learned Contact Us HSS Logo High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters The HEPA Filter web site provides a forum for informing and reporting department-wide activities related to filtration and ventilation issues with special reference to the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters' use, inspection, and testing. This site contains essentials of DOE HEPA filter test program, procedures, requirements and quality assurance aspects applicable to HEPA filters used in DOE facilities. This site contains information about the DOE-accepted Filter Test Facility and its management, operation and quality assuranceprogram.

131

Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material and product thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Overlap zoned electrically heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one, and wherein the N zones and the M sub-zones are arranged in P layers, where P is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Chapman, Mark R [Brighton, MI

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Electrical diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust. An electrical heater is disposed upstream of the DPF and selectively heats the exhaust to initiate combustion of the particulates within the exhaust as it passes therethrough. Heat generated by combustion of the particulates induces combustion of particulates within the DPF.

Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Feasibility of plasma aftertreatment for simultaneous control of NOx and particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma reactors can be operated as a particulate trap or as a NOx converter. Particulate trapping in a plasma reactor can be accomplished by electrostatic precipitation. The soluble organic fraction of the trapped particulates can be utilized for the hydrocarbon-enhanced oxidation of NO to NO2 . The NO2 can then be used to non-thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates. The oxidation of the carbon fraction by NO2 can lead to reduction of NOx or backconversion of NO2 to NO. This paper examines the hydrocarbon and electrical energy density requirements in a plasma for maximum NOx conversion in both heavy-duty and light-duty diesel engine exhaust. The energy density required for complete oxidation of hydrocarbons is also examined and shown to be much greater than that required for maximum NOx conversion. The reaction of NO2 with carbon is shown to lead mainly to backconversion of NO2 to NO. These results suggest that the combination of the plasma with a catalyst will be required to reduce the NOx and oxidize the hydrocarbons. The plasma reactor can be operated occasionally in the arc mode to thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates.

Brusasco, R M; Merritt, B T; Penetrante, B; Pitz, W J; Vogtlin, G E

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fluidizable particulate materials and methods of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides fluidizable, substantially spherical particulate material of improved attrition resistance having an average particle size from about 100 to about 400 microns useful as sorbents, catalysts, catalytic supports, specialty ceramics or the like. The particles are prepared by spray drying a slurry comprising inorganic starting materials and an organic binder. Exemplary inorganic starting materials include mixtures of zinc oxide with titanium dioxide, or with iron oxide, alumina or the like. Exemplary organic binders include polyvinyl alcohol, hydroxypropylemethyl cellulose, polyvinyl acetate and the like. The spray dried particles are heat treated at a first temperature wherein organic binder material is removed to thereby provide a porous structure to the particles, and thereafter the particles are calcined at a higher temperature to cause reaction of the inorganic starting materials and to thereby form the final inorganic particulate material.

Gupta, Raghubir P. (Durham, NC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Optical Backscatter Probe for Sensing Particulate Matter - Energy ...  

Vehicles and Fuels; Wind Energy; ... in the development and testing of multi-cylinder engines Applications and Industries • R&D tool for diesel engine manufacturers

137

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organic aerosol (SOA), airborne soil, other SOA, diesel emissions, secondary sulfate, wood combustion, gasoline vehicle, and secondary nitrate contributing 6.9%, 12.8%, 3.7%,...

138

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from becoming airborne during any activity which might carry such risk (e.g., construction), and describe emissions standards for fuel-burning equipment. Some exemptions are listed...

139

Development of a Low-Cost Particulate Matter Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

could also be applied to ventilation control for better indoor air quality with lower energy expenditure, monitoring airplane cabin air quality and improving industrial...

140

Granulometry of Non-colloidal Particulate Matter Transported by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 30, 2008 ... transportation land use catchments (source areas) in. Baton Rouge, Little Rock, North Little Rock, and. New Orleans. Particle gradations ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Direct-energy-regenerated particulate trap technology. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this CRADA between Lockheed Martin and Cummins Engine Company was to develop fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC) composite materials for use as diesel engine particulate traps. Chemical vapor deposition techniques were used to partially densify and rigidize a thin fibrous substrate and produce the porous SiC- based filter. Microwave energy was used to directly couple to the deposited SiC to uniformly heat the filter and oxidize the collected carbon particulates. For commercial usage particulate traps must: (1) filter carbon particulates from a high temperature diesel exhaust at an acceptably low backpressure, (2) survive thousands of thermal transients due to regeneration or cleaning of the filter by oxidizing the collected carbon, (3) be durable and reliable over the expected life of the filter (300,000 miles or 10,000 hours), and (4) provide a low overall operating cost which is competitive with other filtering techniques. The development efforts performed as part of this CRADA have resulted in a very promising new technology for Cummins Engine Company. Ceramic fiber based filter papers were developed at Fleetguard, Inc., (a Cummins Subsidiary) and used to produce the spiral wound, corrugated filter cartridges. Optimized SiC coatings were developed at Lockheed Martin which couple with 2.45 GHz microwaves. Prototype particulate filter cartridges fabricated at Fleetguard and rigidized at Lockheed Martin performed well in single cylinder engine tests at Cummins. These prototype filters obtained filtering efficiencies greater than 80% at acceptably low backpressures and could be successfully headed and regenerated using a conventional in-home microwave oven.

Stinton, D.P.; Janney, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yonushonis, T.M.; McDonald, A.C.; Wiczynski, P.D. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Haberkamp, W.C. [Fleetguard, Inc. (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Catalytic fabric filtration for simultaneous NO{sub x} and particulate control. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project proposed was to evaluate the catalyst-coated fabric filter concept for effective control of NO{sub 2} and particulate emissions simultaneously. General goals included demonstrating high removal efficiency of NO{sub x} and particulate matter, acceptable bag and catalyst life, and that process economics show a significant cost savings in comparison to a commercial SCR process and conventional particulate control. Specific goals included the following: reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 60 ppM or less; demonstrate particulate removal efficiency of >99.5%; demonstrate a bag/catalyst life of >1 year; Control ammonia slip to <25 ppM; show that catalytic fabric filtration can achieve a 50% cost savings over conventional fabric filtration and SCR control technology; determine compatibility with S0{sub 2} removal systems; and show that the concept results in a nonhazardous waste product.

Weber, G.F.; Dunham, G.E.; Laudal, D.L.; Ness, S.R.; Schelkoph, G.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate Matter Formation in the Atmosphere: Successes and Challenges Speaker(s): James F. Pankow Date: March 6, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 James F. Pankow. The thermodynamic principles according to which organic particulate matter (OPM) forms in the atmosphere have become well identified because of research progress made since about the mid 1990s. These are, ahem, known knowns. However, many unknowns exist regarding the concentrations and chemical characteristics of the biogenic and anthropogenic compounds present in the atmosphere that are important in OPM formation. In this context, since we know what we need to know more about, these are, well, known unknowns. Other known important unknowns are

145

Daily Simulation of Ozone and Fine Particulates over New York State: Findings and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the potential utility of the application of a photochemical modeling system in providing simultaneous forecasts of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) over New York State. To this end, daily simulations from the ...

C. Hogrefe; W. Hao; K. Civerolo; J.-Y. Ku; G. Sistla; R. S. Gaza; L. Sedefian; K. Schere; A. Gilliland; R. Mathur

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and sequestration projects. The objectives of this project were to prove at a commercial scale that ECO is capable of extended operations over a range of conditions, that it meets the reliability requirements of a typical utility, and that the fertilizer co-product can be consistently generated, providing ECO with an economic advantage over conventional technologies currently available. Further objectives of the project were to show that the ECO system provides flue gas that meets the inlet standards necessary for ECO{sub 2} to operate, and that the outlet CO{sub 2} and other constituents produced by the ECO{sub 2} pilot can meet Kinder-Morgan pipeline standards for purposes of sequestration. All project objectives are consistent with DOE's Pollution Control Innovations for Power Plants program goals.

Morgan Jones

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

Leininger, Thomas F. (Chino Hills, CA); Robin, Allen M. (Anaheim, CA); Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Suggitt, Robert M. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

Zoned electrical heater arranged in spaced relationship from particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control  

SciTech Connect

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes X zones. An electrical heater includes Y heater segments that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and proximate with the PM filter. A valve assembly includes Z sections that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. A control module adjusts flow through each of the Z sections during regeneration of the PM filter via control of the valve assembly. X, Y and Z are integers.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dark Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with other matter. Based on observations of the relationships between mass and gravity and the speed of the stars and other cosmological systems, scientists believe that...

152

Non-thermal Aftertreatment of Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of non-thermal plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration in plasma - catalyst hybrid schemes for the removal of NOx employing an NO2 selective catalyst, as the oxidation of PM may deplete the key radicals necessary for NO to NO2 conversion. It was also suggested that where simultaneous NOx and PM removal are required, alternative catalyst formulations may be needed which may be selective to NO rather than NO2.

Thomas, S.E.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

154

Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

SciTech Connect

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electrically heated particulate filter using catalyst striping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating is applied to the PF that increases a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; Ament, Frank

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of A Microwave Assisted Particulate Filter Regeneration System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The need for active regeneration of diesel particulate filters and the advantages of microwave assisted regeneration are discussed. The current study has multiple objectives, which include developing a microwave assisted particulate filter regeneration system for future generation light-duty diesel applications, including PNGV type applications. A variable power 2.0 kW microwave system and a tuned waveguide were employed. Cavity geometry is being optimized with the aid of computational modeling and temperature measurements during microwave heating. A wall-flow ceramic-fiber filter with superior thermal shock resistance, high filtration efficiency, and high soot capacity was used. The microwave assisted particulate filter regeneration system has operated for more than 100 hours in an engine test-cell with a 5.9-liter diesel engine with automated split exhaust flow and by-pass flow capabilities. Filter regeneration was demonstrated using soot loads up to 10 g/liter and engine exhaust at idling flow rates as the oxygen source. A parametric study to determine the optimal combination of soot loading, oxidant flow rate, microwave power and heating time is underway. Preliminary experimental results are reported.

Popuri, Sriram

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

Quark Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quark Quark Matter in Neutron Stars Prashanth Jaikumar Argonne National Laboratory, (PHY) September 7th, 2006 . - p.1/29 Outline * Neutron stars: observations by a theorist . - p.2/29 Outline * Neutron stars: observations by a theorist * Mass-Radius constraints on Equation of State (EoS) . - p.2/29 Outline * Neutron stars: observations by a theorist * Mass-Radius constraints on Equation of State (EoS) * Is quark matter inside neutron stars ruled out? . - p.2/29 Outline * Neutron stars: observations by a theorist * Mass-Radius constraints on Equation of State (EoS) * Is quark matter inside neutron stars ruled out? ------------------------ * Strange Quark stars: Features and "Findings" . - p.2/29 Outline * Neutron stars: observations by a theorist * Mass-Radius constraints on Equation of State (EoS) * Is quark matter inside neutron stars ruled out? ------------------------

159

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)...

160

Electrically heated particulate filter enhanced ignition strategy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating applied to at least one of the PF and the grid. A control module estimates a temperature of the grid and controls the engine to produce a desired exhaust product to increase the temperature of the grid.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 © 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

Modifying Char Dustcake Pressure Drop Using Particulate Additives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coal gasification produces residual particles of coal char, coal ash, and sorbent that are suspended in the fuel gas stream exiting the gasifier. In most cases, these particles (referred to, hereafter, simply as char) must be removed from the stream prior to sending the gas to a turbine, fuel cell, or other downstream device. Currently, the most common approach to cleaning the gas stream at high temperature and pressure is by filtering the particulate with a porous ceramic or metal filter. However, because these dusts frequently have small size distributions, irregular morphology, and high specific surface areas, they can have very high gas flow resistance resulting in hot-gas filter system operating problems. Typical of gasification chars, the hot-gas filter dustcakes produced at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) during recent coal gasification tests have had very high flow resistance (Martin et al, 2002). The filter system has been able to successfully operate, but pressure drops have been high and filter cleaning must occur very frequently. In anticipation of this problem, a study was conducted to investigate ways of reducing dustcake pressure drop. This paper will discuss the efficacy of adding low-flow-resistance particulate matter to the high-flow-resistance char dustcake to reduce dustcake pressure drop. The study had two parts: a laboratory screening study and confirming field measurements at the PSDF.

Landham, C.; Dahlin, R.S.; Martin, R.A.; Guan, X.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

An improved visualization of diesel particulate filter/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prevalence of diesel particulate filters (DPF) is increasing as emissions standards worldwide evolve to match current technologies. Since the first application of DPFs in the 1980's, PM trapping effectiveness has ...

Boehm, Kevin (Kevin W.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

New ESP additive controls particulates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that a conditioning agent enhanced precipitator performance after plant switched to low-sulfur coal. Firing low-sulfur coal at a power plant designed for medium- or high-sulfur coal will impact the downstream particulate control device. Since the performance of an electro-static precipitator (ESP) is a strong function of the sulfur content in the coal, switching to a low-sulfur coal will severely impact collection efficiency. Particle resistivity is the dominant parameter affecting the performance of an ESP. When the resistivity is too high, the ESP must be increased in size by a factor of two to three, resulting in proportionally increased capital and operating costs. Fly ash from low-sulfur coal is known to have a typical resistivity one or two orders of magnitude above that for ideal collection efficiency in a well-designed ESP. Therefore, when a utility burning a medium- or high-sulfur coal switches to a low-sulfur coal, the increase in particle resistivity resulting from the reduced SO{sub 3} concentration will lead to severe problems in the ESP. There have been many instances where utilities have switched from a high- to a low-sulfur coal, and the problems caused by the increased resistivity have had such a devastating effect on the performance of the ESP that emissions have increased by a factor of 10.

Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Martin, C.E.; Dharmarajan, N.N.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

NETL: Control Technology: Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Under DOE-NETL sponsorship, the University of North Dakota, Energy and Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) has developed a new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Otter Tail Power Company. The AHPC utilizes both electrostatic collection and filtration in a unique geometric configuration that achieves ultrahigh particle collection with much less collection area than conventional particulate control devices. The primary technologies for state-of-the-art particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A major limitation of ESPs is that the fractional penetration of 0.1- to 1.0-µm particles is typically at least an order of magnitude greater than for 10-µm particles, so a situation exists where the particles that are of greatest health concern are collected with the lowest efficiency. Fabric filters are currently considered to be the best available control technology for fine particles, but emissions are dependent on ash properties and typically increase if the air-to-cloth (A/C) ratio is increased. In addition, many fabrics cannot withstand the rigors of high-SO2 flue gases, which are typical for bituminous fuels. Fabric filters may also have problems with bag cleanability and high pressure drop, which has resulted in conservatively designed, large, costly baghouses.

166

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Title Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Lobscheid, Agnes B., Thomas E. McKone, and D. A. Valleroc Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5659-5672 Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particulate matter (PM) are co-pollutants emitted as by-products of combustion processes. Convincing evidence exists for PAHs as a primary toxic component of fine PM (PM2.5). Because PM2.5 is listed by the US EPA as a "Criteria Pollutant," it is monitored regularly at sites nationwide. In contrast, very limited data is available on measured ambient air concentrations of PAHs. However, between 1999-2001, ambient air concentrations of PM2.5 and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are available for California locations. We use multivariate linear regression models (MLRMs) to predict ambient air levels of BaP in four air basins based on reported PM2.5 concentrations and spatial, temporal and meteorological variables as variates. We obtain an R2 ranging from 0.57-0.72 among these basins. Significant variables (p<0.05) include the average daily PM2.5 concentration, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity, and the coastal distance as well as season, and holiday or weekend. Combining the data from all sites and using only these variables to estimate ambient BaP levels, we obtain an R2 of 0.55. These R2-values, combined with analysis of the residual error and cross validation using the PRESS-statistic, demonstrate the potential of our method to estimate reported outdoor air PAH exposure levels in metropolitan regions. These MLRMs provide a first step towards relating outdoor ambient PM2.5 and PAH concentrations for epidemiological studies when PAH measurements are unavailable, or limited in spatial coverage, based on publicly available meteorological and PM2.5 data

167

Matter Field, Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model concerning particle theory and cosmology is proposed. Matter field, dark matter and dark energy are created by an energy flow from space to primordial matter fields at the phase transition in the early universe.

Masayasu Tsuge

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evaluation of ceramic filters for high-temperature/high-pressure fine particulate control. Final report Dec 75-Jun 76  

SciTech Connect

High temperature gas turbines used to generate electric power require gas streams virtually free of particulate matter. Gas streams from high temperature, high pressure coal processes, such as low Btu gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion, require considerable particulate removal. In order to maintain high thermal efficiency the particulate clean-up must be done at the high temperatures of the process. Many new concepts for fine particulate control at elevated temperatures are presently being proposed. One such concept utilizes ceramic membrane filters. The report gives results of a study to analyze and evaluate ceramic membrane filters as a new, fine particulate (<3 um) control concept for high-temperature (approx. 900/sup 0/C), high-pressure processes. Several ceramic filters were identified as potential candidates for fine particulate removal. There does not seem to be any inherent material limitation to high-temperature operation; however, no evidence of high-temperature filter application was found. The filters typically are 2-6 mm thick, cylindrical, and available with various pore sizes, increasing upward from 0.5 um. These elements may be suitable for fine particulate control in hot gas streams. The most promising, although undeveloped, idea for a ceramic filter is to use ceramic honeycomb monoliths similar to those available for catalyst supports and heat exchangers. The walls of the monoliths are about 0.2-0.4 mm thick and of varying pore size and porosity. Geometric configurations are available which would force the gas to flow through the membrane walls. Pressure losses would be very small relative to those of standard ceramic filter elements. The application of ceramic monoliths to high-temperature fine particulate control appears very promising. It is strongly recommended that this concept be investigated further.

Poe, G.G.; Evans, R.M.; Bonnett, W.S.; Waterland, L.R.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Stable aqueous suspension of partial oxidation ash, slag and char containing polyethoxylated quaternary ammonium salt surfactant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a pumpable aqueous suspension of particulate matter with reduced viscosity and increased resistance to sedimentation. It has a particle size in the range of about 37-2000 microns as produced by quench cooling of scrubbing the hot raw effluent gas stream comprising H/sub 2/+CO at a temperature in the range of about 1700{sup 0}F - 3000{sup 0}F from the partial oxidation of solid carbonaceous fuel selected from the group consisting of anthracite, bituminous, sub-bituminous and lignite coal, coke from coal, petroleum coke, coal liquefaction solid residue, oil shale, tar sands, asphaltic bitumen, and mixtures thereof. Wherein the aqueous suspension comprises water, about 1.0-50.0 weight percent of the particulate matter consisting of a mixture of slag and char, and about 0.1-10.0 weight percent of a polyethoxylated quaternary ammonium salt surfactant of the formula: where R is an alkyl radical selected from the group consisting of coco, tallow, lauryl, oleyl, and octadecyl, and x+y has a value in the range of 2-15.

Najjar, M.S.; Yaghmaie, F.; Sorell, L.S.

1989-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Particulate Fouling of HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Alexander Siegel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particulate Fouling of HVAC Heat Exchangers by Jeffrey Alexander Siegel B.S. (Swarthmore College.......................................................................................xv CHAPTER 1: PARTICULATE FOULING OF HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS ....1 1.1 Introduction.......................................................................11 CHAPTER 2: MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS

Siegel, Jeffrey

172

Electrically heated particulate filter preparation methods and systems  

SciTech Connect

A control system that controls regeneration of a particulate filter is provided. The system generally includes a fuel control module that controls injection of fuel into exhaust that passes through the particulate filter. A regeneration module controls current to the particulate filter to initiate regeneration after the fuel has been injected into the exhaust.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

The aging of organic aerosol in the atmosphere : chemical transformations by heterogeneous oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The immense chemical complexity of atmospheric organic particulate matter ("aerosol") has left the general field of condensed-phase atmospheric organic chemistry relatively under-developed when compared with either gas-phase ...

Kessler, Sean Herbert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Physics Out Loud - Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Previous Video (Laser) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Neutron) Neutron Matter David Lawrence, a Jefferson Lab physicist, discusses matter...

176

Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana [University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

DIESEL OXIDATION CATALYST CONTROL OF HYDROCARBON AEROSOLS FROM REACTIVITY CONTROLLED COMPRESSION IGNITION COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is a novel combustion process that utilizes two fuels with different reactivity to stage and control combustion and enable homogeneous combustion. The technique has been proven experimentally in previous work with diesel and gasoline fuels; low NOx emissions and high efficiencies were observed from RCCI in comparison to conventional combustion. In previous studies on a multi-cylinder engine, particulate matter (PM) emission measurements from RCCI suggested that hydrocarbons were a major component of the PM mass. Further studies were conducted on this multi-cylinder engine platform to characterize the PM emissions in more detail and understand the effect of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) on the hydrocarbon-dominated PM emissions. Results from the study show that the DOC can effectively reduce the hydrocarbon emissions as well as the overall PM from RCCI combustion. The bimodal size distribution of PM from RCCI is altered by the DOC which reduces the smaller mode 10 nm size particles.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

KAPLAN, DANIEL

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

179

Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: in-flight adsorption of mercury by charged suspended particulates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrostatic precipitation is the dominant method of particulate control used for coal combustion, and varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across ESPs. Nevertheless, the fate of gas-phase mercury within an ESP remains poorly understood. The present analysis focuses on the gas-particle mass transfer that occurs within a charged aerosol in an ESP. As a necessary step in gas-phase mercury adsorption or transformation, gas-particle mass transfer - particularly in configurations other than fixed beds - has received far less attention than studies of adsorption kinetics. Our previous analysis showed that only a small fraction of gas-phase mercury entering an ESP is likely to be adsorbed by collected particulate matter on the plate electrodes. The present simplified analysis provides insight into gas-particle mass transfer within an ESP under two limiting conditions: laminar and turbulent fluid flows. The analysis reveals that during the process of particulate collection, gas-particle mass transfer can be quite high, easily exceeding the mass transfer to ESP plate electrodes in most cases. Decreasing particle size, increasing particle mass loading, and increasing temperature all result in increased gas-particle mass transfer. The analysis predicts significantly greater gas-particle mass transfer in the laminar limit than in the turbulent limit; however, the differences become negligible under conditions where other factors, such as total mass of suspended particulates, are the controlling mass transfer parameters. Results are compared to selected pilot- and full-scale sorbent injection data. 41 refs., 5 figs.

Herek L. Clack [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States). Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Particulate Controls for Near-Zero Emissions Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the ability of current and developing particulate control technologies to meet extremely low, continuous, particulate emission limits. Interest in this topic is due to concerns about the environmental impact of coal-fired power plants and the trend towards lower and lower particulate emission limits proposed by regulators and environmental groups. The report characterizes the capabilities of existing electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and fabric filters (FFs) and identifies several ...

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13...

182

TransForum v3n4 - Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ZEROING IN ON DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS Thick clouds of soot particles no longer billow from new bus and truck exhaust pipes, thanks to today's advanced diesel engines, which...

183

Particulate Measurements and Emissions Characterization of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to measure and characterize particulate emissions from light-duty alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and equivalent gasoline-fueled vehicles. The project included emission testing of a fleet of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel vehicles. Particulate measurements were obtained over Federal Test Procedure and US06 cycles. Chemical characterization of the exhaust particulate was also performed. Overall, the particulate emissions from modern technology compressed natural gas and methanol vehicles were low, but were still comparable to those of similar technology gasoline vehicles.

Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.; Norbeck, J. M. (Center for Environmental Research and Technology College of Engineering, University of California - Riverside, California)

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

Performance evaluation of diesel particulate filters on heavy duty vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters, or DPFs, are exhaust aftertreatment devices used to reduce exhaust emissions from diesel powered vehicles. Typical designs have a wall flow filter… (more)

Rosepiler, Stephen G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Transpiration Purging Access Probe for Particulate Laden or  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

need for sensors that tolerate dirty environments, research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Transpiration Purging Access Probe for Particulate Laden or...

186

Effect of Biodiesel Blends on Diesel Particulate Filter Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents results of tests of ultra-low sulfur diesel blended with soy-biodiesel at 5 percent using a Cummins ISB engine with a diesel particulate filter.

Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Ireland, J.; Fang, H. L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

RHIC | Why Does Quark Matter Matter?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Does Quark Matter 'Matter'? Why Does Quark Matter 'Matter'? The history of modern technological development can be viewed as a series of investigations, with ever increasing resolution, into the microscopic structure of matter. Since the days of the early Greek philosophers, science has been on a continual quest to find the smallest piece - the most fundamental building block - forming the substance of the universe. STAR researchers During that journey, many beautiful and exotic properties of the subatomic world have been discovered: particles with wave-like properties the ultimate position of which can never be known; "particles" of light that deliver a fixed amount of energy when they strike the atoms of a material's surface; particles in some types of electrical conductors that

188

Exothermic dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, ...

Graham, Peter W.

189

Design of programmable matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programmable matter is a proposed digital material having computation, sensing, actuation, and display as continuous properties active over its whole extent. Programmable matter would have many exciting applications, like ...

Knaian, Ara N. (Ara Nerses), 1977-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including ... Keywords: Aerosols, Aggregation, Particle adhesion, Particulate flow

J. S. Marshall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector`s centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel`s wall in the form of a ``wavy film,`` while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs.

Carl, D.E.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

192

Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Richland, WA); Hirth, John P. (Viola, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Development of Metal Substrate for Denox Catalysts and Particulate Trap  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop advanced metallic catalyst substrate materials and designs for use in off-highway applications. The new materials and designs will be used as catalyst substrates and diesel particulate traps. They will increase durability, reduce flow resistance, decrease time to light-off, and reduce cost relative to cordierite substrates. Metallic catalyst substrates are used extensively for diesel oxidation catalysts and have the potential to be used in other catalytic systems for diesel engines. Metallic substrates have many advantages over ceramic materials including improved durability and resistance to thermal shock and vibration. However, the cost is generally higher than cordierite. The most common foil material used for metallic substrates is FeCr Alloy, which is expensive and has temperature capabilities beyond what is necessary for diesel applications. The first task in the project was Identification and Testing of New Materials. In this task, several materials were analyzed to determine if a low cost substitute for FeCr Alloy was available or could be developed. Two materials were identified as having lower cost while showing no decrease in mechanical properties or oxidation resistance at the application temperatures. Also, the ability to fabricate these materials into a finished substrate was not compromised, and the ability to washcoat these materials was satisfactory. Therefore, both candidate materials were recommended for cost savings depending on which would be less expensive in production quantities. The second task dealt with the use of novel flow designs to improve the converter efficiency while possibly decreasing the size of the converter to reduce cost even more. A non-linear flow path was simulated to determine if there would be an increase in efficiency. From there, small samples were produced for bench testing. Bench tests showed that the use of non-linear channels significantly reduced the light-off temperature for diesel oxidation catalytic converters. Finally, the third task was to implement these materials and designs into a full-size converter. Hot shake testing of 13-inch diameter straight channel substrates showed no significant difference in durability between the current material and the two proposed materials. At the time that this program ended, preparations were being made for full-scale emissions testing of the new design converter for comparison to a traditional straight channel with equal catalyst loading.

Pollard, Michael; Habeger, Craig; Frary, Megan; Haines, Scott; Fluharty, Amy; Dakhoul, Youssef; Carr, Michael; Park, Paul; Stefanick, Matthew; DaCosta, Herbert; Balmer-Millar, M Lou; Readey, Michael; McCluskey, Philip

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel use. Mesoscale Modeling Data Set and Mesoscale Modelobserved, quantified in the data set, and modeled to improveerrors for the validation data set are less than 2% for fuel

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and Visible Emissions (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set emissions opacity standards for stationary sources with opacity continuous emissions monitoring equipment, stationary sources without such equipment, and mobile sources. The...

197

Airborne Particulate Matter in HVAC Systems and its Influence on Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews the mechanisms governing movement of PMs in HVAC systems. Then, the basic equations governing PM deposition in ducts are introduced and investigations on airborne PMs distribution in HVAC systems are reviewed. The influence of PMs on indoor air quality and effectiveness of corresponding controlling measures is discussed extensively in the paper. Finally, recommendations for further research are given.

Fu, Z.; Li, N.; Wang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS OF PARTICULATE MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS-SupAgro MISTEA, 2 p. Viala 34060 Montpellier, France, fekih@supagro.inra.fr Introduction. Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Particulate matter chemistry and dynamics in the Twilight Zone at VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marine Chemistry 105, 208 – Volk, T. , Hoffert, M.I. , 1985.Broecker and Peng, 1982; Volk and Hoffert, 1985; Armstrong

Bishop, James K.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Modeling of particulate matter creation and evolution in aircraft engines, plumes and particle sampling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental and health concerns have recently led to growing efforts to characterize the exhaust gas composition of aircraft engines. Besides major chemical species (N?, 0?, C0? and H?0), aircraft engines also emit other ...

Dakhel, Pierre Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system cludes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provide a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

Roach, Paul D. (Darien, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Exposure assessment of particulate matter air pollution before, during, and after the 2003 Southern California wildfires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PM 10 concentrations at zip-code centroids on 10/27/2003.and PM 2.5 ) concentrations at a zip-code level for southerncardiovascular illnesses at the zip-code level. The goal of

Wu, J; Winer, A M; Delfino, R J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

CEC-500-2011-FS-XXX Assessment of Particulate Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, which will include a compressed natural gas car. The physical, chemical, and toxicological properties (diesel, biodiesel, gasoline, E85 ethanol), as well as heavyduty vehicle emissions. The systems

204

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the amount of wasted energy (or increased emissions) due toa certain amount of energy is wasted due to inefficiencies

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

SCAVENGING OF PARTICULATE MATTER IN CONNECTION WITH NUCLEAR-POWERED SHIPS. Final Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect

The work carried out over a 2 1/2-yr period on the scavenging of radioactive particles which might be released by the reactor system of a nuclear- powered ship is summarized. Two types of dispersions were considered: aerosols and hydrosols. Radioactive aerosols were scavenged by heterogeneous coagulation with solid and liquid aerosols produced within the radioactive aerosol cloud. Liquid or highly hygroscopic particles, which can be classified as solid particles with liquld films on their surfaces, were found to be the most effective scavengers. A system of fine water spray and hydrolysis products of silicon tetrafluoride was found to be suitable for field application. Scavenging of radioactive cations, anions, and colloids of corrosion and fission products was studied in substitute ocean water, natural ocean water, and natural harbor water. A scavenging system composed of KMnO/sub 4/ and ferrous salts successfully removed most of the radioisotopes. Fe(OH)/sub 3/--MnO/sub 2/ hydrate adsorbed and absorbed radioactive species, thus transferring them from a liquid to a solid phase. Addition of Floc 111 to the system improved sedimentation. The KMnO/sub 4/-FeSO/sub 4/-Floc 111 system was found to bs suitable for field application. (auth)

Rosinski, J.

1960-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

and Particulate Matter Submitted by the United States SUMMARY Executive summary:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document is submitted in support of the proposal to designate certain waters adjacent to the coasts of the United States territories of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands as an Emission Control Area for NOX, SOX, and PM, in accordance with regulations 13 and 14 and Appendix III of MARPOL Annex VI. It provides references and other information considered in developing the proposal.

English Only

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Particulate Matter in Polluted Air May IncreaseBiomarkers of Inflammation in Mouse Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sample and unlabelled NF-kB consensus oligonu- cleotide, NSCendothelial cells: role of NF-kB activation. J Immunol 2001;EN, Krappmann D, Scheidereit C. NF-kB and the innate immune

Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Non-Thermal Plasma Approach To Simultaneous Removal of NOx & Particulate Matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Develop predictive performance and plasma chemistry tools for an NTP reactor Insights for reactor optimization and energy efficiency Qualitative screening of reactor design concepts Develop working model to guide reactor design Power requirements and operating parameters Geometry and properties Gap width and thickness, barrier material and thickness, etc Voltage requirements, frequency, space velocity Insights on or resolution of operational issues Diagnosis and interpretation of experiments

Kupe, Joachim

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Investigation of Roadside Particulate Matter Concentration Surrounding Major Arterials in Five Southern Californian Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of the Wind Field within the Oklahoma City ParkProperties of the Wind Field within the Oklahoma City ParkWinds, Turbulence, and Dispersion in Built-up Downtown Areas of Oklahoma

Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Edwards, Rufus; Boarnet, Marlon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Method for Determining Performance of Sulfur Oxide Adsorbents for Diesel Emission Control Using Online Measurement of SO2 and SO3 in the Effluent  

SciTech Connect

Upcoming regulations regarding diesel engine emissions require substantial reduction in particulate matter and nitrogen oxides through aftertreatment methods. Since sulfur oxides in the exhaust greatly reduce the performance of the aftertreatment system, a dedicated trap for removal of sulfur oxides has been considered. Most adsorbents are more effective in removing SO{sub 3} than SO{sub 2}; hence oxidation catalysts have been employed to maximize the concentration of SO{sub 3} in the effluent. Although SO{sub 2} concentrations are easily measured, SO3 is less easily quantified. As a result, the only figure of merit for the SOx trap performance has been total capacity, provided by post-characterization. In this paper we describe a chromatographic method for measurement of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} adsorption in real time, which provides adsorbent performance data on breakthrough capacities and sulfur slip, especially important when operating at high space velocities. We also provide experimental measurements of break through capacities for SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} adsorption for some common metal oxide adsorbents using this analytical system.

Li, Liyu; King, David L.

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mesoscale Simulations of Particulate Flows with Parallel Distributed Lagrange Multiplier Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid particulate flows are common phenomena in nature and industry. Modeling of such flows at micro and macro levels as well establishing relationships between these approaches are needed to understand properties of the particulate matter. We propose a computational technique based on the direct numerical simulation of the particulate flows. The numerical method is based on the distributed Lagrange multiplier technique following the ideas of Glowinski et al. (1999). Each particle is explicitly resolved on an Eulerian grid as a separate domain, using solid volume fractions. The fluid equations are solved through the entire computational domain, however, Lagrange multiplier constrains are applied inside the particle domain such that the fluid within any volume associated with a solid particle moves as an incompressible rigid body. Mutual forces for the fluid-particle interactions are internal to the system. Particles interact with the fluid via fluid dynamic equations, resulting in implicit fluid-rigid-body coupling relations that produce realistic fluid flow around the particles (i.e., no-slip boundary conditions). The particle-particle interactions are implemented using explicit force-displacement interactions for frictional inelastic particles similar to the DEM method of Cundall et al. (1979) with some modifications using a volume of an overlapping region as an input to the contact forces. The method is flexible enough to handle arbitrary particle shapes and size distributions. A parallel implementation of the method is based on the SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) library, which allows handling of large amounts of rigid particles and enables local grid refinement. Accuracy and convergence of the presented method has been tested against known solutions for a falling sphere as well as by examining fluid flows through stationary particle beds (periodic and cubic packing). To evaluate code performance and validate particle contact physics algorithm, we performed simulations of a representative experiment conducted at the University of California at Berkley for pebble flow through a narrow opening.

Kanarska, Y

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Quark Matter 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seventeenth International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Quark Matter 2004) took place in Oakland, California from January 11 - 17, 2004. The location...

213

Magnetization of neutron matter  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we compute magnetization of neutron matter at strong magnetic field using the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) technique.

Bigdeli, M. [Department of Physics, Zanjan University, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

Dark matter at colliders  

SciTech Connect

We show that colliders can impose strong constraints on dark matter. We take an effective field theory approach where dark matter couples to quarks and gluons through high dimensional operators. We discuss limits on interactions of dark matter and hadronic matter from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For spin-independent scattering, the LHC limits are stronger than those from direct detection experiments for light WIMPs. For spin-dependent scattering, the LHC sets better limits over much of parameter space.

Yu Haibo [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

Materials/Condensed Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insulators ALS Reveals New State of Matter First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium...

216

Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

Sayuti, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Malikussaleh University of Lhokseumawe, 24300 Aceh (Indonesia); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

A process for off-gas particulate removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an off-gas system for the removal of radioactive particulates from a melter for the vitrification of radioactive wastes to form glass waste forms. A diagram is provided.

Carl, D.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust; and a grid that includes electrically resistive material that is segmented by non-conductive material into a plurality of zones and wherein the grid is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory and licensing matters of interest to DOE, either as an NRC license applicant or in connection with related authorities and responsibilities of DOE and NRC on nuclear material, nuclear waste, and nuclear nonproliferation matters. GC-52 attorneys provide advice and support on a variety of NRC matters including regulation and licensing of DOE independent spent fuel storage facilities (ISFSIs) and a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility, consultation with NRC on certain DOE waste determinations, and imports and exports of nuclear materials and radioactive sealed sources.

220

Search for Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The search for dark matter is a very wide an active field of research, and I necessarily concentrate here only in some aspects of it. I will review the prospects for direct and indirect dark matter searches of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles in the dark halo of our galaxy and focus in particular on the data of GLAST, PAMELA and DAMA.

Graciela B. Gelmini

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration by electrical heating of resistive coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust. An electrical heater is integrally formed in an upstream end of the DPF and selectively heats the exhaust to initiate combustion of the particulates within the exhaust as it passes therethrough. Heat generated by combustion of the particulates induces combustion of particulates within the DPF.

Williamson, Weldon S. (Malibu, CA); Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Dark matter dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N-body simulations have revealed a wealth of information about dark matter halos but their results are largely empirical. Here we attempt to shed light on simulation results by using a combination of analytic and numerical ...

Zukin, Phillip Gregory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Heart of Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article I trace the development of the human understanding of the "Heart of Matter" from early concepts of "elements" (or alternatively "Panchmahabhootas") to the current status of "quarks" and "leptons" as the fundamental constituents of matter, interacting together via exchange of the various force carrier particles called "gauge bosons" such as the photon, W/Z-boson etc. I would like to show how our understanding of the fundamental constituents of matter has gone hand in hand with our understanding of the fundamental forces in nature. I will also outline how the knowledge of particle physics at the "micro" scale of less than a Fermi(one millionth of a nanometer), enables us to offer explanations of Cosmological observations at the "macro" scale. Consequently these observations, may in turn, help us address some very fundamental questions of the Physics at the "Heart of the Matter".

Godbole, Rohini M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Heart of Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article I trace the development of the human understanding of the "Heart of Matter" from early concepts of "elements" (or alternatively "Panchmahabhootas") to the current status of "quarks" and "leptons" as the fundamental constituents of matter, interacting together via exchange of the various force carrier particles called "gauge bosons" such as the photon, W/Z-boson etc. I would like to show how our understanding of the fundamental constituents of matter has gone hand in hand with our understanding of the fundamental forces in nature. I will also outline how the knowledge of particle physics at the "micro" scale of less than a Fermi(one millionth of a nanometer), enables us to offer explanations of Cosmological observations at the "macro" scale. Consequently these observations, may in turn, help us address some very fundamental questions of the Physics at the "Heart of the Matter".

Rohini M. Godbole

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Phases of Nuclear Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and on the density of the nucleons. Thus we may ask what is the equation of state for nuclear matter? In their normal states of lowest energy, nuclei show liquid-like...

226

Programmable matter by folding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to ...

Wood, R. J.

227

Matter & Energy Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Also: Matter & Energy Electricity Energy Technology Computers & Math Distributed Computing Computer Science Science & Society Energy Issues Environmental Policies Reference Electric power transmission Distributed generation Electric power Grid computing ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2010) -- A new study

Hines, Paul

228

Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives  

SciTech Connect

I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Relationship between acid content of particulates and rainfall in Bangkok  

SciTech Connect

Rainfall at nine stations in Bangkok, Thailand, varied from pH 5.57 to 6.32, low values compared with cities in North America and Europe. Particulate acid content ranged from 5.38 to 10.15 micrograms per cu meter. Analysis for several ions showed that the concentration of sulfate was the controlling factor in acidity of rain. pH was reduced by 1 unit for each 9.09 micrograms per cu meter acid content of particulates according to a relationship derived in the study: pH = 6.87 - 0.11 (acidity of particulates in micrograms per cu meter). 13 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

Khan, S.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fluidizing a mixture of particulate coal and char  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of mixing particulate materials comprising contacting a primary source and a secondary source thereof whereby resulting mixture ensues; preferably at least one of the two sources has enough motion to insure good mixing and the particulate materials may be heat treated if desired. Apparatus for such mixing comprising an inlet for a primary source, a reactor communicating therewith, a feeding means for supplying a secondary source to the reactor, and an inlet for the secondary source. Feeding means is preferably adapted to supply fluidized materials.

Green, Norman W. (Pomona, CA)

1979-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Materials/Condensed Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials research provides the foundation on which the economic well being of our high-tech society rests. The impact of advanced materials ranges dramatically over every aspect of our modern world from the minutiae of daily life to the grand scale of our national economy. Invariably, however, breakthroughs to new technologies trace their origin both to fundamental research in the basic properties of condensed matter and to applied research aimed at manipulating properties (structural, physical, chemical, electrical, magnetic, optical, etc.). Increasingly, the frontiers of materials research include materials that are "strongly correlated," characterized by strong coupling between a material's electrons with other electrons, magnetism, or the material lattice itself. This coupling often results in novel behavior, such as superconductivity, that may lead to technologically important applications.

232

Phase transition from hadronic matter to quark matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the phase transition from nuclear matter to quark matter within the SU(3) quark mean field model and NJL model. The SU(3) quark mean field model is used to give the equation of state for nuclear matter, while the equation of state for color superconducting quark matter is calculated within the NJL model. It is found that at low temperature, the phase transition from nuclear to color superconducting quark matter will take place when the density is of order 2.5?0 - 5?0. At zero density, the quark phase will appear when the temperature is larger than about 148 MeV. The phase transition from nuclear matter to quark matter is always first order, whereas the transition between color superconducting quark matter and normal quark matter is second order.

P. Wang; A.W. Thomas; A.G. Williams

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Guidelines for Particulate Control for Advanced SO2 Control Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist utilities in complying with Phase II of the Clean Air Act Amendments, this report delineates the effects of advanced SO2 control technologies on particulate control systems. This guide can prove invaluable to environmental engineers and planners who must select compatible systems and identify sound operating strategies for these technologies.

1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Electrically heated particulate filter diagnostic systems and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system that diagnoses regeneration of an electrically heated particulate filter is provided. The system generally includes a grid module that diagnoses a fault of the grid based on at least one of a current signal and a voltage signal. A diagnostic module at least one of sets a fault status and generates a warning signal based on the fault of the grid.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

Economic Evaluation of Particulate Control Technologies: Volume 1: New Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baghouses (reverse-gas, shake-deflate, and pulse-jet) and electrostatic precipitators are the principal options for controlling particulate emissions at coal-fired power plants. This report provides the latest cost information and cost models for determining the capital and O&M costs of the two technologies for various design conditions in new units.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration methods and systems for hybrid vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for controlling regeneration of a particulate filter for a hybrid vehicle is provided. The system generally includes a regeneration module that controls current to the particulate filter to initiate regeneration. An engine control module controls operation of an engine of the hybrid vehicle based on the control of the current to the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

Corrosion and degradation of ceramic particulate filters in direct coal-fired turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature ceramic filters show considerable promise for efficient particulate removal from coal combustion systems. Advanced coal utilization processes such as direct coal-fired turbines require particulate-free gas for successful operation. This paper describes the various ceramic particulate filters under development and reviews the degradation mechanisms expected when operated in coal combustion systems.

Sawyer, J. (Acurex Corp., Mountain View, CA (US)); Vass, R.J.; Brown, N.R.; Brown, J.J. (Center for Advanced Ceramic Materials, CIT TDC, Virginai Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Matter & Energy Solar Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Also: Matter & Energy Solar Energy· Electronics· Materials Science· Earth & Climate Energy at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got brighter. Although silicon is the industry Electronics Over 1.2 Million Electronics Parts, Components and Equipment. www.AlliedElec.com solar energy

Rogers, John A.

239

Little Higgs Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The introduction of T parity dramatically improves the consistency of Little Higgs models with precision electroweak data, and renders the lightest T-odd particle (LTP) stable. In the Littlest Higgs model with T parity, the LTP is typically the T-odd heavy photon, which is weakly interacting and can play the role of dark matter. We analyze the relic abundance of the heavy photon, including its coannihilations with other T-odd particles, and map out the regions of the parameter space where it can account for the observed dark matter. We evaluate the prospects for direct and indirect discovery of the heavy photon dark matter. The direct detection rates are quite low and a substantial improvement in experimental sensitivity would be required for observation. A substantial flux of energetic gamma rays is produced in the annihilation of the heavy photons in the galactic halo. This flux can be observed by the GLAST telescope, and, if the distribution of dark matter in the halo is favorable, by ground-based telescope arrays such as VERITAS and HESS.

Andreas Birkedal; Andrew Noble; Maxim Perelstein; Andrew Spray

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

Matter: the fundamental particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The largest particle physics centre in the world is located in Europe. It straddles the Franco-Swiss border, near Geneva. At CERN - the European Organisation for Nuclear Research , which is focused on the science of nuclear matter rather than on the exploitation of atomic energy - there are over 6 500 scientists." (1 page)

Landua, Rolf

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dross : re-genesis of diverse matter : a design post-praxis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The word "dross" refers to matter that is foreign, worn out and impure, such as the scum formed by oxidation at the surface of molten metals. Based on a perception of material impurity, this thesis encompasses the generative ...

Kallipoliti, Lydia, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for absence of solar radiation. Using AERMOD predictions of pollutant concentrations off property for regulatory purposes will likely affect a source?s ability to comply with limits set forth by State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) and could lead to inappropriate regulation of the source.

Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Energy Matters in Washington State Page 1 Energy Matters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 1 Energy Matters in Washington State June 2008 Updated November 2009 Updated and Revised October 2013 Grand Coulee Dam #12;Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 2 Copyright © 2013 Washington State University Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, P.O. Box 43169

Collins, Gary S.

244

Quark Matter 2004 Conference Hotel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as the conference Hotel. It is adjacent to the Oakland Convention Center where all Quark Matter talks will be held. Quark Matter attendees can get a reduced price of 126...

245

Centrifugal torque in rotating matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal molecular motion in combination with rotation and differences in centrifugal forces causes a torque in matter. The effect is derived for gas but does also exist in liquid and solid matter.

Jonsson, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Superdense muonic matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A possible method of creation of superdense matter with approximate atomic density 4 x 10/sup 29/cm/sup -3/ is suggested. A pulsed beam of 10/sup 8/ muons, with duration 3 x 10/sup -6/sec is shone on liquid hydrogen of volume approx.(300A)/sup 3/. A muon charge-exchanges with an electron in a hydrogen atom: with enough muonic hydrogen atoms, the compressibility tends to diverge and condensation into a much higher density state begins. The muon beam should be cooled by the ionization process and channeled through crystal axes before irradiation on the hydrogen specimen. When magnetic fields are present upon irradiation, the fields may be enhanced up to 10/sup 9/ Gauss. A possible state of this matter is speculated.

Tajima, T.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Brookhaven Condensed Matter Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Condensed Matter Physics Condensed Matter Physics Condensed matter physicists study the properties of bulk matter-solids and liquids-as well as the properties exhibited at surfaces and interfaces, with a view to obtaining a fundamental understanding of the unusual properties that materials can exhibit. These problems are some of the most challenging in physics today, but have the huge pay-off in that such an understanding may ultimately lead to improved materials for use in applications as diverse as computing, memory storage, electric motors, and energy storage and transport. At Brookhaven Lab, this work includes both experimental and theoretical studies. Much of the experimental work carried out today uses the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS, shown at right)-one of the premiere synchrotron light sources of the last two decades. Commissioned in the 1980s, the NSLS is host to more than 2,200 users per year and produces copious amounts of light, from the infrared to the ultraviolet to the x-ray. By using this light as a probe, scientists can learn about the arrangement of the atoms and electrons in the materials and how they behave under various conditions. Among other projects, BNL scientists have played leading roles in the development and application of resonant and inelastic x-ray scattering techniques to the study of magnetic and other materials, have pioneered the use of photoemission techniques (based on the photoelectric effect that Einstein first understood 100 years ago) for looking at electronic and magnetic materials, and have carried out some of the seminal experiments to understand the atomic and magnetic structure at surfaces.

248

Space Time Matter inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a model of power-law inflationary inflation using the Space-Time-Matter (STM) theory of gravity for a five dimensional (5D) canonical metric that describes an apparent vacuum. In this approach the expansion is governed by a single scalar (neutral) quantum field. In particular, we study the case where the power of expansion of the universe is $p \\gg 1$. This kind of model is more successful than others in accounting for galaxy formation.

Mariano Anabitarte; Mauricio Bellini

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Aging Matters What's Inside  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging Matters What's Inside Letter from the dean PSU winS Carter award artiSan eConomy eLi BUi and Public affairs 2008 fall newsletter www.pdx.edu/cupa aGinG is a modern fact of life. In 2006 the world's population of adults aged 60 or over was 650 million. By 2025 that number will nearly double. By 2050

Bertini, Robert L.

250

Sulfur tolerance of selective partial oxidation of NO to NO2 in a plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO2 to achieve efficient reduction of NOx and particulates in diesel exhaust. These technologies include the use of selective catalytic reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons, NOx adsorption, and continuously regenerated particulate trapping. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO2 is also active in converting SO2 to SO3 . The SO3 leads t o increase in particulates and/or poison active sites on the catalyst. A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO2 in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO2 without oxidizing SO2 to SO3 .

Penetrante, B; Brusasco, R M; Merritt, B T; Vogtlin, G E

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

New phase of matter discovered In superconducting material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New phase of matter discovered In superconducting material New phase of matter discovered In superconducting material New phase of matter discovered In superconducting material Tiny crystals, probed with a device called a resonant ultrasound spectrometer, are helping solve the long-time mystery of "pseudogap behavior" in copper oxide superconductors. June 6, 2013 Arkady Shekhter setting up the resonant ultrasound measurement in a flow cryostat. Arkady Shekhter setting up the resonant ultrasound measurement in a flow cryostat. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email News flash: The pseudogap is indeed a phase of matter. Albert Migliori, LANL Fellow and Seaborg Institute director noted that, "the key effects were so small that extreme attention to eliminating spurious signals

252

Normal matter storage of antiprotons  

SciTech Connect

Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

Campbell, L.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Dark Energy and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief overview of our current understanding of abundance and properties of dark energy and dark matter is presented. A more focused discussion of supersymmetric dark matter follows. Included is a frequentist approach to the supersymmetric parameter space and consequences for the direct detection of dark matter.

Keith A. Olive

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

dark matter dark energy inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theory dark matter dark energy inflation The National Science Foundation The Kavli Foundation NSF Site Review November 28-29, 2005 #12;dark matter dark energy inflation NSF Site Visit ­ November 28 Gravitation initial conditions beyond single-field slow roll #12;dark matter dark energy inflation NSF Site

Hu, Wayne

255

Particulate Characteristics for Varying Engine Operation in a Gasoline Spark Ignited, Direct Injection Engine  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is a detailed investigation of particulate sizing and number count from a direct-injection spark-ignited (DISI) engine at different operating conditions. The engine is a 549 [cc] single-cylinder, four valve engine with a flat-top piston, fueled by Tier II EEE. A baseline engine operating condition, with a low number of particulates, was established and repeatability at this condition was ascertained. This baseline condition is specified as 2000 rpm, 320 kPa IMEP, 280 [°bTDC] end of injection (EOI), and 25 [°bTDC] ignition timing. The particle size distributions were recorded for particle sizes between 7 and 289 [nm]. The baseline particle size distribution was relatively flat, around 1E6 [dN/dlogDp], for particle diameters between 7 and 100 [nm], before dropping off to decreasing numbers at larger diameters. Distributions resulting from a matrix of different engine conditions were recorded. These varied parameters include load, air-to-fuel ratio (A/F), spark timing, injection timing, fuel rail pressure, and oil and coolant temperatures. Most conditions resulted with uni-modal type distributions usually with an increase in magnitude of particles in comparison to the baseline, with the exception of lean operation with retarded ignition timing. Further investigation revealed high sensitivity of the particle number and size distribution to changes in the engine control parameters. There was also a high sensitivity of the particle size distributions to small variations in A/F, ignition timing, and EOI. Investigations revealed the possibility of emissions oxidation in the exhaust and engine combustion instability at later EOI timings which therefore ruled out late EOI as the benchmark condition. Attempts to develop this benchmark revealed engine sensitivity to A/F and ignition timing, especially at later EOI operation

Farron, Carrie; Matthias, Nick; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Mike; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Quantum Condensed Matter | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Condensed Matter SHARE Quantum Condensed Matter Neutron scattering is a uniquely powerful probe for measuring the structure and dynamics of condensed matter. As such it is...

257

Quantum Condensed Matter | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Condensed Matter SHARE Quantum Condensed Matter Neutron scattering is a uniquely powerful probe for measuring the structure and dynamics of condensed matter. As such it is...

258

Quantum Condensed Matter Division | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Condensed Matter Division SHARE Quantum Condensed Matter Division QCMD Director Steve Nagler The Quantum Condensed Matter Division (QCMD) enables and conducts a broad...

259

Engines - Particulate Studies - Revealing the True Nature of Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Nanoparticle Research: Revealing the True Nature of Diesel Particulates Engine Nanoparticle Research: Revealing the True Nature of Diesel Particulates Thermophoretic sampling device Argonne's test engine with the thermophoretic sampling device attached. Nanostructure of graphitic diesel soot under high engine load A transmission electron microscope reveals the nanostructures of graphitic diesel soot sampled under high engine loads. Morphology of particles collected from diesel combustion with iso-paraffin-enriched fuel. Morphology of particles collected from diesel combution with iso-paraffin-enriched fuel. Amorphous soot particle collected from biodiesel combustion undera low-temperature condition. Amorphous soot particle collected from biodiesel combustion under low temperature conditions. Researchers have many ideas about how to reduce the soot produced by diesel

260

Particulate Contamination Within Fusion Devices and Complex (Dusty) Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade, dust particulate contamination has increasingly become an area of concern within the fusion research community. In a burning plasma machine design like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), dust contamination presents problems for diagnostic integration and may contribute to tritium safety issues. Additionally due to ITER design, such dust contamination problems are projected to become of even greater concern due to dust/wall interactions and possible instabilities created within the plasma by such particulates. Since the dynamics of such dust can in general be explained employing a combination of the ion drag, Coulomb force, and ion pre-sheath drifts, recent research in complex (dusty) plasma physics often offers unique insights for this research area. This paper will discuss the possibility of how experimental observations of the dust and plasma parameters within a GEC rf Reference Cell might be employed to diagnose conditions within fusion reactors, hopefully pr...

Creel, J; Kong, J; Hyde, Truell W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Controlling diesel NOx & PM emissions using fuel components and enhanced aftertreatment techniques: developing the next generation emission control system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following research thesis focuses on methods of controlling nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) and particulate matter (PM) emissions emitted from a low temperature diesel exhaust. This… (more)

Gill, Simaranjit Singh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Matter & Energy Biochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

some 300 times more so than carbon ... > read more Can Biochar Help Suppress Greenhouse Gases? (Mar. 28 the effect of incorporating biochar into the soil on nitrous oxide emissions produced by cattle ... > read. These ... > read more Is Biochar the Answer for Agriculture? Long- Term Study Digs Up New Information On Biochar

Forrest, Tim

263

Thermodynamics of electroweak matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a slightly modified version of the introductory part of a PhD thesis, also containing the articles hep-ph/0303019, hep-ph/0510375 and hep-ph/0512177. We provide a short history of the research of electroweak thermodynamics and a brief introduction to the theory as well as to the necessary theoretical tools needed to work at finite temperatures. We then review computations regarding the pressure of electroweak matter at high temperatures (the full expression of the perturbative expansion of the pressure is given in the appendix) and the electroweak phase diagram at finite chemical potentials. Finally, we compare electroweak and QCD thermodynamics.

A. Gynther

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

264

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter: to advance the understanding and applications of cold atomic matter, including ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

A dark matter scaling relation from mirror dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mirror dark matter, and other similar dissipative dark matter candidates, need an energy source to stabilize dark matter halos in spiral galaxies. It has been suggested previously that ordinary supernovae can potentially supply the required energy. By matching the energy supplied to the halo from supernovae to that lost due to radiative cooling, we here derive a rough scaling relation, $R_{SN} \\propto \\rho_0 r_0^2$ ($R_{SN}$ is the supernova rate and $\\rho_0, \\ r_0$ the dark matter central density and core radius). Such a relation is consistent with dark matter properties inferred from studies of spiral galaxies with halo masses larger than $3\\times 10^{11} M_\\odot$. We speculate that other observed galaxy regularities might be explained within the framework of such dissipative dark matter.

R. Foot

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PICASSO experiment searches for cold dark matter through the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their spin?dependent interactions with fluorine at SNOLAB

Ubi Wichoski; The PICASSO Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Statistical Mechanics of Jammed Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermodynamic formulation of jammed matter is reviewed. Experiments and simulations of compressed emulsions and granular materials are then used to provide a foundation for the thermodynamics.

Hernan A. Makse; Jasna Brujic; Sam F. Edwards

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of brass: Particulate and ICPMS measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Brass: Particulate and ICPMScompared for ablating brass alloys. All operating parametersby resolidi- fication of molten brass. Melting and splashing

Liu, C.; Mao, X.L.; Mao, S.; Zeng, X.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cold Dark Matter Resuscitated?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model has an elegant simplicitly which makes it very predictive, but when its parameters are fixed at their `canonical' values its predictions are in conflict with observational data. There is, however, much leeway in the initial conditions within the CDM framework. We advocate a re-examination of the CDM model, taking into account modest variation of parameters from their canonical values. We find that CDM models with $n=0.8$--0.9 and $h=0.45$--0.50 can fit the available data. Our ``best fit'' CDM model has $n=0.9$, $h=0.45$ and $C_2^{T}/C_2^{S}=0.7$. We discuss the current state of observations which could definitely rule out this model.

Martin White; Douglas Scott; Joe Silk; Marc Davis

1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

Sehmel, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

MERCURY CONTROL WITH THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 4-Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team includes the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Power Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and is now marketed as the ADVANCED HYBRID{trademark} Filter by Gore. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas-solid contactor. The objective of the three-task project is to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the AHPC at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach includes bench-scale batch testing that ties the new work to previous results and links results with larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, pilot-scale testing on a coal-fired combustion system with both a pulse-jet baghouse and an AHPC to prove or disprove the research hypotheses, and field demonstration pilot-scale testing at a utility power plant to prove scaleup and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. This project, if successful, will demonstrate at the pilot-scale level a technology that would provide a cost-effective technique to accomplish control of mercury emissions and, at the same time, greatly enhance fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution to a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries requiring mercury control.

Stanley J. Miller; Ye Zhuang; Michelle R. Olderbak

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ENGINEERED PARTICULATES FOR CO-FIRING OF DIVERSE FEEDSTOCKS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a novel methodology for the formation of engineered particulates of energy-relevant material. Specifically, we aim to control interparticle cohesion in such a way as to generate macro-particles or agglomerates of several differing types of primary particles in specific proportions such that they would be of utility for co-firing applications. In Phase I of this project, we used a combination of experimentation and simulation to validate theoretically derived mixing/segregation rules for cohesive granular materials in static systems, flowing systems, and gas-solid systems.

Joseph J. McCarthy; Kunal Jain; Hongming Li; Deliang Shi

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mercuty Control With The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 4 - Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team includes the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., and is now marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas-solid contactor. The objective of the three-task project is to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the AHPC at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach includes bench-scale batch testing that ties the new work to previous results and links results with larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, pilot-scale testing on a coal-fired combustion system with both a pulse-jet baghouse and an AHPC to prove or disprove the research hypotheses, and field demonstration pilot-scale testing at a utility power plant to prove scaleup and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. This project, if successful, will demonstrate at the pilot-scale level a technology that would provide a cost-effective technique to accomplish control of mercury emissions and, at the same time, greatly enhance fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution to a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries requiring mercury control.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michelle R. Olderbak

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Multifunctional Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3) Electric, ferroelectric, magnetic and photonic properties of oxides 4) Theoretical modeling of epitaxial growth, interfaces and microstructures 5) Composition ...

276

Crystal Structure and Characterization of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase from Methylocystis species Strain M  

SciTech Connect

Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Previous biochemical and structural studies of pMMO have focused on preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. A pMMO from a third organism, Methylocystis species strain M, has been isolated and characterized. Both membrane-bound and solubilized Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contain {approx}2 copper ions per 100 kDa protomer and exhibit copper-dependent propylene epoxidation activity. Spectroscopic data indicate that Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contains a mixture of Cu{sup I} and Cu{sup II}, of which the latter exhibits two distinct type 2 Cu{sup II} electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data are best fit with a mixture of Cu-O/N and Cu-Cu ligand environments with a Cu-Cu interaction at 2.52-2.64 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO was determined to 2.68 {angstrom} resolution and is the best quality pMMO structure obtained to date. It provides a revised model for the pmoA and pmoC subunits and has led to an improved model of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO. In these new structures, the intramembrane zinc/copper binding site has a different coordination environment from that in previous models.

Smith, Stephen M.; Rawat, Swati; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

Wright, G.T.

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Distributor means for charging particulate material into receptacles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are receptacles, such as shaft furnaces illustrated by a blast furnace and an upright oil shale retort, embodying rotatable charge distributor means for distributing particulate charge material in the furnace, which charge distributor means can provide a high uniformity of distribution of various sizes of particles and also can provide and maintain a stock line of desired contour and heighth in the receptacle. The distributor means includes a hopper having rigidly fixed to it a plurality of downwardly extending chutes with lower discharge portions that discharge in concentric circular zones at the stock line. The distributor means includes a segmented portion at the juncture of the hopper and the chutes that divides the charge material discharged into the hopper in proportion to the area of the circular zone at the stock line that is fed by the chute. The distributor means embodies means for providing mass flow of the particulate charge material through the chutes to the stock line and for avoiding segregation between larger and smaller particles of charge material deposited at the stock line.

Greaves, Melvin J. (9995 Cliff Drive, Cleveland, OH 44102)

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Shock driven jamming and periodic fracture of particulate rafts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tenuous monolayer of hydrophobic particles at the air-water interface often forms a scum or raft. When such a monolayer is disturbed by the localized introduction of a surfactant droplet, a radially divergent surfactant shock front emanates from the surfactant origin and packs the particles into a jammed, compact, annular band with a packing fraction that saturates at a peak packing fraction $\\phi^*$. As the resulting two-dimensional, disordered elastic band grows with time and is driven radially outwards by the surfactant, it fractures to form periodic triangular cracks with robust geometrical features. We find the number of cracks $N$ and the compaction band radius $R^*$ at fracture onset vary monotonically with the initial packing fraction ($\\phi_{init}$). However, its width $W^*$ is constant for all $\\phi_{init}$. A simple geometric theory that treats the compaction band as an elastic annulus, and accounts for mass conservation allows us to deduce that $N \\simeq 2\\pi R^*/W^* \\simeq 4\\pi \\phi_{RCP}/\\phi_{init}$, a result we verify both experimentally and numerically. We show the essential ingredients for this phenomenon are an initially low enough particulate packing fraction that allows surfactant driven advection to cause passive jamming and eventual fracture of the hydrophobic particulate interface.

M. M. Bandi; T. Tallinen; L. Mahadevan

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy Matters in Washington State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Matters in Washington State Energy Matters in Washington State www.energy.wsu.edu/library/ November 2009 #12;905 Plum Street SE, Building 3 P.O. Box 43169 Olympia, Washington 98504-3169 Energy University Extension Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, Building 3, P.O. Box 43169, Olympia, Washington

Collins, Gary S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Particulate matter emissions from a DISI engine under cold-fast-idle conditions for ethanol-gasoline blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to build internal combustion engines with both reduced brake-specific fuel consumption and better emission control, engineers developed the Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engine. DISI engines combine ...

Dimou, Iason

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Engine performance and particulate matter speciation for compression ignition engines powered by a range of fossil and biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fuels: Non-renewable fossil fuels are the largest man-made contributor to global warming. Biofuel market share will increase, promoted by renewability, inherent lower net CO(2) emissions,… (more)

Rounce, Paul Lindsey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Simulation of Daily Variation of Suspended Particulate Matter over Delhi: Relative Roles of Vehicular Emission, Dust, and Domestic Appliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The massive growth in the size and the population of cities over the past few decades has led to serious deterioration in the quality of air. One of the important constituents of airborne pollutants, which is a major health hazard, is suspended ...

P. Goswami; J. Baruah

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Effect of Coal Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel System Performance and Service Life  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's SECA program envisions the development of high-efficiency, low-emission, CO{sub 2} sequestration-ready, and fuel-flexible technology to produce electricity from fossil fuels. One such technology is the integrated gasification-solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) that produces electricity from the gas stream of a coal gasifier. SOFCs have high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency, environmental compatibility (low NO{sub x} production), and modularity. Naturally occurring coal has many impurities and some of these impurities end in the fuel gas stream either as a vapor or in the form of fine particulate matter. Establishing the tolerance limits of SOFCs for contaminants in the coal-derived gas will allow proper design of the fuel feed system that will not catastrophically damage the SOFC or allow long-term cumulative degradation. The anodes of Ni-cermet-based SOFCs are vulnerable to degradation in the presence of contaminants that are expected to be present in a coal-derived fuel gas stream. Whereas the effects of some contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3} and HCl have been studied, the effects of other contaminants such as As, P, and Hg have not been ascertained. The primary objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells to trace level contaminants present in a coal-derived gas stream in the temperature range 700 to 900 C. The results were used to assess catastrophic damage risk and long-term cumulative effects of the trace contaminants on the lifetime expectancy of SOFC systems fed with coal-derived gas streams.

Gopala Krishnan; P. Jayaweera; J. Bao; J. Perez; K. H. Lau; M. Hornbostel; A. Sanjurjo; J. R. Albritton; R. P. Gupta

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Research, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is the nature of the superconducting transition? What is the role of charge stripes (if any) in the HTS state? What is the nature of the overdoped metallic state - a...

286

Publications, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications In Press M. P. M. Dean, G. Dellea, R. S. Springell, F. Yakhou-Harris, K. Kummer, N. B. Brookes, X. Liu, Y. Sun, J. Strle, T. Schmitt, L. Braicovich, G. Ghiringhelli, I. Bozovic and J. P. Hill. "Persistence of magnetic excitations in La2-xSrxCuOP4 from the undoped insulator to the heavily overdoped non-superconducting metal." Nature Materials (Submitted 2013). In press. J. Wu, O. Pelleg, G. Logvenov, A. T. Bollinger, Y. Sun, G. S. Boebinger, M. Vanevic, Z. Radovic and I. Bozovic. "Anomalous (in)dependence of interface superconductivity on carrier density." Nature Materials (Submitted 2012). In press. G. Dubuis, A. T. Bollinger, D. Pavuna and I. Bozovic. "On Field Effect Studies and Superconductor-Insulator Transition in High-Tc Cuprates."

287

Laboratories, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories: Photo Tour Laboratories: Photo Tour MBE Laboratory MBE Laboratory MBE Chamber MBE Chamber Temperature Controllers MBE Computers and Servers Pneumatic Hoses Transport between MBE Laboratory and Nano-Lithography Laboratory Backside of MBE chamber during growth, lit by Nano-Lithography Laboratory Nano-Lithography Laboratory Processing Chamber Laminar Flow Hood Mask Aligner Profilometer Probe Station Wire Bonder X-Ray Diffraction and Chemistry Laboratory X-Ray Diffraction System X-Ray Diffraction System X-Ray Diffraction System Chemistry Laboratory Chemistry Laboratory Mutual Inductance, Transport and Field Effect Laboratory Field Effect Measurement system Liquid Helium-4 Dipstick for Mutual Inductance Transport Measurement System COMBI Hall Effect, COMBI Transport and Mutual Inductance Measurements Laboratory

288

Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(right) and U.S. Under Secretary of Science Raymond L. Orbach (middle) visiting the MBE lab, 2 June 2006. Left: Ivan Bozovic. Back row: BNL Director Sam Aronson (right) and...

289

Visitors, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University) Mar 23 2009 Prof. Efthimios Liarokapis (Nat. Technical University, Athens, Greece) Mar 22 2009 to Mar 4 2009 Dr. Scott Riggs, Zac Stegen and Jon Kemper (Florida State...

290

Collaborations, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborations Collaborations Collaborations at BNL Experiment COBRA X-ray crystallography Researchers Dr. Ron Pindak, Dr. Hua Zhou (NSLS), Dr. Yitzak Yacobi (Technion, Israel) Object of Study The atomic structure of interfaces in M-I bilayers Experiment High-resolution electron microscopy Researchers Dr. Yimei Zhu (CMPMS) Object of Study The atomic structure of HTS heterostructures; bi-crystal grain boundaries Experiment Synchrotron X-ray crystallography Researchers Dr. John Hill (CMPMS) Object of Study Spin excitation spectrum in ultrathin LSCO layers Experiment Ultrafast electron diffraction Researchers Dr. Xijie Wang (NSLS) Object of Study Photo-induced lattice expansion Collaborations in the United States Experiment Resonant soft X-ray scattering (SXRS) Researchers Prof. Peter Abbamonte, Dr. Serban Smadici (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

291

Magnetism and superconductivity of heavy fermion matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interplay of magnetism and unconventional superconductivity (d singlet wave or p triplet wave) in strongly correlated electronic system (SCES) is discussed with recent examples found in heavy fermion compounds. A short presentation is given on the formation of the heavy quasiparticle with the two sources of a local and intersite enhancement for the effective mass. Two cases of the coexistence or repulsion of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity are given with CeIn3 and CeCoIn5. A spectacular example is the emergence of superconductivity in relatively strong itinerant ferromagnets UGe2 and URhGe. The impact of heavy fermion matter among other SCES as organic conductor or high TC oxide is briefly pointed out. Key words: heavy fermion, superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, ferromagnetism

J. Flouquet A; G. Knebel A; D. Braithwaite A; D. Aoki B; J. P. Brison C; F. Hardy A; A. Huxley A; S. Raymond A; B. Salce A; I. Sheikin D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Numerical simulation of the impact and deposition of charged particulate droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work addresses the impact and deposition of charged ''cluster-droplets'', comprised of particulates, on electrified surfaces. A direct numerical method is developed, based on an implicit, staggered, time-stepping scheme which separates the impulsive ... Keywords: Charged particulates, Clusters, Impact, Staggering scheme

T. I. Zohdi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fictitious boundary and moving mesh methods for the numerical simulation of rigid particulate flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the numerical simulation of particulate flows using a new moving mesh method combined with the multigrid fictitious boundary method (FBM) [S. Turek, D.C. Wan, L.S. Rivkind, The fictitious boundary method for the implicit ... Keywords: ALE, FEM, Fictitious boundary, Moving mesh, Multigrid, Particulate flows

Decheng Wan; Stefan Turek

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates:Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Determination of adenosine triphosphate on marine particulates: synthesis of methods for use on OTEC samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

Jones, A.T.; Hartwig, E.O.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Resistive heater geometry and regeneration method for a diesel particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One embodiment of the invention includes a diesel particulate filter comprising a first face and a second face; a bottom electrode layer formed over the first face of the diesel particulate filter; a middle resistive layer formed over a portion of the bottom electrode layer; and a top electrode layer formed over a portion of the middle resistive layer.

Phelps, Amanda (Malibu, CA); Kirby, Kevin W. (Calabasas Hills, CA); Gregoir, Daniel J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

297

Synergistic effects of lubricant additive chemistry on ash properties impacting diesel particulate filter flow resistance and catalyst performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread use in recent years in both on- and offroad applications as an effective means for meeting the increasingly stringent particulate emission regulations. Overtime, ...

Munnis, Sean (Sean Andrew)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Unification and Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In grand unified theories with gauge groups larger than SU(5), the multiplets that contain the known quarks and leptons also contain fermions that are singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Some of these could be the dark matter of the universe. Grand unified theories can also have accidental U(1) global symmetries (analogous to B-L in minimal SU(5)) that can stabilize dark matter. These ideas are illustrated in an SU(6) model.

S. M. Barr

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Unification and Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In grand unified theories with gauge groups larger than SU(5), the multiplets that contain the known quarks and leptons also contain fermions that are singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Some of these could be the dark matter of the universe. Grand unified theories can also have accidental U(1) global symmetries (analogous to B-L in minimal SU(5)) that can stabilize dark matter. These ideas are illustrated in an SU(6) model.

Barr, S M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Energy of Charged Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk I will discuss some of the techniques that have been developed over the past 35 years to estimate the energy of charged matter. These techniques have been used to solve stability of (fermionic) matter in different contexts, and to control the instability of charged bosonic matter. The final goal will be to indicate how these techniques with certain improvements can be used to prove Dyson's 1967 conjecture for the energy of a charged Bose gas--the sharp $N^{7/5}$ law.

Jan Philip Solovej

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Matter Matters: Unphysical Properties of the Rh = ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is generally agreed that there is matter in the universe and, in this paper, we show that the existence of matter is extremely problematic for the proposed Rh = ct universe. Considering a dark energy component with an equation of state of w=-1/3, it is shown that the presence of matter destroys the strict expansion properties that define the evolution of Rh = ct cosmologies, distorting the observational properties that are touted as its success. We further examine whether an evolving dark energy component can save this form of cosmological expansion in the presence of matter by resulting in an expansion consistent with a mean value of = -1/3, finding that the presence of mass requires unphysical forms of the dark energy component in the early universe. We conclude that matter in the universe significantly limits the fundamental properties of the Rh = ct cosmology, and that novel, and unphysical, evolution of the matter component would be required to save it. Given this, Rh = ct cosmology is not simpler or...

Lewis, Geraint F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Particulate measurement issues in diesel exhausts using laser induced incandescence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of studies in the recent past have identified Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) as a versatile technique for in-flame measurement of soot concentrations. Recently, a number of researchers have focused their attention in adapting this technique to measure particulate in diesel exhausts. However the agreement with established physical sampling techniques, such as the EPA recommended filter paper collection method, was found to be less than ideal. This paper reports the efforts to adapt this technique for diesel exhaust characterization. Many of the factors affecting LII signal were identified through computer modeling. Parameters that could not be determined through such a model were determined experimentally following a parametric study. Subsequently, LII measurements were performed in the exhaust of a modified lab burner, with conditions close to that of diesel engine exhausts. Such measurements show excellent agreement with those performed using the standard filter paper collection technique.

Gupta, S. B.; Poola, R. B.; Sekar, R.

2000-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

304

TRANSIENT, REAL-TIME, PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN DIESEL ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports our efforts to develop an instrument, TG-1, to measure particulate emissions from diesel engines in real-time. TG-1 while based on laser-induced incandescence allows measurements at 10 Hz on typical engine exhausts. Using such an instrument, measurements were performed in the exhaust of a 1.7L Mercedes Benz engine coupled to a low inertia dynamometer. Comparative measurements performed under engine steady state conditions showed the instrument to agree within {+-}12% of measurements performed with an SMPS. Moreover, the instrument had far better time response and time resolution than a TEOM{reg_sign} 1105. Also, TG-1 appears to surpass the shortcomings of the TEOM instrument, i.e., of yielding negative values under certain engine conditions and, being sensitive to external vibration.

Gupta, S; Shih, J; Hillman, G; sekar, R; Graze, R; Shimpi, S; Martin, W; Pier, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PILOT-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding. In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Big Stone power station. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique approach to develop a compact but highly efficient system. Filtration and electrostatics are employed in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The objective of the AHPC is to provide >99.99% particulate collection efficiency for particle sizes from 0.01 to 50 {micro}m and be applicable for use with all U.S. coals at a lower cost than existing technologies. In previous field tests with the AHPC, some minor bag damage was observed that appeared to be caused by electrical effects. Extensive studies were then carried out to determine the reason for the bag damage and to find possible solutions without compromising AHPC performance. The best solution to prevent the bag damage was found to be perforated plates installed between the electrodes and the bags, which can block the electric field from the bag surface and intercept current to the bags. The perforated plates not only solve the bag damage problem, but also offer many other advantages such as operation at higher A/C (air-to-cloth) ratios, lower pressure drop, and an even more compact geometric arrangement. For this project, AHPC pilot-scale tests were carried out to understand the effect of the perforated plate configuration on bag protection and AHPC overall performance and to optimize the perforated plate design. Five different perforated plate configurations were evaluated in a coal combustion system. The AHPC performed extremely well even at a low current level (1.5-3.0 mA) and a low pulse trigger pressure of 6.5 in. W.C. (1.62 kPa), resulting in a bag-cleaning interval of over 40 min at an A/C ratio of 12 ft/min (3.7 m/min) for most of the test period. The longest bag-cleaning interval was 594 min, which is the best to date. The residual drag was reduced to the range from 0.25 to 0.35 in. H{sub 2}O/ft/min, showing an excellent bag-cleaning ability under the perforated plate configurations. The K{sub 2}C{sub i} at the current level of 3 mA was as low as 1.0, indicating excellent ESP performance. All the results are the best achieved to date.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

PII S0016-7037(01)00632-9 Preservation of particulate non-lithogenic uranium in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(01)00632-9 Preservation of particulate non-lithogenic uranium in marine sediments in revised form March 26, 2001) Abstract--Particulate non-lithogenic uranium (PNU), excess U above detrital). This excess U is referred to as particulate non-lithogenic U (PNU). Uranium concentrations in the supernant

van Geen, Alexander

307

Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of planet formation and structures as well as the evolution of an imploding inertial fusion capsule depends on our understanding of matter in the complex warm dense matter...

308

MSD Condensed Matter Theory - Argonne National Laboratories,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Condensed Matter Theory Condensed Matter Theory research interacts with the materials research program at ANL through a mix of individual theoretical studies and...

309

Quantum Condensed Matter Division | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Condensed Matter Division Steve Nagler, QCMD Director QCMD Director Steve Nagler. The Quantum Condensed Matter Division (QCMD) enables and conducts a broad program of...

310

Hot and Dense QCD Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

QCD Matter QCD Matter A Community White Paper on the Future of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Physics in the US Unraveling the Mysteries of the Strongly Interacting Quark-Gluon-Plasma Executive Summary This document presents the response of the US relativistic heavy-ion community to the request for comments by the NSAC Subcommittee, chaired by Robert Tribble, that is tasked to recommend optimizations to the US Nuclear Science Program over the next five years. The study of the properties of hot and dense QCD matter is one of the four main areas of nuclear physics research described in the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan. The US nuclear physics community plays a leading role in this research area and has been instrumental in its most important discovery made over the past decade, namely that hot and dense QCD matter acts as a strongly interacting system with unique and previously unexpected

311

Brookhaven Soft Condensed Matter Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface freezing are still unresolved. One objective of the soft matter program at Brookhaven is to understand the behavior of ultra-thin organic films on solid and liquid...

312

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

Glenn C. England

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Shear viscosity of nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk I report my recent study on the shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. An isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction is used in the study. Effects of density, temperature, and isospin asymmetry of nuclear matter on its shear viscosity have been discussed. Similar to the symmetry energy, the symmetry shear viscosity is defined and its density and temperature dependence are studied.

Jun Xu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Strongly interacting parton matter equilibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different energy densities. Particle abundances, kinetic energy distributions, and the detailed balance of the off-shell quarks and gluons in the strongly-interacting quarkgluon plasma are addressed and discussed.

Ozvenchuk, V., E-mail: ozvenchuk@fias.uni-frankfurt.de [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (Germany); Linnyk, O. [Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Bratkovskaya, E. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (Germany); Gorenstein, M. [NAS Ukraine, Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (Ukraine); Cassing, W. [Justus-Liebig Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Cosmology, Thermodynamics and Matter Creation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several approaches to the matter creation problem in the context of cosmological models are summarily reviewed. A covariant formulation of the general relativistic imperfect simple fluid endowed with a process of matter creation is presented. By considering the standard big bang model, it is shown how the recent results of Prigogine et alii \\cite{1} can be recovered and, at the same time their limits of validity are explicited.

J. A. S. Lima; M. O. Calvao; I. Waga

2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

Shear viscosity of nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk I report my recent study on the shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. An isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction is used in the study. Effects of density, temperature, and isospin asymmetry of nuclear matter on its shear viscosity have been discussed. Similar to the symmetry energy, the symmetry shear viscosity is defined and its density and temperature dependence are studied.

Xu, Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the trapped soot. During this project an ancillary bio-medical application was discovered for lattices of hydroxyapatite. These structures show promise as bone scaffolds for the reparation of damaged bone. A case study depicting the manufacture of a customized device that fits into a damaged mandible is described.

Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Size-Resolved Density Measurements of Particulate Emissions from an Advanced Combustion Diesel Engine: Effect of Aggregate Morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the first in situ size-resolved density measurements of particles produced by premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) and compare these with conventional diesel particles. The densities of size-classified particles were determined by measurements with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM). Particle masses of the different size classes were evaluated with a proposed DMA-APM response function for aggregates. Our results indicate that the effective densities of PCCI and conventional diesel particles were approximately the same for 50 and 100 nm electrical mobility diameters (0.9 and 0.6 g/cc, respectively), but the PCCI particle effective density (0.4 g/cc) was less than the conventional (0.5 g/cc) for 150 nm. The lowest effective particle densities were observed for exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels somewhat less than that required for PCCI operation. The inherent densities of conventional particles in the 50 and 100 nm size classes were 1.22 and 1.77 g/cc, which is in good agreement with Park et al. (2004). PCCI inherent particle densities for these same size classes were higher (1.27 and 2.10 g/cc), suggesting that there may have been additional adsorbed liquid hydrocarbons. For 150 nm particles, the inherent densities were nearly the same for PCCI and conventional particles at 2.20 g/cc. We expect that the lower effective density of PCCI particles may improve particulate emissions control with diesel particulate filters (DPFs). The presence of liquid hydrocarbons may also promote oxidation in DPFs.

Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fake Dark Matter at Colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If the dark matter (DM) consists of a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), it can be produced and studied at future collider experiments like those at the LHC. The production of collider-stable WIMPs is characterized by hard scattering events with large missing transverse energy. Here we point out that the discovery of this well-characterized DM signal may turn out to be a red herring. We explore an alternative explanation -- fake dark matter -- where the only sources of missing transverse energy are standard model neutrinos. We present examples of such models, focusing on supersymmetric models with R-parity violation. We also briefly discuss means of differentiating fake dark matter from the production of new collider-stable particles.

Chang, Spencer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fake Dark Matter at Colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If the dark matter (DM) consists of a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), it can be produced and studied at future collider experiments like those at the LHC. The production of collider-stable WIMPs is characterized by hard scattering events with large missing transverse energy. Here we point out that the discovery of this well-characterized DM signal may turn out to be a red herring. We explore an alternative explanation -- fake dark matter -- where the only sources of missing transverse energy are standard model neutrinos. We present examples of such models, focusing on supersymmetric models with R-parity violation. We also briefly discuss means of differentiating fake dark matter from the production of new collider-stable particles.

Spencer Chang; Andre de Gouvea

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Relationship between Particulate Chemistry and Air Masses in Southern Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The particulate characteristics of the surface layer of the atmosphere over a region of southwest Indiana were determined for forty-two 24-hour periods between September 1985 and April 1986. The water-soluble sulfate, chloride and sodium content ...

Richard H. Grant; William W. McFee

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

325

Passive regeneration : long-term effects on ash characteristics and diesel particulate filter performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread growth as an effective means for meeting increasingly rigorous particle emissions regulations. There is growing interest to exploit passive regeneration of DPFs to ...

Bahr, Michael J., Nav. E. (Michael James). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

Marshall, J.S. [School of Engineering, University of Vermont, 33 Colchecter Avenue, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)], E-mail: jeffm@cems.uvm.edu

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 ºC and 2.0 kPa O2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil™ particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ~ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure – possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O2. This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ~ 0.03 – 0.04) of the flakes.

J.W. Davis; B.W.N. Fitzpatrick; J.P. Sharpe; A.A. Haasz

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Dark energy from bulk matter  

SciTech Connect

We consider the possibility of getting accelerated expansion and w=-1 crossing in the context of a braneworld cosmological setup, endowed with a bulk energy-momentum tensor. For a given ansatz of the bulk content, we demonstrate that the bulk pressures dominate the dynamics at late times and can lead to accelerated expansion. We also analyze the constraints under which we can get a realistic profile for the effective equation of state and conclude that matter in the bulk has the effect of dark energy on the brane. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to simulate the behavior to a Chaplygin gas using nonexotic bulk matter.

Bogdanos, C.; Dimitriadis, A.; Tamvakis, K. [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina GR451 10 (Greece)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Optical backscatter probe for sensing particulate in a combustion gas stream  

SciTech Connect

A system for sensing particulate in a combustion gas stream is disclosed. The system transmits light into a combustion gas stream, and thereafter detects a portion of the transmitted light as scattered light in an amount corresponding to the amount of particulates in the emissions. Purge gas may be supplied adjacent the light supply and the detector to reduce particles in the emissions from coating or otherwise compromising the transmission of light into the emissions and recovery of scattered light from the emissions.

Parks, James E; Partridge, William P

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Information and the Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article a revised, to some extent, version of the Information concept as utmost fundamental essence ("The Information and the Matter",v1) is presented - a little more logical grounds and may be of a philosophy, the correction and the development of the gravity force concept, etc...

S. V. Shevchenko; V. V. Tokarevsky

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Solar Neutrino Matter Effects Redux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following recent low-threshold analysis of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and asymmetry measurements of the BOREXINO Collaboration of the solar neutrino flux, we revisit the analysis of the matter effects in the Sun. We show that solar neutrino data constrains the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ poorly and that subdominant Standard Model effects can mimic the effects of the physics beyond the Standard Model.

A. B. Balantekin; A. Malkus

2011-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Financing Initiative Focus Area: Industry Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/universal_ownership.pdf Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors Screenshot References: Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors[1] Logo: Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors Summary "This study assesses the financial implications of unsustainable natural

334

Particulate control for coal-fueled diesel engine exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Core Separator is a cylindrical vessel having one tangential inlet and two outlets at the opposite end of the vessel. It contains an outlet for the clean flow and a second outlet for the recirculating flow. The solids-laden flue gas is introduced through a fan to the inlet of the Core Separator. Due to the swirling motion of the flow, solids move to the periphery as the central jet leaving the system through the central outlet is cleaned of particulates. The peripheral flow with most of the particles is exhausted to the cyclone and then recirculates back to the Core Separator by means of the fan. The processes of separation and solids collection are accomplished separately and in different components. The Core Separator cleans the flow discharged from the system and detains solids within the system If the Core Separator efficiency is high enough, particles cannot leave the system. They recirculate again and again until the cyclone finally collects them for removal. An analytical formula can be derived that defines the system performance. E = E{sub c}E{sub s}/1{minus}E{sub s}(1{minus}E{sub c}), where E, E{sub c}, and E{sub s} are the system, collector, and Core Separator partial separation efficiencies respectively. Examination of this equation shows that the system efficiency remains high even with poor performance in the collector, as long as the efficiency of the Core Separator is high. For example, if E{sub s} is 99% and E{sub c} is 30%, the system efficiency is 96.7%.

Smolensky, L.A.; Easom, B.H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nuclear matter to strange matter transition in holographic QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a simple holographic QCD model to study nuclear matter to strange matter transition. The interaction of dense medium and hadrons is taken care of by imposing the force balancing condition for stable D4/D6/D6 configuration. By considering the intermediate and light flavor branes interacting with baryon vertex homogeneously distributed along R^3 space and requesting the energy minimization, we find that there is a well defined transition density as a function of current quark mass. We also find that as density goes up very high, intermediate (or heavy) and light quarks populate equally as expected from the Pauli principle. In this sense, the effect of the Pauli principle is realized as dynamics of D-branes.

Youngman Kim; Yunseok Seo; Sang-Jin Sin

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

Ceyer, Sylvia T. (Cambridge, MA); Lahr, David L. (Cambridge, MA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Microscopic Approach to Nuclear Matter and Neutron Star Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review a variety of theoretical and experimental investigations aimed at improving our knowledge of the nuclear matter equation of state. Of particular interest are nuclear matter extreme states in terms of density and/or isospin asymmetry. The equation of state of matter with unequal concentrations of protons and neutrons has numerous applications. These include heavy-ion collisions, the physics of rare, short-lived nuclei and, on a dramatically different scale, the physics of neutron stars. The "common denominator" among these (seemingly) very different systems is the symmetry energy, which plays a crucial role in both the formation of the neutron skin in neutron-rich nuclei and the radius of a neutron star (a system 18 orders of magnitude larger and 55 orders of magnitude heavier). The details of the density dependence of the symmetry energy are not yet sufficiently constrained. Throughout this article, our emphasis will be on the importance of adopting a microscopic approach to the many-body problem, which we believe to be the one with true predictive power.

Francesca Sammarruca

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

THE ENERGY GAP IN NUCLEAR MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W-7405-eng-48 THE ENERGY GAP IN NUCLEAR MATTER V. J. Emery31, 1960 .po THE ENERGY GAP IN NUCLEAR HNrTEh V. J. ? :merysingle-particle energy in nuclear matter. The internucleon

Emery, V.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Quark matter conductivity in strong magnetic background  

SciTech Connect

Applying the ideas and methods of condensed matter physics we calculate the quantum conductivity of quark matter in magnetic field. In strong field quantum conductivity is proportional to the square root of the field.

Kerbikov, B. O., E-mail: borisk@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cold quark matter in compact stars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used an equation of state for the cold quark matter to the study of properties of quark stars. We also discuss the absolute stability of quark matter and compute the mass-radius relation for self-bound stars.

Franzon, B.; Fogaca, D. A.; Navarra, F. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Horvath, J. E. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 1226, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Semi-annihilation of dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the thermal relic abundance of dark matter can be affected by a new type of reaction: semi-annihilation. Semi-annihilation takes the schematic form ..., where psi i are stable dark matter particles and phi is ...

D’Eramo, Francesco

342

Dark matter axions and caustic rings  

SciTech Connect

This report contains discussions on the following topics: the strong CP problem; dark matter axions; the cavity detector of galactic halo axions; and caustic rings in the density distribution of cold dark matter halos.

Sikivie, P.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Magnetization of neutron star matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The magnetization of neutron star matter in magnetic fields is studied by employing the FSUGold interaction. It is found that the magnetic susceptibilities of the charged particles (proton, electron and muon) can be larger than that of neutron. The effects of the anomalous magnetic moments (AMM) of each component on the magnetic susceptibility are examined in detail. It is found that the proton and electron AMM affect their respective magnetic susceptibility evidently in strong magnetic fields. In addition, they are the protons instead of the electrons that contribute most significantly to the magnetization of the neutron star matter in a relative weak magnetic field, and the induced magnetic field due to the magnetization can be appear to be very large. Finally, the effect of the density-dependent symmetry energy on the magnetization is discussed.

Dong, Jianmin; Gu, Jianzhong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Neutron Condensed Matter Science Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Condensed Matter Science Staff Directory. Dr. Dan Neumann, Group Leader, 301-975-5252. ... Macromolecular and Microstructural Sciences. ...

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Light-matter Interactions in Semiconductor Nanostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light-matter interactions in Semiconductor Nanostructures. ... We investigate the interaction of light with semiconductor-based nanostructures. ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Quantum Nature of Light and Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum Nature of Light and Matter. to explore fundamental aspects of the quantum nature of light and its interaction with ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Neutrino Opacities in Nuclear Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutrino-matter cross sections and interaction rates are central to the core-collapse supernova phenomenon and, very likely, to the viability of the explosion mechanism itself. In this paper, we describe the major neutrino scattering, absorption, and production processes that together influence the outcome of core collapse and the cooling of protoneutron stars. One focus is on energy redistribution and many-body physics, but our major goal is to provide a useful resource for those interested in supernova neutrino microphysics.

Adam Burrows; Sanjay Reddy; Todd A. Thompson

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

348

Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a short review, aimed at a general audience, of several current subjects of research in cosmology. The topics discussed include the cosmic microwave background (CMB), with particular emphasis on its relevance for testing inflation; dark matter, with a brief review of astrophysical evidence and more emphasis on particle candidates; and cosmic acceleration and some of the ideas that have been put forward to explain it. A glossary of technical terms and acronyms is provided.

Marc Kamionkowski

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a short review, aimed at a general audience, of several current subjects of research in cosmology. The topics discussed include the cosmic microwave background (CMB), with particular emphasis on its relevance for testing inflation; dark matter, with a brief review of astrophysical evidence and more emphasis on particle candidates; and cosmic acceleration and some of the ideas that have been put forward to explain it. A glossary of technical terms and acronyms is provided.

Kamionkowski, Marc

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Decoupling Dark Energy from Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the embedding of dark energy in high energy models based upon supergravity and extend the usual phenomenological setting comprising an observable sector and a hidden supersymmetry breaking sector by including a third sector leading to the acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We find that gravitational constraints on the non-existence of a fifth force naturally imply that the dark energy sector must possess an approximate shift symmetry. When exact, the shift symmetry provides an example of a dark energy sector with a runaway potential and a nearly massless dark energy field whose coupling to matter is very weak, contrary to the usual lore that dark energy fields must couple strongly to matter and lead to gravitational inconsistencies. Moreover, the shape of the potential is stable under one-loop radiative corrections. When the shift symmetry is slightly broken by higher order terms in the Kähler potential, the coupling to matter remains small. However, the cosmological dynamics are largely affected by the shift symmetry breaking operators leading to the appearance of a minimum of the scalar potential such that dark energy behaves like an effective cosmological constant from very early on

Carsten Van De Bruck; Jérôme Martin; et al.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Synergistic effects of lubricant additive chemistry on ash properties impacting diesel particulate filter flow resistance and catalyst performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread use in recent years in both on- and offroad applications as an effective means for meeting the increasingly… (more)

Munnis, Sean (Sean Andrew)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Pump Systems Matter Mission and Vision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

issionofPumpSystemsMatter.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Pump Systems Matter Hydraulic Institute Member Benefits Course Overview Pump Systems Matter Optimization...

353

The Use of Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes as a Method for Delineating Sources of Organic Matter in Anchialine Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submerged caves, locally referred to as cenotes, can be found throughout the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. These nutrient poor, aphotic “underground estuaries” lack photosynthetic primary productivity, but are often found underlying high primary productivity areas such as mangroves and tropical forests. Adjacent ecosystems contribute organic carbon to the cave systems via percolation, where it is then utilized by the obligate, cave-dwelling fish and invertebrates. Another potential pathway through which organic carbon can enter the cave food web is through chemosynthesis. Chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing or nitrifying bacteria have been found in the hydrogen sulfide layer or in the sediments of some anchialine caves. Our study utilizes 13C/12C and 15N/14N stable isotopes as well as 14C radiocarbon dating to determine and compare the sources of organic matter entering a coastal anchialine cave (Cenote Aak Kimin) versus an inland cave (Cenote Maya Blue) in the Yucatan Peninsula. Stable isotopes have long been employed in tropic investigations. This study, however, is the first to utilize radiocarbon isotopes in anchialine caves. The use of both stable and radiocarbon isotopes as source indicators provides greater discrimination in systems that contain numerous carbon sources or indistinct trophic levels, particularly to distinguish between chemoautotrophic versus photosynthetically derived carbon. Results indicate that chemosynthetically derived organic carbon contributes substantially to the diet of some crustaceans, such as the stygobitic shrimp Typhlatya, while other species remain dependent on detrital inputs. Depleted ?13C values and aged radiocarbon values (as low as -47.51‰ and 1840 yrs. for Typhlatya spp.) in comparison to particulate and sediment ?13C values (lowest -32.07‰ and -28.43‰, respectively). A comparison of isotopic values between Cenote Aak Kimin and Cenote Maya Blue suggests that the trophic web of the coastal cave incorporates more photosynthetic or detrital carbon, while the inland cave, with more depleted 13C and 14C values, relies more heavily on chemoautotrophic carbon. Within both systems, however, distinct photosynthetic and chemoautotrophic levels were identified. Water quality parameters, especially dissolved oxygen and pH, support the hypothesis of bacterial activity at the halocline. Anchialine systems in the Yucatan Peninsula are threatened due to increases in tourism, development, and pollution. Quantifying and qualifying the inputs of organic carbon is vital for the management and conservation of the area’s freshwater resources.

Neisch, Julie A

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

DEMONSTRATION OF A FULL-SCALE RETROFIT OF THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector (AHPC), developed in cooperation between W.L. Gore & Associates and the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), is an innovative approach to removing particulates from power plant flue gas. The AHPC combines the elements of a traditional baghouse and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) into one device to achieve increased particulate collection efficiency. As part of the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy and Otter Tail Power Company. The EERC is the patent holder for the technology, and W.L. Gore & Associates was the exclusive licensee for this project. The project objective was to demonstrate the improved particulate collection efficiency obtained by a full-scale retrofit of the AHPC to an existing electrostatic precipitator. The full-scale retrofit was installed on an electric power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, Otter Tail Power Company's Big Stone Plant, in Big Stone City, South Dakota. The $13.4 million project was installed in October 2002. Project related testing concluded in December 2005. The following Final Technical Report has been prepared for the project entitled ''Demonstration of a Full-Scale Retrofit of the Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Technology'' as described in DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41420. The report presents the operation and performance results of the system.

Tom Hrdlicka; William Swanson

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Transpiring purging access probe for particulate laden or hazardous environments  

SciTech Connect

An access probe for remote-sensing access through a viewing port, viewing volume, and access port into a vessel. The physical boundary around the viewing volume is partially formed by a porous sleeve lying between the viewing volume and a fluid conduit. In a first mode of operation, a fluid supplied to the fluid conduit encounters the porous sleeve and flows through the porous material to maintain the viewing volume free of ash or other matter. When additional fluid force is needed to clear the viewing volume, the pressure of the fluid flow is increased sufficiently to slidably translate the porous sleeve, greatly increasing the flow into the viewing volume. The porous sleeve is returned to position by an actuating spring. The access probe thereby provides for alternate modes of operation based on the pressure of an actuating fluid.

VanOsdol, John G

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

The problem of big bang matter vs. anti-matter symmetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Bang was symmetrical in the particles and radiation emitted from its singularity source, which implies its resulting in equal amounts of matter and anti-matter and their prompt mutual annihilation. But that did not take place. The favored explanation ... Keywords: anti-matter, big bang, gamma ray bursts, matter, mutual annihilation, universe

Roger Ellman

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two new classes of catalysts for the removal of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg) from effluent gases. Both of these classes of catalysts are excellent absorbers of HCl and Cl.sub.2 present in effluent gases. This adsorption of oxidizing agents aids in the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants. The catalysts remove mercury by oxidizing the Hg into mercury (II) moieties. For one class of catalysts, the active component is selected from the group consisting of iridium (Ir) and iridum-platinum (Ir/Pt) alloys. The Ir and Ir/Pt alloy catalysts are especially corrosion resistant. For the other class of catalyst, the active component is partially combusted coal or "Thief" carbon impregnated with Cl.sub.2. Untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-activating in the presence of effluent gas streams. The Thief carbon catalyst is disposable by means of capture from the effluent gas stream in a particulate collection device (PCD).

Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

358

Flow cytometric analysis of respiratory tract cells exposed to oil shale and silica particulates. [Hamsters  

SciTech Connect

Flow cytometric techniques were used to measure the cytological and biochemical damage to respiratory tract cells in animals exposed to particulates. Hamsters were exposed to raw and spent oil shale particulates and silica by intratracheal instillation. Exfoliated lung cells were obtained by sacrificing the animals and lavaging the respiratory tract posterior to the trachea with saline. Cell samples were fixed in ethanol and stained with mithramycin for fluorescence analysis of DNA content. DNA content distributions from hamsters exposed to spent oil shale and silica particulates showed atypical changes 28 to 35 days later. Cell counts and total numbers of macrophages, leukocytes, and epithelial cells in the lavage fluid also showed marked changes related to time after exposure.

Steinkamp, J.A.; Wilson, J.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Apparatus for real-time airborne particulate radionuclide collection and analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus for collecting and analyzing an airborne particulate radionuclide having a filter mounted in a housing, the housing having an air inlet upstream of the filter and an air outlet downstream of the filter, wherein an air stream flows therethrough. The air inlet receives the air stream, the filter collects the airborne particulate radionuclide and permits a filtered air stream to pass through the air outlet. The improvement which permits real time counting is a gamma detecting germanium diode mounted downstream of the filter in the filtered air stream. The gamma detecting germanium diode is spaced apart from a downstream side of the filter a minimum distance for a substantially maximum counting detection while permitting substantially free air flow through the filter and uniform particulate radionuclide deposition on the filter.

Smart, John E. (West Richland, WA); Perkins, Richard W. (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

HOME NEWS SPORTS BUSINESS OPINIONS ENTERTAINMENT HEALTH TRAVEL INFO CLASSIFIED ADSLong Beach, CA, 12/21/2006 Advertisement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it from truck diesel, said USC professor of engineering Constantinos Sioutas, who is leading the study Beach, which already has air pollution and wind monitors at two locations, said Robert Article Search, sulfur oxides and diesel particulate matter, but do not capture particulate matter for research, Kanter

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Policy Matters Ohio | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Matters Ohio Matters Ohio Jump to: navigation, search Name Policy Matters Ohio Address 3631 Perkins Avenue - Suite 4C-East Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44114 Website http://www.policymattersohio.o References Policy Matters Ohio[1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Policy Matters Ohio is an organization based in Cleveland, Ohio. References ↑ "Policy Matters Ohio" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Policy_Matters_Ohio&oldid=367666" Categories: Policy Organizations Clean Energy Organizations Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

362

Energy Matters LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Matters LLC Matters LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Matters LLC Place Santa Rosa, California Zip 95402 Sector Renewable Energy Product Energy Matters specialises in software tools for the renewable energy industries. References Energy Matters LLC[1] Solar-Estimate.org[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Energy Matters LLC is a company located in Santa Rosa, California . Solarestimate.gif Solar-Estimate.org Energy Matters created the solar estimator, a useful tool to analyze the benefits of a solar or wind system installation in your home or business. The estimator takes into account your region, average utility bills, and the system you are installing, and calculates a 25-year timeline for you to analyze the potential cost savings on energy.

363

Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Examinations of the origins of polyatomic ions and advances in the sampling of particulates  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation provides a general introduction to Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) sampling, with an examination of analytical challenges in the employment of this technique. It discusses the origin of metal oxide ions (MO+) in LA-ICP-MS, as well as the effect of introducing helium and nitrogen to the aerosol gas flow on the formation of these polyatomic interferences. It extends the study of polyatomic ions in LA-ICP-MS to metal argide (MAr+) species, an additional source of possible significant interferences in the spectrum. It describes the application of fs-LA-ICP-MS to the determination of uranium isotope ratios in particulate samples.

Witte, Travis

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Bulk Materials Synthesis & Characterization, Condensed Matter Physics &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Details Site Details EMSC Homepage Research Publications Collaborators Laboratory People Links of Interest Other Information Basic Energy Sciences Directorate Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Dept Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Exploratory Materials Synthesis & Characterization The focus of our research is design, discovery, synthesis and characterization of new model materials for condensed matter physics. Particular emphasis is devoted to the discovery of new phenomena associated with correlated electron behavior and problems in superconductivity and magnetism. Since many observables are tensor quantities, significant effort is devoted to the synthesis of materials in single crystal form. New materials are prepared by variety of growth methods: conventional arc melting and powder metallurgical techniques, solution methods, high temperature intermetallic, oxide or sulfide flux as well as chemical vapor transport and deposition. Automated physical and structural characterization is the essential component of the lab. In order to optimize synthesis parameters, it is necessary to characterize structural and physical properties of materials. Quite often the same methods are used to probe and perturb crystal structure, transport, thermodynamic and magnetic properties of new materials at extreme conditions of low temperatures, high magnetic fields and high pressures.

365

Imbibition dynamics of nano-particulate ink-jet drops on micro-porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imbibition dynamics of nano-particulate ink-jet drops on micro-porous media Hsiao, W.-K., Hoath, S. D., Martin, G. D., Hutchings, I. M., Chilton, N. B. and Jones, S., Proc Nanotech 2011 Conference, Boston, June 2011. Imbibition dynamics... of nano-particulate ink-jet drops on micro-porous media W.-K. Hsiao*, S. D. Hoath*, G. D. Martin*, I. M. Hutchings*, N. B. Chilton** and S. Jones** *Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge Cambridge CB3 0FS, United Kingdom, wkh26@cam...

Hsiao, W.-K.; Hoath, S.D.; Martin, G.D.; Hutchings, I.M.; Chilton, N.B.; Jones, S.

366

Method for the Removal of Ultrafine Particulates from an Aqueous Suspension  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating ultra-fine particulate from an aqueous suspension such as a process stream or a waste stream. The method involves the addition of alkali silicate and an organic gelling agent to a volume of liquid, from the respective process or waste stream, to form a gel. The gel then undergoes syneresis to remove water and soluble salts from the gel-containing the particulate, thus, forming a silica monolith. The silica monolith is then sintered to form a hard, nonporous waste form.

Chaiko, David J.; Kopasz, John P.; Ellison, Adam J.G.

1999-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Study of Particulate Emissions of Engine Fuelled with Biodiesel-Diesel Blends Using Thermo-gravimetric Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particulate emissions of engine fuelled different proportions of Pistacia chinensis Bunge seed biodiesel-dieselblends were collected under different fuel supplying advance dangles and different operating conditions. The change of volatile organic fractions ... Keywords: Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis, Biodiesel, Engine, Particulate Emissions

Ma Zhihao; Zhang Xiaoyu; Wang Xin; Xu Bin; Wu Jian

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Development of Mercury Oxidation Catalyst for Enhanced Mercury Capture by Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recent progress on a mercury control technology development program co-funded by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), and several EPRI-member companies. The mercury control process under development uses catalysts installed downstream of the air heater and particulate control device to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

EXTRAGALACTIC DARK MATTER AND DIRECT DETECTION EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Recent astronomical data strongly suggest that a significant part of the dark matter content of the Local Group and Virgo Supercluster is not incorporated into the galaxy halos and forms diffuse components of these galaxy clusters. A portion of the particles from these components may penetrate the Milky Way and make an extragalactic contribution to the total dark matter containment of our Galaxy. We find that the particles of the diffuse component of the Local Group are apt to contribute {approx}12% to the total dark matter density near Earth. The particles of the extragalactic dark matter stand out because of their high speed ({approx}600 km s{sup -1}), i.e., they are much faster than the galactic dark matter. In addition, their speed distribution is very narrow ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). The particles have an isotropic velocity distribution (perhaps, in contrast to the galactic dark matter). The extragalactic dark matter should provide a significant contribution to the direct detection signal. If the detector is sensitive only to the fast particles (v > 450 km s{sup -1}), then the signal may even dominate. The density of other possible types of the extragalactic dark matter (for instance, of the diffuse component of the Virgo Supercluster) should be relatively small and comparable with the average dark matter density of the universe. However, these particles can generate anomaly high-energy collisions in direct dark matter detectors.

Baushev, A. N., E-mail: baushev@gmail.com [DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses classical molecular dynamics to simulate infinite nuclear matter and study the effect of isospin asymmetry on bulk properties such as energy per nucleon, pressure, saturation density, compressibility and symmetry energy. The simulations are performed on systems embedded in periodic boundary conditions with densities and temperatures in the ranges $\\rho$=0.02 to 0.2 fm$^{-3}$ and T = 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 MeV, and with isospin content of $x=Z/A$=0.3, 0.4 and 0.5. The results indicate that symmetric and asymmetric matter are self-bound at some temperatures and exhibit phase transitions from a liquid phase to a liquid-gas mixture. The main effect of isospin asymmetry is found to be a reduction of the equilibrium densities, a softening of the compressibility and a disappearance of the liquid-gas phase transition. A procedure leading to the evaluation of the symmetry energy and its variation with the temperature was devised, implemented and compared to mean field theory results.

J. A. López; E. Ramírez-Homs; R. González; R. Ravelo

2013-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

Soft Matter Group, Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Department,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Information (pdf) Research Information (pdf) Publications Seminars Journal Club Staff Information Other Information Basic Energy Sciences Directorate Related Sites BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Soft Matter Group Confinement and Template Directed Assembly in Chemical and Biomolecular Materials We use synchrotron x-ray scattering, scanning probe and optical microscopy techniques to study fundamental properties of complex fluids, simple liquids, macromolecular assemblies, polymers, and biomolecular materials under confinement and on templates. The challenges are: To understand liquids under nano-confinement. How templates and confinement can be used to direct the assembly. To understand the fundamental interactions which give rise to similar self-assembly behavior for a wide variety of systems.

372

Publications, Soft Matter Group, Condensed Matter Physics & Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 2011 Unifying interfacial self-assembly and surface freezing, B.M. Ocko, H. Hlaing, P.N. Jepsen, S. Kewalramani, A. Tkachenko, D. Pontoni, H. Reichert and M. Deutsch. Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 137801 (2011) Reversible uptake of water on NaCl nanoparticles at relative humidity below deliquescence point observed by noncontact environmental atomic force microscopy, D.A. Bruzewicz, A. Checco, B.M. Ocko, E.R. Lewis, R.L. McGraw and S.E. Schwartz. J. Chem. Phys. 134, 044702 (2011) Systematic approach to electrostatically induced 2D crystallization of nanoparticles at liquid interfaces, S. Kewalramani, S.T. Wang, Y. Lin, H.G. Nguyen, Q. Wang, M. Fukuto and L. Yang. Soft Matter 7, 939-945 (2011)

373

110K Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor oxide and method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor is disclosed consisting of a sufficiently pure phase of the oxides of Bi, Sr, Ca, and Cu to exhibit a resistive zero near 110K resulting from the process of forming a mixture of Bi[sub 2]O[sub 3], SrCO[sub 3], CaCO[sub 3] and CuO into a particulate compact wherein the atom ratios are Bi[sub 2], Sr[sub 1.2-2.2], Ca[sub 1.8-2.4], Cu[sub 3]. Thereafter, heating the particulate compact rapidly in the presence of oxygen to an elevated temperature near the melting point of the oxides to form a sintered compact, and then maintaining the sintered compact at the elevated temperature for a prolonged period of time. The sintered compact is cooled and reground. Thereafter, the reground particulate material is compacted and heated in the presence of oxygen to an elevated temperature near the melting point of the oxide and maintained at the elevated temperature for a time sufficient to provide a sufficiently pure phase to exhibit a resistive zero near 110K. 7 figs.

Veal, B.W.; Downey, J.W.; Lam, D.J.; Paulikas, A.P.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

374

Baryon destruction by asymmetric dark matter  

SciTech Connect

We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause induced nucleon decay by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10{sup 29}-10{sup 32} yrs in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter-induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.

Davoudiasl, Hooman [Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Morrissey, David E.; Tulin, Sean [Theory Group, TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Sigurdson, Kris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect

Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

376

Developments in the Processing and Properties of Particulate Al-Si ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of low to medium density particulates.32,33 A fundamental characteristic of this technique is ..... K.G. Satyanarayana, R.M. Pillai, and B.C. Pai, Handbook of Ceramics and .... Direct questions about this or any other JOM page to jom@tms. org.

377

Sieveless particle size distribution analysis of particulate materials through computer vision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the inconsistency of ''length-based separation'' by mechanical sieving of particulate materials with standard sieves, which is the standard method of particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. We observed inconsistencies of length-based ... Keywords: Biomass sieve analysis, Dimension, Image processing, ImageJ plugin, Particle size distribution, Physical property

C. Igathinathane; L. O. Pordesimo; E. P. Columbus; W. D. Batchelor; S. Sokhansanj

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

TASI 2008 Lectures on Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect

Based on lectures given at the 2008 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute (TASI), I review here some aspects of the phenomenology of particle dark matter, including the process of thermal freeze-out in the early universe, and the direct and indirect detection of WIMPs. I also describe some of the most popular particle candidates for dark matter and summarize the current status of the quest to discover dark matter's particle identity.

Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Dark Matter Jets at the LHC  

SciTech Connect

We argue that dark matter particles which have strong interactions with the Standard Model particles are not excluded by current astrophysical constraints. These dark matter particles have unique signatures at colliders; instead of missing energy, the dark matter particles produce jets. We propose a new search strategy for such strongly interacting particles by looking for a signal of two trackless jets. We show that suitable cuts can plausibly allow us to find these signals at the LHC even in early data.

Bai, Yang; /SLAC; Rajaraman, Arvind; /UC, Irvine

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

Stocker, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Phase-Coherent Amplification of Matter Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in optical pulsed-dye laser amplifiers that are not well aligned. ... Superradiance is based on matter-wave bosonic stimulation, and thus the probability ...

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

THE ENERGY GAP IN NUCLEAR MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy gap for nuclear matter with a vieVi to gaining some ins ight into the possible results of extending the theory

Emery, V.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Some Practical Applications of Dark Matter Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two practical spin-offs from the development of cryogenic dark matter detectors are presented. One in materials research, the other in biology.

Stodolsky, L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Multiscale Materials Modeling of Condensed Matter - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 29, 2007 ... The following presentations from MMM 2007, the International Max-Planck Workshop on Multiscale Materials Modeling of Condensed Matter, ...

385

Consistent matter couplings for Plebanski gravity  

SciTech Connect

We develop a scheme for the minimal coupling of all standard types of tensor and spinor field matter to Plebanski gravity. This theory is a geometric reformulation of vacuum general relativity in terms of two-form frames and connection one-forms, and provides a covariant basis for various quantization approaches. Using the spinor formalism we prove the consistency of the newly proposed matter coupling by demonstrating the full equivalence of Plebanski gravity plus matter to Einstein-Cartan gravity. As a by-product we also show the consistency of some previous suggestions for matter actions.

Tennie, Felix; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R. [Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik und II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Quantum Condensates in Nuclear Matter: Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In connection with the contribution "Quantum Condensates in Nuclear Matter" some problems are given to become more familiar with the techniques of many-particle physics.

G. Ropke; D. Zablocki

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Dark Energy and Dark Matter Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the problems of dark energy and dark matter and several models designed to explain them, in the light of some latest findings.

Sidharth, Burra G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dark Energy and Dark Matter Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the problems of dark energy and dark matter and several models designed to explain them, in the light of some latest findings.

Burra G. Sidharth

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

389

Course Overview Pump Systems Matter Optimization | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Course Overview Pump Systems Matter Optimization Attendees of the "Pump Systems Optimization" one-day course will gain valuable new skills to help them improve...

390

Does Management Matter? Evidence from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOES MANAGEMENT MATTER? EVIDENCE FROM INDIA Nicholas Bloombadly managed? Our experiment does not directly answer thisworks, imagine a plant that does not record quality defects.

Bloom, Nicholas; Eifert, Benn; Mahajan, Aprajit; McKenzie, David; Roberts, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The XENON Dark Matter Search  

SciTech Connect

The XENON experiment will search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPS), a leading candidate for the dark matter content of the Universe. The XENON detector uses the simultaneous measurement of ionization and scintillation in liquid xenon to distinguish between nuclear recoils and background electronic interactions. Ionization electrons are extracted into the xenon vapor where they produce a large proportional scintillation signal in a grid assembly. Both prompt and proportional scintillation light are detected by PMT arrays on the top and bottom of the active liquid xenon volume. The distribution of proportional scintillation light in the top PMT array can be used to achieve xy position resolution, while the ionization drift time gives position resolution in the z direction. This allows the definition of a low-background fiducial volume. I describe the results of the R and D phase of this project before providing a status update on the XENON10 phase.

McKinsey, D. N. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Singlet-Doublet Dark Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light of recent data from direct detection experiments and the Large Hadron Collider, we explore models of dark matter in which an SU(2){sub L} doublet is mixed with a Standard Model singlet. We impose a thermal history. If the new particles are fermions, this model is already constrained due to null results from XENON100. We comment on remaining regions of parameter space and assess prospects for future discovery. We do the same for the model where the new particles are scalars, which at present is less constrained. Much of the remaining parameter space for both models will be probed by the next generation of direct detection experiments. For the fermion model, DeepCore may also play an important role.

Cohen, Timothy; /SLAC /Michigan U., MCTP; Kearney, John; Pierce, Aaron; /Michigan U., MCTP; Tucker-Smith, David; /Williams Coll.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Particulate Emissions from a Pre-Emissions Control Era Spark-Ignition Vehicle: A Historical Benchmark  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examined the particulate emissions from a pre-emissions control era vehicle operated on both leaded and unleaded fuels for the purpose of establishing a historical benchmark. A pre-control vehicle was located that had been rebuilt with factory original parts to approximate an as-new vehicle prior to 1968. The vehicle had less than 20,000 miles on the rebuilt engine and exhaust. The vehicle underwent repeated FTP-75 tests to determine its regulated emissions, including particulate mass. Additionally, measurements of the particulate size distribution were made, as well as particulate lead concentration. These tests were conducted first with UTG96 certification fuel, followed by UTG96 doped with tetraethyl lead to approximate 1968 levels. Results of these tests, including transmission electron micrographs of individual particles from both the leaded and unleaded case are presented. The FTP composite PM emissions from this vehicle averaged 40.5 mg/mile using unleaded fuel. The results from the leaded fuel tests showed that the FTP composite PM emissions increased to an average of 139.5 mg/mile. Analysis of the particulate size distribution for both cases demonstrated that the mass-based size distribution of particles for this vehicle is heavily skewed towards the nano-particle range. The leaded-fuel tests showed a significant increase in mass concentration at the <0.1 micron size compared with the unleaded-fuel test case. The leaded-fuel tests produced lead emissions of nearly 0.04 g/mi, more than a 4-order-of-magnitude difference compared with unleaded-fuel results. Analysis of the size-fractionated PM samples showed that the lead PM emissions tended to be distributed in the 0.25 micron and smaller size range.

John M.E. Storey; C. Scott Sluder; Douglas A. Blom; Erin Higinbotham

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

398

Lipid Oxidation Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews state-of-the-art developments in the understanding of the oxidation of lipids and its connection with the oxidation of other biological molecules such as proteins and starch. Lipid Oxidation Pathways Hardback Books Health - Nutrition -

399

Chiral thermodynamics of dense hadronic matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss phases of hot and dense hadronic matter using chiral Lagrangians. A two-flavored parity doublet model constrained by the nuclear matter ground state predicts chiral symmetry restoration. The model thermodynamics is shown within the mean-field approximation. A field-theoretical constraint on possible phases from the anomaly matching is also discussed.

Sasaki, C., E-mail: sasaki@fias.uni-frankfurt.de [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (Germany)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields under relatively mild reaction conditions. Results in this document are reported under the headings: methane oxidation over silica, methane oxidation over Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, and oxidative coupling of methane over sulfate-doped Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. 24 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

WBZ-12-0005 - In the Matter of Jeffrey S. Derrick | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WBZ-12-0005 - In the Matter of Jeffrey S. Derrick WBZ-12-0005 - In the Matter of Jeffrey S. Derrick WBZ-12-0005 - In the Matter of Jeffrey S. Derrick On October 2, 2012, a Hearing Officer issued an Interlocutory Order denying a Motion to Dismiss filed by Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC (Shaw), regarding a complaint submitted by Jeffrey S. Derrick under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Shaw alleged that Derrick's Part 708 complaint should be dismissed because Shaw management had prior knowledge of Derrick's disclosures concerning pipe installation at the DOE's Mixed Oxide Fabrication Facility in Savannah River. The Hearing Officer determined that Derrick's disclosures, for the pupose of deciding the Motion, were not identical to the issues raised in a prior NNSA Report which had been issued

402

Biology and Soft Matter | Neutron Sciences | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and Soft Matter Biology and Soft Matter SHARE Biology and Soft Matter This is a time of unprecedented opportunity for using neutrons in biological and soft matter research. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has invested in two forefront neutron user facilities, the accelerator-based Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the reactor-based High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Researchers have access to new instrumentation on some of the world's most intense neutron beam lines for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of complex systems. We anticipate that soft matter and biological sciences of tomorrow will require understanding, predicting, and manipulating complex systems to produce the new materials and products required to meet our nation's

403

Dark matter chaos in the Solar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the capture of galactic dark matter particles in the Solar System produced by rotation of Jupiter. It is shown that the capture cross section is much larger than the area of Jupiter orbit being inversely diverging at small particle energy. We show that the dynamics of captured particles is chaotic and is well described by a simple symplectic dark map. This dark map description allows to simulate the scattering and dynamics of $10^{14}$ dark matter particles during the life time of the Solar System and to determine dark matter density profile as a function of distance from the Sun. The mass of captured dark matter in the radius of Neptune orbit is estimated to be $2 \\cdot 10^{15} g$. The radial density of captured dark matter is found to be approximately constant behind Jupiter orbit being similar to the density profile found in galaxies.

J. Lages; D. L. Shepelyansky

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

Dark Matter Studies Entrain Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review theoretically well-motivated dark-matter candidates, and pathways to their discovery, in the light of recent results from collider physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Taken in aggregate, these encourage broader thinking in regards to possible dark-matter candidates --- dark-matter need not be made of "WIMPs," i.e., elementary particles with weak-scale masses and interactions. Facilities dedicated to nuclear physics are well-poised to investigate certain non-WIMP models. In parallel to this, developments in observational cosmology permit probes of the relativistic energy density at early epochs and thus provide new ways to constrain dark-matter models, provided nuclear physics inputs are sufficiently well-known. The emerging confluence of accelerator, astrophysical, and cosmological constraints permit searches for dark-matter candidates in a greater range of masses and interaction strengths than heretofore possible.

Susan Gardner; George Fuller

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

405

Does It Matter Who Scouts?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scouting is the most widely used integrated pest management (IPM) technique. It has been argued that only independent crop consultants provide unbiased scouting information. In contrast, chemical dealers inflate scouting reports and/or reduce economic thresholds in order to increase pesticide sales while farmers may use excessively low treatment thresholds due to risk aversion and/or overestimation of pest pressure.. Since the majority of scouting is done by farmers and chemical dealer employees, it follows that scouting may not be a very effective means of reducing reliance on chemical pesticides. This study applies an implicit demand formulation of the Lichtenberg-Zilberman damage abatement model to data from a survey of Maryland field crop growers to examine differences in pesticide demand between growers using scouts trained and supervised by extension and those using chemical dealer employees or scouting themselves. Our results give partial support to those skeptical of the quality of scouting by farmers themselves and by consultants working for chemical dealers. We found that soybean growers using extension trained scouts had significantly lower pesticide demand than those using chemical dealer employees or scouting themselves. However, we found no significant differences in the pesticide demands for alfalfa, corn, and small grains. Since soybeans in Maryland are substantially more pesticide-intensive than corn, alfalfa, or small grains, these results suggest that it does matter who scouts when there is scope for substantial savings in pesticides.

Erik Lichtenberg; Ayesha Velderman Berlind

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

SciTech Connect

The device described in this report will simultaneously remove particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the combustion gases of coal combustors. The device is configured as a cross-flow filter. The gas flows from the inlet passages to orthogonally oriented discharge channels via thin, multilayered porous walls. Flue gas enters from both the front and back of the device. With the left wall of the filter sealed, gas discharges from the right side of the device. The key to combined physical (fly ash) and chemical (SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}) cleaning is to utilize chemical active sorbent-catalysts (e.g., metal oxides) in the layered walls of the filter. This quarter, the NO{sub x} reduction activity of three sorbent-catalyst materials was tested over a temperature range from 200 to 500{degree}C. We were primarily interested in the sorbent-catalyst NO{sub x} reduction performance at 400{degree}C because this appears to be a minimum temperature for acceptable sulfur capture with these sorbents. the tradeoff between sulfur capture and NO{sub x} reduction performance for these sorbent-catalysts is clear: sulfation improves with higher temperatures (e.g., 400--600{degree}C) while NO{sub x} reduction improves at lower temperatures (e.g., 200--300{degree}C). Sorbent-catalyst materials included: Cu-7Al-O; Cu-Ce-O; and CeO{sub 2}. 7 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Effects of humidity and temperature on the conversion of SO/sub 2/ to particulate sulfate and sulfite. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Effects of humidity and temperature on SO/sub 2/ conversion to particulate sulfate and sulfite in relation to heterogeneous conversion in droplets and on particle surfaces; homogeneous conversion in the gas phase; and gas-to-particle conversion are discussed. Theoretical quantitative expressions for some effects are derived and order-of-magnitude calculations are given. Detailed conclusions and comparisons regarding the effects of temperature and humidity on specific oxidation paths. Major conclusions documented are: rates of SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 4//sup =/ converison in aqueous droplets are generally negatively correlated with temperature and positively correlated with relative humidity (particularly at high relative humidity); the rates of SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 4//sup =/ conversion on reactive surfaces can be either positively correlated with relative humidity or unaffected by relative humidity, and can have a negative, a positive, or a zero correlation with temperture; the homogeneous photooxidation is considerably less sensitive to temperature than is the heterogeneous conversion. (The photooxidation of SO/sub 2/ is expected to be positively correlated with temperature, but the correlation will be weaker in clean air than in polluted air, the positive dependence of SO/sub 2/ photooxidation on humidity will be weaker in polluted air containing NMHC than in clean air); the specific conversion paths have rates with highly different sensitivities to relative humidity and temperature. Thus, a given conversion path can become more or less significant relative to other paths as relative humidity and temperature vary. This suggests that temperature and relative humidity variations can be major causes of the temporal and spatial variations in the rate and yield of conversion and in the type of sulfate produced, which in turn determine the extent of adverse environmental effects. 228 references, 1 figure, 28 tables.

Freiberg, J.E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

SOLAR CONSTRAINTS ON ASYMMETRIC DARK MATTER  

SciTech Connect

The dark matter content of the universe is likely to be a mixture of matter and antimatter, perhaps comparable to the measured asymmetric mixture of baryons and antibaryons. During the early stages of the universe, the dark matter particles are produced in a process similar to baryogenesis, and dark matter freezeout depends on the dark matter asymmetry and the annihilation cross section (s-wave and p-wave annihilation channels) of particles and antiparticles. In these {eta}-parameterized asymmetric dark matter ({eta}ADM) models, the dark matter particles have an annihilation cross section close to the weak interaction cross section, and a value of dark matter asymmetry {eta} close to the baryon asymmetry {eta}{sub B}. Furthermore, we assume that dark matter scattering of baryons, namely, the spin-independent scattering cross section, is of the same order as the range of values suggested by several theoretical particle physics models used to explain the current unexplained events reported in the DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, and CRESST experiments. Here, we constrain {eta}ADM by investigating the impact of such a type of dark matter on the evolution of the Sun, namely, the flux of solar neutrinos and helioseismology. We find that dark matter particles with a mass smaller than 15 GeV, a spin-independent scattering cross section on baryons of the order of a picobarn, and an {eta}-asymmetry with a value in the interval 10{sup -12}-10{sup -10}, would induce a change in solar neutrino fluxes in disagreement with current neutrino flux measurements. This result is also confirmed by helioseismology data. A natural consequence of this model is suppressed annihilation, thereby reducing the tension between indirect and direct dark matter detection experiments, but the model also allows a greatly enhanced annihilation cross section. All the cosmological {eta}ADM scenarios that we discuss have a relic dark matter density {Omega}h {sup 2} and baryon asymmetry {eta}{sub B} in agreement with the current WMAP measured values, {Omega}{sub DM} h {sup 2} = 0.1109 {+-} 0.0056 and {eta}{sub B} = 0.88 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}.

Lopes, Ilidio [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Silk, Joseph, E-mail: ilidio.lopes@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.uk [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Using Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Pollution Sources1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Pollution Sources 1 Thomas Grahame U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC George Hidy Envair/Aerochem Placitas, NM ABSTRACT Laden et al. (2000) recently reported results of applying factor analysis to data taken in six cities from1979 to1988, identifying airborne particle sources potentially affecting daily mortality. These authors sought relationships between source groups and risk measures using source tracer elements, Se (coal combustion), Pb (light duty motor vehicle sources), and Si (crustal--soil dispersion). Combined data analyses of this kind may overlook the complexity of source contributions, which have common tracer elements. In one of the cities, Boston for example, the authors found coal combustion

410

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Grohse, Edward W. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Apparatus and method for removing particulate deposits from high temperature filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion of a fuel-air mixture is used to provide a high-temperature and high-pressure pulse of gaseous combustion products for the back-flush cleaning of ceramic filter elements contained in a barrier filter system and utilized to separate particulates from particulate-laden process gases at high temperature and high pressure. The volume of gaseous combustion products provided by the combustion of the fuel-air mixture is preferably divided into a plurality of streams each passing through a sonic orifice and conveyed to the open end of each filter element as a high pressure pulse which passes through the filter elements and dislodges dust cake supported on a surface of the filter element.

Nakaishi, Curtis V. (Morgantown, WV); Holcombe, Norman T. (McMurray, PA); Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol. 3 figs.

Steinberg, M.; Grohse, E.W.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

413

Apparatus and method for removing particulate deposits from high temperature filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The combustion of a fuel-air mixture is used to provide a high-temperature and high-pressure pulse of gaseous combustion products for the back-flush cleaning of ceramic filter elements contained in a barrier filter system and utilized to separate particulates from particulate-laden process gases at high temperature and high pressure. The volume of gaseous combustion products provided by the combustion of the fuel-air mixture is preferably divided into a plurality of streams each passing through a sonic orifice and conveyed to the open end of each filter element as a high pressure pulse which passes through the filter elements and dislodges dust cake supported on a surface of the filter element.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Holcombe, N.T.; Micheli, P.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composties produced thereby  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intenisty acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaciton products comprise a solide particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particles-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dark Matter in the Private Higgs Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extremely large hierarchy observed in the fermion mass spectrum remains as one of the most puzzling and unresolved issues in particle physics. In a recent proposal, however, it was demonstrated that by introducing one Higgs doublet (or Private Higgs) per fermion this hierarchy could be made natural by making the Yukawa couplings between each fermion and its respective Higgs boson of order unity. Among the interesting predictions of the Private Higgs scenario is a variety of scalars which could be probed at future collider experiments and a possible dark matter candidate. In this paper, we study in some detail the dark matter sector of the Private Higgs model. We first calculate the annihilation cross sections of dark matter in this model and find that one can easily account for the observed density of dark matter in the Universe with relatively natural values of the model's parameters. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting Private Higgs dark matter indirectly via the observation of anomalous gamma rays originating from the galactic halo. We show that a substantial flux of photons can be produced from the annihilation of Private Higgs dark matter such that, if there is considerable clumping of dark matter in the galactic halo, the flux of these gamma rays could be observed by ground-based telescope arrays such as VERITAS and HESS.

C. B. Jackson

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

Benedek, K. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Cross-flow filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Retrieval of Profiles of Particulate Extinction from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) Data: Algorithm Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the algorithms used for the fully automated retrieval of profiles of particulate extinction coefficients from the attenuated backscatter data acquired by the lidar on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite ...

Stuart A. Young; Mark A. Vaughan

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the infiltration of outdoor PM2.5 into a residence in the San Joaquin Valley Title Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the infiltration of outdoor PM2.5 into a residence in the San Joaquin Valley Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Tracy L. Thatcher, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4724-4732 Date Published October 15, 2003 Abstract Recent studies associate particulate air pollution with adverse health effects. The indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin is not well characterized, particularly for individual chemical species. In response to this, a field study in an unoccupied, single-story residence in Clovis, California was conducted. Real-time particle monitors were used both outdoors and indoors to quantity PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. The aggregate of the highly time-resolved sulfate data, as well as averages of these data, was fit using a time-averaged form of the infiltration equation, resulting in reasonable values for the penetration coefficient and deposition velocity. In contrast, individual values of the indoor/outdoor ratio can vary significantly from that predicted by the model for time scales ranging from a few minutes to several hours. Measured indoor ammonium nitrate levels were typically significantly lower than expected based solely on penetration and deposition losses. The additional reduction is due to the transformation of ammonium nitrate into ammonia and nitric acid gases indoors, which are subsequently lost by deposition and sorption to indoor surfaces. This result illustrates that exposure assessments based on total outdoor particle mass can obscure the actual causal relationships for indoor exposures

420

Development of Optical Technologies for Monitoring Moisture and Particulate in Geothermal Steam  

SciTech Connect

The results of an investigation directed at evaluating the feasibility of using optical measurements for the real-time monitoring moisture and particulate in geothermal steam is described. The measurements exploit new technologies that have been developed for the telecommunications industry and includes new solid state laser devices, large-bandwidth, high-sensitivity detectors and low loss optical fiber compo-nents. In particular, the design, fabrication, and in-plant testing of an optical steam monitor for the detection of moisture is presented. The measurement principle is based upon the selective absorption of infrared energy in response to the presence of moisture. Typically, two wavelengths are used in the measurements: a wavelength that is strongly absorbed by water and a reference wavelength that is minimally influenced by water and steam which serves as a reference to correct for particulate or droplet scattering. The two wavelengths are chosen to be as close as possible in order to more effectively correct for scattering effects. The basic instrumentation platform developed for the in-situ monitoring of steam moisture can be modified and used to perform other measurements of interest to plant operators. An upgrade that will allow the instrument to be used for the sensitive detection of particulate in process streams has been investigated. The new monitor design involves the use of laser diodes that are much less sensitive to water and water vapor and more sensitive to scattering phenomena, as well as new processing techniques to recover these signals. The design reduces the averaging time and sampling volume, while increasing the laser probe power, enhancing particulate detection sensitivity. The design concept and initial laboratory experiments with this system are also reported.

J. K. Partin

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

VBR-0002 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Savannah River Company...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the Complainant. vbr0002.pdf More Documents & Publications VBH-0002 - In the Matter of Don W. Beckwith VWD-0006 - In the Matter of Lucy B. Smith VBH-0056 - In the Matter of Jean...

422

TBH-0075 - In the Matter of Richard L. Rieckenberg | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications TBD-0073 - In the Matter of Richard L. Rieckenberg TBD-0075 -In the Matter of Jonathan Strausbaugh TBH-0057 - In the Matter of Frederick L. Higgs...

423

BABAR Constrains Dark-Matter Photon and Higgs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Constrains Dark-Matter Photon and Higgs The majority of matter in the universe is "dark matter" that does not interact with light. Since it cannot be seen directly, its existence...

424

Particulate Control Device (PCD) Testing at the Power Systems Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) objectives overseen by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to test systems and components for advanced coal-based power generation systems, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and integrated gasification/fuel cell (IGFC) systems. Stringent particulate requirements for fuel gas for both combustion turbines and fuel cells that are integral to these systems. Particulates erode and chemically attack the blade surfaces in turbines, and cause blinding of the electrodes in fuel cells. Filtration of the hot, high-pressure, gasified coal is required to protect these units. Filtration can be accomplished by first cooling the gas, but the system efficiency is reduced. High-temperature, high-pressure, particulate control devices (PCDs) need to be developed to achieve high efficiency and to extend the lifetime of downstream components to acceptable levels. Demonstration of practical high-temperature PCDs is crucial to the evolution of advanced, high-efficiency, coal-based power generation systems. The intent at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is to establish a flexible test facility that can be used to (1) develop advanced power system components, such as high-temperature, high-pressure PCDs; (2) evaluate advanced power system configurations and (3) assess the integration and control issues of these advanced power systems.

Longanbach, J.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Program on Technology Innovation: Developing Technologies for the Direct Measurement of Particulate Mass Emissions from Flue Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the current status of continuous particulate monitoring systems. It addresses the recent advent of new monitoring systems and the role of miniaturization and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in particulate monitor development. It examines sensors and monitoring systems in other fields of application, such as ambient, indoor, process, and clean room monitoring. Many of these methods are particle counting and particle sizing methods, meant for monitoring low particle concentration...

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

NOx Solutions for Biodiesel: Final Report; Report 6 in a Series of 6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of studies have shown substantial particulate matter (PM) reductions for biodiesel, but also a significant increase in nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions. This study examines a number of approaches for NOx reduction from biodiesel.

McCormick, R. L.; Alvarez, J. R.; Graboski, M. S.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effect of sequential removal of organic matter on the surface morphology of humin  

SciTech Connect

Natural organic matter in soils interacts with surfaces of inorganic materials, primarily aluminosilicates or clay minerals, to form a strongly associated organo-mineral composite known as humin. Because of humin`s insolubility, it is recognized as the primary sorbent of many anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) introduced into soil systems. This recognition has significant implications for understanding the fate and transport of AOCs, the effective remediation of contaminated sites, and the formulation and application of various agrochemicals. Humin was isolated from four soil samples. Surface area, surface charge, porosity measurements, and fractal analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data were used to characterize changes in the surface properties resulting from selective removal of the various components of organic matter from humin. Organic matter was removed selectively from humin by Soxhlet extraction, disaggregation with the methylisobutylketone (MIBK) method, and bromine oxidation. The surface fractal dimensions decreased while surface area increased, and surface pore size decreased upon removal of organic matter. These results suggest that the mineral components of humin have smooth surfaces over length scales of {approximately}1 to 15 run, and that it is the organic matter coatings that are responsible for their surface roughness. The surfaces of all the components of humin were found to be dominated by micro and mesopores that could be responsible for humin`s high sorptive uptake of organic chemicals.

Malekani, K.; Rice, J.A. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)] [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States); Lin, Jar-Shyong [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Photo-oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Smith, R. Davis (Golden, CO)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Coal oxidation has been studies extensively in previous work. However, there is still no general agreement concerning the mechanisms of oxidation. Moreover, the oxidation behavior of coal and mineral matter have generally been regarded as separate processed. There is appreciable evidence that organic and inorganic oxidation process are actually coupled, consequently the changes in their surface properties induced by oxidation are difficult to predict. This makes the effectively of coal cleaning processes highly sensitive to the extent of weathering and oxidation that the coal has experienced. The objective of this research was to investigate the oxidation behavior of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with these surface properties that would influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes.

Doyle, F.M.

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

Neutrons in Soft Matter Science | Education | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complex Materials on Mesoscopic Scales Neutron in Soft Matter Science flyer The new cyber-enabled collaborative graduate course "Neutrons in Soft Matter Science: Complex...

431

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Subject Matter Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subject Matter Contacts as of June 2012 Subject Matter Contacts Category Primary Secondary Ext. CellPager Aboveground Storage Tanks (Petroleum) Robert Fox 7327 425-0451 Activity...

432

Overview of Pump Systems Matter | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PumpSystemsMatter.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary of 2011 Accomplishments HI & PSM Course Overview Pump Systems Matter Optimization Hydraulic Institute Member Benefits...

433

The Particle Adventure | What is the world made of? | Matter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is electrically negative. Gravity affects matter and antimatter the same way because gravity is not a charged property and a matter particle has the same mass as its...

434

VBZ-0014 - In the Matter of Sandia Corporation | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - In the Matter of Sandia Corporation VBZ-0014 - In the Matter of Sandia Corporation This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss that Sandia Corporation (Sandia)...

435

VBZ-0013 - In the Matter of Sandia Corporation | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - In the Matter of Sandia Corporation VBZ-0013 - In the Matter of Sandia Corporation This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss that Sandia Corporation (Sandia)...

436

EPA's Science Matters Newsletter Puts Spotlight on Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPA's Science Matters Newsletter Puts Spotlight on Climate Change Print E-mail EPA's Science Matters Newsletter Puts Spotlight on Climate Change Friday, July 26, 2013 Featured by...

437

Does Policy Matter? On Governments' Attempts to Control Unwanted Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California, San Diego CCIS Does Policy Matter? OnPaper 112 December 2004 Does Policy Matter? On Governments’geographic proximity does not guarantee the establishment of

Thielemann, Eiko

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Explaining Corporate Environmental Performance: How Does Regulation Matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Performance: How Does Regulation Matter?How and to what extent does regulation matter in shapingof social control, and how does it interact with those

Kagan, Robert A.; Gunningham, Neil; Thornton, Dorothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nanophotonics for tailoring light-matter interaction/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we will theoretically explore three nanophotonics phenomena which enable strong light-matter interaction. The first phenomenon is plasmonic resonance, where the surface plasmon mode at metal and dielectric ...

Qiu, Wenjun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its extreme temperatures and pressures, WDM tends to be drastically transient and thus difficult to study in the laboratory. Now, researchers have set up ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the ALS to measure the electronic structure of WDMs, demonstrating that fast-changing electron temperatures of matter under extreme conditions can be determined with picosecond resolution.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxides particulate matter" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

BNL | QCD Matter, Big Bang Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

QCD Matter QCD Matter image Physicist Paul Sorensen next to the STAR detector at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Exploring Matter at the Dawn of Time Brookhaven Lab leads the world in exploring how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang. At that time, more than 13 billion years ago, there were no protons and neutrons-just a sea of "free" quarks and gluons, fundamental particles whose interactions are governed by nature's strongest force and described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). More than 1,000 scientists from around the nation and the world come to Brookhaven to recreate this "quark-gluon plasma" by accelerating heavy ions (atoms stripped of their electrons) to nearly the speed of light and smashing them together at the Lab's

442

Pump Systems Matter Mission and Vision:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pump Systems Matter Mission and Vision: Pump Systems Matter Mission and Vision: Pump Systems Matter(tm) (PSM) places a primary focus on pump systems education and outreach and addresses energy savings and total cost of pump ownership. Vision: Pump Systems Matter initiative assists North American pump users gain a more competitive business advantage through strategic, broad-based energy management and pump system performance optimization. Mission: To provide the marketplace with tools and collaborative opportunities to integrate pump system performance optimization and efficient energy management practices into normal business operations. Essential Elements: * Build awareness of the benefits of systems optimization and pump system life cycle cost at the management, production and technical levels of companies throughout the supply chain.

443

Energy Matters Mailbag | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Matters Mailbag Energy Matters Mailbag Energy Matters Mailbag July 8, 2011 - 6:21pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Editor's Note: Want to know more about Energy? Whether your seeking tips for saving money, insight on a scientific concept or more details on our policies we invite you to submit your questions via e-mail, Facebook or Twitter for possible inclusion in future editions of our mailbag series. During last week's edition of Energy Matters, Dr. Arun Majumdar discussed what we as a Department are doing to help diversify our energy portfolio, foster new technologies and break our reliance on foreign oil. He also responded to a variety of questions on the subject submitted via e-mail and by our followers on Facebook and Twitter.

444

Energy Matters Mailbag | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Matters Mailbag Matters Mailbag Energy Matters Mailbag July 8, 2011 - 6:21pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Editor's Note: Want to know more about Energy? Whether your seeking tips for saving money, insight on a scientific concept or more details on our policies we invite you to submit your questions via e-mail, Facebook or Twitter for possible inclusion in future editions of our mailbag series. During last week's edition of Energy Matters, Dr. Arun Majumdar discussed what we as a Department are doing to help diversify our energy portfolio, foster new technologies and break our reliance on foreign oil. He also responded to a variety of questions on the subject submitted via e-mail and by our followers on Facebook and Twitter.

445

An Introduction to Soft Matter Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

research world, soft matter materials didn't step into the light as a specific ..... http:/ /www.doitpoms.ac.uk/tlnlib/anisotr opylliguidcrystalsp. hp. 131 http://www.

446

Antigravitation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter - Alternative Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collisional damping of gravitational waves in the Newtonian matter is investigated. The generalized theory of Landau damping is applied to the gravitational physical systems in the context of the plasma gravitational analogy.

Alexeev, Boris V

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Antigravitation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter - Alternative Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collisional damping of gravitational waves in the Newtonian matter is investigated. The generalized theory of Landau damping is applied to the gravitational physical systems in the context of the plasma gravitational analogy.

Boris V. Alexeev

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

The crystallography of three flavor quark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of cold three-flavor quark matter at the large (but not asymptotic) densities relevant to neutron star phenomenology is not resolved. The gapless CFL phase, which was previously believed to have the lowest free ...

Sharma, Rishi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Light Dark Matter Annihilations into Two Photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the pair annihilation cross section of light (spin-0) dark matter particles into two photons and discuss the detectability of the monochromatic line associated with these annihilations.

C. Boehm; J. Orloff; P. Salati

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

ALS Reveals New State of Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a new state of matter embodied by "topological insulators," materials that conduct electricity only on their surfaces. First identified at the ALS in 2007 by a Princeton team led...

451

Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Department, Brookhaven...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qiang Li Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York 11973-5000 (631) 344-4490 qiangli@bnl.gov Education: Iowa State...

452

The C-4 Dark Matter Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract We describe the experimental design of C-4, an expansion of the CoGeNT dark matter search to four identical detectors each approximately three times the mass of the p-type point contact (PPC) germanium diode presently taking data at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Expected reductions of radioactive backgrounds and energy threshold are discussed, including an estimate of the additional sensitivity to low-mass dark matter candidates to be obtained with this search.

Bonicalzi, Ricco; Collar, J. I.; Colaresi, J.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hai, M.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Cory T.; Reid, Douglas J.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wiseman, Clinton G.; Yocum, K. M.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

From nuclear matter to Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron stars are the most dense objects in the observable Universe and conventionally one uses nuclear theory to obtain the equation of state (EOS) of dense hadronic matter and the global properties of these stars. In this work, we review various aspects of nuclear matter within an effective Chiral model and interlink fundamental quantities both from nuclear saturation as well as vacuum properties and correlate it with the star properties.

T. K. Jha

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

454

PSH-12-0083 - In the Matter of In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 - In the Matter of In the Matter of Personnel Security 83 - In the Matter of In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing PSH-12-0083 - In the Matter of In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing On November 14, 2012, an OHA Hearing Officer issued a decision in which he concluded that an individual's security clearance should be restored. A Local Security Office suspended the individual's security clearance for failing to comply with rules regarding the handling of classified information and conduct within limited access areas and for failing to report such non-compliance. This behavior raised security concerns under Criteria G and L. After conducting a hearing and evaluating the documentary and testimonial evidence, the Hearing Officer found that the individual had presented sufficient evidence to resolve these security

455

Measuring the dark matter equation of state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the dominant component of galaxies and clusters remains unknown. While the astrophysics community supports the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm as a clue factor in the current cosmological model, no direct CDM detections have been performed. Faber and Visser 2006 have suggested a simple method for measuring the dark matter equation of state that combines kinematic and gravitational lensing data to test the widely adopted assumption of pressureless dark matter. Following this formalism, we have measured the dark matter equation of state for first time using improved techniques. We have found that the value of the equation of state parameter is consistent with pressureless dark matter within the errors. Nevertheless, the measured value is lower than expected because typically the masses determined with lensing are larger than those obtained through kinematic methods. We have tested our techniques using simulations and we have also analyzed possible sources of error that could invalidate or mimic our results. In the light of this result, we can now suggest that the understanding of the nature of dark matter requires a complete general relativistic analysis.

Ana Laura Serra; Mariano Javier de León Domínguez Romero

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Multifunctional Oxides: Multifunctional Oxides: Synthesis and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy to Explore Magneoelectric Coupling in Multiferroic Oxide Heterostructures: Y-M Sheu1; S. Trugman1; L Yan1; C-P Chuu 1; ...

457

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement performance has not been considered adequately in pavement design. Part of the reason is that the process of asphalt oxidation in pavement is not well understood. This work focused on understanding the asphalt oxidation kinetics and on developing pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation and hardening in pavement under environmental conditions. A number of asphalts were studied in laboratory condition. Based on kinetics data, a fast-rate ? constant-rate asphalt oxidation kinetics model was developed to describe the early nonlinear fast-rate aging period and the later constant-rate period of asphalt oxidation. Furthermore, reaction kinetics parameters for the fast-rate and constant-rate reactions were empirically correlated, leading to a simplified model. And the experimental effort and time to obtain these kinetics parameters were significantly reduced. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanism of asphalt oxidation, two antioxidants were studied on their effectiveness. Asphalt oxidation was not significantly affected. It was found that evaluation of antioxidant effectiveness based on viscosity only is not reliable. The asphalt oxidation kinetics model was incorporated into the pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation in pavement. The pavement oxidation model mimics the oxidation process of asphalt in real mixture at pavement temperatures. A new parameter, diffusion depth, defined the oxygen diffusion region in the mastic. A field calibration factor accounted for the factors not considered in the model such as the effect of small aggregate particles on oxygen diffusion. Carbonyl area and viscosity of binders recovered from field cores of three pavements in Texas were measured and were used for model calibration and validation. Results demonstrated that the proposed model estimates carbonyl growth over time in pavement, layer-by-layer, quite well. Finally, this work can be useful for incorporating asphalt oxidation into a pavement design method that can predict pavement performance with time and for making strategic decisions such as optimal time for maintenance treatments.

Jin, Xin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Hierarchical phase space structure of dark matter haloes: Tidal debris, caustics, and dark matter annihilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most of the mass content of dark matter haloes is expected to be in the form of tidal debris. The density

Bertschinger, Edmund

459

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to