Sample records for oxide polymer porous

  1. Porous polymer media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly crosslinked monolithic porous polymer materials for chromatographic applications. By using solvent compositions that provide not only for polymerization of acrylate monomers in such a fashion that a porous polymer network is formed prior to phase separation but also for exchanging the polymerization solvent for a running buffer using electroosmotic flow, the need for high pressure purging is eliminated. The polymer materials have been shown to be an effective capillary electrochromatographic separations medium at lower field strengths than conventional polymer media. Further, because of their highly crosslinked nature these polymer materials are structurally stable in a wide range of organic and aqueous solvents and over a pH range of 2-12.

  2. Propagation of polymer slugs through porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lecourtier, J.; Chauveteau, G.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an experimental and theoretical study of the mechanisms governing polymer slug propagation through porous media. An analytical model taking into account the macromolecule exclusion from pore walls is proposed to predict rodlike polymer velocity in porous media and thus the spreading out of polydispersed polymer slugs. Under conditions where this wall exclusion is maximum, i.e. at low shear rates and polymer concentrations, the experiments show that xanthan propagation is effectively predicted by this model. At higher flow rates and polymer concentrations, the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion and viscous fingering are analyzed. A new fractionation method for determining molecular weight distribution of polymers used in EOR is proposed.

  3. Photoinitiated grafting of porous polymer monoliths and thermoplastic polymers for microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frechet, Jean M. J. (Oakland, CA); Svec, Frantisek (Alameda, CA); Rohr, Thomas (Leiden, NL)

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfluidic device preferably made of a thermoplastic polymer that includes a channel or a multiplicity of channels whose surfaces are modified by photografting. The device further includes a porous polymer monolith prepared via UV initiated polymerization within the channel, and functionalization of the pore surface of the monolith using photografting. Processes for making such surface modifications of thermoplastic polymers and porous polymer monoliths are set forth.

  4. Experimental and theoretical study of polymer flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorbie, K.S.; Parker, A.; Clifford, P.J.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, an extensive study is presented on the single-phase flow of xanthum/tracer slugs in a consolidated sandstone. The phenomena studied include polymer/tracer dispersion, excluded/inaccessible-volume effects, polymer adsorption, and viscous fingering. In some floods, there is also evidence of nonequilibrium effects. Macroscopic flow equations are derived that include terms to model all the behaviors listed above. A microscopic approach is also developed that describes certain features of polymer flow in porous media semiquantitatively.

  5. Two-Sided Comb Poly(amic ester)Poly(propylene oxide) Graft Copolymers as Porous Polyimide Precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Kenneth

    Two-Sided Comb Poly(amic ester)­Poly(propylene oxide) Graft Copolymers as Porous Polyimide. These polymers were thermally cured to produce polyimide/PPO composites. The thermolysis of these polyimide/ PPO composites yielded porous polyimide films with porosities ranging of 4­22.5%. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  6. Method for dialysis on microchips using thin porous polymer membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Anup K. (San Francisco, CA); Kirby, Brian J. (San Francisco, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced phase-separation polymerization of a porous acrylate polymer is used for in-situ fabrication of dialysis membranes inside glass microchannels. A shaped 355 nm laser beam is used to produce a porous polymer membrane with a thickness of about 15 .mu.m, which bonds to the glass microchannel and forms a semi-permeable membrane. Differential permeation through a membrane formed with pentaerythritol triacrylate was observed and quantified by comparing the response of the membrane to fluorescein and fluorescently tagging 200 nm latex microspheres. Differential permeation was observed and quantified by comparing the response to rhodamine 560 and lactalbumin protein in a membrane formed with SPE-methylene bisacrylamide. The porous membranes illustrate the capability for the present technique to integrate sample cleanup into chip-based analysis systems.

  7. Dialysis on microchips using thin porous polymer membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Anup K. (San Francisco, CA); Kirby, Brian J. (San Francisco, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced phase-separation polymerization of a porous acrylate polymer is used for in-situ fabrication of dialysis membranes inside glass microchannels. A shaped 355 nm laser beam is used to produce a porous polymer membrane with a thickness of about 15 .mu.m, which bonds to the glass microchannel and form a semi-permeable membrane. Differential permeation through a membrane formed with pentaerythritol triacrylate was observed and quantified by comparing the response of the membrane to fluorescein and fluorescently tagging 200 nm latex microspheres. Differential permeation was observed and quantified by comparing the response to rhodamine 560 and lactalbumin protein in a membrane formed with SPE-methylene bisacrylamide. The porous membranes illustrate the capability for the present technique to integrate sample cleanup into chip-based analysis systems.

  8. Randomly charged polymers in porous environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Blavatska; C. von Ferber

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the conformational properties of charged polymers in a solvent in the presence of structural obstacles correlated according to a power law $\\sim x^{-a}$. We work within the continuous representation of a model of linear chain considered as a random sequence of charges $q_i=\\pm q_0$. Such a model captures the properties of polyampholytes -- heteropolymers comprising both positively and negatively charged monomers. We apply the direct polymer renormalization scheme and analyze the scaling behavior of charged polymers up to the first order of an $\\epsilon=6-d$, $\\delta=4-a$-expansion.

  9. An electrochemical route for making porous nickel oxide electrochemical capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, V.; Weidner, J.W. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous nickel oxide films were prepared by electrochemically precipitating nickel hydroxide and heating the hydroxide in air at 300 C. The resulting nickel oxide films behave as an electrochemical capacitor with a specific capacitance of 59 F/g electrode material. These nickel oxide films maintain high utilization at high rates of discharge (i.e., high power density) and have excellent cycle life. Porous cobalt oxide films were also synthesized. Although the specific capacitances of these films are approximately one-fifth that of the nickel oxide films, the results demonstrate the versatility of fabricating a wide range of porous metal oxide films using this electrochemical route for use in capacitor applications. Electrochemical capacitors have generated wide interest in recent years for use in high power applications (e.g., in a hybrid electric vehicle, where they are expected to work in conjunction with a conventional battery).

  10. A dual approach to tuning the porosity of porous organic polymers: controlling the porogen size and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Consequently, the majority of POPs are interpenetrating networks with rela- tively low total pore volumesA dual approach to tuning the porosity of porous organic polymers: controlling the porogen size. Weston, Omar K. Farha,* Joseph T. Hupp* and SonBinh T. Nguyen* Porous organic polymers (POPs

  11. Multiple Regulated Assembly, Crystal Structures and Magnetic Properties of Porous Coordination Polymers with Flexible Ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Song

    polymers, although with inge- nious design, interpenetrated networks can give novel top- ologies and useful Coordination Polymers with Flexible Ligands Chang-Yan Sun,[a] Xiang-Jun Zheng,[a] Song Gao,[b] Li-Cun Li,[c] and Lin-Pei Jin*[a] Keywords: Cobalt / Coordination polymers / Magnetic properties / Nickel / Porous

  12. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI)

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  13. Chemical reduction of a diimide based porous polymer for selective uptake of carbon dioxide versus methanew

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A diimide based porous organic polymer (POP) post-synthetically reduced with lithium metal demonstrates).12 This amorphous material was shown to be permanently porous and robust, maintaining these properties even when a local-dipole­quadrupole interaction with guest CO2; no such interaction is expected with CH4 guests.12

  14. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  15. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  16. Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

  17. Highly efficient carbon dioxide capture with a porous organic polymer impregnated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Highly efficient carbon dioxide capture with a porous organic polymer impregnated environmental crises such as global warming and ocean acidication, efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) capture As CO2 capture mate- rials, numerous solid adsorbents such as silica5 and carbon materials,6 metal

  18. ForPeerReview Hybrid structures of porous silicon and conjugated polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asscher, Micha

    based solar cells suffer from a poor efficiency-to-cost ratio (usually defined in units of $ per k polymers that are suitable for solar cell applications. Meso-porous silicon substrates with relatively compounds require in- terfacing with other semiconductors to create hybrid, thin film solar cells (sometime

  19. Porous polymer film calcium ion chemical sensor and method of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Porter, M.D.; Chau, L.K.

    1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring calcium ions is disclosed wherein a calcium sensitive reagent, calcichrome, is immobilized on a porous polymer film. The reaction of the calcium sensitive reagent to the Ca(II) is then measured and concentration determined as a function of the reaction. 1 figure.

  20. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising laser micromachined porous support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Han (Waltham, MA); LaConti, Anthony B. (Lynnfield, MA); Mittelsteadt, Cortney K. (Natick, MA); McCallum, Thomas J. (Ashland, MA)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a rigid, non-electrically-conducting support, the support preferably being a sheet of polyimide having a thickness of about 7.5 to 15 microns. The support has a plurality of cylindrical pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores, which preferably have a diameter of about 5 microns, are made by laser micromachining and preferably are arranged in a defined pattern, for example, with fewer pores located in areas of high membrane stress and more pores located in areas of low membrane stress. The pores are filled with a first solid polymer electrolyte, such as a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer. A second solid polymer electrolyte, which may be the same as or different than the first solid polymer electrolyte, may be deposited over the top and/or bottom of the first solid polymer electrolyte.

  1. Oxidation of Polymer-derived SiAICN Ceramics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decrease in oxidation rate. Citation: Wang Y, L An, Y Fan, L Zhang, SD Burton, and Z Gan.2005."Oxidation of Polymer-derived SiAICN Ceramics."Journal of the American Ceramic...

  2. ENS'05 Paris, France, 14-16 December 2005 CONTROL POROUS PATTERN OF ANODIC ALUMINUM OXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ENS'05 Paris, France, 14-16 December 2005 CONTROL POROUS PATTERN OF ANODIC ALUMINUM OXIDE BY FOILS simpler, and low cost method to fabricate porous pattern of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) based on the aluminum foils laminate approach were carried out. During our experiments, it was found that the pores

  3. Polymer geometry and Li+ conduction in poly(ethylene oxide)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Averbuch, Amir

    Polymer geometry and Li+ conduction in poly(ethylene oxide) L. Gitelman a , M. Israeli b, , A: Lithium battery Polymer molecule Brownian motion Simulation Conductivity PEO a b s t r a c t We study of the amorphous PE structure is increased by mechanical stretching due to the unraveling of loops in the polymer

  4. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising plasma etched porous support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Han (Waltham, MA); LaConti, Anthony B. (Lynnfield, MA)

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a rigid, non-electrically-conducting support, the support preferably being a sheet of polyimide having a thickness of about 7.5 to 15 microns. The support has a plurality of cylindrical pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores, which preferably have a diameter of about 0.1 to 5 microns, are made by plasma etching and preferably are arranged in a defined pattern, for example, with fewer pores located in areas of high membrane stress and more pores located in areas of low membrane stress. The pores are filled with a first solid polymer electrolyte, such as a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer. A second solid polymer electrolyte, which may be the same as or different than the first solid polymer electrolyte, may be deposited over the top and/or bottom of the first solid polymer electrolyte.

  5. Heterogeneous electrocatalysis in porous cathodes of solid oxide fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Y; Bertei, A; Qi, C; Mohanram, A; Pietras, J D; Bazant, M Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general physics-based model is developed for heterogeneous electrocatalysis in porous electrodes and used to predict and interpret the impedance of solid oxide fuel cells. This model describes the coupled processes of oxygen gas dissociative adsorption and surface diffusion of the oxygen intermediate to the triple phase boundary, where charge transfer occurs. The model accurately captures the Gerischer-like frequency dependence and the oxygen partial pressure dependence of the impedance of symmetric cathode cells. Digital image analysis of the microstructure of the cathode functional layer in four different cells directly confirms the predicted connection between geometrical properties and the impedance response. As in classical catalysis, the electrocatalytic activity is controlled by an effective Thiele modulus, which is the ratio of the surface diffusion length (mean distance from an adsorption site to the triple phase boundary) to the surface boundary layer length (square root of surface diffusivity div...

  6. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Luping (Hoffman Estates, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yuan, Shengwen (Chicago, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  7. Evaluation of charred porous polymers as a method of storm water pollution prevention for shipyards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, G.E.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most shipyards have viable Best Management Practices (BMPs) in place to mitigate the transport of heavy metals to surface waters by storm water. Despite aggressive efforts to control storm water, shipyards have come under increased regulatory pressure to further reduce concentrations of heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, in storm water discharges. The tightening of regulatory requirements warrants research into additional BMPs. The objectives of this research project were to: (1) determine the feasibility of placing a replaceable cartridge of adsorbent material within a storm water collection system; and (2) evaluate two commercially available charred porous polymer adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from storm water. The results indicated that there are commercially available storm water treatment components which could be adapted to house a cartridge of porous adsorbent material.

  8. Polymer-assisted aqueous deposition of metal oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, DeQuan (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic solvent-free process for deposition of metal oxide thin films is presented. The process includes aqueous solutions of necessary metal precursors and an aqueous solution of a water-soluble polymer. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is fired at high temperatures to yield optical quality metal oxide thin films.

  9. A MULTI-LENGTH SCALE APPROACH TO CORRELATING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL POROUS CATHODE MICROSTRUCTURE TO ELECTROCHEMICAL PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    1 A MULTI-LENGTH SCALE APPROACH TO CORRELATING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL POROUS CATHODE MICROSTRUCTURE.....................................................................................................18 2.2 Mixed Conductor SOFC Cathode

  10. Effects of Combustor Rig Exposure on a Porous-Matrix Oxide Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    Effects of Combustor Rig Exposure on a Porous-Matrix Oxide Composite Michael A. Mattoni, James Y combustor on microstructural stability and property retention of an all-oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic combustor rig under conditions that simulate the pertinent heat loads and combustion environ- ments.11

  11. Preparation and electrochemical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes-nickel oxide porous composite for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yanzhen [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang Milin [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: dhyzyz@yahoo.com.cn; Gao Peng [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous nickel oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NiO/MWNTs) composite material was synthesized using sodium dodecyl phenyl sulfate as a soft template and urea as hydrolysis-controlling agent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results show that the as-prepared nickel oxide nanoflakes aggregate to form a submicron ball shape with a porous structure, and the MWNTs with entangled and cross-linked morphology are well dispersed in the porous nickel oxide. The composite shows an excellent cycle performance at a high current of 2 A g{sup -1} and keeps a capacitance retention of about 89% over 200 charge/discharge cycles. A specific capacitance approximate to 206 F g{sup -1} has been achieved with NiO/MWNTs (10 wt.%) in 2 M KOH electrolyte. The electrical conductivity and the active sites for redox reaction of nickel oxide are significantly improved due to the connection of nickel nanoflakes by the long entangled MWNTs.

  12. New porous titanium–niobium oxide for photocatalytic degradation of bromocresol green dye in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaleshtori, Maryam Zarei, E-mail: mzarei@utep.edu [Materials Research and Technology Institute (MRTI), University of Texas at El Paso, 500W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Hosseini, Mahsa; Edalatpour, Roya [Materials Research and Technology Institute (MRTI), University of Texas at El Paso, 500W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Masud, S.M. Sarif [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, 500W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Chianelli, Russell R., E-mail: chianell@utep.edu [Materials Research and Technology Institute (MRTI), University of Texas at El Paso, 500W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The photocatalytic activity of different porous titanium–niobium oxides was evaluated toward degradation of bromocresol green (BG) under UV light. A better catalytic activity was observed for all samples at lower pH. Catalysts have a stronger ability for degradation of BG in acid media than in alkaline media. - Highlights: • Different highly structured titanium–niobium oxides have been prepared using improved methods of synthesis. • Photo-degradation of bromocresol green dye (BG) with nanostructure titanium–niobium oxide catalysts was carried out under UV light. • The photo-catalytic activity of all catalysts was higher in lower pH. • Titanium–niobium oxide catalysts are considerably stable and reusable. - Abstract: In this study, high surface area semiconductors, non porous and porous titanium–niobium oxides derived from KTiNbO{sub 5} were synthesized, characterized and developed for their utility as photocatalysts for decontamination with sunlight. These materials were then used in the photocatalytic degradation of bromocresol green dye (BG) in aqueous solution using UV light and their catalytic activities were evaluated at various pHs. For all catalysts, the photocatalytic degradation of BG was most efficient in acidic solutions. Results show that the new porous oxides have large porous and high surface areas and high catalytic activity. A topotactic dehydration treatment greatly improves catalyst performance at various pHs. Stability and long term activity of porous materials (topo and non-topo) in photocatalysis reactions was also tested. These results suggest that the new materials can be used to efficiently purify contaminated water.

  13. Fabrication and testing of oxidized porous silicon field emitter strips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madduri, Vasanta Bhanu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanism. Formation by Local Dissolution of Silicon Unagami proposed [29] that the formation of porous silicon occurs due to the dissolution of silicon at places restricted by a surface porous film and silicic acid formed during the dissolution reaction... anodized in the presence of HF electmlyte. The silicon wafer divides the electrochemical cell into front and rear half cells. Each of the cells was filled with the electrolyte which is a mixture of 1. 5:1 hydroflouric acid and ethanol. Ethanol is used...

  14. Author's personal copy Porous layered oxide/Nafion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    transport through membranes for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. Ó 2008 Elsevier Inc. All September 2008 Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) Polyelectrolyte exchange membrane (PEM) Porous for conduction through the PEM. In particular, the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) utilizes methanol as the fuel

  15. An Experimental Study of Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Permeable Porous Media Using Polymer-Enhanced Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. One possible cause for premature chromate breakthrough is associated with the presence of high-permeability zones in the aquifer. In these zones, groundwater moves relatively fast and is able to oxidize iron more rapidly. There is also a possibility that the high-permeability flow paths are deficient in reducing equivalents (e.g. reactive iron), required for barrier performance. One way enhancement of the current barrier reductive capacity can be achieved is by the addition of micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer. The potential emplacement of zero-valent iron (Fe0) into high-permeability Hanford sediments (Ringold Unit E gravels) using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers was investigated in three-dimensional wedge-shaped aquifer models. Polymers were used to create a suspension viscous enough to keep the Fe0 in solution for extended time periods to improve colloid movement into the porous media without causing a permanent detrimental decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Porous media were packed in the wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone in between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel surrounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments.

  16. Highly Conductive and Porous Activated Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for High-Power Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Highly Conductive and Porous Activated Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for High-Power Supercapacitors for a free-standing carbon film reported to date. A two-electrode supercapacitor using these carbon films. KEYWORDS: Graphene, flexible film, chemical activation, supercapacitors Free-standing thin film materials

  17. Porous anodic aluminum oxide scaffolds; formation mechanisms and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Jihun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) can be created with pores that self-assemble into ordered configurations. Nanostructured metal oxides have proven to be very useful as scaffolds for growth of nanowires and nanotubes ...

  18. Solid oxide fuel cells having porous cathodes infiltrated with oxygen-reducing catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Meilin; Liu, Ze; Liu, Mingfei; Nie, Lifang; Mebane, David Spencer; Wilson, Lane Curtis; Surdoval, Wayne

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-oxide fuel cells include an electrolyte and an anode electrically coupled to a first surface of the electrolyte. A cathode is provided, which is electrically coupled to a second surface of the electrolyte. The cathode includes a porous backbone having a porosity in a range from about 20% to about 70%. The porous backbone contains a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) of a first material infiltrated with an oxygen-reducing catalyst of a second material different from the first material.

  19. Penetrating the Oxide Barrier in Situ and Separating Freestanding Porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as polycarbonate membranes, well-fabricated anodic alumina oxide (AAO) membranes possess a much higher pore conducting substrate in applications such as dc electrodeposition of nanowires and * To whom correspondence

  20. Fabrication and testing of oxidized porous silicon field emitter strips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madduri, Vasanta Bhanu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fig. 1 Cross-section of Thin-film Field Emission Structure (After Spindt, et al. [7] ). Mo Silicon dioxide Silicon substrate Axis of rotation ~' Evaporant Aluminum release layer Mo SiO Si Evaporant Deposition for cone formation Etch off... release layer Fig. 2 Fabrication Procedure to Produce Mo Cones silicon substrates with 1-1, 5 pm of thermally grown oxide on them. Holes of 1. 5-2 ltm diameter are micro-machined in the oxide layer using electron beam lithography. Mo serves as an etch...

  1. Electrochemical fabrication and optical properties of porous tin oxide films with structural colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Hua; Shu, Shiwei; Lee, Chris; Zeng, Shanshan [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong); Lu, Zhouguang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: yangli@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Centre for Advanced Structural Materials, City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, 8 Yuexing 1st Road, Shenzhen Hi-Tech Industrial Park, Nanshan District, Shenzhen (China); Li, Yang Yang, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: yangli@cityu.edu.hk [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong); City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, 8 Yuexing 1st Road, Shenzhen Hi-Tech Industrial Park, Nanshan District, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals with porous features not only provide the capability to control light but also enable structural colors that are environmentally sensitive. Here, we report a novel kind of tin oxide-based photonic crystal featuring periodically arranged air pores fabricated by the periodic anodization of tin foil. The existence of a photonic band gap in the fabricated structure is verified by its vivid color, and its reflective spectra which are responsive to environmental stimuli. Furthermore, the sample colors (i.e., the photonic band gap positions) can be easily adjusted by manipulating the anodization parameters. The theoretical modeling results of these tin oxide photonic crystals agree well with the reported experimental ones.

  2. Correlation between the Indium Tin Oxide morphology and the performances of polymer light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : This paper reports on performance enhancement of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) based on poly(2,5-bis. Keywords : Polymer light emitting diode; Indium tin oxide; Atomic force microscopy; Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy 1. Introduction Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) have received worldwide

  3. Porous materials by design. Plasma oxidation of hydrocarbon templates in polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Buss, R.J.; Assink, R.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Shea, K.J.; Oviatt, H. (California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arylene- and alkylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by sol-gel processing of bis(triethoxysilyl)-aryl monomers and decyl monomer. The arylene polysilsesquioxanes were porous materials with surface areas as high as 830 m[sup 2]/g (BET). Treatment with an inductively coupled oxygen plasma resulted in the near quantitative removal of the arylene bridging groups and a coarsening of the pore structure. Solid state [sup 29]Si NMR was used to confirm the conversion of the sesquioxane silicons (T) to silica (Q). The decylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane was a non-porous material. Oxygen plasma treatment afforded a silica gel with a surface area of 294 m[sup 2]/g and a mean pore diameter of 46 [Angstrom]. The porosity in the silica gel appears to arise entirely from the oxidation of the 1,10-decylene spacer.

  4. Porous materials by design. Plasma oxidation of hydrocarbon templates in polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Buss, R.J.; Assink, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shea, K.J.; Oviatt, H. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arylene- and alkylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by sol-gel processing of bis(triethoxysilyl)-aryl monomers and decyl monomer. The arylene polysilsesquioxanes were porous materials with surface areas as high as 830 m{sup 2}/g (BET). Treatment with an inductively coupled oxygen plasma resulted in the near quantitative removal of the arylene bridging groups and a coarsening of the pore structure. Solid state {sup 29}Si NMR was used to confirm the conversion of the sesquioxane silicons (T) to silica (Q). The decylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane was a non-porous material. Oxygen plasma treatment afforded a silica gel with a surface area of 294 m{sup 2}/g and a mean pore diameter of 46 {Angstrom}. The porosity in the silica gel appears to arise entirely from the oxidation of the 1,10-decylene spacer.

  5. Porous materials by design. Plasma oxidation of hydrocarbon templates in polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Buss, R.J.; Assink, R.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shea, K.J.; Oviatt, H. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arylene- and alkylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by sol-gel processing of bis (triethoxysilyl)-aryl monomers 1-4 and decyl monomer 5. The arylene polysilsesquioxanes were porous materials with surface areas as high as 830 m{sup 2}/g (BET). Treatment with an inductively coupled oxygen plasma resulted in the near quantitative removal of the arylene bridging groups and a coarsening of the pore structure. Solid state {sup 29}Si NMR was used to confirm the conversion of the sesquioxane silicons (T) to silica (Q). The decylene-bridged polysilsesquinoxane was non-porous materials. Oxygen plasma treatment afforded a silica gel with a surface area of 294 m{sup 2}/g and a mean pore diameter of 46 {angstrom}. The porosity in the silica gel appears to arise entirely from the oxidation of the 1,10-decylene spacer.

  6. Entropically Driven Partitioning of Ethylene Oxide Oligomers and Polymers in Aqueous/ Organic Biphasic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    Entropically Driven Partitioning of Ethylene Oxide Oligomers and Polymers in Aqueous/ Organic; In Final Form: June 19, 2002 Partitioning of ethylene oxide oligomers and polymers (PEO) in biphasic unit, smaller than hydration numbers reported in aqueous solutions. All of these findings lead

  7. anisotropic porous layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Highly Porous Catalytic Layers for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Based on Carbon Aerogels Physics Websites Summary: Synthesis of Highly Porous Catalytic Layers for Polymer...

  8. Porous acicular mullite obtained by controlled oxidation of waste molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu?evac, Dušan, E-mail: bucevac@vinca.rs [Vin?a Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Dap?evi?, Aleksandra [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, Belgrade 11120 (Serbia); Maksimovi?, Vesna [Vin?a Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Waste MoSi{sub 2} heating elements were used as starting material for fabrication of porous acicular mullite. • Calcined MoSi{sub 2} powder was source of SiO{sub 2} and pore former at the same time. • Porous acicular mullite is promising material for filtration of diesel engine exhaust. • Samples with decent mechanical integrity and porosity of more than 60% were fabricated. - Abstract: Porous acicular mullite was fabricated by using waste MoSi{sub 2} heating element and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Careful calcination of the pulverized heating element led to the formation of a mixture of MoO{sub 3} and amorphous SiO{sub 2}. This mixture was employed as both SiO{sub 2} precursor and pore former. The oxidation of MoSi{sub 2} and mullite formation were studied. The effect of fabrication temperature on phase composition, porosity, grain morphology, and compressive strength of sintered mullite was examined. Pure mullite with porosity of more than 60% and compressive strength of ?20 MPa was obtained at temperature as low as 1300 °C. The microstructure consisted of elongated, rectangular, prism-like grains which are known to be effective in filtration of diesel engine exhaust. The increase in sintering temperature caused the change of grain morphology and reduction in compressive strength.

  9. Tubular solid oxide fuel cells with porous metal supports and ceramic interconnections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Kevin (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell structure capable of operating at from 600.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. having a very thin porous hollow elongated metallic support tube having a thickness from 0.10 mm to 1.0 mm, preferably 0.10 mm to 0.35 mm, a porosity of from 25 vol. % to 50 vol. % and a tensile strength from 700 GPa to 900 GPa, which metallic tube supports a reduced thickness air electrode having a thickness from 0.010 mm to 0.2 mm, a solid oxide electrolyte, a cermet fuel electrode, a ceramic interconnection and an electrically conductive cell to cell contact layer.

  10. The development of a high-throughput gradient array apparatus for the study of porous polymer networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Weisz, Michael (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Schiele, Kris (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gradient array apparatus was constructed for the study of porous polymers produced using the process of chemically-induced phase separation (CIPS). The apparatus consisted of a 60 element, two-dimensional array in which a temperature gradient was placed in the y-direction and composition was varied in the x-direction. The apparatus allowed for changes in opacity of blends to be monitored as a function of temperature and cure time by taking images of the array with time. The apparatus was validated by dispense a single blend composition into all 60 wells of the array and curing them for 24 hours and doing the experiment in triplicate. Variations in micron scale phase separation were readily observed as a function of both curing time and temperature and there was very good well-to-well consistency as well as trial-to-trial consistency. Poragen of samples varying with respect to cure temperature was removed and SEM images were obtained. The results obtained showed that cure temperature had a dramatic affect on sample morphology, and combining data obtained from visual observations made during the curing process with SEM data can enable a much better understanding of the CIPS process and provide predictive capability through the relatively facile generation of composition-process-morphology relationships. Data quality could be greatly enhanced by making further improvements in the apparatus. The primary improvements contemplated include the use of a more uniform light source, an optical table, and a CCD camera with data analysis software. These improvements would enable quantification of the amount of scattered light generated from individual elements as a function of cure time. In addition to the gradient array development, porous composites were produced by incorporating metal particles into a blend of poragen, epoxy resin, and crosslinker. The variables involved in the experiment were metal particle composition, primary metal particle size, metal concentration, and poragen composition. A total of 16 different porous composites were produced and characterized using SEM. In general, the results showed that pore morphology and the distribution of metal particles was dependent on multiple factors. For example, the use of silver nanoparticles did not significantly affect pore morphology for composites derived from decanol as the poragen, but exceptionally large pores were obtained with the use of decane as the poragen. With regard to the effect of metal particle size, silver nanoparticles were essentially exclusively dispered in the polymer matrix while silver microparticles were found in pores. For nickel particles, both nanoparticles and microparticles were largely dispersed in the polymer matrix and not in the pores.

  11. Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of conductive polymers for use in novel photovoltaic device architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howden, Rachel M. (Rachel Mary)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), (PEDOT), deposited via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) has been investigated for use in organic electronic devices. The oCVD process as well as the ...

  12. Synthesis of Highly Porous Catalytic Layers for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Based on Carbon Aerogels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aerogels J. Mariea , S. Berthon-Fabrya , P. Acharda , M. Chatenetb , E. Chainetb , R. Pirardc , N. Cornetd and characterized carbon aerogels which exhibit high surface area, high porous volume and adjustable pore carbon aerogels with 2 different Nafion loadings. Finally, we characterized the structure

  13. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basoli, Francesco [Universitŕ degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy] [Universitŕ degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy; Senesi, Roberto [ORNL] [ORNL; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL] [ORNL; Licoccia, Silvia [NAST Center, University of Roma "Tor Vergata"] [NAST Center, University of Roma "Tor Vergata"

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  14. Studies on phenol-formaldehyde crosslinked polymer gels in bulk and in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albonico, P.; Bartosek, M.; Malandrino, A.; Bryant, S.; Lockhart, T.P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general conditions for gel formation by phenol-formaldehyde polymer solutions have been examined in studies with three acrylamide polymers. Contrary to an earlier report, polymer crosslinking is found to take place over a wide interval of pH. While the gelation time is relatively insensitive to the concentrations of phenol and formaldehyde or pH, it is strongly influenced by the temperature and the nature of the polymer. These gelants display good infectivity in corefloods and slim-tube experiments at temperatures up to 140 C. On the other hand, the partitioning of phenol into crude oil is found to be a significant issue for the propagation of these gelants. The use of a phenol pre-flush of the formation is shown by numerical modeling to be a potentially viable solution for this problem.

  15. List of Journal Publications (updated April 2014) R. Justin, B. Chen*: Strong and conductive polymer-reduced graphene oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ojovan, Michael

    polymer-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for transdermal drug deliveyr. Journal of Materials*: Characterisation and drug release performance of biodegradable chitosan-graphene oxide nanocomposites. Carbohydrate Polymers. 2014, 103, 70-80. · R. Justin, B. Chen*: Body temperature reduction of graphene oxide through

  16. Diorganosilacetylene-alt-diorganosilvinylene polymers and a process densifying porous silicon-carbide bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Pang, Y.

    1994-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides linear organosilicon polymers including acetylene and vinylene moieties, and a process for their preparation. These diorganosilacetylene-alt-diorganosilvinylene linear polymers can be represented by the formula: --[--(R[sup 1])(R[sup 2])Si--C[triple bond]C-(R[sup 3])(R[sup 4])Si--CH[double bond]CH--][sub n]--, wherein n[>=]2; and each R[sup 1], R[sup 2], R[sup 3], and R[sup 4] is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, halogen, alkyl, alkenyl, aryl, and aralkyl radicals. The polymers are soluble in organic solvents, air stable, and can be pulled into fibers or cast into films. They can be thermally converted into silicon carbide ceramic materials.

  17. The measurement of the shear modulus for polymer porous layer with two microphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to sound-absorbing materials, such as glass wool and plastic foams, for noise control applications without any mechanical excitation. Keywords : polymer foam; shear modulus; biot-johnson-allard theory impedance in normal incidence. The layered media is an impervious plate fixed on thin acoustic foam backed

  18. Slow dynamics of nanocomposite polymer aerogels as revealed by X-ray photocorrelation spectroscopy (XPCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernández, Rebeca, E-mail: rhernandez@ictp.csic.es, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Mijangos, Carmen [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, ICTP-CSIC, Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, ICTP-CSIC, Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nogales, Aurora, E-mail: rhernandez@ictp.csic.es, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sprung, Michael [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a novel slow dynamics of polymer xerogels, aerogels, and nanocomposite aerogels with iron oxide nanoparticles, as revealed by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The polymer aerogel and its nanocomposite aerogels, which are porous in nature, exhibit hyper-diffusive dynamics at room temperature. In contrast, non-porous polymer xerogels exhibit an absence of this peculiar dynamics. This slow dynamical process has been assigned to a relaxation of the characteristic porous structure of these materials and not to the presence of nanoparticles.

  19. Polyphosphazine-based polymer materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V.; Avci, Recep; Groenewold, Gary S.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  20. acid polymers highly: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Highly Porous Catalytic Layers for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Based on Carbon Aerogels Physics Websites Summary: Synthesis of Highly Porous Catalytic Layers for Polymer...

  1. Detecting Hazardous Gas Analytes Using Porous Silicon Sensors Coated with Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Eddie Goude, University of Florida Georgia Tech SURF 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Detecting Hazardous Gas Analytes Using Porous Silicon Sensors Coated with Metal Oxide Nanoparticles oxide coatings and the Hard-Soft Acid-Base concept. This sensor is proposed to be a new, nanotechnology for this experiment, p-type and n-type. The wafers were first coated with silicon carbide and then etched with a mask

  2. Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT) [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  3. Inorganic metal oxide/organic polymer nanocomposites and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal inorganic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophillic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the composite material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  4. Inorganic Metal Oxide/Organic Polymer Nanocomposites And Method Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Simpson, Randy (Livermore, CA)

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal in organic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophilic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  5. Effect of electron collecting metal oxide layer in normal and inverted structure polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, A.; Liu, X.; Sun, Y. C.; Djuriši?, A. B. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, P. R. (China); Ng, A. M. C. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, P. R. China and Nanostructure Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, Division of Physical Sciences, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen (China); Chan, W. K. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, P. R. (China)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a systematic study of the effect of electron collecting metal oxide layer on the performance of P3HT: PCBM solar cells. Zinc oxide (ZnO) or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) buffer layers were prepared by either e-beam evaporation or solution processing method. We also compared the photovoltaic performance of inserting the buffer layer between indium tin oxide (ITO) and the polymer layer for the inverted structure (ITO/ ZnO or TiO{sub 2}/P3HT:PCBM/V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Au) as well as inserting the buffers layers between the polymer and the aluminum electrode for the conventional structure (ITO/V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/P3HT:PCBM/ZnO or TiO{sub 2}/Al). The results are shown in detail.

  6. Initiation of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on polymer substrates by water plasma pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Brandt, E.; Grace, Jeremy M. [Eastman Kodak Company, 1999 Lake Avenue, Rochester, New York 14650-2022 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of surface hydroxyl content in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide (AO) on polymers is demonstrated by performing an atomic layer deposition of AO onto a variety of polymer types, before and after pretreatment in a plasma struck in water vapor. The treatment and deposition reactions are performed in situ in a high vacuum chamber that is interfaced to an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer to prevent adventitious exposure to atmospheric contaminants. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to follow the surface chemistries of the polymers, including theformation of surface hydroxyls and subsequent growth of AO by ALD. Using dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide and water as reactants, ALD is obtained for water-plasma-treated poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN). For PS, PP, and PEN, initial growth rates of AO on the native (untreated) polymers are at least an order of magnitude lower than on the same polymer surface following the plasma treatment. By contrast, native PVA is shown to initiate ALD of AO as a result of the presence of intrinsic surface hydroxyls that are derived from the repeat unit of this polymer.

  7. Integrated feature scale modeling of plasma processing of porous and solid SiO2 . II. Residual fluorocarbon polymer stripping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    fluorocarbon polymer stripping and barrier layer deposition Arvind Sankarana) Department of Chemical from trenches following etching using fluorocarbon plasmas and the deposition of a continuous barrier these issues, reactions mechanisms for plasma stripping of fluorocarbon polymer using oxygen containing plasmas

  8. Porous Materials Porous Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Porous Materials x Porous Materials · Physical properties * Characteristic impedance p = p 0 e -jk xa- = vej[ ] p x - j ; Zc= p ve = c ka 0k = c 1-j #12;2 Porous Materials · Specific acoustic impedance Porous Materials · Finite thickness ­ blocked p e + -jk (x-d)a p e - jk (x-d)a d x #12

  9. Porous Materials -Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ShellsSnow Coral SoilBoneLungs Lemons #12;Artificial Porous Materials Insulation Cake Concrete BreadPorous Materials -Metal-Organic Frameworks 2012 Nanocamp NCMN, UNL Dr. Jian Zhang & Jacob Johnson-organic Frameworks Porous polymer networks #12;Porous Materials in Nature Sandstones Sea Sponge Butterfly Wings Egg

  10. Reduced bleaching in organic nanofibers by bilayer polymer/oxide coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavares, L.; Kjelstrup-Hansen, J.; Rubahn, H.-G. [NanoSyd, Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Alsion 2, DK-6400 Soenderborg (Denmark); Sturm, H. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) molecules exhibit a characteristic photoinduced reaction (bleaching) resulting in a decrease in luminescence intensity upon UV light exposure, which could render the technological use of the nanofibers problematic. In order to investigate the photoinduced reaction in nanofibers, optical bleaching experiments have been performed by irradiating both pristine and coated nanofibers with UV light. Oxide coating materials (SiO{sub x} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were applied onto p-6P nanofibers. These treatments caused a reduction in the bleaching reaction but in addition, the nanofiber luminescence spectrum was significantly altered. It was observed that some polymer coatings [a statistical copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene and 2,2-bis-trifluoromethyl-4,5-difluoro-1,3-dioxole, P(TFE-PDD), and poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA] do not interfere with the luminescence spectrum from the p-6P but are not effective in stopping the bleaching. Bilayer coatings with first a polymer material, which should work as a protection layer to avoid modifications of the p-6P luminescence spectrum, and second an oxide layer used as oxygen blocker were tested and it was found that a particular bilayer polymer/oxide combination results in a significant reduction in bleaching without affecting significantly the emission spectrum from the nanofibers.

  11. Mullite/Alumina Mixtures for Use as Porous Matrices in Oxide Fiber Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    ceramic composites. Conditions for the deflection of a matrix crack at a fiber-matrix interface are used particle mixtures of mullite and alumina are assessed as candidate matrixes for use in porous matrix to identify the combinations of modulus and toughness of the fibers and the matrix for which damage

  12. Polymer sphere lithography for solid oxide fuel cells: a route to functional, well-defined electrode structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polymer sphere lithography for solid oxide fuel cells: a route to functional, well. Introduction Dramatic breakthroughs in the materials, particularly electrode materials, for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been reported in recent years.1­3 Fundamental understanding of the electro- catalytic

  13. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Liming [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Fu, Honggang, E-mail: fuhg@vip.sina.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g{sup ?1} Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 457.92 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}. After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g{sup ?1} Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance.

  14. Tungsten oxide-Prussian blue electrochromic system based on a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, K.C.; Rukavina, T.G.; Greenberg, C.B. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Glass Technology Center)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new solid-state electrochromic system is presented. It is transparent and is comprised of a tungsten oxide and Prussian blue (PB) thin film couple in combination with a proton-conducting, solid polymer electrolyte. This electrochromic system exhibits rapid and deep optical switching; characteristics of a complementary configuration, both electrochromic films color and bleach in phase. Complementary electrochromic cells with the tungsten oxide-PB couple have previously been based on Li[sup +] or K[sup +]-conducting electrolytes. A repetitively cycling cell has not previously been reported with a proton-conducting solid polymer electrolyte. The devices were operated at low applied voltages, +1.2 V to darken and [minus]0.6 V to bleach. Repeated reduction and oxidation of the current system over 20,000 cycles has been demonstrated, indicating a large number of switchings without great degradation or irreversible side reactions. The sustained, high overall coloration efficiency of the devices suggests the insertion/extraction of protons into and out of both WO[sub 3] and PB films. The effects of cell size and operating temperature on the switching response are discussed.

  15. Synthesis of a Novel Porous Polymer/Ceramic Composite Material by Low-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven M.

    48667 Peng Li Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, UniVersity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 ReceiVed May 25, 2007. ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed August 10, 2007 Highly porous poly, such as an interconnected pore structure, large surface area, and small pore size. Ideally, tissue engineering materials

  16. Semipermeable polymers and method for producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buschmann, Wayne E. (Boulder, CO)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A polyamide membrane comprising reaction product of an anhydrous solution comprising an anhydrous solvent, at least one polyfunctional secondary amine and a pre-polymer deposition catalyst; and an anhydrous, organic solvent solution comprising a polyfunctional aromatic amine-reactive reactant comprising one ring. A composite semipermeable membrane comprising the polyamide membrane on a porous support. A method of making a composite semipermeable membrane by coating a porous support with an anhydrous solution comprising an anhydrous solvent, a polyfunctional secondary amine and a pre-polymer deposition catalyst, to form an activated pre-polymer layer on the porous support and contacting the activated pre-polymer layer with an anhydrous, organic solvent solution comprising a polyfunctional amine-reactive reactant to interfacially condense the amine-reactive reactant with the polyfunctional secondary amine, thereby forming a cross-linked, interfacial polyamide layer on the porous support. A method of impregnating a composite semipermeable membrane with nanoparticles selected from heavy metals and/or oxides of heavy metals.

  17. Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  18. Porous light-emitting compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, Thomas Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Bauer, Eve (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Alexander H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-emitting devices are prepared by coating a porous substrate using a polymer-assisted deposition process. Solutions of metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for metal precursor were coated onto porous substrates. The coated substrates were heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere. The result was a substrate with a conformal coating that did not substantially block the pores of the substrate.

  19. Lewis acid–base interactions enhance explosives sensing in silacycle polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Jason C.; DiPasquale, Antonio G.; Mrse, Anthony A.; Trogler, William C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed rigid pentiptycene polymers that are porous inexplosives into the polymer structure. Ad- sorption isof conjugated organic polymers in a commercial instrument

  20. Pyrite oxidation in saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media Flow: AComparison of alternative mathematical modeling approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; White, Stephen P.; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is one of the most common naturally occurring minerals that is present in many subsurface environments. It plays an important role in the genesis of enriched ore deposits through weathering reactions, is the most abundant sulfide mineral in many mine tailings, and is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. The pyrite oxidation reaction serves as a prototype for oxidative weathering processes with broad significance for geoscientific, engineering, and environmental applications. Mathematical modeling of these processes is extremely challenging because aqueous concentrations of key species vary over an enormous range, oxygen inventory and supply are typically small in comparison to pyrite inventory, and chemical reactions are complex, involving kinetic control and microbial catalysis. We present the mathematical formulation of a general multi-phase advective-diffusive reactive transport model for redox processes. Two alternative implementations were made in the TOUGHREACT and TOUGH2-CHEM simulation codes which use sequential iteration and simultaneous solution, respectively. The simulators are applied to reactive consumption of pyrite in (1) saturated flow of oxidizing water, and (2) saturated-unsaturated flow in which oxygen transport occurs in both aqueous and gas phases. Geochemical evolutions predicted from different process models are compared, and issues of numerical accuracy and efficiency are discussed.

  1. Nanostructure and Shape Control in Polymer-Ceramic Hybrids from Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-Poly(hexyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    #12;Nanostructure and Shape Control in Polymer-Ceramic Hybrids from Poly(ethylene oxide: amphiphiles; block copolymers; morphology; nanocomposites; structure-directing agent Introduction The study of amphiphilic block copolymer-derived, organic- inorganic hybrid materials is an emerging research field

  2. Improved porous mixture of molybdenum nitride and tantalum oxide as a charge storage material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, C.Z.; Pynenburg, R.A.J.; Tsai, K.C. [Pinnacle Research Inst., Inc., Los Gatos, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High surface area {gamma}-molybdenum nitride has shown promise as a charge storage material. The addition of amorphous tantalum oxide to the molybdenum nitride system not only improves the film cohesion tremendously, but also widens the voltage stability window from 0.8 to 1.1 V. This occurs without adversely effecting the capacitance. Ultracapacitors, also called supercapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, are high power storage devices which have found application in products as diverse as cardiac pacemakers, cellular phones, electric vehicles, and air bags.

  3. Ring Walking/Oxidative Addition Reactions for the Controlled Synthesis of Conjugated Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazan, Guillermo C

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Power conversion efficiencies of plastic solar cells depend strongly on the molecular weight characteristics of the semiconducting polymers used for their fabrication. The synthesis of these materials typically relies on transition metal mediated catalytic reactions. In many instances, the ideal structures cannot be attained because of deficiencies in these reactions, particularly when it comes to being able to achieve high number average molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. Another important conjugated polymer structure of interest is one in which a single functional group is attached at the end group of the chain. Such systems would be ideal for modifying surface properties at interfaces and for labeling biomolecular probes used in fluorescent biosensors. To respond to the challenges above, our efforts have centered on the design of homogenous transition metal complexes that are easy to prepare and effective in carrying out living, or quasi-living, condensative chain polymerization reactions. The key mechanistic challenge for the success of this reaction is to force the insertion of one monomer unit at a time via a process that involves migration of the transition metal-containing fragment to one terminus of the polymer chain. Chain growth characteristics are therefore favored when the metal does not dissociate from the newly formed reductive elimination product. We have proposed that dissociation is disfavored by the formation of a Ď?-complex, in which the metal can sample various locations of the electronically delocalized framework, a process that we term â??ring-walkingâ?ť, and find the functionality where oxidative addition takes place. Success has been achieved in the nickel-mediated cross coupling reaction of Grignard reagents with aromatic halides by using bromo[1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane]phenylnickel. This reagent can yield poly(thiophene)s (one of the most widely used type of polymer in plastic solar cells) with excellent stereoregularity and molecular weight distributions with polydispersities that are consistent with a living polymerization sequence. Another important objective of this program concerned the use of these new catalysts and improved mechanistic insight for the synthesis of specific polymeric materials with prespecified properties.

  4. Peculiarities of formation of phase composition, porous structure, and catalytic properties of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials fabricated by sol–gel synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papynov, Evgeniy Konstantinovich, E-mail: Papynov@mail.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Natural Sciences, Suhanova, 8, Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation); Mayorov, Vitaliy Yurevich, E-mail: 024205@inbox.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Palamarchuk, Marina Sergeevna, E-mail: 02.06.1984@mail.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Avramenko, Valentin Aleksandrovich, E-mail: avramenko1@yandex.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Natural Sciences, Suhanova, 8, Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of template sol–gel synthesis of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials using ‘core–shell’ latex particles as colloid templates is described. The chemical composition and structural characteristics of the synthesized macroporous oxide systems have been investigated. The peculiarities of formation of material phase composition and macroporous structure under different template thermal destruction conditions have been revealed. An optimal method of a targeted synthesis of the crystalline tungsten(VI) oxide having a defect-free macroporous structure (average pore size 160 nm) and efficient catalytic properties under organic liquid phase oxidation conditions has been suggested. The prospects of the fabricated material application as catalysts of hydrothermal oxidation of radionuclide organic complexes at radioactive waste decontamination have been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Macroporous tungsten oxides were fabricated via sol–gel process. • The correlation between synthesis conditions and composition was determined. • Influence of synthesis conditions on porous structure has been explained. • The effects of template thermodestruction have been set up. • High potential of such materials for catalysis applications has been shown.

  5. In situ derivation of sulfur activated TiO{sub 2} nano porous layers through pulse-micro arc oxidation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayati, M.R., E-mail: mbayati@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golestani-Fard, F. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-195, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moshfegh, A.Z. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Molaei, Roya [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} S-TiO{sub 2} layers were grown by MAO technique under pulse current for the first time. {yields} Effect of growth parameters on chemical composition, topography, and morphology of the layers was studied. {yields} A correlation between photocatalytic performance and growth conditions was proposed. -- Abstract: Micro arc oxidation technique, as a facile and efficient process, was employed to grow sulfur doped titania porous layers. This research sheds light on the photocatalytic performance of the micro arc oxidized S-TiO{sub 2} nano-porous layers fabricated under pulse current. Morphological and topographical studies, performed by SEM and AFM techniques, revealed that increasing the frequency and/or decreasing the duty cycle resulted in formation of finer pores and smoother surfaces. XRD and XPS results showed that the layers consisted of anatase and rutile phases whose fraction was observed to change depending on the synthesis conditions. The highest anatase relative content was obtained at the frequency of 500 Hz and the duty cycle of 5%. Furthermore, photocatalytic activity of the layers was examined by measuring the decomposition rate of methylene blue under both ultraviolet and visible photo irradiations. Maximum photodegradation reaction rate constants over the pulse-grown S-TiO{sub 2} layers were respectively measured as 0.0202 and 0.0110 min{sup -1} for ultraviolet and visible irradiations.

  6. In situ Foaming of Porous (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.98} (Co{sub 0.2} Fe{sub 0.8}) O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF) Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandavarapu, Sodith; Sabolsky, Edward; Sabolsky, Katarzyna; Gerdes, Kirk

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A binder system containing polyurethane precursors was used to in situ foam (direct foam) a (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.98} (Co{sub 0.2} Fe{sub 0.8}) O{sub 3-{#2;delta}} (LSCF) composition for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode applications. The relation between in situ foaming parameters on the final microstructure and electrochemical properties was characterized by microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. The optimal porous cathode architecture was formed with a 70 vol% solids loading within a polymer precursor composition with a volume ratio of 8:4:1 (isocyanate: PEG: surfactant) in a terpineol-based ink vehicle. The resultant microstructure displayed a broad pore size distribution with highly elongated pore structure.

  7. Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of semiconducting polymers and their use In organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrelli, David Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have received significant interest for their potential low cost, high mechanical flexibility, and unique functionalities. OPVs employing semiconducting polymers in the photoactive layer have ...

  8. Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

  9. The Chemical Behavior and Degradation Mitigation Effect of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Perfluorosulfonic Acid Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearman, Benjamin P [ORNL; Mohajeri, Nahid [ORNL; Slattery, Darlene [Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); Hampton, Michael [University of Florida; Seal, Sudipta [University of Central Florida; Cullen, David A [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, the polymer of choice for polymer electrolyte hydrogen fuel cells, are susceptible to degradation due to attacks on polymer chains from radicals. Mitigation of this attack by cerium-based radical scavengers is an approach that has shown promise. In this work, two formulations of single-crystal cerium oxide nanoparticles, with an order of magnitude difference in particle size, are incorporated into said membranes and subjected to proton conductivity measurements and ex-situ durability tests. We found that ceria is reduced to Ce(III) ions in the acidic environment of a heated, humidified membrane which negatively impacts proton conductivity. In liquid and gas Fenton testing, fluoride emission is reduced by an order of magnitude, drastically increasing membrane longevity. Side-product analysis demonstrated that in the liquid Fenton test, the main point of attack are weak polymer end groups, while in the gas Fenton test, there is additional side-chain attack. Both mechanisms are mitigated by the addition of the ceria nanoparticles, whereby the extent of the durability improvement is found to be independent of particle size.

  10. Light-extraction enhancement in GaN-based light-emitting diodes using grade-refractive-index amorphous titanium oxide films with porous structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, D.-S.; Lin, T.-W.; Huang, B.-W.; Juang, F.-S.; Lei, P.-H. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.-Z. [Chilin Technology Co. Ltd., Tainan County 71758, Taiwan (China)

    2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO{sub x}:OH) films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition at 200 and 25 deg. C are in turn deposited onto the GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) to enhance the associated light extraction efficiency. The refractive index, porosity, and photocatalytic effect of the deposited films are correlated strongly with the deposition temperatures. The efficiency is enhanced by a factor of {approx}1.31 over that of the uncoated LEDs and exhibited an excellent photocatalytic property after an external UV light irradiation. The increase in the light extraction is related to the reduction in the Fresnel transmission loss and the enhancement of the light scattering into the escape cone by using the graded-refractive-index a-TiO{sub x}:OH film with porous structures.

  11. Sputtered Nickel Oxide Thin Film for Efficient Hole Transport Layer in Polymer-Fullerene Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widjonarko, N. E.; Ratcliff, E. L.; Perkins, C. L.; Sigdel, A. K.; Zakutayev, A.; Ndione, P. F.; Gillaspie, D. T.; Ginley, D. S.; Olson, D. C.; Berry, J. J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics (OPV) are very promising thin film renewable energy conversion technologies due to low production cost by high-throughput roll-to-roll manufacturing, an expansive list of compatible materials, and flexible device fabrication. An important aspect of OPV device efficiency is good contact engineering. The use of oxide thin films for this application offers increased design flexibility and improved chemical stability. Here we present our investigation of radio frequency magnetron sputtered nickel oxide (NiO{sub x}) deposited from oxide targets as an efficient, easily scalable hole transport layer (HTL) with variable work-function, ranging from 4.8 to 5.8 eV. Differences in HTL work-function were not found to result in statistically significant changes in open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) for poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) BHJ device. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) characterization of the NiO{sub x} film and its interface with the polymer shows Fermi level alignment of the polymer with the NiO{sub x} film. UPS of the blend also demonstrates Fermi level alignment of the organic active layer with the HTL, consistent with the lack of correlation between V{sub oc} and HTL work-function. Instead, trends in j{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and thus overall device performance are related to the surface treatment of the HTL prior to active layer deposition through changes in active layer thickness.

  12. Laser-induced dehydration of graphite oxide coatings on polymer substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longo, Angela, E-mail: angela.longo@cnr.it; Palomba, Mariano; Carotenuto, Gianfranco; Nicolais, Luigi [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Viale Kennedy, 54, Mostra d'Oltremare Padiglione 20, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Orabona, Emanuele; Maddalena, Pasqualino [Department of Physics, University of Naples, Federico II, via cintia, 80126, Naples, Italy and SPIN Institute, National Research Council, UOS Naples, via cintia, 80126, Naples (Italy); Ambrosio, Antonio [SPIN Institute, National Research Council, UOS Naples, via cintia, 80126, Naples (Italy)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosized graphite has been oxidized by the Hummers method to give high quality graphite oxide. This reaction is characterized by a very fast kinetic behavior and a high yield. The produced graphite oxide has been conveniently used to pattern graphene by using a standard photolithographic method, and the resulting systems have been characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Visible-Near Infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIR)

  13. Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacFadden, Kenneth Orville (Highland, MD)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer bonded sheet product suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance.

  14. Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacFadden, K.O.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer bonded sheet product is described suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance. 1 fig.

  15. Method for production of ceramic oxide and carbide bodies by polymer inclusion and decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quinby, T.C.

    1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the preparation of thin, free-standing metal oxide films which are useful as nuclear accelerator target materials is described. Cations of any metal except those of Group IA and precious metals, such as, U, Zr, Nd, Ce, Th, Pr or Cr, are absorbed on a thin film of polymeric material, such as carboxymethylcellulose, viscose rayon or cellophane. The cation impregnated polymeric material is dried. Then the impregnated film is heated in an inert atmosphere to form a carbonized membrane. The carbonized membrane is oxidized to yield a thin, self-supporting, metal oxide membrane. Or, the membrane can be heated in an inert atmosphere to yield a thin, self-supporting, metal carbide-containing membrane.

  16. acid polymers obtained: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. For this (more) Leemhuis, M. 2007-01-01 23 Ammonia Capture in Porous Organic Polymers Densely Functionalized with Brnsted Acid Groups...

  17. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiner, Robert H. (Knoxville, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  18. Porous ceramics and method for making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, R.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1989-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fabrication of a porous ceramic composite is described. Fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  19. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, R.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  20. Composition suitable for decontaminating a porous surface contaminated with cesium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Finck, Martha R.; Mertz, Carol J.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of decontaminating porous surfaces contaminated with water soluble radionuclides by contacting the contaminated porous surfaces with an ionic solution capable of solubilizing radionuclides present in the porous surfaces followed by contacting the solubilized radionuclides with a gel containing a radionuclide chelator to bind the radionuclides to the gel, and physically removing the gel from the porous surfaces. A dry mix is also disclosed of a cross-linked ionic polymer salt, a linear ionic polymer salt, a radionuclide chelator, and a gel formation controller present in the range of from 0% to about 40% by weight of the dry mix, wherein the ionic polymer salts are granular and the non cross-linked ionic polymer salt is present as a minor constituent.

  1. Development of hybrid organic-inorganic light emitting diodes using conducting polymers deposited by oxidative chemical vapor deposition process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chelawat, Hitesh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Difficulties with traditional methods of synthesis and film formation for conducting polymers, many of which are insoluble, motivate the development of CVD methods. Indeed, conjugated polymers with rigid linear backbones ...

  2. Fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and stability in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homsy, G.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes accomplished and proposed work for the fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and stability in porous media. Topics discussed include: viscous fingering in miscible displacements; polymer flow interactions in free shear layers of viscoelastic fluids; effect of nonmonotonic viscosity profiles on the stability of miscible displacements in porous media; and references. (JL)

  3. Coated porous carbon cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coated porous carbon cathodes for automotive lithium batteries are being developed with the goal of overcoming the problems with capacity fade and poor thermal management in conventional polymer-bonded cathodes. The active cathode material (lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles) is carbon-bonded to the porous carbon support material. Cathodes have been developed with high specific energy and power and with good cycling behavior.

  4. Variably porous structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul V. (Savoy, IL); Yu, Xindi (Urbana, IL)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a monolithic porous structure, comprises electrodepositing a material on a template; removing the template from the material to form a monolithic porous structure comprising the material; and electropolishing the monolithic porous structure.

  5. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  6. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Polymer Backbone Dynamics in Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Based Lithium and Sodium Polyether-ester-sulfonate Ionomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, David J. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dou, Shichen [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Colby, Ralph H. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer backbone dynamics of single ion conducting poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based ionomer samples with low glass transition temperatures (Tg) have been investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Experiments detecting 13C with 1H decoupling under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions identified the different components of the polymer backbone (PEO spacer and isophthalate groups) and their relative mobilities for a suite of lithium- and sodium-containing ionomer samples with varying cation contents. Variable temperature (203-373 K) 1H-13C cross-polarization MAS (CP-MAS) experiments also provided qualitative assessment of the differences in the motions of the polymer backbone components as a function of cation content and identity. Each of the main backbone components exhibit distinct motions, following the trends expected for motional characteristics based on earlier Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering and 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements. Previous 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation measurements focused on both the polymer backbone and cation motion on the nanosecond timescale. The studies presented here assess the slower timescale motion of the polymer backbone allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the polymer dynamics. The temperature dependences of 13C linewidths were used to both qualitatively and quantitatively examine the effects of cation content and identity on PEO spacer mobility. Variable contact time 1H-13C CP-MAS experiments were used to further assess the motions of the polymer backbone on the microsecond timescale. The motion of the PEO spacer, reported via the rate of magnetization transfer from 1H to 13C nuclei, becomes similar for T ? 1.1 Tg in all ionic samples, indicating that at similar elevated reduced temperatures the motions of the polymer backbones on the microsecond timescale become insensitive to ion interactions. These results present an improved picture, beyond those of previous findings, for the dependence of backbone dynamics on cation density (and here, cation identity as well) in these amorphous PEO-based ionomer systems.

  7. Improved synthesis and crystal structure of the flexible pillared layer porous coordination polymer: Ni(1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene)[Ni(CN)(4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong-Ng, W.; Culp, J. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Zavalij, P.; Espinal, L.; Siderius, D. W.; Allen, A. J.; Scheins, S Matranga, C

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports our synthesis of flexible coordination polymer, Ni(L)[Ni(CN){sub 4}], (L = 1,2-bis(4- pyridyl)ethylene (nicknamed bpene)), and its structural characterization using synchrotron single crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure of the purplish crystals has been determined to be monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/m, a = 13.5941(12) Ĺ, b = 14.3621(12) Ĺ, c = 14.2561(12) Ĺ, {beta} = 96.141(2){degrees|, V = 2767.4(4) Ĺ{sup 3}, Z = 4, D{sub c} = 1.46 g cm{sup -1}. Ni(bpene)[Ni(CN){sub 4}] assumes a pillared layer structure with layers defined by Ni[Ni(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} nets and bpene ligands acting as pillars. With the present crystallization technique which involves the use of concentrated ammonium hydroxide solution and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), disordered free bpene ligands and solvents of crystallization (DMSO and water molecules) occupy the pores, resulting in a formula of Ni(bpene)[Ni(CN){sub 4}](1/2)bpene.DMSO.2H{sub 2}O, or Ni{sub 2}N{sub 7}C{sub 24}H{sub 2}.5SO{sub 3}. Without the inclusion of free bpene ligands and solvent molecules, the free volume is approximately 61% of the total volume; this free volume fraction is reduced to 50% with the free ligands present. Pores without the free ligands were found to have a local diameter of 5.7 Ĺ and a main aperture of 3.5 Ĺ. Based on the successful crystal synthesis, we also devised a new bulk synthetic technique which yielded a polycrystalline material with a significantly improved CO{sub 2} uptake as compared to the originally reported powder material. The improved synthetic technique yielded a polycrystalline material with 40% higher CO{sub 2} uptake compared to the previously reported powder material. An estimated 14.4 molecules of CO{sub 2} per unit cell was obtained.

  8. Zinc Oxide Nanowire As an Electron-Extraction Layer for Broadband Polymer Photodetectors with an Inverted Device Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    to be unstable with indium, contaminating the polymer and thus degrading the performance of devices. MeanwhileOx) and cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) are developed onto the ITO electrode to break the symmetry. The elimination

  9. New Porous Lanthanide-Organic Frameworks: Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Lanthanide 2,6-Naphthalenedicarboxylates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Song

    to avoid the interpenetration of networks. Thus far, porous coordination polymers have centered. However, the main problem encountered in designing such coordination polymers is the interpenetration. The interpenetration of frameworks can fre- quently be seen in lanthanide coordination polymers be- cause many

  10. Influence of confinement on polymer-electrolyte relaxational dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanotti, J.-M.; Smith, L. J.; Price, D. L.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Lab. Leon Brillouin (CEA-CRNS); Clark Univ.; CRMHT (CNRS); CRMD (CNRS)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conception and industrial production of viable high specific energy/power batteries is a central issue for the development of non-polluting vehicles. In terms of stored energy and safety, solid-state devices using polymer electrolytes are highly desirable. One of the most studied systems is PEO (polyethylene oxide) complexed by Li salts. Polymer segmental motions and ionic conductivity are closely related. Bulk PEO is actually a biphasic system where an amorphous and a crystalline state (Tm 335 K) coexist. To improve ionic conduction in those systems requires a significant increase of the amorphous phase fraction where lithium conduction is known to mainly take place. Confinement strongly affects properties of condensed matter and in particular the collective phenomena inducing crystallization. Confinement of the polymer matrix is therefore a possible alternative route to the unpractical use of high temperature. Results of a quasi-elastic incoherent neutron scattering study of the influence of confinement on polyethylene oxide (PEO) and (PEO)8Li+[(CF3SO2)2N]- (or (POE)8LiTFSI) dynamics are presented. The nano-confining media is Vycor, a silica based hydrophilic porous glass (characteristic size of the 3D pore network 50 {angstrom}). As expected, the presence of Li salt slows down the bulk polymer dynamics. The confinement also affects dramatically the apparent mean-square displacement of the polymer. Local relaxational PEO dynamics is described KWW model. We also present an alternate model and show how the detailed polymer dynamics (correlation times and local geometry of the motions) can be described without the use of such stretched exponentials so as to access a rheology-related meaningful physical quantity: the monomeric friction coefficient.

  11. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje (East Patchogue, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  12. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, T.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  13. Commercial applications of nanostructures created with ordered porous alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Brendan Christopher, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the drive from microfabrication to nanofabrication, porous alumina templates may play a key role in technological evolution. Under the right processing conditions, ordered pores can grow in anodic aluminum oxide, which ...

  14. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  15. Solid polymer electrolyte compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garbe, James E. (Stillwater, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Hamrock, Steven J. (St. Paul, MN); Le, Dinh Ba (St. Paul, MN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolyte composition is featured that includes a solid, ionically conductive polymer, organically modified oxide particles that include organic groups covalently bonded to the oxide particles, and an alkali metal salt. The electrolyte composition is free of lithiated zeolite. The invention also features cells that incorporate the electrolyte composition.

  16. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  17. Alumina nanoparticle/polymer nanocomposite dielectric for flexible amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors on plastic substrate with superior stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Hsin-Cheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Pei, Zingway, E-mail: zingway@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Optoelectronic Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Center of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Jian, Jyun-Ruri; Tzeng, Bo-Jie [Graduate Institute of Optoelectronic Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were incorporated into polymer as a nono-composite dielectric for used in a flexible amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate by solution process. The process temperature was well below 100?°C. The a-IGZO TFT exhibit a mobility of 5.13?cm{sup 2}/V s on the flexible substrate. After bending at a radius of 4?mm (strain?=?1.56%) for more than 100 times, the performance of this a-IGZO TFT was nearly unchanged. In addition, the electrical characteristics are less altered after positive gate bias stress at 10?V for 1500?s. Thus, this technology is suitable for use in flexible displays.

  18. INVESTIGATION AND MODELING OF DAMPING IN A PLATE WITH A BONDED POROUS LAYER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -00438860,version1-31Dec2009 #12;1. INTRODUCTION Porous materials like polymer foam and glass wool. It can be the major phenomenon within soft materials, but for most foams viscoelastic dissipation

  19. Polymer films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granick, Steve (Champaign, IL); Sukhishvili, Svetlana A. (Maplewood, NJ)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  20. Fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and stability in porous media. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homsy, G.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes accomplished and proposed work for the fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and stability in porous media. Topics discussed include: viscous fingering in miscible displacements; polymer flow interactions in free shear layers of viscoelastic fluids; effect of nonmonotonic viscosity profiles on the stability of miscible displacements in porous media; and references. (JL)

  1. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity and methods for manufacturing such blends

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje (East Patchogue, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  2. 4/28/2010 1Porous Pavements Porous Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    4/28/2010 1Porous Pavements Porous Pavements for Stormwater Restoration in Urban Environments Cliff Aichinger Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District #12;4/28/2010 2Porous Pavements Porous Pavements Why am new volume reduction rules. Porous pavement is one of a relative few BMPs that address stormwater

  3. Performance of Titanium-Oxide/Polymer Insulation in Bi-2212/Ag-alloy Round Wire Wound Superconducting Coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Chen; Ulf P Trociewitz; Matthieu Dalban-Canassy; Jianyi Jiang; Eric E Hellstrom; David C Larbalestier

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Conductor insulation is one of the key components needed to make Ag-alloy clad Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212/Ag) superconducting round wire (RW) successful for high field magnet applications as dielectric standoff and high winding current densities (Jw) directly depend on it. In this study, a TiO2/polymer insulation coating developed by nGimat LLC was applied to test samples and a high field test coil. The insulation was investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dielectric properties measurement, and transport critical current (Ic) properties measurement. About 29% of the insulation by weight is polymer. When the Bi-2212/Ag wire is full heat treated, this decomposes with slow heating to 400{\\deg}C in pure O2. After the full reaction, we found that the TiO2 did not degrade the critical current properties, adhered well to the conductor, and provided a breakdown voltage of >100 V, which allowed the test coil to survive quenching in 31.2 T background field, while providing a 2.6 T field increment. For Bi-2212/Ag RW with a typical diameter of 1.0-1.5 mm, this ~15 um thick insulation allows a very high coil packing factor of ~0.74, whereas earlier alumino-silicate braid insulation only allows packing factors of 0.38-0.48.

  4. Performance of Titanium-Oxide/Polymer Insulation in Bi-2212/Ag-alloy Round Wire Wound Superconducting Coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Peng; Dalban-Canassy, Matthieu; Jiang, Jianyi; Hellstrom, Eric E; Larbalestier, David C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conductor insulation is one of the key components needed to make Ag-alloy clad Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212/Ag) superconducting round wire (RW) successful for high field magnet applications as dielectric standoff and high winding current densities (Jw) directly depend on it. In this study, a TiO2/polymer insulation coating developed by nGimat LLC was applied to test samples and a high field test coil. The insulation was investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dielectric properties measurement, and transport critical current (Ic) properties measurement. About 29% of the insulation by weight is polymer. When the Bi-2212/Ag wire is full heat treated, this decomposes with slow heating to 400{\\deg}C in pure O2. After the full reaction, we found that the TiO2 did not degrade the critical current properties, adhered well to the conductor, and provided a breakdown voltage of >100 V, which allowed the test coil to survive quenching in 31.2...

  5. High-strength porous carbon and its multifunctional applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wojtowicz, Marek A; Rubenstein, Eric P; Serio, Michael A; Cosgrove, Joseph E

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High-strength porous carbon and a method of its manufacture are described for multifunctional applications, such as ballistic protection, structural components, ultracapacitor electrodes, gas storage, and radiation shielding. The carbon is produced from a polymer precursor via carbonization, and optionally by surface activation and post-treatment.

  6. Method to fabricate high performance tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fanglin; Yang, Chenghao; Jin, Chao

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes forming an asymmetric porous ceramic tube by using a phase inversion process. The method further includes forming an asymmetric porous ceramic layer on a surface of the asymmetric porous ceramic tube by using a phase inversion process. The tube is co-sintered to form a structure having a first porous layer, a second porous layer, and a dense layer positioned therebetween.

  7. Ventilation of porous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neeper, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for distributing gases throughout the interstices of porous materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of porous materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction.

  8. Ventilation of porous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neeper, D.A.

    1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are presented for distributing gases throughout the interstices of porous materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of porous materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction. 10 figures.

  9. Microporous Patterned Electrodes for Color-Matched Electrochromic Polymer Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, David B.

    Microporous Patterned Electrodes for Color-Matched Electrochromic Polymer Displays Pierre of electroactive and conducting polymers offers new opportunities for the design of materials for electrochromic the most promising electrochromic (EC) properties. Here, we report the use of highly porous metallized

  10. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  11. anodically oxidized titanium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mixed anatase and rutile phases. Under simulated AM 1.5 G illumination, the peak solar energy conversion Heller, Eric 7 Porous anodic aluminum oxide scaffolds; formation mechanisms...

  12. anodic oxidized titanium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mixed anatase and rutile phases. Under simulated AM 1.5 G illumination, the peak solar energy conversion Heller, Eric 7 Porous anodic aluminum oxide scaffolds; formation mechanisms...

  13. Water-soluble hydrophobically associating polymers for improved oil recovery: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, K.C. [Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-soluble hydrophobically associating polymers are reviewed with particular emphasis on their application in improved oil recovery (IOR). These polymers are very similar to conventional water-soluble polymers used in IOR, except that they have a small number of hydrophobic groups incorporated into the polymer backbone. At levels of incorporation of less than 1 mol%, these hydrophobic groups can significantly change polymer performance. These polymers have potential for use in mobility control, drilling fluids and profile modification. This review includes synthesis, characterization, stability, rheology and flow in porous media of associating polymers in IOR are also examined. 100 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Electronically conductive polymer composites and microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyke, L.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composites of electronically conductive polymers with insulating host materials are investigated. A template synthesis method was developed for the production of electronically conductive polymer microstructures. In template synthesis the pores of a porous host membrane act as templates for the polymerization of a conductive polymer. The template synthetic method can be used to form either solid microfibrils or hollow microtubules. The electrochemical properties of conductive polymers produced via the template synthesis method are superior to those of conventionally synthesized conductive polymers. Electronically conductive polymers are used to impart conductivity to non-conductive materials. Two different approaches are used. First, thin film composites of conductive polymers with fluoropolymers are made by the polymerization of conductive polymers onto fluoropolymer films. Modification of the fluoropolymer surface prior to conductive polymer polymerization is necessary to obtain good adhesion between the two materials. The difference in adhesion of the conductive polymer to the modified and unmodified fluoropolymer surfaces can be used to pattern the conductive polymer coating. Patterning of the conductive polymer coating can alternatively be done via UV laser ablation of the conductive polymer. The second method by which conductive polymers were used to impart conductivity to an insulating polymer was via the formation of a graft copolymer. In this approach, heterocyclic monomers grafted to an insulating polyphosphazene backbone were polymerized to yield semiconductive materials. Finally the measurement of electrolyte concentration in polypyrrole and the effects of hydroxide anion on the electrochemical and electrical properties of polypyrrole are described. It is shown that treatment of polypyrrole with hydroxide anion increases the potential window over which polypyrrole is a good electronic conductor.

  15. Preparation of redox polymer cathodes for thin film rechargeable batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the manufacture of thin film solid state electrochemical devices using composite cathodes comprising a redox polymer capable of undergoing oxidation and reduction, a polymer solid electrolyte and conducting carbon. The polymeric cathode material is formed as a composite of radiation crosslinked polymer electrolytes and radiation crosslinked redox polymers based on polysiloxane backbones with attached organosulfur side groups capable of forming sulfur-sulfur bonds during electrochemical oxidation.

  16. Surface engineering using layer-by-layer assembly of pH-sensitive polymers and nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Daeyeon

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface engineering of a variety of materials including colloidal particles and porous membranes has been achieved by using layer-by-layer assembly of pH-sensitive polymers and nanoparticles. In the first part of this ...

  17. Computer simulations of adsorption and molecular recognition phenomena in molecularly imprinted polymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dourado, Eduardo Manuel de Azevedo

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are a novel, promising family of porous materials with potential applications ranging from separations, chemical sensing and catalysis to drug delivery and artificial immunoassays. The ...

  18. PH/sub 3/ treatment for polymer stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers are stabilized against oxidative degradation by treatment with phosphine gas. The treatment can be used in situ on polymeric components already in use.

  19. Porous material neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  20. Effect of Spin-Crossover-Induced Pore Contraction on CO{sub 2}-Host Interactions in the Porous Coordination Polymers [Fe(pyrazine)M(CN){sub 4}] (M = Ni, Pt)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Jeffrey T.; Chen, De-Li; Liu, Jinchen; Chirdon, Danielle; Kauffman, Kristi; Goodman, Angela; Johnson, J. Karl

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-temperature in situ ATR-FTIR spectra are presented for the porous spin-crossover compounds [Fe(pyrazine)- Ni(CN){sub 4}] and [Fe(pyrazine)Pt(CN){sub 4}] under CO{sub 2} pressures of up to 8 bar. Significant shifts in the ?{sub 3} and ?{sub 2} IR absorption bands of adsorbed CO{sub 2} are observed as the host materials undergo transition between low- and high-spin states. Computational models used to determine the packing arrangement of CO{sub 2} within the pore structures show a preferred orientation of one of the adsorbed CO{sub 2} molecules with close O=C=O···H contacts with the pyrazine pillar ligands. The interaction is a consequence of the commensurate distance of the inter-pyrazine separations and the length of the CO{sub 2} molecule, which allows the adsorbed CO{sub 2} to effectively bridge the pyrazine pillars in the structure. The models were used to assign the distinct shifts in the IR absorption bands of the adsorbed CO{sub 2} that arise from changes in the O=C=O···H contacts that strengthen and weaken in correlation with changes in the Fe–N bond lengths as the spin state of Fe changes. The results indicate that spin-crossover compounds can function as a unique type of flexible sorbent in which the pore contractions associated with spin transition can affect the strength of CO{sub 2}–host interactions.

  1. Accelerated Characterization of Polymer Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wroczynski; l. Brewer; D. Buckley; M. Burrell; R. Potyrailo

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the efforts to develop a suite of microanalysis techniques that can rapidly measure a variety of polymer properties of industrial importance, including thermal, photo-oxidative, and color stability; as well as ductility, viscosity, and mechanical and antistatic properties. Additional goals of the project were to direct the development of these techniques toward simultaneous measurements of multiple polymer samples of small size in real time using non-destructive and/or parallel or rapid sequential measurements, to develop microcompounding techniques for preparing polymers with additives, and to demonstrate that samples prepared in the microcompounder could be analyzed directly or used in rapid off-line measurements. These enabling technologies are the crucial precursors to the development of high-throughput screening (HTS) methodologies for the polymer additives industry whereby the rate of development of new additives and polymer formulations can be greatly accelerated.

  2. Porous metallic bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

  3. The influence of self-assembly behavior of nanoparticles on the dielectric polymer composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xin; Li, Weiping, E-mail: liweiping@nbu.edu.cn; Wang, Tingting; Jiang, Long; Luo, Laihui; Hua, Dayin; Zhu, Yuejin [Department of Microelectronic Science and Engineering, Facuty of Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo, 315211 (China)] [Department of Microelectronic Science and Engineering, Facuty of Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo, 315211 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To clearify the influence of the distribution of the conductive nanoparticles on the dielectric properties of the corresponding polymer composites, the microstructure and dielectric character of the composites based on the oleic acid modified ferroferric oxide and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer have been studied experimentally. It is found that these composites exhibit a normal percolative phase transition over the filler content from insulator to conductor, consistent with the classical percolation theory. However, when the percentage of fillers is at a certain value which is below the percolation threshold, these nanoparticles can assemble into a special porous structure in the PVDF matrix, associated with the enhancement of dielectric constant at low frequency. In addition, the controllable dispersion of conducting nanoparticles in a polymer matrix can prevent premature agglomeration at low filling fractions and avoid the appearance of anomalously early percolation. Therefore, the self-assembly behavior of nanoparticles can be beneficial to preparation of the high dielectric constant and low loss composites for the application of electric energy storage.

  4. Stimuli Responsive Polymers for Enhanced Drug Release Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Michael K. C.

    This talk will focus on the development of polymeric nano-structured systems for drug and gene delivery applications. Two major classes of polymer systems will be considered; namely poly(ethylene-oxide-b-propylene-oxide- ...

  5. Polymer-assisted deposition of films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Lin, Yuan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer assisted deposition process for deposition of metal oxide films is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures to yield metal oxide films. Such films can be epitaxial in structure and can be of optical quality. The process can be organic solvent-free.

  6. Polymer-assisted deposition of films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell; Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia; Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Lin; Yuan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer assisted deposition process for deposition of metal oxide films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures to yield metal oxide films and the like. Such films can be epitaxial in structure and can be of optical quality. The process can be organic solvent-free.

  7. Fabrication of porous silicon membranes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue, Wing Kong

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Porous silicon layer is formed by the local dissolution which is initiated by the surface layer and is promoted by the hindrance layers composed of the silicic acid. Local etching or local dissolution is the cause of forming porous structure... of pores were 25 to 45 A with a mean value of 38 A. Microstructure of porous silicon studied by Besle et al. showed two distinct 17 patterns: the structure pattern of porous silicon film on heavily doped silicon and that on slightly doped silicon [26...

  8. Displacement of oil from reservoir rock using high molecular weight polymer solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barzi, Houshang

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In general, the tests have been inconclusive. The object of this research was to measure the effectiveness of water containing polymers in displacing oil from porous media and to measure the effect of the polymers on the permeability of the porous med... lower than in normal water flood operations. The published results of laboratory research and a limited number of field trials indicate that polymer solutions may be effective agents for recovering 3i5s6~7i8~9~10 additional crude oil from reservoir...

  9. Influence of Ionic Surfactants on the Aggregation of Poly(Ethylene Oxide)-Poly(Propylene Oxide)-Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Block Copolymers Studied by Differential Scanning and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    Influence of Ionic Surfactants on the Aggregation of Poly(Ethylene Oxide)-Poly(Propylene Oxide copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), EOnPOmEOn, and the ionic surfactants sodium the aggregates of all three polymers. Introduction Water-soluble poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)- poly

  10. Control of edge effects of oxidant electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Peter (Utica, MI); Chi, Chen H. (Sterling Heights, MI)

    1981-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is an electrode assembly comprising; a. a porous electrode having a first and second exterior face with a cavity formed in the interior between said exterior faces thereby having first and second interior faces positioned opposite the first and second exterior faces; b. a counter electrode positioned facing each of the first and second exterior faces of the porous electrode; c. means for passing an oxidant through said porous electrode; and d. screening means for blocking the interior face of the porous electrode a greater amount than the blocking of the respective exterior face of the porous electrode, thereby maintaining a differential of oxidant electrode surface between the interior face and the exterior face. The electrode assembly is useful in a metal, halogen, halogen hydrate electrical energy storage device.

  11. Semipermeable polymers and method for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buschmann, Wayne E

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polyamide membrane including reaction product of an anhydrous solution comprising an anhydrous solvent, at least one polyfunctional secondary amine and a pre-polymer deposition catalyst, and an anhydrous, organic solvent solution comprising a polyfunctional aromatic amine-reactive reactant having one ring. A composite semipermeable membrane including the polyamide membrane on a porous support.

  12. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Xiaofan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Stanford, Interpenetrating polymer networks for high-based on interpenetrating polymer networks, Proceeding ofX. Niu, Q. Pei, Interpenetrating polymer networks based on

  13. Branched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Kenyon; Peter Winkler

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Building on and from the work of Brydges and Imbrie, we give an elementary calculation of the volume of the space of branched polymers of order $n$ in the plane and in 3-space. Our development reveals some more general identities, and allows exact random sampling. In particular we show that a random 3-dimensional branched polymer of order $n$ has diameter of order $\\sqrt{n}$.

  14. Enhancement of thermal stability of porous bodies comprised of stainless steel or an alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bischoff, Brian L. (Knoxville, TN); Sutton, Theodore G. (Kingston, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN); Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Adcock, Kenneth D. (Harriman, TN)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a porous item constructed of metal powder, such as a powder made of Series 400 stainless steel, involves a step of preheating the porous item to a temperature of between about 700 and 900.degree. C. degrees in an oxidizing atmosphere and then sintering the body in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature which is slightly below the melting temperature of the metal which comprises the porous item. The thermal stability of the resulting item is enhanced by this method so that the item retains its porosity and metallic characteristics, such as ductility, at higher (e.g. near-melting) temperatures.

  15. Template-Based Growth of Various Oxide Nanorods by SolGel Electrophoresis**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    , a porous membrane (such as radiation track-etched polycarbonate, PC, or anodic alumi- na) is used,12] For metal and conducting polymer rods grown with a template, the method generally used is electrochemical

  16. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes include chemical compounds comprising a polymer backbone with side chains that include guanidinium cations.

  17. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  18. Antimocrobial Polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Huang, Zhi-Heng (Walnut Creek, CA); Wright, Stacy C. (Columbus, GA)

    2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from quaternary ammonium compounds, gentian violet compounds, substituted or unsubstituted phenols, biguanide compounds, iodine compounds, and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A)3P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the antimicrobial agent is chlorhexidine, dimethylchlorophenol, cetyl pyridinium chloride, gentian violet, triclosan, thymol, iodine, and mixtures thereof.

  19. Polymer inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed Moeez Hassan; Viqar Husain; Sanjeev S. Seahra

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the semi-classical dynamics of a free massive scalar field in a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological spacetime. The scalar field is quantized using the polymer quantization method assuming that it is described by a gaussian coherent state. For quadratic potentials, the semi-classical equations of motion yield a universe that has an early "polymer inflation" phase which is generic and almost exactly de Sitter, followed by a epoch of slow-roll inflation. We compute polymer corrections to the slow roll formalism, and discuss the probability of inflation in this model using a physical Hamiltonian arising from time gauge fixing. We also show how in this model, it is possible to obtain a significant amount of slow-roll inflation from sub-Planckain initial data, hence circumventing some of the criticisms of standard scenarios. These results show the extent to which a quantum gravity motivated quantization method affects early universe dynamics.

  20. Ultra-low density microcellular polymer foam and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-low density, microcellular open-celled polymer foam and a method for making such foam are disclosed. A polymer is dissolved in a heated solution consisting essentially of at least one solvent for the dissolution of the polymer in the heated solution and the phase inversion of the dissolved polymer to a liquid gel upon sufficient cooling of the heated solution. The heated solution is contained in a containment means provided with a nucleating promoting means having a relatively rough surface formed of fixed nucleating sites. The heated solution is cooled for a period of time sufficient to form a liquid gel of the polymer by phase inversion. From the gel, a porous foam having a density of less than about 12.0 mg/cm{sup 3} and open porosity provided by well interconnected strut morphology is formed.

  1. Ultra-low density microcellular polymer foam and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Farragut, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-low density, microcellular open-celled polymer foam and a method for making such foam. A polymer is dissolved in a heated solution consisting essentially of at least one solvent for the dissolution of the polymer in the heated solution and the phase inversion of the dissolved polymer to a liquid gel upon sufficient cooling of the heated solution. The heated solution is contained in a containment means provided with a nucleating promoting means having a relatively rough surface formed of fixed nucleating sites. The heated solution is cooled for a period of time sufficient to form a liquid gel of the polymer by phase inversion. From the gel, a porous foam having a density of less than about 12.0 mg/cm.sup.3 and open porosity provided by well interconnected strut morphology is formed.

  2. Mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Qinjin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO{sub 2} saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occuning at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multi-physicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

  3. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  4. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics of Porous Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Todd Richard

    We reformulate and extend porous electrode theory for non-ideal active materials, including those capable of phase transformations. Using principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we relate the cell voltage, ionic ...

  5. Porous polymer fibers for low-loss Terahertz guiding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    of this fiber type is also compared to that of the equivalent sub-wavelength rod-in-the-air fiber the collective vibrational dynamics of a protein in liquid water by terahertz absorption spectroscopy", Protein. Kawase, "Laser terahertz-emission microscope for inspecting electrical faults in integrated circuits

  6. Modeling Methane Adsorption in Interpenetrating Porous Polymer Networks |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide Capture inFacility AMF InformationLos

  7. Porous Polymer Networks: Synthesis, Porosity, and Applications in Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Patent: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalms Village ResortEnergyL LMesoscalefor|

  9. Stable benzimidazole-incorporated porous polymer network for carbon capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite MapCrime Witnesswith high efficiency

  10. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronicCurves | SciTechLagrange Multiplier Technique |

  11. Ammonia Capture in Porous Organic Polymers Densely Functionalized with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Building multiple adsorption sites in porous polymer networks for carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries AnVirtualcapture applications | Center

  13. Polymers Pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    Polymers Pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore R. Podgornik, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, United States ABSTRACT: We investigate polymer partitioning from polymer

  14. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Nanomanufacturing with Polymers"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Nanomanufacturing with Polymers" Prof. Joey Mead University Lowell has developed a suite of processes to enable the nanomanufacturing of polymer based products of properties (e.g. biocompatibility, polarity, and modulus). Polymer materials can be used as substrates

  15. Dutch gas plant uses polymer process to treat aromatic-saturated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-processing plant in Harlingen, The Netherlands, operated by Elf Petroland has been running a porous-polymer extraction process since 1994 to remove aromatic compounds from water associated with produced natural gas. In the period, the unit has removed dispersed and dissolved aromatic compounds to a concentration of <1 ppm with energy consumption of only 17% that of a steam stripper, according to Paul Brooks, general manager for Akzo Nobel`s Macro Porous Polymer-Extraction (MPPE) systems. The paper describes glycol treatment the MPPE separation process, and the service contract for the system.

  16. Conductive Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohnert, G.W.

    2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

  17. Materials comprising polydienes and hydrophilic polymers and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mays, Jimmy W. (Knoxville, TN); Deng, Suxiang (Knoxville, TN); Mauritz, Kenneth A. (Hattiesburg, MS); Hassan, Mohammad K. (Hattiesburg, MS); Gido, Samuel P. (Hadley, MA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials prepared from polydienes, such as poly(cyclohexadiene), and hydrophilic polymers, such as poly(alkylene oxide), are described. Methods of making the materials and their use in fuel cell membranes, batteries, breathable chemical-biological protective materials, and templates for sol-gel polymerization are also provided. The materials can be crosslinked and sulfonated, and can include copolymers and polymer blends.

  18. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Xiaofan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strain in dielectric elastomers, Journal of Polymer SciencePart B: Polymer Physics. 49 (2011) 504–515. [25] X. Zhao, Z.Electroactive nanostructured polymers as tunable actuators,

  19. Precursors for the polymer-assisted deposition of films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, Thomas M.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Jia, Quanxi; Lin, Yuan

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer assisted deposition process for deposition of metal oxide films is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures to yield metal oxide films. Such films can be epitaxial in structure and can be of optical quality. The process can be organic solvent-free.

  20. Method for control of edge effects of oxidant electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Peter (Utica, MI); Chi, Chen H. (Sterling Heights, MI)

    1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is an electrode assembly comprising; a. a porous electrode having a first and second exterior face with a cavity formed in the interior between said exterior faces thereby having first and second interior faces positioned opposite the first and second exterior faces; b. a counter electrode positioned facing each of the first and second exterior faces of the porous electrode; c. means for passing an oxidant through said porous electrode; and d. screening means for blocking the interior face of the porous electrode a greater amount than the blocking of the respective exterior face of the porous electrode, thereby maintaining a differential of oxidant electrode surface between the interior face and the exterior face. The electrode assembly is useful in a metal, halogen, halogen hydrate electrical energy storage device.

  1. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon is described in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon. 1 fig.

  2. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T.sub.2 gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon.

  3. Stack configurations for tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Trammell, Michael P. (Clinton, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell unit includes an array of solid oxide fuel cell tubes having porous metallic exterior surfaces, interior fuel cell layers, and interior surfaces, each of the tubes having at least one open end; and, at least one header in operable communication with the array of solid oxide fuel cell tubes for directing a first reactive gas into contact with the porous metallic exterior surfaces and for directing a second reactive gas into contact with the interior surfaces, the header further including at least one busbar disposed in electrical contact with at least one surface selected from the group consisting of the porous metallic exterior surfaces and the interior surfaces.

  4. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, Edward F. (P.O. Box 900, Isle of Palms, SC 29451)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF.sub.4 and HNO.sub.3 and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200.degree. C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

  5. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Xiaofan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AgNW) polymer composite material that is conductive enoughAgNW/polymer composite was nominated as a highly conductive,

  6. Borrowing Nature's Polymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Borrowing Nature's Polymers 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:January 2015 All Issues submit Borrowing Nature's Polymers Los Alamos scientists are...

  7. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  8. Super sensitive UV detector using polymer functionalized nanobelts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L; Lao, Changshi; Zhou, Jun

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultraviolet light sensor includes an elongated metal oxide nanostructure, a layer of an ultraviolet light-absorbing polymer, a current source and a current detector. The elongated metal oxide nanostructure has a first end and an opposite second end. The layer of an ultraviolet light-absorbing polymer is disposed about at least a portion of the metal oxide nanostructure. The current source is configured to provide electrons to the first end of the metal oxide nanostructure. The current detector is configured to detect an amount of current flowing through the metal oxide nanostructure. The amount of current flowing through the metal oxide nanostructure corresponds to an amount of ultraviolet light impinging on the metal oxide nanostructure.

  9. Polymers with increased order

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Talhi, Abdelhafid (Rochester, MI); Taylor, Craig M. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention features polymers with increased order, and methods of making them featuring a dense gas.

  10. Bacteria transport through porous media. Annual report, December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, T.F.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following five chapters in this report have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base: (1) theoretical model of convective diffusion of motile and non-motile bacteria toward solid surfaces; (2) interfacial electrochemistry of oxide surfaces in oil-bearing sands and sandstones; (3) effects of sodium pyrophosphate additive on the ''huff and puff''/nutrient flooding MEOR process; (4) interaction of Escherichia coli B, B/4, and bacteriophage T4D with Berea sandstone rock in relation to enhanced oil recovery; and (5) transport of bacteria in porous media and its significance in microbial enhanced oil recovery.

  11. Electrospun Polyaniline/Poly (ethylene oxide) Composite Nanofibers Based Gas Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Changling

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    polymer composite nanofibers ( i.e. , (+)- camphor-10-sulfonic acid (HCSA) doped polyanline PANI (conductive)conductive hosting polymers such as poly(ethylene oxide), polyvinylpyrrolidone and cellulose acetate which have been used to assist polyaniline to form composite

  12. Method for Producing Flame Retardant Porous Products and Products Produced Thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

  13. Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame. 1 fig.

  14. Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

  15. USE OF POLYMERS TO RECOVER VISCOUS OIL FROM UNCONVENTIONAL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall Seright

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical progress report summarizes work performed the project, 'Use of Polymers to Recover Viscous Oil from Unconventional Reservoirs.' The objective of this three-year research project was to develop methods using water soluble polymers to recover viscous oil from unconventional reservoirs (i.e., on Alaska's North Slope). The project had three technical tasks. First, limits were re-examined and redefined for where polymer flooding technology can be applied with respect to unfavorable displacements. Second, we tested existing and new polymers for effective polymer flooding of viscous oil, and we tested newly proposed mechanisms for oil displacement by polymer solutions. Third, we examined novel methods of using polymer gels to improve sweep efficiency during recovery of unconventional viscous oil. This report details work performed during the project. First, using fractional flow calculations, we examined the potential of polymer flooding for recovering viscous oils when the polymer is able to reduce the residual oil saturation to a value less than that of a waterflood. Second, we extensively investigated the rheology in porous media for a new hydrophobic associative polymer. Third, using simulation and analytical studies, we compared oil recovery efficiency for polymer flooding versus in-depth profile modification (i.e., 'Bright Water') as a function of (1) permeability contrast, (2) relative zone thickness, (3) oil viscosity, (4) polymer solution viscosity, (5) polymer or blocking-agent bank size, and (6) relative costs for polymer versus blocking agent. Fourth, we experimentally established how much polymer flooding can reduce the residual oil saturation in an oil-wet core that is saturated with viscous North Slope crude. Finally, an experimental study compared mechanical degradation of an associative polymer with that of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide. Detailed results from the first two years of the project may be found in our first and second annual reports. Our latest research results, along with detailed documentation of our past work, can be found on our web site at http://baervan.nmt.edu/randy/. As an overall summary of important findings for the project, polymer flooding has tremendous potential for enhanced recovery of viscous oil. Fear of substantial injectivity reduction was a primary hurdle that limited application of polymer flooding. However, that concern is largely mitigated by (1) use of horizontal wells and (2) judicious injection above the formation parting pressure. Field cases now exist where 200-300-cp polymer solutions are injected without significant reductions in injectivity. Concern about costs associated with injection of viscous polymer solutions was a second major hurdle. However, that concern is reduced substantially by realization that polymer viscosity increases approximately with the square of polymer concentration. Viscosity can be doubled with only a 40% increase in polymer concentration. Up to a readily definable point, increases in viscosity of the injected polymer solution are directly related to increases in sweep efficiency and oil recovery. Previously published simulation results - suggesting that shear-thinning polymer solutions were detrimental to sweep efficiency - were shown to be unfounded (both theoretically and experimentally).

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Nonhalogenated Jeffrey W. Elam,*, David A. Baker, Alex B. F. Martinson,, Michael J. Pellin, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    precise coatings to be applied on all exposed surfaces of nanoporous substrates such as aerogels10 using ALD techniques to apply metal oxide coatings onto porous supports such as anodic aluminum oxide

  17. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  18. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF[sub 4] and HNO[sub 3] and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200 C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

  19. Polymer network/carbon layer on monolith support and monolith catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an improved monolith catalytic reactor and a monolith support. The improvement in the support resides in a polymer network/carbon coating applied to the surface of a porous substrate and a catalytic metal, preferably a transition metal catalyst applied to the surface of the polymer network/carbon coating. The monolith support has from 100 to 800 cells per square inch and a polymer network/carbon coating with surface area of from 0.1 to 15 m.sup.2 /gram as measured by adsorption of N.sub.2 or Kr using the BET method.

  20. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, M.S.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers. 9 figs.

  1. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  2. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  3. Modified cermet fuel electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, PA); Spengler, Charles J. (Murrysville, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An exterior porous electrode (10), bonded to a solid oxygen ion conducting electrolyte (13) which is in contact with an interior electrode (14), contains coarse metal particles (12) of nickel and/or cobalt, having diameters from 3 micrometers to 35 micrometers, where the coarse particles are coated with a separate, porous, multiphase layer (17) containing fine metal particles of nickel and/or cobalt (18), having diameters from 0.05 micrometers to 1.75 micrometers and conductive oxide (19) selected from cerium oxide, doped cerium oxide, strontium titanate, doped strontium titanate and mixtures thereof.

  4. Etching of porous and solid SiO2 in Ar/c-C4F8, O2/c-C4F8 and Ar/O2/c-C4F8 plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    and porous SiO2 in fluorocarbon plasmas and for etching of organic polymers in O2 plasmas have been.1063/1.1834979] I. INTRODUCTION Fluorocarbon plasma etching of SiO2 and low-dielectric constant (low-k) porous SiO2 of pattern transfer by fluorocarbon plasmas is in large part a result of the excellent selectivity which can

  5. Polymers incorporating covalently attached organoimido polyoxometalates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maatta, Eric A.; Moore, Aaron R.

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    New polyoxometalate compounds and polymers comprising recurring monomers of those compounds are provided. The compounds are formed by replacing at least one oxide of the starting polyoxometalate with an organoimido (NR) group bonded to the polyoxometalate via a triple bond to the nitrogen atom. The R of the (NR) group comprises a reactive functional group which renders the compound readily polymerizable, alone or with other monomers (e.g., divinylbenzene), to form the inventive polymers. Additionally, a countercation (e.g., bis(tetra-n-butylammonium)) can be mixed with the polyoxometalate compounds in order to neutralize the negative charge thereof as well as to make those compounds more soluble in organic solvents.

  6. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  7. Plasmas and Polymers, Vol. 5, Nos. 3/4, 2000 Synthesis of Organic Compounds from Mixtures of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Plasmas and Polymers, Vol. 5, Nos. 3/4, 2000 Synthesis of Organic Compounds from Mixtures operation, due to surface modification processes (polymer film deposition, its oxidation or reduction gases; polymer films; dielectric-barrier discharge; organic synthesis. 1. INTRODUCTION The first

  8. Metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villarreal, I.; Jacobson, C.; Leming, A.; Matus, Y.; Visco, S.; De Jonghe, L.

    2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Low cost, colloidal deposition methods have been utilized to produce novel solid oxide fuel cell structures on metal alloy support electrodes. YSZ films were deposited on iron-chrome supports on top of a thin Ni/YSZ catalytic layer, and sintered at 1350 degrees C, in a reducing atmosphere. Dense, 20??m YSZ electrolyte films were obtained on highly porous stainless steel substrates.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Abstract: Reflection-absorption...

  10. Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. Abstract: Functionalized graphene sheets (FGS)...

  11. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests....

  12. Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction enhanced by desiccation and water Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

  13. Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

  14. Stiff Quantum Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kleinert

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the moments and of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  15. ZnO/porous-Si and TiO{sub 2}/porous-Si nanocomposite nanopillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dong, E-mail: dong.wang@tu-ilmenau.de; Yan, Yong; Schaaf, Peter [Chair Materials for Electronics, Institute of Materials Engineering and Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano, TU Ilmenau, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Sharp, Thomas [Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology Ltd., Yatton, Bristol BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Schönherr, Sven; Ronning, Carsten [Institute for Solid State Physics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Ji, Ran [SUSS MicroTec Lithography GmbH, Schleissheimer Str. 90, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous Si nanopillar arrays are used as templates for atomic layer deposition of ZnO and TiO{sub 2}, and thus, ZnO/porous-Si and TiO{sub 2}/porous-Si nanocomposite nanopillars are fabricated. The diffusion of the precursor molecules into the inside of the porous structure occurs via Knudsen diffusion and is strongly limited by the small pore size. The luminescence of the ZnO/porous-Si nanocomposite nanopillars is also investigated, and the optical emission can be changed and even quenched after a strong plasma treatment. Such nanocomposite nanopillars are interesting for photocatalysis and sensors.

  16. A new method to simulate the effects of viscous fingering on miscible displacement processes in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vossoughi, S.; Green, D.W.; Smith, J.E.; Wilhite, G.P.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersion and viscous fingering are important parameters in miscible displacement. Effects of dispersion on concentration profiles in porous media can be simulated when the viscosity ratio is favorable. The capability to simulate viscous fingering is limited. This paper presents a new method to simulate effects of viscous fingering on miscible displacement processes in porous media. The method is based on the numerical solution of a general form of the convection-dispersion equation. In this equation the convection term is represented by a fractional flow function. The fractional flow function is derived from Darcy's law by using a concentration-dependent average viscosity and relative flow area to each fluid at any point in the bed. The method was extended to the description of a polymer flood by including retention and inaccessible PV. A Langmuir-type model for polymer retention in the rock was used. The resulting convection-dispersion equation for displacement by polymer was solved numerically by the use of a finite-element method with linear basis functions and Crank-Nicholson derivative approximation. History matches were performed on four sets of laboratory data to verify the model: (1) an unfavorable viscosity ratio displacement, (2) stable displacement of glycerol by polymer solution, (3) unstable displacement of brine by a slug of polymer solution, and (4) a favorable viscosity ratio displacement. In general, computed results from the model matched laboratory data closely. Good agreement of the model with experiments over a significant range of variables lends support to the analysis.

  17. Insulating polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schorr, H. Peter (Douglaston, NY); Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight insulating polymer concrete formed from a lightweight closed cell aggregate and a water resistance polymeric binder.

  18. Production of microporous aluminum oxide electrodes as supports for tethered lipid bilayers of large surface area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Production of microporous aluminum oxide electrodes as supports for tethered lipid bilayers.Bourdillon@utc.fr Abstract A composite electrode made by association of gold and porous aluminum oxide has been used aluminum oxide; phospholipid bilayer; two-dimensional electrochemistry; ubiquinone lateral mobility. 1

  19. Microgravity Laminar Diffusion Flame In A Perpendicular Fuel And Oxidizer Streams Configuration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brahmi, Lynda; Vietoris, Thomas; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Joulain, Pierre; David, L; Torero, Jose L

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel is injected through a porous flat plate perpendicular to a stream of oxidizer flowing parallel to the surface of the burner for regimes corresponding to fire scenario in spacecrafts. Particle Image Velocimetry is ...

  20. A Microfluidic Pore Network Approach to Investigate Water Transport in Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazylak, A; Markicevic, B; Sinton, D; Djilali, N

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pore network modelling has traditionally been used to study displacement processes in idealized porous media related to geological flows, with applications ranging from groundwater hydrology to enhanced oil recovery. Very recently, pore network modelling has been applied to model the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Discrete pore network models have the potential to elucidate transport phenomena in the GDL with high computational efficiency, in contrast to continuum or molecular dynamics modelling that require extensive computational resources. However, the challenge in studying the GDL with pore network modelling lies in defining the network parameters that accurately describe the porous media as well as the conditions of fluid invasion that represent realistic transport processes. In this work, we discuss the first stage of developing and validating a GDL-representative pore network model. We begin with a two-dimensional pore network model with a single mobile pha...

  1. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  2. Nanoporous polymer electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Brian (Wheat Ridge, CO); Nguyen, Vinh (Wheat Ridge, CO)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanoporous polymer electrolyte and methods for making the polymer electrolyte are disclosed. The polymer electrolyte comprises a crosslinked self-assembly of a polymerizable salt surfactant, wherein the crosslinked self-assembly includes nanopores and wherein the crosslinked self-assembly has a conductivity of at least 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 S/cm at 25.degree. C. The method of making a polymer electrolyte comprises providing a polymerizable salt surfactant. The method further comprises crosslinking the polymerizable salt surfactant to form a nanoporous polymer electrolyte.

  3. Microelectromechanical pump utilizing porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lantz, Jeffrey W. (Albuquerque, NM); Stalford, Harold L. (Norman, OK)

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a porous silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The porous silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.

  4. Fluidic Integration of Nanophotonic Devices Using Decomposable Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Kohl, Paul; Adibi, Ali

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polynorbornene-based decomposable polymer which can be patterned with ultraviolet or electron-beam radiation is used to create micrometer-scale fluidic channels. Silicon nitride substrates are used to fabricate nanophotonic wavegide and resonators operating in the visible range of the spectrum. Fluidic channels generated by thermally decomposing the polymer through the oxide cladding is used to deliver ultra-small amounts of florescent samples to the optical sensors.

  5. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

  6. Aqueous biphasic plutonium oxide extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for simultaneously partitioning a metal oxide and silica from a material containing silica and the metal oxide, using a biphasic aqueous medium having immiscible salt and polymer phases. 2 figs.

  7. Aqueous biphasic plutonium oxide extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J. (Woodridge, IL); Mensah-Biney, R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for simultaneously partitioning a metal oxide and silica from a material containing silica and the metal oxide, using a biphasic aqueous medium having immiscible salt and polymer phases.

  8. Diffuse charge and Faradaic reactions in porous electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biesheuvel, P. M.

    Porous electrodes instead of flat electrodes are widely used in electrochemical systems to boost storage

  9. Winter Performance and Maintenance of Porous Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete (HSG-B)Porous Asphalt (HSG-C) #12;Cold Climate Performance Results #12;12 Porous Asphalt SurfaceWinter Performance and Maintenance of Porous Asphalt Pavements Robert M. Roseen, Ph.D., P.E., D impacts for new development and reverse impacts in areas with redevelopment. #12;Porous Asphalt Design

  10. The design and synthesis of electroactive and magnetic polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rock, M.M. Jr.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) remains a valuable tool in polymer synthesis because it affords structurally well-defined, functionalized materials with highly unsaturated polymer backbones. The power and flexibility of organic and polymer chemistry are used here to create fully conjugated, electroactive organic polymers. A series of electroactive poly(norbornadienebenzoquinone-imine) and poly(norbornadienebenzoquinone) polymers have been synthesized by the ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of functionalized bicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-dienes using alkylidene metathesis catalysts. Incorporation of these quinone and imine redox units into organic norbornadiene polymers generates highly reactive and conductive materials capable of charge storage and electrochromism. An improved precursor polymer route is described to polyparaphenylene (PPP) based upon the ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) chemistry of cis-di(3,4-dihydroxymethyl)cyclobutene dicarbonate. These precursor polybutenamers undergo a final conversion to insoluble polyparaphenylene (PPP) without destroying or disturbing the existing polymer structure. These polybutenamers are of great interest because they incorporate high degrees of acid, oxygen, and heteroatom functionality into a soluble 1,4-poly(butadiene) structure. Organic magnets offer new insights into the nature of magnetism and lead to the development of materials with unique optical, electrical, and magnetic properties. To test the Topological Coupling Model an organic-based ferromagnetic polymer was designed around the ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of 3-diphenylmethylenecyclobutene. Doping, the generation of charged species along the polymer, generates a radical spin (1,2) on every monomer unit in the polymer chain, resulting in a fully conjugated polybutenamer polymer. Oxidative doping of this material evokes ferromagnetic couplings among unpaired spins in the material.

  11. Development of an oxidized porous silicon vacuum microtriode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Don Deewayne

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In order to effectively adapt this technology to mainstream vacuum microelectronic applications, a means of creating a gated triodic structure must be found. No previous attempts had successfully yielded such a device. We have succeeded in utilizing a...

  12. Mechanics of amorphous polymers and polymer gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Shawn Alexander

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many applications of amorphous polymers require a thermo-mechanically coupled large-deformation elasto-viscoplasticity theory which models the strain rate and temperature dependent response of amorphous polymeric materials ...

  13. Characterization of porous GASAR aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonenberger, R.J. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Kee, A.J. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States); Everett, R.K.; Matic, P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and numerical analyses were performed on porous aluminum samples to evaluate microstructure and mechanical properties. Experiments considered of tensile tests on dog-bone specimens containing 9 to 17% porosity, which were instrumented with axial and transverse extensometers. Properties measured included Young`s modulus, Poisson`s ratio remained constant with porosity., For the numerical simulations, 3-D, mesoscale, multilayer models were constructed to evaluate the effects of pore morphology and interactions on material properties. The models allowed systematic spatial positioning of the pore within the cell and the ability to form solid zones. Pore arrangement, the effect of constraint, and gradients on the stress state were investigated. By using different combinations of hex cells as building blocks, several complicated microstructural arrangements were simulated.

  14. Tunneling of Polymer Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Martín-Ruiz; E. Chan-López; A. Carbajal-Domínguez; J. Bernal

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the tunneling using a background independent (polymer) quantization scheme. We show that at low energies, for the tunneling through a single potential barrier, the polymer transmission coefficient and the polymer tunneling time converge to its quantum-mechanical counterparts in a clear fashion. As the energy approaches the maximum these polymer quantities abruptly decrease to zero. We use the transfer matrix method to study the tunneling through a series of identical potential barriers. We obtain that the transmission coefficients (polymer and quantum-mechanical) behave qualitatively in a similar manner, as expected. Finally we show that the polymer tunneling time exhibits anomalous peaks compared with the standard result. Numerical results are also presented.

  15. X-ray and synchrotron studies of porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivkov, V. N., E-mail: svn@dm.komisc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Lomov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Physical-Technological Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Physical-Technological Institute (Russian Federation); Vasil'ev, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Nekipelov, S. V. [Komi State Pedagogical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Komi State Pedagogical Institute (Russian Federation); Petrova, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of comprehensive studies of layers of porous silicon of different conductivity types, grown by anodizing standard Si(111) substrates in an electrolyte based on fluoric acid and ethanol with the addition of 5% of iodine and kept in air for a long time, are discussed. Measurements are performed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and ultrasoft X-ray spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The structural parameters of the layers (thickness, strain, and porosity) and atomic and chemical composition of the porous-silicon surface are determined. It is found that an oxide layer 1.5-2.3-nm thick is formed on the surface of the silicon skeleton. The near-edge fine structure of the Si 2p absorption spectrum of this layer corresponds to the fine structure of the 2p spectrum of well coordinated SiO{sub 2}. In this case, the fine structure in the Si 2p-edge absorption region of the silicon skeleton is identical to that of the 2p absorption spectrum of crystalline silicon.

  16. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  17. Self-assembly of conformal polymer electrolyte film for lithium ion microbatteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Christalee

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I apply the theory of polar and apolar intermolecular interactions to predict the behavior of combinations of common battery materials, specifically the cathode substrate lithium cobalt oxide (LCO) and the polymer separator ...

  18. The applications of comb polymer to the study of liver cell adhesion and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, David, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comb polymer, which consists of a hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone with hydrophilic hydroxy-poly(ethylene oxide) (HPOEM) side chains, is a tool that has many possible applications for the study of liver ...

  19. Growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowalls for inverted polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowalls for inverted polymer solar cells Zhiqiang Liang a,n a School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, PR China b May 2013 Keywords: Inverted polymer solar cells Zinc oxide Nanowalls Aqueous solution growth a b s t r

  20. ENVIRONENTAL DEGRADATION OF ADVANCED AND TRADITIONAL ENGINERING Chapter 14. Forms of Polymer Degradation: Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roylance, David

    ENVIRONENTAL DEGRADATION OF ADVANCED AND TRADITIONAL ENGINERING MATERIALS Chapter 14. Forms of Polymer Degradation: Overview Margaret Roylance and David Roylance 1. Introduction 1.1. Usage of polymeric of Environmental Degradation in Polymers 2.1. Thermal depolymerization 2.2. Photolytic oxidation 2.3. Moisture

  1. Multiphase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goal of this research project was to improve the understanding of the gas-oil two-phase flow in fractured porous media. In addition, miscible displacement was studied to evaluate its promise for enhanced recovery.

  2. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  3. Combustion performance of porous silicon-based energetic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Benjamin Aaron [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Son, Steve F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Asay, Blaine W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cho, Kevin Y [PURDUE UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combustion performance of oxidizer filled porous silicon(PSi) was studied. PSi samples with diameters of 2.54 cm were fabricated by electrochemical etching. The % porosity of the samples ranged from 55 to 82%. The samples were cut into 3-5 mm strips and filled with the oxidizers NaClO{sub 4} x 1H{sub 2}O, Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 4H{sub 2}O, S and perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The filled PSi was then burned by igniting the sample with a hot NiChrome{trademark} wire. The burns were recorded using high speed photography from which bring rates were calculated. That burning rates showed a strong dependency on quality of the oxidizer loading. The % porosity did not appear to have a direct affect on the burning rates for those studied. PSi loaded with NaClO{sub 4} x 1H{sub 2}O produced burning rates that ranged from 216-349 cm/s. PSi loaded with Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub x}x 4 H{sub 2}O had burning rates of 154-285 cm/s. An S filled PSi sample burned a rate of 16 to 290 cm/s, and perfluoropolyether loaded PSi burned at a rate of 1.4 cm/s.

  4. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  5. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  6. Characterization of naturally occurring porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, Robert Daniel

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics of natural occur- ring porous media, The gR /K dimensionless ratio is related to the minimum water saturation in the reverse manner as is permeability. REFERENCES Wyllie, M. R. J. and M. B. Spangler: Application of Electrical Resistivity...: Resistivity of Brine-Saturated Sands in Relation to Pore Seometry. Cornell, D. snd D. L. Kstz: Flow of Sases through Consolidated Porous Media. Industrial and En ineeri hemietr (October 1953) Vo . 5, p. 21 5. Leverett, N, C. : Capillary Behavior...

  7. Conductive porous scaffolds as potential neural interface materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Cicotte, Kirsten N.; Buerger, Stephen P.; Reece, Gregory; Dirk, Shawn M.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our overall intent is to develop improved prosthetic devices with the use of nerve interfaces through which transected nerves may grow, such that small groups of nerve fibers come into close contact with electrode sites, each of which is connected to electronics external to the interface. These interfaces must be physically structured to allow nerve fibers to grow through them, either by being porous or by including specific channels for the axons. They must be mechanically compatible with nerves such that they promote growth and do not harm the nervous system, and biocompatible to promote nerve fiber growth and to allow close integration with biological tissue. They must exhibit selective and structured conductivity to allow the connection of electrode sites with external circuitry, and electrical properties must be tuned to enable the transmission of neural signals. Finally, the interfaces must be capable of being physically connected to external circuitry, e.g. through attached wires. We have utilized electrospinning as a tool to create conductive, porous networks of non-woven biocompatible fibers in order to meet the materials requirements for the neural interface. The biocompatible fibers were based on the known biocompatible material poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) as well as a newer biomaterial developed in our laboratories, poly(butylene fumarate) (PBF). Both of the polymers cannot be electrospun using conventional electrospinning techniques due to their low glass transition temperatures, so in situ crosslinking methodologies were developed to facilitate micro- and nano-fiber formation during electrospinning. The conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was controlled by controlling the loading with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Fabrication, electrical and materials characterization will be discussed along with initial in vivo experimental results.

  8. Poly(ethylene oxide) functionalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pratt, Russell Clayton

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple procedure is provided by which the hydroxyl termini of poly(ethylene oxide) can be appended with functional groups to a useful extent by reaction and precipitation. The polymer is dissolved in warmed toluene, treated with an excess of organic base and somewhat less of an excess of a reactive acylating reagent, reacted for several hours, then precipitated in isopropanol so that the product can be isolated as a solid, and salt byproducts are washed away. This procedure enables functionalization of the polymer while not requiring laborious purification steps such as solvent-solvent extraction or dialysis to remove undesirable side products.

  9. Polymers 2014, 6, 311-326; doi:10.3390/polym6020311 ISSN 2073-4360

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    #12;Polymers 2014, 6, 311-326; doi:10.3390/polym6020311 polymers ISSN 2073-4360 www.mdpi.com/journal/polymers copolymers, star polymers, and concentrated polymer brushes on solid surfaces were prepared using living catalysts; block copolymers; triblock copolymers; star polymers; polymer brushes OPEN ACCESS #12;Polymers

  10. Melons are branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razvan Gurau; James P. Ryan

    2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  11. Stiff quantum polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kleinert

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  12. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  13. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Nanofibers: Electrospinning, Structure, and Properties"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Nanofibers: Electrospinning, Structure, and Properties" Dr. Masaya been widely employed as a technique to produce sub-micron and nanometer scale polymer fibers. The technique utilizes electrical forces induced by a high voltage to draw charged polymer solution jet

  14. Polymer-Metal Nanocomposites via Polymer Thin Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Polymer-Metal Nanocomposites via Polymer Thin Film T. P. Radhakrishnan School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad Polymer-metal nanocomposite thin films are versatile materials that not only Chemistry Inside a Polymer Thin Film P. Radhakrishnan School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad metal

  15. Polymer graphite composite anodes for Li-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Polymer graphite composite anodes for Li-ion batteries Basker Veeraraghavan, Bala Haran, Ralph for the graphite particles by in-situ polymerization #12;Experimental Preparation of PPy/Graphite composites Dropwise addition of pyrrole into aqueous slurry of graphite at 0 °C with nitric acid acting as an oxidizer

  16. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  17. Fracture of porous materials induced by crystallization of salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katzoff, Golda Y

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The penetration of salt into porous materials is known to have deleterious effects, often resulting in fracture. The damage process begins with a saline solution penetrating the porous network by way of capillary action. ...

  18. Silvered polymer reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schissel, P.; Neidlinger, H.H.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal objectives of the Solar Thermal Research Program is to develop silvered polymer films for constructing durable, low-cost, lightweight concentrating collectors for high temperature solar thermal systems. The mirrors are characterized for their solar-weighted (air mass 1.5) reflectance and exposed to environmental degradation. Photodegradation of polymers has also been studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy supplemented with surface analysis characterization. Results are discussed for extruded films, ultraviolet effects, metallization, and the effects of polymer additives. (LEW)

  19. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  20. Investigation of porous media structures using NMR restricted diffusion measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Peizhi

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coefficient which produces a new description of molecule diffusion in porous media. Experimental Details Model porous media chosen for investigation are water saturated glass bead packs of different bead sizes from 50 to 300 microns. First the glass beads... is accessible with the aid of sufficiently developed analysis procedures, NMR techniques can be applied to porous structure analysis. For the hypothesis that water saturated in porous media consists of two phases: water removed from domain boundaries...

  1. Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    REVIEWS Mechanical Properties of Porous- Matrix Ceramic Composites** By Frank W. Zok* and Carlos G/Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites REVIEWS The porous matrix concept has been developed primarily. Levi 1. Introduction Damage tolerance can be enabled in continuous fiber-rein- forced ceramic

  2. Solid polymer MEMS-based fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Morse, Jeffrey D. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. The electrolyte layer can consist of either a solid oxide or solid polymer material, or proton exchange membrane electrolyte materials may be used. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

  3. Sulfonated polyphenylene polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, Christopher J. (Albuquerque, NM); Fujimoto, Cy H. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickner, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved sulfonated polyphenylene compositions, improved polymer electrolyte membranes and nanocomposites formed there from for use in fuel cells are described herein. The improved compositions, membranes and nanocomposites formed there from overcome limitations of Nafion.RTM. membranes.

  4. Polymer quantization and Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghanashyam Date; Nirmalya Kajuri

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer quantization was discovered during the construction of Loop Quantum Cosmology. For the simplest quantum theory of one degree of freedom, the implications for dynamics were studied for the harmonic oscillator as well as some other potentials. For more degrees of freedom, the possibility of continuous, kinematic symmetries arises. While these are realised on the Hilbert space of polymer quantum mechanics, their infinitesimal versions are not supported. For an invariant Hamiltonian, these symmetry realizations imply infinite degeneracy suggesting that the symmetry should be spontaneously or explicitly broken. The estimation of symmetry violations in some cases have been analysed before. Here we explore the alternative of shifting the arena to the distributional states. We discuss both the polymer quantum mechanics case as well as polymer quantized scalar field.

  5. Heavily fluorinated electronic polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jeewoo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building blocks, containing majority fluorine content by weight, for PPEs and PPVs have been synthesized. Some of the monomers were shown to give exclusively fluorous-phase soluble polymers, the syntheses of which were ...

  6. NORIA. Nonisothermal Two-Phase Porous Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    NORIA is a finite element program that simultaneously solves four nonlinear parabolic, partial differential equations that describe the transport of water, water vapor, air, and energy through partially saturated porous media. NORIA is designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, non-isothermal, unsaturated porous flow problems. Nearly all material properties, such as permeability, can either be set to constant values or defined as functions of the dependent and independent variables by user-supplied subroutines. The gas phase is taken to be ideal. NORIA is intended to solve nonisothermal problems in which large gradients are expected in the gas pressure.

  7. Method to prepare nanoparticles on porous mediums

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vieth, Gabriel M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Dudney, Nancy J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to prepare porous medium decorated with nanoparticles involves contacting a suspension of nanoparticles in an ionic liquid with a porous medium such that the particles diffuse into the pores of the medium followed by heating the resulting composition to a temperature equal to or greater than the thermal decomposition temperature of the ionic liquid resulting in the removal of the liquid portion of the suspension. The nanoparticles can be a metal, an alloy, or a metal compound. The resulting compositions can be used as catalysts, sensors, or separators.

  8. Conducting polymer nanostructures for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Electronically Conductive Polymer Nanostructures,” Acc.et al. , “Conjugated-Polymer Micro- and Milliactuators for3. Y. Berdichevsky, Y. -H. Lo, “Polymer Microvalve Based on

  9. Exceptional properties of semi-dilute solutions of nanoparticle laden polymers in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    National Laboratory. Advanced Photon Source, Argonne IL January 2005 Dr. Wang will lead studies discovered properties of semi-dilute aqueous solutions of composite polymers of polyethylene oxide and silica with exceptional properties is created by the absorption of the polyethylene oxide onto the silica nanoparticles

  10. Polymers in disordered environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Blavatska; N. Fricke; W. Janke

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of our recent studies aiming at a better understanding of the scaling behaviour of polymers in disordered environments is given. The main emphasis is on a simple generic model where the polymers are represented by (interacting) self-avoiding walks and the disordered environment by critical percolation clusters. The scaling behaviour of the number of conformations and their average spatial extent as a function of the number of monomers and the associated critical exponents $\\gamma$ and $\

  11. Porous, sintered metal filter recovers 100% of catalyst in H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G.L.; Isaacs, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery of catalyst and prevention of catalyst from entering the oxidizer were plant problems for the Interox America process for production of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ by the catalyzed alternative hydrogenation and oxidation of anthraquinone. A porous metal filter element was inserted in the filter unit following the hydrogenation stage to collect the catalyst which forms a permeable cake that is recovered by backwashing on a timer cycle. The porous metal filters consisting of a rigid matrix containing small pores applicable for the collection of very small particles (> 0.5 ..mu.. in liquids and 0.05 ..mu.. in gases) have been in use in plants in UK for 25 years with 75% of the original filter elements still in use. (BLM)

  12. Interfacial thermal conductance in spun-cast polymer films and polymer brushes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Interfacial thermal conductance in spun-cast polymer films and polymer brushes Mark D. Losego inorganic materials and anharmonic polymers have potentially intriguing thermal transport behavior. The low thermal conductivity of amorphous polymers limits significant interfacial effects to polymer film

  13. Microbes encapsulated within crosslinkable polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chidambaram, Devicharan; Liu, Ying; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to porous films comprising crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. Viable microbes are encapsulated within the crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. The crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers are water insoluble and permeable. The invention also relates to methods of making and using such porous films.

  14. Solid-particle erosion of bismaleimide polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandstaedter, A.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Groppi, D.P.; Karasek, K.R. [Allied-Signal Inc., Des Plaines, IL (United States)] [Allied-Signal Inc., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-particle erosion of bismaleimide (BMI) polymers of various compositions was studied and compared with measured mechanical properties. For angular aluminum oxide erodents of mean diameter 42, 63, 143 or 390 {mu}m impacting normal to the surface at 60 m s{sup {minus}1}, the erosion rate was found to be a strong function of the size of the impacting particle. Material removal occurred primarily by a process of brittle-fracture-induced damage. However, the results suggest that for the BMI specimens, degradation and plasticity occurred in addition to fracture, and that the occurrence of these phenomena reduced the erosion rates.

  15. Directed inorganic modification of bi-component polymer fibers by selective vapor reaction and atomic layer deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    . The ALD process promotes selective precursor infusion into the inner core of a core/shell polymer fiber and transmission electron microscopy show that infusion yields selective dispersion of aluminum oxide in different

  16. Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, Timothy W. (Tempe, AZ); Sathe, Sanjeev B. (Tempe, AZ); Peck, Robert E. (Tempe, AZ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

  17. Open-cell glass crystalline porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Zykova, Irina D. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Lubtsev, Rem I. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

  18. Open-cell glass crystalline porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anshits, Alexander G.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Zykova, Irina D.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Lubtsev, Rem I.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

  19. Danish Polymer Centre Annual Report 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danish Polymer Centre Annual Report 2002 #12;2 The Danish Polymer Centre, DTU and Risř Annual.1 Polymer based solar cells (photovoltaics) ................................ 5 2.2 Structuring Plastic ........................................................................ 17 2.7 Biodegradable polymer composites .......................................... 19 2

  20. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy . Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron...

  1. The Polymer Bouncer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Martin-Ruiz; A. Frank; L. F. Urrutia

    2015-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer Quantization (PQ) is a background independent quantization scheme that is deployed in Loop Quantum Gravity. This framework leads to a new short-distance (discretized) structure characterized by a fundamental length. In this paper we use PQ to analyze the problem of a particle bouncing on a perfectly reflecting surface under the influence of Earth's gravitational field, what we have called "\\textit{The Polymer Bouncer}". In this scenario, deviations from the usual quantum effects are induced by the spatial discreteness, but not by a new short-range gravitational interaction. We solve the polymer Schr\\"odinger equation in an analytical fashion, and we evaluate numerically the corresponding energy levels. We find that the polymer energy spectrum exhibits a negative shift compared to the obtained for the quantum bouncer. The comparison of our results with those obtained in the GRANIT experiment leads to an upper bound for the fundamental length scale, namely $\\lambda \\ll 0.6 \\buildrel _{\\circ} \\over {\\mathrm{A}}$. We find polymer corrections to the probability of transitions between levels, induced by small vibrations, together with the probability of spontaneous emission in the quadrupole approximation.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Paul Willhite; Don W. Green; Stan McCool; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the research are to improve the effectiveness of polymer gels to increase volumetric sweep efficiency of fluid displacement processes and to reduce water production in production wells. The research is based on experimental data and conceptual and mathematical models developed from interpretation of experimental data. This report describes two types of mathematical models that were developed. One model type simulates the chemical reactions where polymer molecules are crosslinked to form a 3-dimensional network or gel. The model is based on statistical probabilities of reactions and yields molecular weights averages and distributions as functions of conversion. The second model type simulates the transport of chromium acetate, a common polymer crosslinker, through porous dolomite rock and includes the mechanisms of dolomite dissolution and chromium precipitation. The chromium transport model reasonably agreed with experimental data.

  3. Electrochromic device with a polymer ionic conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Y.; Gu, P.; Tang, J. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Optical Engineering

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic material is one which can undergo a reversible color change on the exertion of an external electric field. This can be used for large-area glazings of future buildings, automobiles, aircrafts, etc. Transmittance control of the smart windows can be useful to reduce lighting, heating and cooling energy loads. The optical and electrochromic properties of tungsten oxide films deposited by e-beam evaporation were investigated. A laminated structure device was prepared. The as-deposited tungsten oxide film was used as the electrochromic film. A solid polymer electrolyte PPG-PMMA-LiClO{sub 4} was used as an ionic conductor. Spectrophotometric measurements show that the luminous transmittance of the device can be modulated between about 60% and 15%.

  4. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO[sub 3], YCrO[sub 3] or LaMnO[sub 3] particles, on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate, (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure between the doped particles, (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles as a contact. 7 figs.

  5. Branched Polymers and Hyperplane Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    We generalize the construction of connected branched polymers and the notion of the volume of the space of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie (Ann Math, 158:1019–1039, 2003), and Kenyon and Winkler ...

  6. Fluctuations of ring polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medalion, Shlomi; Meirovitch, Hagai; Barkai, Eli; Kessler, David A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an exact solution for the distribution of sample averaged monomer to monomer distance of ring polymers. For non-interacting and weakly-interacting models these distributions correspond to the distribution of the area under the reflected Bessel bridge and the Bessel excursion respectively, and are shown to be identical in dimension d greater or equal 2. A symmetry of the problem reveals that dimension d and 4 minus d are equivalent, thus the celebrated Airy distribution describing the areal distribution of the one dimensional Brownian excursion describes also a polymer in three dimensions. For a self-avoiding polymer in dimension d we find numerically that the fluctuations of the scaled averaged distance are nearly identical in dimensions 2 and 3, and are well described to a first approximation by the non-interacting excursion model in dimension 5.

  7. Antithrombogenic Polymer Coating.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhi Heng (San Ramon, CA); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An article having a non-thrombogenic surface and a process for making the article are disclosed. The article is formed by (i) coating a polymeric substrate with a crosslinked chemical combination of a polymer having at least two amino substituted side chains, a crosslinking agent containing at least two crosslinking functional groups which react with amino groups on the polymer, and a linking agent containing a first functional group which reacts with a third functional group of the crosslinking agent, and (ii) contacting the coating on the substrate with an antithrombogenic agent which covalently bonds to a second functional group of the linking agent. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone, the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, the linking agent is a polyhydrazide and the antithrombogenic agent is heparin.

  8. Shape memory polymer medical device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maitland, Duncan (Pleasant Hill, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Bearinger, Jane P. (Livermore, CA); Wilson, Thomas S. (San Leandro, CA); Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Jensen, Wayne A. (Livermore, CA); Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Marion, III, John E. (Livermore, CA); Loge, Jeffrey M. (Stockton, CA)

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  9. Photoconductivity of structures based on the SnO{sub 2} porous matrix coupled with core-shell CdSe/CdS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drozdov, K. A.; Kochnev, V. I.; Dobrovolsky, A. A.; Khokhlov, D. R. [Department of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Department of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Popelo, A. V. [Department of Materials Science, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Department of Materials Science, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rumyantseva, M. N.; Gaskov, A. M.; Ryabova, L. I. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, R. B. [Department of Materials Science, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation) [Department of Materials Science, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Embedding of quantum dots into porous oxide matrixes is a perspective technique for photosensitization of a structure. We show that the sensitization efficiency may be increased by the use of core-shell quantum dots. It is demonstrated that the photoresponse amplitude in a SnO{sub 2} porous matrix with CdSe/CdS quantum dots depends non-monotonously on the number of atomic layers in a shell. The best results are obtained for SnO{sub 2} matrixes coupled with the quantum dots with three atomic layers of a shell. Mechanisms responsible for the structure sensitization are discussed.

  10. BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS KAROLA M´ESZ´AROS ALEXANDER POSTNIKOV Abstract. We of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie [BI], and Kenyon and Winkler [KW] to any hyperplane arrangement A. The volume of the resulting configuration space of connected branched polymers

  11. Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  12. The Orientation Distributions of Lines, Surfaces, and Interfaces around Three-Phase Boundaries in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    in a multiphase ceramic material. I. Introduction THE active cathode regions of many solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes Shen J. Dillon, Lam Helmick,§,¶ Herbert M. Miller,§ Lane Wilson relevant triple phase boundary lines and surfaces near them in SOFC cathodes made up of a porous mixture

  13. Effect of La2Zr2O7 on Interfacial Resistance in Solid Oxide J. R. Smith,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Effect of La2Zr2O7 on Interfacial Resistance in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells A. Chen,a J. R. Smith,a K. L manuscript received August 9, 2010. Published September 14, 2010. Solid oxide fuel cells SOFC are energy to gas phase transport in porous media, is controlled by optimizing electrode mi- crostructures

  14. Unreacted Hugoniots for porous and liquid explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, R.L.; Sheffield, S.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous authors have measured the Hugoniots of a variety of granular explosives pressed to different densities. Each explosive at each density was typically then treated as a unique material having its own Hugoniot. By combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. We discuss application of this method to several materials including HMX, PETN, TNT, and Tetryl, as well as HNS. We also show that the ``Universal Liquid Hugoniot`` can be used to calculate the unreacted Hugoniot for liquid explosives. With this method only the ambient pressure sound speed and density are needed to predict the Hugoniot. Applications presented include nitromethane and liquid TNT.

  15. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

  16. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS: The Gas Diffusion Layer Johannah Itescu Princeton University PRISM REU #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information I. What do fuel cells do? Generate electricity through chemical reaction #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information -+ + eHH 442 2 0244 22 He

  17. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  18. Primordial polymer perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeev S. Seahra; Iain A. Brown; Golam Mortuza Hossain; Viqar Husain

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the generation of primordial fluctuations in pure de Sitter inflation where the quantum scalar field dynamics are governed by polymer (not Schrodinger) quantization. This quantization scheme is related to, but distinct from, the structures employed in Loop Quantum Gravity; and it modifies standard results above a polymer energy scale $M_{\\star}$. We recover the scale invariant Harrison Zel'dovich spectrum for modes that have wavelengths bigger than $M_{\\star}^{-1}$ at the start of inflation. The primordial spectrum for modes with initial wavelengths smaller than $M_{\\star}^{-1}$ exhibits oscillations superimposed on the standard result. The amplitude of these oscillations is proportional to the ratio of the inflationary Hubble parameter $H$ to the polymer energy scale. For reasonable choices of $M_{\\star}$, we find that polymer effects are likely unobservable in CMB angular power spectra due to cosmic variance uncertainty, but future probes of baryon acoustic oscillations may be able to directly constrain the ratio $H/M_{\\star}$.

  19. Synthesis and charge-transport properties of polymers derived from the oxidation of 1-hydro-1'-(6-(pyrrol-1-yl)hexyl)-4,4'-bipyridium Bis(hexafluorophosphate) and demonstration of pH-sensitive microelectrochemical transistor derived from the redox properties of a conventional redox center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, C.F.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1988-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the synthesis and electrochemical properties of redox polymers, having a polypyrrole backbone and viologen subunits, derived from oxidative electropolymerization of 1-methyl-1'-(6-(pyrrol-1-yl)hexyl)-4,4'-bipyridinium (P-V-Me/sup 2 +/) and 1-hydro-1'-(6-(pyrrol-1-yl)hexyl)-4,4'-bipyridinium (P-V-H/sup 2 +/). Closely spaced (approx. 1.5 ..mu..M) Au microelectrode arrays (approx. 2.5 ..mu..m wide /times/ 50 ..mu..m long /times/ 0.1 ..mu..m high) modified with the polymers can be used to study aspects of the charge-transport behavior of the viologen redox system. Poly(P-V-Me/sup 2 +/) have been used to investigate the characteristics of microelectrochemical transistors based on a viologen redox center and a similar redox center, protonated, monoquaternized bipyridinium, which is pH dependent. The interesting properties from poly(P-V-Me/sup 2 +/) and poly(P-V-H/sup 2 +/) stem from behavior of the pendant viologen redox centers. The device based on poly(P-V-Me/sup 2 +/) has a narrow region (approx. 200 mV) of gate voltage, V/sub G/, where the source-drain current, I/sub D/, is nonzero and has a sharp, pH-independent peak in the I/sub D/-V/sub G/ plot at approx. 0.53 V versus SCE associated with the reversible, one-electron reduction of viologen. This result is consistent with electron self-exchange between redox centers being the mechanism for charge transport. The device based on poly(P-V-H/sup 2 +/) shows a pH-dependent I/sub D/ at fixed V/sub G/, as expected from the electrochemical behavior from reversible protonation of the terminal N of the bipyridinium group of poly(P-V-H/sup 2 +/). The microelectrochemical transistor based on poly(P-V-H/sup 2 +/) illustrates the design of chemically sensitive, molecule-based devices using conventional redox materials.

  20. Heat transfer enhancement in a channel with porous baffles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Kang-Hoon

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    with staggered positioned porous baffles. A numerical procedure was implemented, in conjunction with a commercially available Navier-Stokes solver, to model the turbulent flow in porous media. The Brinkman-Forchheimer-Extended Darcy model was used for modeling... fluid flow through the porous baffles. Conventional, one- equation, and two-equation models were used for heat transfer modeling. The accuracy and characteristics of each model were investigated and discussed. The results were compared...

  1. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper.

  2. Porous silicon membranes as ultrafiltration devices: a feasibility study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Xiangrong

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the integrated circuits. According to research results, porous silicon layers are formed by local dissolution of silicon during anodization in hydrofluoric acid solution. Memming and Schwandt (1966) proposed the following model for the etching process... results in the formation of the etched pores. Beale (1984) investigated the microstructure of porous silicon using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The studies show that the structure of porous silicon is not perfectly cylindrical...

  3. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  4. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willit, James L. (Ratavia, IL)

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  5. Processing of YSZ Thin Films on Dense and Porous Substrates (Prop.2002-065)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Ye [ORNL; Zhu, Jiahong [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films with a Zr/Y molar ratio of 0.84:0.16 were synthesized on both dense Si substrates and porous Ni-YSZ anodes using the spin coating technique. Two polymeric precursors were used to process the YSZ films on the Si substrates. The first one utilized a commercial precursor, with butanol added as the diluting solvent. By controlling the content of butanol in the solution, dense and crack-free YSZ films with thickness of 500 nm were obtained after 8 coating runs with a final anneal of 700 C for 4 h. X-ray diffraction was used to monitor the crystallization process in the films during annealing, which indicated that the YSZ films started to crystallize at 300--400 C and became fully crystalline with a cubic structure at temperature {>=} 600 C. In the second case, a new YSZ polymeric precursor was prepared and used for coating. It was found that the viscosity of the precursor solution is critical in controlling the film quality. Relatively thick, dense YSZ films were also synthesized on porous Ni-YSZ anode substrates using a combined colloidal-polymer method.

  6. Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation. Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation. Abstract: In this study, porous silicon...

  7. Living Bacterial Sacrificial Porogens to Engineer Decellularized Porous Scaffolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Feng

    Decellularization and cellularization of organs have emerged as disruptive methods in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Porous hydrogel scaffolds have widespread applications in tissue engineering, regenerative ...

  8. Transport in Porous Media ISSN 0169-3913

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    -011-9720-2 Applicability of the Linearized Governing Equation of Gas Flow in Porous Media Jian Li · Hongbin Zhan · Guanhua

  9. Facile Synthesis of Highly Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes from Polymer Precursors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Catherine Y.; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Wang, H. Hau; Lin, Xiao-Min; Trasobares, Susana; Cook, Russell E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a facile one-step approach which involves no flammable gas, no catalyst, and no in situ polymerization for the preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotube array. A polymer precursor is placed on top of an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane containing regular nanopore arrays, and slow heating under Ar flow allows the molten polymer to wet the template through adhesive force. The polymer spread into the nanopores of the template to form polymer nanotubes. Upon carbonization the resulting multi-walled carbon nanotubes duplicate the nanopores morphology precisely. The process is demonstrated for 230, 50, and 20?nm pore membranes. The synthesized carbonmore »nanotubes are characterized with scanning/transmission electron microscopies, Raman spectroscopy, and resistive measurements. Convenient functionalization of the nanotubes with this method is demonstrated through premixing CoPt nanoparticles in the polymer precursors.« less

  10. Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, M.R.; Gal, E.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and system are described for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous mixture.

  11. Apparatus and method for oxidation and stabilization of polymeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulauskas, Felix L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; White, Terry L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Sherman, Daniel M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of plasma-derived gas containing at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at a selected temperature. The polymer may be directly exposed to the plasma, or alternatively, the plasma may be established in a separate volume from which the reactive species may be extracted and introduced into the vicinity of the polymer. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments.

  12. Apparatus and method for oxidation and stabilization of polymeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulauskas, Felix L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; White, Terry L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Sherman, Daniel M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of plasma-derived gas containing at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at a selected temperature. The polymer may be directly exposed to the plasma, or alternatively, the plasma may be established in a separate volume from which the reactive species may be extracted and introduced into the vicinity of the polymer. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments.

  13. Seeding Bioreactor-Produced Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes on Different Porous, Degradable, Polyurethane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Seeding Bioreactor-Produced Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes on Different Porous in bioreactors and seeded them on porous, 3-dimensional scaffolds prepared using 2 different techniques

  14. High-throughput Characterization of Porous Materials Using Graphics Processing Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jihan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A.E. ; Purcell, T. Computer Graphics Forum 2007, 26(1), 80-of Porous Materials Using Graphics Processing Units Jihanof Porous Materials Using Graphics Processing Units Jihan

  15. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High Performance Supercapacitors. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High...

  16. Relaxation in polymer electrolytes on the nanosecond timescale.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, G.; Fernandez-Perea, R.; Price, D. L.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Howells, W. S.; Materials Science Division; Rutherford-Appleton Lab.

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The relation between mechanical and electrical relaxation in polymer/lithium-salt complexes is a fascinating and still unresolved problem in condensed-matter physics, yet has an important bearing on the viability of such materials for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries. At room temperature, these materials are biphasic: they consist of both fluid amorphous regions and salt-enriched crystalline regions. Ionic conduction is known to occur predominantly in the amorphous fluid regions. Although the conduction mechanisms are not yet fully understood, it is widely accepted that lithium ions, coordinated with groups of ether oxygen atoms on single or perhaps double polymer chains, move through re-coordination with other oxygen-bearing groups. The formation and disruption of these coordination bonds must be accompanied by strong relaxation of the local chain structure. Here we probe the relaxation on a nanosecond timescale using quasielastic neutron scattering, and we show that at least two processes are involved: a slow process with a translational character and one or two fast processes with a rotational character. Whereas the former reflects the slowing-down of the translational relaxation commonly observed in polyethylene oxide and other polymer melts, the latter appears to be unique to the polymer electrolytes and has not (to our knowledge) been observed before. A clear picture emerges of the lithium cations forming crosslinks between chain segments and thereby profoundly altering the dynamics of the polymer network.

  17. Mesoporous carbons and polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, William; Dietz, Steven

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer is prepared by polymerizing a polymerizable component from a mixture containing the polymerizable component and a surfactant, the surfactant and the polymerizable component being present in the mixture in a molar ratio of at least 0.2:1, having an average pore size greater than 4 nm and a density greater than 0.1 g/cc. The polymerizable component can comprise a resorcinol/formaldehyde system and the mixture can comprise an aqueous solution or the polymerizable component can comprise a divinylbenzene/styrene system and the mixture can comprise an organic solution. Alternatively, the polymerizable component can comprise vinylidene chloride or a vinylidene chloride/divinylbenzene system. The polymer may be monolithic, have a BET surface area of at least about 50 m.sup.2 /g., include a quantity of at least one metal powder, or have an electrical conductivity greater than 10 Scm.sup.-1.

  18. Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risř National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

  19. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Choe, Hyoun S. (Waltham, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.2, LiAsF.sub.6, and LiClO.sub.4.

  20. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, K.M.; Alamgir, M.; Choe, H.S.

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li{sup +}) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}, LiAsF{sub 6}, and LiClO{sub 4}. 2 figs.

  1. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large-scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e., the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the interbead elastic potential) is made explicit. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Polymer Crowding and Shape Distributions in Polymer-Nanoparticle Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Kang Lim; Alan R. Denton

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Macromolecular crowding can influence polymer shapes, which is important for understanding the thermodynamic stability of polymer solutions and the structure and function of biopolymers (proteins, RNA, DNA) under confinement. We explore the influence of nanoparticle crowding on polymer shapes via Monte Carlo simulations and free-volume theory of a coarse-grained model of polymer-nanoparticle mixtures. Exploiting the geometry of random walks, we model polymer coils as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor. Accounting for the entropic cost of a nanoparticle penetrating a larger polymer coil, we compute the crowding-induced shift in the shape distributions, radius of gyration, and asphericity of ideal polymers in a theta solvent. With increased nanoparticle crowding, we find that polymers become more compact (smaller, more spherical), in agreement with predictions of free-volume theory. Our approach can be easily extended to nonideal polymers in good solvents and used to model conformations of biopolymers in crowded environments.

  3. Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

  4. Stability of Miscible Displacements Across Stratified Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shariati, Maryam; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report studied macro-scale heterogeneity effects. Reflecting on their importance, current simulation practices of flow and displacement in porous media were invariably based on heterogeneous permeability fields. Here, it was focused on a specific aspect of such problems, namely the stability of miscible displacements in stratified porous media, where the displacement is perpendicular to the direction of stratification.

  5. Combustion fronts in porous media with two layers Steve Schecter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schecter, Stephen

    Combustion fronts in porous media with two layers layer 1 layer 2 Steve Schecter North Carolina Subject: Propagation of a combustion front through a porous medium with two parallel layers having different properties. · Each layer admits a traveling combustion wave. · The layers are coupled by heat

  6. Porous Pavement in Cold Climates Part: Performance and Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porous Pavement in Cold Climates Part: Performance and Cost Onondaga Environmental Institute 17 #12;Overview 1. Hydrology of Permeable Pavements 2. Water Quality Performance 3. Hydraulic Performance However, a large number of installations STILL continue to be sub-standard 4 #12;Porous Pavement Design

  7. SIMULATING NON-DARCY FLOW THROUGH POROUS MEDIA USING SUNDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, C. T. "Tim"

    Abstract A non-Darcy partial differential equation (PDE) model for flow through porous media is presentedSIMULATING NON-DARCY FLOW THROUGH POROUS MEDIA USING SUNDANCE J. P. REESE1 , K. R. LONG2 , C. T media has been modeled using either the linear Darcy's law or some empirical nonlinear relationship

  8. TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP From: Anter El-Azab (anter@seas.ucla.edu) Re with Lithium will can not work and this concept should be terminated. For the case of vanadium alloy on this concept should be terminated. #12;TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT Best Regards, Anter #12;

  9. Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance Stephanie L for supercapacitor applications. Surface modification increases the amount of nitrogen by four times when compared elements in highly porous carbon used for electric double-layer supercapacitors.1 These elements modify

  10. Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media approximation by a finite volume. Quelques tests numériques sont ensuite montrés. KEYWORDS: diffusion, dissolution­precipitation, porous­ ficiency of such disposals relies on material barriers. For such a use, cement concrete offers

  11. Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media approximation by a finite volume numériques sont ensuite montrés. KEYWORDS: diffusion, dissolution-precipitation, porous media, finite volumes barriers. For such a use, cement concrete offers the advantage of having a weak porosity. However, disposal

  12. Invariant measures for a stochastic porous medium equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röckner, Michael

    Invariant measures for a stochastic porous medium equation Giuseppe Da Prato (Scuola Normale AMS :76S05,35J25, 37L40 . 1 Introduction The porous medium equation X t = (Xm ), m N, (1 Brownian motion in H and C is a positive definite bounded operator on H of trace class. To be more concrete

  13. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as an electrode in field emission applications. In this project, the formation of a CoSi2, conducting layer on porous silicon by high dose ion implantation while preserving the pore structure and field emission properties of the underlying porous silicon...

  14. Numerical Computation of Multiphase Flows in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastian, Peter

    Preface iii Notation ix Introduction 1 1 Modeling Immiscible Fluid Flow in Porous Media 7 1.1 Porous Media legendi im Fachgebiet Informatik (Wissenschaftliches Rechnen) #12;ii #12;Preface Groundwater is a precious resource that is important for all forms of life on earth. The quality of groundwater is impaired

  15. COMPARISON OF VARIOUS FORMULATIONS OF THREEPHASE FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , oil, and gas) flow in porous media, including phase, global, and pseudo­global pressure three­phase (e.g., water, oil, and gas) flow in porous media. We show that, under a so­called total­global pressure and two saturations without any assumption. However, it turns out that the phase and pseudo

  16. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

    1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

  17. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  18. Production of porous coating on a prosthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preselected surface areas of a prosthesis are covered by a blend of matching primary metallic particles and expendable particles. The particles are compressed and heated to assure that deformation and metallurgical bonding occurs between them and between the primary particles and the surface boundaries of the prosthesis. Porosity is achieved by removal of the expendable material. The result is a coating including discrete bonded particles separated by a network of interconnected voids presenting a homogeneous porous coating about the substrate. It has strength suitable for bone implant usage without intermediate adhesives, and adequate porosity to promote subsequent bone ingrowth.

  19. Protein separations using porous silicon membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pass, Shannon Marie

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charge or as the absence of an electron in the crystal structure of silicon. The properties of boron doped siTicon are exploited experimentally by setting up an etch cell in which one surface of the silicon serves as the anode and by using... terminals located on the top surface of the etch cell. The current to be used in the experiment and the total time were previously calculated to produce the desired average pore size and porous silicon film thickness, respectively. The power source...

  20. Porous Power Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation to Reduce EmissionsPoncha Hot SpringsPorous

  1. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  2. Stretched Polymers in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Ioffe; Yvan Velenik

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey recent results and open questions on the ballistic phase of stretched polymers in both annealed and quenched random environments.

  3. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  4. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  5. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  6. Thin film-coated polymer webs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wenz, Robert P. (Cottage Grove, MN); Weber, Michael F. (Shoreview, MN); Arudi, Ravindra L. (Woodbury, MN)

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

  7. Photopatterned conjugated polymer electrochromic nanofibers Arvind Kumara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otero, Toribio Fernández

    Photopatterned conjugated polymer electrochromic nanofibers on paper Arvind Kumara , Chris Asemotaa. Electrochromic nanofibers of conducting polymer (terthiophene) have been deposited over a conventional paper in electrochromic characters. SEM images of the conducting polymer nanofibers together with the cellulose fibers

  8. Nitinol-reinforced shape-memory polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Leo, Claudio V

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reinforced shape-memory polymers have been developed from an acrylate based thermoset shape-memory polymer and nitinol wires. A rectangular shape-memory polymer measuring approximately 1 by 2 by 0.1 inches has a ten fold ...

  9. Nanostructure Control of Biologically Inspired Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosales, Adrianne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. B. ; Wagener, K. B. Polymer 2008, 49, 2985-2995. Boz,T. ; Matyjaszewski, K. Polymer 2008, 49, 1567-1578. Kim,Flory, P. J. ; Jackson, J. B. Polymer 1963, 4, (2), 221-236.

  10. Porous Elasticity: Lectures on the elasticity of porous materials as an application of the theory of mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ray M.

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of classical porous media models. Chapter 2 introduces the essentials of the theory of mixtures. Chapters 3,4 and 5 exploit the theory of mixtures to formulate various models of porous elastic materials. Chapter 6 is concerned with establishing connections...

  11. DOI: 10.1002/chem.200901707 Bipyridinium Array-Type Porous Polymer Displaying Hydrogen Storage,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    . Viologens (1,1'-disubstituted-4,4'-bipyridinium) are well-known for their photoelectrochemical activity and redox ability. They can undergo one-electron reduction to produce intensely colored free radicals and act as good electron acceptors in charge-transfer (CT) complexes.[7] If viologen units were di- rectly

  12. Facile one-pot synthesis of porphyrin based porous polymer networks (PPNs)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A This photo shows one ofandScienceas

  13. Highly Stable Porous Polymer Networks with Exceptionally High Gas-Uptake

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged3Education »Center for

  14. Ammonia Capture in Porous Organic Polymers Densely Functionalized with Brnsted Acid Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Changchun, China 130012 *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The elimination of specific environmental to exhibit an uptake of 17.7 mmol/g at 1 bar, the highest capacity yet demonstrated for a readily recyclable that are present in vanishingly low concentrationparts per million or belowpresents a significant technical

  15. Polyamine-Tethered Porous Polymer Networks for Carbon Dioxide Capture from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An Acknowledge

  16. Sulfonate-Grafted Porous Polymer Networks for Preferential CO2 Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF and Photon Science|Stories Site Mapat Low

  17. CO2 Capture from Air Using Porous Polymer Networks | Center for Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries BatteriesCAESMission Welcome

  18. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air Using Amine-Grafted Porous Polymer Networks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries BatteriesCAESMissionMetal-OrganicCarbon Bearing|

  19. Journal Title: Journal of polymer science. Part B, Polymer physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    composites. rigid rod polymer. mo- lecular modeling. poly (azomethine) · epoxy. glass/epoxy composite. Such composites would find * To whom correspondence should be addressed. Journal of Polymer Science: Part B molecular composite. Since heat conduction oc- curs more efficiently intramolecularly (through bonds) than

  20. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, S.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  1. Singular Limits in Polymer Stabilized Liquid Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-31-00T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate equilibrium configurations for a polymer stabilized liquid crys- tal material ... eling the cross section of the liquid crystal-polymer fiber composite.

  2. Partially fluorinated cyclic ionic polymers and membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhen-Yu

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic polymers are made from selected partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic. The polymers are formed into membranes.

  3. Using Theory to Model Polymer Properties There are two general themes to this research: (1) polymer degradation that occurs when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the polymer with nanoinclusions of carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets and other structures. Polymer

  4. Biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides from contaminated gases under aerobic conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, W.A.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A biofilter is described for reducing concentrations of gaseous nitrogen oxides in a polluted gas comprises a porous organic filter bed medium disposed in a housing, the filter bed medium including a mixed culture of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria for converting the nitrogen oxides to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide, and water. A method is described of reducing concentrations of nitrogen oxides in polluted gas comprises conducting the polluted gas through the biofilter so that the denitrifying bacteria can degrade the nitrogen oxides. A preferred filter medium is wood compost, however composts of other organic materials are functional. Regulation of pH, moisture content, exogenous carbon sources, and temperature are described. 6 figs.

  5. Biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides from contaminated gases under aerobic conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A biofilter for reducing concentrations of gaseous nitrogen oxides in a polluted gas comprises a porous organic filter bed medium disposed in a housing, the filter bed medium including a mixed culture of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria for converting the nitrogen oxides to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide, and water. A method of reducing concentrations of nitrogen oxides in polluted gas comprises conducting the polluted gas through the biofilter so that the denitrifying bacteria can degrade the nitrogen oxides. A preferred filter medium is wood compost, however composts of other organic materials are functional. Regulation of pH, moisture content, exogenous carbon sources, and temperature are described.

  6. Polymers in a vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Deutsch

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In a variety of situations, isolated polymer molecules are found in a vacuum and here we examine their properties. Angular momentum conservation is shown to significantly alter the average size of a chain and its conservation is only broken slowly by thermal radiation. The time autocorrelation for monomer position oscillates with a characteristic time proportional to chain length. The oscillations and damping are analyzed in detail. Short range repulsive interactions suppress oscillations and speed up relaxation but stretched chains still show damped oscillatory time correlations.

  7. Tubular screen electrical connection support for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlins, Gregory W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Jaszcar, Michael P. (Murrysville, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel assembly is made of fuel cells (16, 16', 18, 24, 24', 26), each having an outer interconnection layer (36) and an outer electrode (28), which are disposed next to each other with rolled, porous, hollow, electrically conducting metal mesh conductors (20, 20') between the fuel cells, connecting the fuel cells at least in series along columns (15, 15') and where there are no metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

  8. Macrodispersivity tensor for nonreactive solute transport in isotropic and anisotropic fractal porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    porous media: Analytical solutions Hongbin Zhan1 and Stephen W. Wheatcraft Hydrology/Hydrogeology Program

  9. RPM-2: A recyclable porous material with unusual adsorption capability: self assembly via structural transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    RPM-2: A recyclable porous material with unusual adsorption capability: self assembly via, fully recyclable porous material (RPM-2) with a very high sorption capability. Self recent explora- tory study on such a structure, the 3D porous RPM-1 (RPM: Rutgers Recyclable Porous

  10. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affinito, John D. (Kennewick, WA); Gross, Mark E. (Pasco, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  11. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  12. Rotational dynamics of entangled polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Charles Walter; Michiel Laleman; Marco Baiesi; Enrico Carlon

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent results on the rotational dynamics of polymers are reviewed and extended. We focus here on the relaxation of a polymer, either flexible or semiflexible, initially wrapped around a rigid rod. We also study the steady polymer rotation generated by a constant torque on the rod. The interplay of frictional and entropic forces leads to a complex dynamical behavior characterized by non-trivial universal exponents. The results are based on extensive simulations of polymers undergoing Rouse dynamics and on an analytical approach using force balance and scaling arguments. The analytical results are in general in good agreement with the simulations, showing how a simplified approach can correctly capture the complex dynamical behavior of rotating polymers.

  13. Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly (Allentown, PA); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT); Ohrn, Ted R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Peterson, David (Uniontown, OH); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA)

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

  14. Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly (Allentown, PA); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT); Ohm, Ted R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Peterson, David (Uniontown, OH); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Dyer, deceased, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA)

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

  15. Oilfield flooding polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Fred D. (Socorro, NM); Hatch, Melvin J. (Socorro, NM); Shepitka, Joel S. (Socorro, NM); Donaruma, Lorraine G. (Syosset, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monomer, polymers containing the monomer, and the use of the polymer in oilfield flooding is disclosed. The subject monomer is represented by the general formula: ##STR1## wherein: n is an integer from 0 to about 4; m is an integer from 0 to about 6; a is an integer equal to at least 1 except where m is equal to 0, a must equal 0 and where m is equal to 1, a must equal 0 or 1; p is an integer from 2 to about 10; b is an integer equal to at least 1 and is of sufficient magnitude that the ratio b/p is at least 0.2; and q is an integer from 0 to 2. The number of hydroxy groups in the monomer is believed to be critical, and therefore the sum of (a+b) divided by the sum (m+p) should be at least 0.2. The moieties linked to the acrylic nitrogen can be joined to provide a ringed structure.

  16. Rapid process for producing transparent, monolithic porous glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making transparent porous glass monoliths from gels. The glass is produced much faster and in much larger sizes than present technology for making porous glass. The process reduces the cost of making large porous glass monoliths because: 1) the process does not require solvent exchange nor additives to the gel to increase the drying rates, 2) only moderate temperatures and pressures are used so relatively inexpensive equipment is needed, an 3) net-shape glass monoliths are possible using this process. The process depends on the use of temperature to control the partial pressure of the gel solvent in a closed vessel, resulting in controlled shrinking during drying.

  17. Porous silicon ring resonator for compact, high sensitivity biosensing applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Gilberto A.; Hu, Shuren; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ring resonator is patterned on a porous silicon slab waveguide to produce a compact, high quality factor biosensor with a large internal surface area available for enhanced recognition of biological and chemical molecules. The porous nature of the ring resonator allows molecules to directly interact with the guided mode. Quality factors near 10,000 were measured for porous silicon ring resonators with a radius of 25 ?m. A bulk detection sensitivity of 380 nm/RIU was measured upon exposure to salt water solutions. Specific detection of nucleic acid molecules was demonstrated with a surface detection sensitivity of 4 pm/nM.

  18. Towards improved methods for determining porous media multiphase flow functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Song

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the empirical relation by using the three-dimensional saturation and relaxation data. 7 CHAPTER II ESTIMATION OF POROUS MEDIA FLOW FUNCTIONS Multiphase flow functions are required to simulate the flow of multiple fluid phases through porous media....3) Snw + Sw = 1: (2.4) Together with boundary and initial conditions, Eqs. (2.1)-(2.4) provide a mathemat- ical model of three-dimensional, two-phase fluid flow in porous media. Several properties have to be specified in the above model. The densities...

  19. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Technological Center

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  20. Morphological effects on the electrochemical performance of lithium-rich layered oxide cathodes, prepared by electrospinning technique, for lithium-ion battery applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Ji Won; Kalathil, Abdul Kareem; Yim, Chul Jin; Im, Won Bin, E-mail: imwonbin@jnu.ac.kr

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Li-rich Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub 0.17}Co{sub 0.17}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} cathode materials were synthesized by electrospinning technique with different polymers, and their structural, morphological, and electrochemical performances were investigated. It was found that the electrospinning process leads to the formation of a fiber and flower-like morphology, by using different polymers and heat treatment conditions. The nanostructured morphology provided these materials with high initial discharge capacity. The cycling stability was improved with agglomerated nano-particles, as compared with porous materials. - Highlights: • Fiber and flower-like Li-rich cathode was synthesized by simple electrospinning. • Polymer dependent morphology and electrochemical performance was investigated. • Well-organized porous structure facilitates the diffusion of lithium ions. • Technique could be applicable to other cathode materials as well.

  1. Polymer solutions: from hard monomers to soft polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Hansen; C. I. Addison; A. A. Louis

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A coarse-graining strategy for dilute and semi-dilute solutions of interacting polymers, and of colloid polymer mixtures is briefly described. Monomer degrees of freedom are traced out to derive an effective, state dependent pair potential between the polymer centres of mass. The cross-over between good and poor solvent conditions is discussed within a scaling analysis. The method is extended to block copolymers represented as "necklaces" of soft "blobs", and its success is illustrated here in the case of a symmetric diblock copolymer which exhibits microphase separation.

  2. The porous atmosphere of eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir J. Shaviv

    2000-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the wind generated by the great 20 year long super-Eddington outburst of eta-Carinae. We show that using classical stellar atmospheres and winds theory, it is impossible to construct a consistent wind model in which a sufficiently small amount of mass, like the one observed, is shed. One expects the super-Eddington luminosity to drive a thick wind with a mass loss rate substantially higher than the observed one. The easiest way to resolve the inconsistency is if we alleviate the implicit notion that atmospheres are homogeneous. An inhomogeneous atmosphere, or "porous", allows more radiation to escape while exerting a smaller average force. Consequently, such an atmosphere yields a considerably lower mass loss rate for the same total luminosity. Moreover, all the applications of the Eddington Luminosity as a strict luminosity limit should be revised, or at least reanalyzed carefully.

  3. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive dionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m.sup.2 /gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon compositives with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to be high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced.

  4. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication is described for conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive deionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m{sup 2}/gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon composites with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced. 1 fig.

  5. Rapid switching in electrochromic devices based on complementary conducting polymer films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapp, S.A.; Sotzing, G.A.; Reddinger, J.L.; Reynolds, J.R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for stable, rapid switching electrochromic materials that are easy and inexpensive to process has become the focus of a great deal of research in the past few years. Conducting and electroactive polymers are one class of electrochromic materials which may offer a low cost alternative to the traditional metal oxide materials that have been studied in depth. These materials also offer the advantages of having rapid switching rates and a well defined chemical structure. Recently, there have been many new conducting polymer systems developed which exhibit complementary electrochromic behavior and undergo reversible redox chemistry. This presentation will focus on the design, fabrication, and characterization of electrochromic devices based on complementary conducting polymers as cathodic and anodic electrochromic materials. Spectroelectrochemistry results and switching rate determinations will be discussed for two of these polymer based electrochromic devices.

  6. When does TMAO fold a polymer chain and urea unfold it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondal, Jagannath; Berne, B J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Longstanding mechanistic questions about the role of protecting osmolyte trimethylamine N- oxide (TMAO) which favors protein folding and the denaturing osmolyte urea are addressed by studying their effects on the folding of uncharged polymer chains. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we show that 1-M TMAO and 7-M urea solutions act dramatically differently on these model polymer chains. Their behaviors are sensitive to the strength of the attractive dispersion interactions of the chain with its environment: when these dispersion interactions are high enough, TMAO suppresses the formation of extended conformations of the hydrophobic polymer as compared to water, while urea promotes formation of extended conformations. Similar trends are observed experimentally on real protein systems. Quite surprisingly, we find that both protecting and denaturing osmolytes strongly interact with the polymer, seemingly in contrast with existing explanations of the osmolyte effect on proteins. We show that what rea...

  7. Highly efficient photoinduced desorption of N{sub 2}O and CO from porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toker, Gil; Sagi, Roey; Bar-Nachum, Shay; Asscher, Micha [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoinduced desorption (PID) of N{sub 2}O and CO from porous silicon (PSi) samples is reported. Both adsorbates exhibit unusually large cross sections for PID at 193 nm, up to 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the literature values for similar processes on flat Si. Under this UV irradiation, N{sub 2}O molecules undergo photodissociation (a competing process leading to surface oxidation) with a cross section that is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than photodesorption. In the case of CO desorption is the exclusive photodepletion mechanism. PID efficiency decreases with increasing CO coverage suggesting PID hindrance by interactions among the desorbing CO molecules leading to re-adsorption at higher coverage. The wavelength and fluence dependence measurements exclude the possibility of laser induced thermal desorption for both adsorbates. The proposed mechanism for this phenomenon is desorption induced by hot electron transfer from the substrate to the adsorbate. Enhanced lifetime of transient negative adsorbate due to stabilization by localized holes on PSi nanotips can explain the observed abnormally large PID efficiency on top of porous silicon.

  8. Polymer Thermodynamics and Chain Structure Polymers display some similarities and some differences with nano-aggregates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Polymer Thermodynamics and Chain Structure Polymers display some similarities and some differences with nano-aggregates. Both materials are composed of basic units, Kuhn units for polymers which are rod an aggregate in nanomaterials and a polymer coil in Polymer Science. The mass-fractal or minimum dimension

  9. Polymer adsorption near the surface of a polymer solution : a universal behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    699 Polymer adsorption near the surface of a polymer solution : a universal behaviour J. des5 , pour 0 03B5 1. Abstract.2014 A universal property of good solutions of long polymers near. Introduction. The free surface of a polymer solution may attract the polymer which forms an adsorbed layer

  10. ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics. Prof. Rama Bansil Class will be assumed. The course will not emphasize synthetic polymer chemistry. Practical applications of polymers of classes TEXT BOOKS Main Text Book: Required: Polymer Chemistry, 2nd Edition, Hiemenz and Lodge, CRC Press

  11. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gennett, Thomas (Denver, CO); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Landi, Brian J. (Rochester, NY); Heben, Michael J. (Denver, CO)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  12. Kac polymers Paolo Butt`a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procacci, Aldo

    Kac polymers Paolo Butt`a Aldo Procacci Benedetto Scoppola Abstract We show how a polymer in two- sidered on the appropriate scale. Key words: Polymers, Kac potentials, phase transition. Running title: Kac polymers Dedicated to a Marzio Cassandro's birthday. 1 Introduction In the last two decades

  13. Non-strinking siloxane polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-linked polymers formed by ring-opening polymerization of a precursor monomer of the general formula R[CH.sub.2 CH(Si(CH.sub.3).sub.2).sub.2 O].sub.2, where R is a phenyl group or an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms. A cross-linked polymer is synthesized by mixing the monomer with a co-monomer of the general formula CH.sub.2 CHR.sup.2 (SiMe.sub.2).sub.2 O in the presence of an anionic base to form a cross-linked polymer of recurring units of the general formula R(Me.sub.2 SiOCH.sub.2 CHSiMe.sub.2).sub.2 [CH.sub.2 CHR.sup.2 (SiMe.sub.2).sub.2 O].sub.n, where R.sup.2 is hydrogen, phenyl, ethyl, propyl or butyl. If the precursor monomer is a liquid, the polymer can be directly synthesized in the presence of an anionic base to a cross-linked polymer containing recurring units of the general formula R(Me.sub.2 SiOCH.sub.2 CHSiMe.sub.2).sub.2. The polymers have approximately less than 1% porosity and are thermally stable at temperatures up to approximately 500.degree. C. The conversion to the cross-linked polymer occurs by ring opening polymerization and results in shrinkage of less than approximately 5% by volume.

  14. Development of Bioinspired Mn4O4-Cubane Water Oxidation Catalysts: Lessons from Photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    efficient system that uses solar energy to oxidize water is the photosystem II water-oxidizing complex (PSII, Victoria 3800, Australia, § Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia

  15. The evolution of miscible gravity currents in horizontal porous layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

    Gravity currents of miscible fluids in porous media are important to understand because they occur in important engineering projects, such as enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO[subscript 2] sequestration. These flows ...

  16. Simulation of filtration for suspension transport in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yun Sung, 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development and application of a novel method for analyzing the filtration of particles transported through a granular porous medium. The proposed analysis considers the deposition of particles ...

  17. Modelling Flow through Porous Media under Large Pressure Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Shriram

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most interesting and technologically important problems in the study of flow through porous media involve very high pressures and pressure gradients in the flow do- main such as enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. The popular...

  18. Porous material and process development for electrospray propulsion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arestie, Steven Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion electrospray propulsion devices rely on the transportation of ionic liquid propellant to emission regions where ions are extracted at high velocities. One such method involves the use of porous substrates to passively ...

  19. Gasification and combustion modeling for porous char particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Simcha Lev

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification and combustion of porous char particles occurs in many industrial applications. Reactor-scale outputs of importance depend critically on processes that occur at the particle-scale. Because char particles often ...

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of Porous Media Structure on Mixing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Effects of Porous Media Structure on Mixing-Controlled Reactions Using Pore-Scale Modeling and Micromodel Abstract: The objectives of this work were to determine if a...

  1. Carbide-derived carbons - From porous networks to nanotubes and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carbide-derived carbons - From porous networks to nanotubes and graphene Re-direct Destination: Carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) are a large family of carbon materials derived from...

  2. Flow of pH-responsive microcapsules in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gun, Wei Jin; Routh, Alexander F.

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Flow of pH-responsive microcapsules in porous media Wei Jin Gun and Alexander F. Routh* BP Institute for Multiphase Flow, Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, CB3 0EZ, United Kingdom. Abstract...

  3. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous silicon has become potentially important material for microelectronics applications. By using low energy implantation and energy scan implantation, a stable silicide with good electrical conductivity can be formed, and can be used...

  4. Modeling of Porous Electrodes in Molten-Salt Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, John

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Porous Electrodes in Molten-Salt Systems^ John Newmanon High-Temperature Molten Salt B a t - teries, Argonneby the modeling of molten-salt cells, including some

  5. Uncertainty quantification using multiscale methods for porous media flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dostert, Paul Francis

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    numerical models. When solving the flow and transport through heterogeneous porous media some type of upscaling or coarsening is needed due to scale disparity. We describe multiscale techniques used for solving the spatial component of the stochastic flow...

  6. Effective hydraulic conductivity of bounded, strongly heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    Effective hydraulic conductivity of bounded, strongly heterogeneous porous media Evangelos K of Arizona, Tucson Abstract. We develop analytical expressions for the effective hydraulic conductivity Ke boundaries. The log hydraulic conductivity Y forms a Gaussian, statistically homogeneous and anisotropic

  7. Functionalization/passivation of porous graphitic carbon with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data are also presented. Citation: Jensen DS, V Gupta, RE Olsen, AT Miller, RC Davis, D Ess, Z Zhu, MA Vail, A Dadson, and MR Linford.2011."Functionalizationpassivation of porous...

  8. Overlimiting Current and Shock Electrodialysis in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Daosheng

    Most electrochemical processes, such as electrodialysis, are limited by diffusion, but in porous media, surface conduction and electroosmotic flow also contribute to ionic flux. In this article, we report experimental ...

  9. anisotropic porous medium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    outflows ... Germain, Joel; Martel, Hugo 2009-01-01 24 Ultrasonic measurement of porous medium in an aqueous environment Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: August 1995 Major...

  10. Ultrasonic measurement of porous medium in an aqueous environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daubon, Jose C

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a medical ultrasonic scanning device was studied as a measuring tool for determining the physical characteristics of soft porous media in an turbid aqueous environment. Three different sponge types were used as the soft objects. A method...

  11. Experimental design for study of nucleate boiling in porous structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Mitchell Joseph

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superheat required to initiate nucleate boiling inside porous wicks is not well understood in practice. This thesis reports the design of an experimental setup for investigating the onset of vapor nucleation in sintered ...

  12. Thermodynamics of tubelike flexible polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Vogel; Thomas Neuhaus; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present the general phase behavior of short tubelike flexible polymers. The geometric thickness constraint is implemented through the concept of the global radius of curvature. We use sophisticated Monte Carlo sampling methods to simulate small bead-stick polymer models with Lennard-Jones interaction among non-bonded monomers. We analyze energetic fluctuations and structural quantities to classify conformational pseudophases. We find that the tube thickness influences the thermodynamic behavior of simple tubelike polymers significantly, i.e., for given temperature, the formation of secondary structures strongly depends on the tube thickness.

  13. Novel oxide-oxide fiber reinforced hot gas filter development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.A.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to fabricate and test oxide fiber reinforced composite hot gas filter elements for advanced power generation systems. The level of mechanical durability exhibited by the currently available filters in field tests indicates that more rugged filters are required to meet the demands of large power generation systems. Furthermore, long term corrosion resistance of currently available filters has yet to be demonstrated in PFBC systems. The essential requirements of a composite material designed to meet the program objective for a toughened hot gas filter include the following: Stable continuous fiber; rigid porous matrix; engineered fiber-matrix interface; and cost effectiveness. Based on properties, availability, and cost, Mitsui`s ALMAX alumina fiber and 3M`s NEXTEL 610 alumina fiber were selected as the oxide reinforcement fibers. In order to meet the economic goals of the program it is essential that the cost and amount of continuous fiber be minimized. A four axis filament winder will be used to fabricate filter Preforms in a variety of fiber architectures. Carbon was used as the initial fiber coating because it was known to be resistant to the Processing chemicals. The coating was produced by pyrolysis of the resin based sizings on the continuous fibers. The matrix of the composite filter is comprised of chopped ceramic fiber. Saffil fiber was used for all compositions in this program.

  14. Macrostructure-dependent photocatalytic property of high-surface-area porous titania films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, T., E-mail: t-kimura@aist.go.jp [Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous titania films with different macrostructures were prepared with precise control of condensation degree and density of the oxide frameworks in the presence of spherical aggregates of polystyrene-block-poly(oxyethylene) (PS-b-PEO) diblock copolymer. Following detailed explanation of the formation mechanisms of three (reticular, spherical, and large spherical) macrostructures by the colloidal PS-b-PEO templating, structural variation of the titania frameworks during calcination were investigated by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, photocatalytic performance of the macroporous titania films was evaluated through simple degradation experiments of methylene blue under an UV irradiation. Consequently, absolute surface area of the film and crystallinity of the titania frameworks were important for understanding the photocatalytic performance, but the catalytic performance can be improved further by the macrostructural design that controls diffusivity of the targeted molecules inside the film and their accessibility to active sites.

  15. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arora, Michelle B. (Woodridge, IL); Hestekin, Jamie A. (Morton Grove, IL); Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); St. Martin, Edward J. (Libertyville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  16. Porous silicon membranes as ultrafiltration devices: a feasibility study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Xiangrong

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    etching have several physical qualities desirable for an ultrafiltration membrane. Porous silicon layers with mean pore sizes of 7. 5 ? 11. 0 nm were fabricated. Porous silicon membrane samples were tested for permeability using nitrogen gas... . . 8 10 . . . 12 GAS FLOW TESTING 14 Apparatus and test procedure of gas flow testing Inf1uence of etching current density on gas flow rate Influence of the concentration of hydrofluoric acid on gas flow rate . . . 1 4 17 . . . 20 TABLE...

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of methane adsorbed on porous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Feng

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by FENG I I Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1992 Major Subject: Physics NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by FENG LI Approved as to style and content by: . P. Kirk (Chair of Committee) i G. Agnolet (Member) J. H. Ross, r (Member) M...

  18. The study of methane adsorbed on porous silicon by NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czermak, Adam Kazimierz

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON BY NMR A Thesis by ADAM KAZIMIERZ CZERMAK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986... Major Subject: Physics THE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON BY NMR A Thesis by ADAM KAZIMIERZ CZERMAK Approved as to style and content by: e Wile . Kirk (Chairman of Committee) J eevak M. Par pi a (Member) Randall L. Geiger...

  19. Two dimensional properties of methane adsorbed on porous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennis, Richard Franklin

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TWO DIMENSIONAL PROPERTIES OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by RICHARD FRANKLIN TENNIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Physics TWO DIMENSIONAL PROPERTIES OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by RICHARD FRANKLIN TENNIS Approved as to style and content by: P. Kirk (C ir of Committee) Glenn olet (M er) Da J. Ernst...

  20. Preparation of Polymer-Coated Functionalized Ferrimagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Shi

    A simple chemical method to synthesize PMAA coated maghemite nanoparticles is described. Monomer methacrylic acid molecules were absorbed onto the synthesized ferrimagnetic nanoparticles followed by polymerization. The ...

  1. Oxidation catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceyer, Sylvia T. (Cambridge, MA); Lahr, David L. (Cambridge, MA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  2. Unusual behavior of poly(ethylene-oxide) in aqueous mixtures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lal, J.; Hakem, I. F.; IPNS

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The model system of poly(ethylene-oxide) or PEO, where the changing hydrogen-bond connectivity of the water has large effect on the conformation of the polymer chain, in mixtures of water and acetonitrile, is experimentally studied. The results show the existence of a threshold water content in the system at which the 3d connectivity of the water network begins. Unusual expansion of the polymer chain, an effect larger than that observed in either of the pure solvents, is seen. Upon addition of small amounts of a monovalent salt, binding of ion to polymer takes place in pure acetonitrile solutions. Salt ions begin to co-ordinate with water molecules at the same solvent ratio as the threshold for water network formation. Ions now no longer complex to PEO; instead, hydrogen bonding of water to the polymer strongly dictates conformation in this regime.

  3. Characterization of macro-length conducting polymers and the development of a conducting polymer rotary motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bryan D. (Bryan David), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers are a subset of materials within the electroactive polymer class that exhibit active mechanical deformations. These deformations induce stresses and strains that allow for conducting polymers to be used ...

  4. Polymer electronic devices and materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, William Kent; Baca, Paul Martin; Dirk, Shawn M.; Anderson, G. Ronald; Wheeler, David Roger

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer electronic devices and materials have vast potential for future microsystems and could have many advantages over conventional inorganic semiconductor based systems, including ease of manufacturing, cost, weight, flexibility, and the ability to integrate a wide variety of functions on a single platform. Starting materials and substrates are relatively inexpensive and amenable to mass manufacturing methods. This project attempted to plant the seeds for a new core competency in polymer electronics at Sandia National Laboratories. As part of this effort a wide variety of polymer components and devices, ranging from simple resistors to infrared sensitive devices, were fabricated and characterized. Ink jet printing capabilities were established. In addition to promising results on prototype devices the project highlighted the directions where future investments must be made to establish a viable polymer electronics competency.

  5. Continuous production of conducting polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaige, Terry A. (Terry Alden), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device to continuously produce polypyrrole was designed, manufactured, and tested. Polypyrrole is a conducting polymer which has potential artificial muscle applications. The objective of continuous production was to ...

  6. Constitutive modeling of active polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Therkelsen, Scott V. (Scott Vincent), 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a three-dimensional constitutive model of active polymeric materials, including changes in material volume and properties due to actuation. Active polymers reversibly change shape, volume and/or material ...

  7. A conjugated polymer plastic gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a gel route to process highly oriented conjugated polymer films and fibers. The incorporation of hexafluoroisopropanol, a strong and stable dipolar group, to the polythiophene backbone enhances the solubility ...

  8. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI); Dourado, Sunil K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dulebohn, Joel I. (Lansing, MI); Hanchar, Robert J. (Charlotte, MI)

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  9. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics.

  10. Polymer Bose--Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Castellanos; G. Chacon-Acosta

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we analyze a non--interacting one dimensional polymer Bose--Einstein condensate in an harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose--Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for $\\lambda^{2}$ up to $ \\lesssim 10 ^{-16}$m$^2$. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles.

  11. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  12. Hydrogen separation membrane on a porous substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Song, Sun-Ju (Orland Park, IL); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL); Chen, Ling (Woodridge, IL); Dorris, Stephen E. (LaGrange Park, IL); Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen permeable membrane is disclosed. The membrane is prepared by forming a mixture of metal oxide powder and ceramic oxide powder and a pore former into an article. The article is dried at elevated temperatures and then sintered in a reducing atmosphere to provide a dense hydrogen permeable portion near the surface of the sintered mixture. The dense hydrogen permeable portion has a higher initial concentration of metal than the remainder of the sintered mixture and is present in the range of from about 20 to about 80 percent by volume of the dense hydrogen permeable portion.

  13. Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. Abstract: A review with 171 references. Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers for...

  14. Exploring Polymer and Liposomal Carriers for Optimized Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Heidi M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1459–1467. Fox, M. E. Dendritic polymers for the delivery ofiii Chapter 1: Introduction to Polymer and Liposome Drugbioavailability. Conclusions Polymers and liposomes can be

  15. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent Developments in Polymer MEMS. Advanced Materials,using thin silicon/polymer bimorph membranes. Sensors andof cantilever arrays reveal polymer film expansion and

  16. Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers. Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers. Abstract: Super-absorbent polymers (SAPs) have...

  17. a-1 polymer chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    walk in random Sepplinen, Timo 16 Polymer-Metal Nanocomposites via Polymer Thin Film Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Polymer-Metal...

  18. Coordination polymers and building blocks based on ditopic heteroscorpionate ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santillan, Guillermo A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Silver (I) Coordination Polymers formed through hydrogenBlocks for Coordination Polymers” Inorg. Chem. *One of theof Silver(I) Coordination Polymers Formed through Hydrogen

  19. High cation transport polymer electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state ion conducting electrolyte and a battery incorporating same. The electrolyte includes a polymer matrix with an alkali metal salt dissolved therein, the salt having an anion with a long or branched chain having not less than 5 carbon or silicon atoms therein. The polymer is preferably a polyether and the salt anion is preferably an alkyl or silyl moiety of from 5 to about 150 carbon/silicon atoms.

  20. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The transport of foam in porous media is complicated in that the number of lamellae present governs flow characteristics such as viscosity, relative permeability, fluid distribution, and interactions between fluids. Hence, foam is a non-Newtonian fluid. During transport, foam destruction and formation occur. The net result of the two processes determines the foam texture (i.e., bubble density). Some of the foam may be trapped during transport. According to the impacts of the aqueous and gas flow rates, foam flow generally has two regimes – weak and strong foam. There is also a minimum pressure gradient to initiate foam flow and a critical capillary for foam to be sustained. Similar to other fluids, the transport of foam is described by Darcy’s law with the exception that the foam viscosity is variable. Three major approaches to modeling foam transport in porous media are the empirical, semi-empirical, and mechanistic methods. Mechanistic approaches can be complete in principal but may be difficult to obtain reliable parameters, whereas empirical and semi-empirical approaches can be limited by the detail used to describe foam rheology and mobility. Mechanistic approaches include the bubble population-balance model, the network/percolation theory, the catastrophe theory, and the filtration theory. Among these methods, all were developed for modeling polyhedral foam with the exception that the method based on the filtration theory was for the ball foam (microfoam).

  1. Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, A.F.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Rambach, G.D.; Randich, E.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated. 8 figs.

  2. Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rambach, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA); Randich, Erik (Endinboro, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated.

  3. Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rambach, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA); Randich, Erik (Endinboro, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated.

  4. Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

  5. Electrokinetic coupling in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, A.; Linde, N.; Cerepi, A.; Jougnot, D.; Matthai, S.; Finsterle, S.

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a charged porous material that is saturated bytwo fluid phases that are immiscible and continuous on the scale of arepresentative elementary volume. The wetting phase for the grains iswater and the nonwetting phase is assumed to be an electricallyinsulating viscous fluid. We use a volume-averaging approach to derivethe linear constitutive equations for the electrical current density aswell as the seepage velocities of the wetting and nonwetting phases onthe scale of a representative elementary volume. These macroscopicconstitutive equations are obtained by volume-averaging Ampere's lawtogether with the Nernst Planck equation and the Stokes equations. Thematerial properties entering the macroscopic constitutive equations areexplicitly described as functions of the saturation of the water phase,the electrical formation factor, and parameters that describe thecapillary pressure function, the relative permeability function, and thevariation of electrical conductivity with saturation. New equations arederived for the streaming potential and electro-osmosis couplingcoefficients. A primary drainage and imbibition experiment is simulatednumerically to demonstrate that the relative streaming potential couplingcoefficient depends not only on the water saturation, but also on thematerial properties of the sample, as well as the saturation history. Wealso compare the predicted streaming potential coupling coefficients withexperimental data from four dolomite core samples. Measurements on thesesamples include electrical conductivity, capillary pressure, thestreaming potential coupling coefficient at various level of saturation,and the permeability at saturation of the rock samples. We found verygood agreement between these experimental data and the modelpredictions.

  6. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  7. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansur, Louis K [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhattacharya, R [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH] [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL] [ORNL; Clemons, Art [ORNL] [ORNL; Eberle, Cliff [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans, H B [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH] [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL] [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, E H [Consultant, Milpitas, CA] [Consultant, Milpitas, CA; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL] [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL] [ORNL; Rivard, John D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  8. The synthesis and characterization of porous, conductive, and ordered materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, Tarun Chandru

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different classes of polymers were pursued as candidates for materials possessing porosity, conductivity, and crystalline order. Attempts were made with hexaazatrinaphthylene- and dibenzotetrathiafulvalene-based ...

  9. J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) 1625-1646 DECEMBER1996, PAGE 1625 An Overview of Buried Oxides on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Silicon-On- Insulator (SOI) Concept 70's Zone Melting Recrystallization (ZMR) Limited recrystallization. by laser and electron beams. Limited seed growth. Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth (ELO). 80's Separation by Implantation of Additive synthesis of Si02 OXygen (SIMOX). Full-Isolation by Porous Oxidized Selective

  10. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTING POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, M.; Clark, E.; Lascola, R.

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of beta (tritium) and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of conducting polymer films are documented to determine their potential use as a sensing and surveillance device for the tritium facility. It was shown that surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma and tritium gas. In order to compare the results from the two radiation sources, an approximate dose equivalence was calculated. The materials were also sensitive to small radiation doses (<10{sup 5} rad), showing that there is a measurable response to relatively small total doses of tritium gas. Spectroscopy was also used to confirm the mechanism by which this sensing device would operate in order to calibrate this sensor for potential use. It was determined that one material (polyaniline) was very sensitive to oxidation while the other material (PEDOT-PSS) was not. However, polyaniline provided the best response as a sensing material, and it is suggested that an oxygen-impermeable, radiation-transparent coating be applied to this material for future device prototype fabrication. A great deal of interest has developed in recent years in the area of conducting polymers due to the high levels of conductivity that can be achieved, some comparable to that of metals [Gerard 2002]. Additionally, the desirable physical and chemical properties of a polymer are retained and can be exploited for various applications, including light emitting diodes (LED), anti-static packaging, electronic coatings, and sensors. The electron transfer mechanism is generally accepted as one of electron 'hopping' through delocalized electrons in the conjugated backbone, although other mechanisms have been proposed based on the type of polymer and dopant [Inzelt 2000, Gerard 2002]. The conducting polymer polyaniline (PANi) is of particular interest because there are extensive studies on the modulation of the conductivity by changing either the oxidation state of the main backbone chain, or by protonation of the imine groups [de Acevedo, 1999]. There are several types of radiation sensors commercially available, including ionization chambers, geiger counters, proportional counters, scintillators and solid state detectors. Each type has advantages, although many of these sensors require expensive electronics for signal amplification, are large and bulky, have limited battery life or require expensive materials for fabrication. A radiation sensor constructed of a polymeric material could be flexible, light, and the geometry designed to suit the application. Very simple and inexpensive electronics would be necessary to measure the change in conductivity with exposure to radiation and provide an alarm system when a set change of conductivity occurs in the sensor that corresponds to a predetermined radiation dose having been absorbed by the polymer. The advantages of using a polymeric sensor of this type rather than those currently in use are the flexibility of sensor geometry and relatively low cost. It is anticipated that these sensors can be made small enough for glovebox applications or have the ability to monitor the air tritium levels in places where a traditional monitor cannot be placed. There have been a few studies on the changes in conductivity of polyaniline specifically for radiation detection [de Acevedo, 1999; Lima Pacheco, 2003], but there have been no reports on the effects of tritium (beta radiation) on conducting polymers, such as polyaniline or polythiophene. The direct implementation of conducting polymers as radiation sensor materials has not yet been commercialized due to differing responses with total dose, dose rate, etc. Some have reported a large increase in the surface conductivity with radiation dose while others report a marked decrease in conductive properties; these differing observations may reflect the competing mechanisms of chain scission and cross-linking. However, it is clear that the radiation dose effects on conducting polymers must be fully understood before these materials can be used

  11. Porous platinum-based catalysts for oxygen reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Jonah D; Snyder, Joshua D

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A porous metal that comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A fuel cell includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and an electrolyte arranged between the first and the second electrodes. At least one of the first and second electrodes is coated with a porous metal catalyst for oxygen reduction, and the porous metal catalyst comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A method of producing a porous metal according to an embodiment of the current invention includes producing an alloy consisting essentially of platinum and nickel according to the formula Pt.sub.xNi.sub.1-x, where x is at least 0.01 and less than 0.3; and dealloying the alloy in a substantially pH neutral solution to reduce an amount of nickel in the alloy to produce the porous metal.

  12. Polymer Welding: Strength Through Entanglements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting Ge; Flint Pierce; Dvora Perahia; Gary S. Grest; Mark O. Robbins

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale simulations of thermal welding of polymers are performed to investigate the rise of mechanical strength at the polymer-polymer interface with the welding time. The welding process is in the core of integrating polymeric elements into devices as well as in thermal induced healing of polymers; processes that require development of interfacial strength equal to that of the bulk. Our simulations show that the interfacial strength saturates at the bulk shear strength much before polymers diffuse by their radius of gyration. Along with the strength increase, the dominant failure mode changes from chain pullout at the interface to chain scission as in the bulk. Formation of sufficient entanglements across the interface, which we track using a Primitive Path Analysis is required to arrest catastrophic chain pullout at the interface. The bulk response is not fully recovered until the density of entanglements at the interface reaches the bulk value. Moreover, the increase of interfacial strength before saturation is proportional to the number of interfacial entanglements between chains from opposite sides.

  13. Hollow Core-Shell Structured Porous Si-C Nanocomposites for Li...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hollow Core-Shell Structured Porous Si-C Nanocomposites for Li-Ion Battery Anodes. Hollow Core-Shell Structured Porous Si-C Nanocomposites for Li-Ion Battery Anodes. Abstract:...

  14. Highly porous chemically modified carbon cryogels and their coherent nanocomposites for energy applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    the pores, porous media for natural gas (methane) storage at reduced pressure, and scaffolds for hydride the pores, porous media for natural gas (m of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, 430074, China d

  15. Study of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media with laser-polarized ą˛?Xe NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ruopeng, 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media by using laser-polarized ą˛?Xe . Two different physical processes, the gas transport in porous rock cores and ...

  16. Thin Porous Metal Sheet-Supported NaA Zeolite Membrane for Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thin Porous Metal Sheet-Supported NaA Zeolite Membrane for WaterEthanol Separation. Thin Porous Metal Sheet-Supported NaA Zeolite Membrane for WaterEthanol Separation. Abstract:...

  17. Flow adjustment and interior flow associated with a rectangular porous obstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey Tsaros

    The flow at the leading edge and in the interior of a rectangular porous obstruction is described through experiments and scaling. The porous obstruction consists of an emergent, rectangular array of cylinders in shallow ...

  18. Discrete particle transport in porous media : discrete observations of physical mechanisms influencing particle behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Joon Sik, 1973-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of how discrete particles in the micron to submicron range behave in porous media is important to a number of environmental problems. Discrete particle behavior in the interior of a porous medium is complex ...

  19. NERSC Analysis of Void Space of Porous Materials Used in Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Porous Materials Analysis of Void Space of Porous Materials Used in Energy-related Applications fmm-smmaciek.jpg We have developed partial differential equations-based tools that...

  20. Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

  1. Influence of an adsorbing polymer in the aging dynamics of Laponite clay suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zulian; B. Ruzicka; G. Ruocco

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay-polymer dispersions in aqueous solutions have attracted a great interest in recent years due to their industrial applications and intriguing physical properties. Aqueous solutions of bare Laponite particles are known to age spontaneously from an ergodic state to a non ergodic state in a time varying from hours to months depending on Laponite concentration. When a polymer species like Polyethylene Oxide (PEO) is added to the solution, it weakly adsorbs on clay particle surfaces modifying the effective interaction potential between Laponite particles. A dynamic light scattering study, varying polymer concentration at fixed polymer molecular weight (Mw=200.000 g/mol), has been performed in order to understand the effect of polymer on the aging dynamics of the system. The results obtained show that arresting phenomena between clay particles are hindered if PEO is added and consequently the aging dynamics slows down with increasing PEO concentration. This process is possibly due to the progressive coverage of the clay surface by polymers that grow with increasing PEO concentration and may lead to steric stabilization.

  2. Microstructure Sensitive Design and Processing in Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Hamid Garmestani; Dr. Stephen Herring

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to develop and inexpensive manufacturing process for deposition of functionally graded thin films of LSM oxides with porosity graded microstructures for use as IT-SOFCs cathode. The spray pyrolysis method was chosen as a low-temperature processing technique for deposition of porous LSM films onto dense YXZ substrates. The effort was directed toward the optimization of the processing conditions for deposition of high quality LSM films with variety of morphologies in the range of dense to porous microstructures. Results of optimization studies of spray parameters revealed that the substrate surface temperature is the most critical parameter influencing the roughness and morphology, porosity, cracking and crystallinity of the film.

  3. Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Non-bulk Polymer Interphases in Nanotube-reinforced Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Non-bulk Polymer Interphases in Nanotube-reinforced Polymers polymer composite materials with outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. A hurdle to nanoscale interactions between the embedded NTs and adjacent polymer chains. This interphase region

  4. ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics. Prof. Rama Bansil Class: Blackboard.bu.edu ME/MS/BE 504 PY 744 A1 POLYMERS AND SOFT MATERIALS (FALL 2012) (12FALLENGME504_A1) E with thermodynamics and statistical mechanics will be assumed. Practical applications of polymers will be discussed

  5. Some Rigorous Results on Semiflexible Polymers I. Free and confined polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velenik, Yvan

    Some Rigorous Results on Semiflexible Polymers I. Free and confined polymers O. Hryniva , Y 4, Switzerland Abstract We introduce a class of models of semiflexible polymers. The latter, called the persistence length, being of the same order as the polymer length. We determine

  6. Polymers: Molecular Structure [A polymer is a very large molecule comprising hundreds or thousands of atoms,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    1 Polymers: Molecular Structure [A polymer is a very large molecule comprising hundreds into chain or network structures|The concept of the polymer is one of the great ideas of twentieth century with the name of Hermann Staudinger who received the Nobel Prize in 1953. The influence of the polymer (or

  7. Confining multiple polymers between sticky walls: a directed walk model of two polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rechnitzer, Andrew

    Confining multiple polymers between sticky walls: a directed walk model of two polymers Thomas Wong 30, 2014 Abstract We study a model of two polymers confined to a slit with sticky walls. More on the square lattice. We compare the infinite slit limit, in which the length of the polymer (thermodynamic

  8. The challenges of organic polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saif Addin, Burhan K. (Burhan Khalid)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and commercial prospects of polymer solar cells were evaluated. Polymer solar cells are an attractive approach to fabricate and deploy roll-to-roll processed solar cells that are reasonably efficient (total ...

  9. Modeling and Optimization of Interpenetrating Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Modeling and Optimization of Interpenetrating Polymer Network Process Weijie Lin, Lorenz T. Biegler. Crosslinking Features Complex diffusion; single component reaction Complex composite networking reaction · Initiator feeding rate · Initial polymer · Monomer concentration · Initiator concentration · Holding

  10. Transports of Polymer Nanomedicine in the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing production and commercial use of polymer nanomedicine and a lack of regulation to govern their disposal, polymer nanomedicine may enter into soils and ultimately into ground water system. In this dissertation, adsorption of polymeric...

  11. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM); Apen, Paul G. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  12. Dynamics of Polymers in Flowing Colloidal Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hsieh

    Using hydrodynamic simulations we examine the behavior of single polymers in a confined colloidal suspension under flow. We study the conformations of both, collapsed and noncollapsed polymers. Our results show that the ...

  13. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM); Apen, Paul G. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  14. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Thomas S; Hearon, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  15. Surface Modification of Polymer Substrates by Oxygen Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Araki, R.; Yakushiji, T. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen cluster ions and/or monomer ions were used for the sputtering and the surface modification of polymers such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). For the case of oxygen cluster ion irradiation, the sputtered depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the sputtering yield was much larger than that by the monomer ion irradiation. The sputtered particles represented the polymer structure, which indicated that the bond scission by the cluster ion irradiation resulted in an ejection of monomer molecule through the intermolecular collision. On the other hand, for the oxygen monomer ion irradiation, the implanted depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the bond scission occurred at the deep region through the binary collision with the high energetic ions. Therefore, the sputtering yield for the polymer surfaces decreased, and the sputtering effect became very small. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was more effective for oxidation of the PET surfaces rather than the monomer ion irradiation or the cluster ion irradiation. As a result, the contact angle measurement showed that the wettability of the PET surfaces irradiated by the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was much enhanced.

  16. Simulation of surface waves with porous boundaries in a 2-D numerical wave tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Weoncheol

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are obtained for an arbitrary 2-D body. The boundary element method is then extended to the problem with porous boundaries. The flow inside porous medium is based on Darcy's rule. Analytic solutions are obtained for the flat porous bottom case and compared...

  17. Water Quality and Hydrologic Performance of a Porous Asphalt Pavement as a Storm-Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    examined the functionality of a porous pavement storm-water management system in coastal New Hampshire headings: Stormwater management; Runoff; Porous media; Pavements; Cold regions; Best Management Practice; Water quality; Water treatment. Author keywords: Storm-water management; Runoff; Porous pavements; Cold

  18. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an illumination source comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interstices thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon. 1 fig.

  19. SALT DAMAGE OF POROUS MATERIALS: A COMBINED THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinsch, Klaus

    SALT DAMAGE OF POROUS MATERIALS: A COMBINED THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Herbert Juling-resolved deformation data were promising and confirmed the dilatometric results. Keywords: salt crystallization, porous Introduction It is generally recognized that crystal growth of salts in porous materials is a major cause

  20. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination source is disclosed comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interstices thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon. 1 fig.

  1. The acoustical flows of the hydrophobic and anticeptic liquids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the acoustical flows in the porous or microcrum- bling media. Concrete and brick walls being porous media absorbThe acoustical flows of the hydrophobic and anticeptic liquids in porous media V. Tsaplev North effect. Just the same, if the protective covering of the concrete or brick wall is damaged, they begin

  2. DYNAMICS OF FREE SURFACES IN RANDOM POROUS MEDIA DANIEL M. TARTAKOVSKY AND C. L. WINTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    media to be concrete. Predicting flow through natural porous media is complicated by their high degreeDYNAMICS OF FREE SURFACES IN RANDOM POROUS MEDIA DANIEL M. TARTAKOVSKY AND C. L. WINTER SIAM J­1876 Abstract. We consider free surface flow in random porous media by treating hydraulic conduc- tivity

  3. A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete Michael Chapwanya residing in the porous concrete matrix. The main hypothesis in this model is that the reaction product hydration; Porous media; Reaction-diffusion equations; Vari- able porosity. 1. Introduction Concrete

  4. Asymptotical Computations for a Model of Flow in Saturated Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WeinmĂĽller, Ewa B.

    a variably saturated porous medium with exponential diffusivity, such as soil, rock or concrete is given by uAsymptotical Computations for a Model of Flow in Saturated Porous Media P. Amodio a , C.J. Budd b for an implicit second order ordinary differential equation which arises in models of flow in saturated porous

  5. Bending Creep Test to Measure the Viscosity of Porous Materials during Sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messing, Gary L.

    Bending Creep Test to Measure the Viscosity of Porous Materials during Sintering Sang-Ho Lee creep test is proposed for measuring the change in viscosity of a porous material during densification be measured. Experiments with porous Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 beams were used to illustrate the bending creep test

  6. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination source comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interticies thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon.

  7. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination source comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interticies thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon.

  8. Porous GaN nanowires synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bongsoo

    Porous GaN nanowires synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition Seung Yong Bae a , Hee Won 2003 Abstract Porous structured GaN nanowires were synthesized with a large scale by chemical vapor to 1 mm. The porous GaN nanowires consist of the wurtzite single crystal grown with the [0 1 1

  9. Adsorption of polymers at nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Vogel; Michael Bachmann

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-energy structures of a hybrid system consisting of a polymer and an attractive nanowire substrate as well as the thermodynamics of the adsorption transition are studied by means of Monte Carlo computer simulations. Depending on structural and energetic properties of the substrate, we find different adsorbed polymer conformations, amongst which are spherical droplets attached to the wire and monolayer tubes surrounding it. We identify adsorption temperatures and the type of the transition between adsorbed and desorbed structures depending on the substrate attraction strength.

  10. Modeling and Optimization for Interpenetrating polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Modeling and Optimization for Interpenetrating polymer network process 1 Weijie Lin, Lorenz T #12;Project Overview · IPN Interpenetrating polymer network ­ A combination of two polymers in a network form Fig. 2 An IPN process example · Typical Sequential Type of Process Fig. 1 IPN network

  11. Novel polyoxazolines polymer drug delivery platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    performed with 4 different polymers in multi- drug resistant (MCF7/ADR) human adenocarcinoma cells, non-resistant (MCF7) human adenocarcinoma cells and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. All polymers were found lines. 2. To investigate the effect of the addition of drugs to the polymers on cell toxicity, micelles

  12. Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

  13. Polymer microcantilevers fabricated via multiphoton absorption polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Malvin C.

    Polymer microcantilevers fabricated via multiphoton absorption polymerization Z. Bayindir, Y. Sun polymer cantilevers. Atomic force microscopy has been used to characterize the mechanical properties orders of magnitude smaller than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk polymer.6 If correct

  14. Nordic Polymer Days 2006 Copenhagen, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Nordic Polymer Days 2006 Copenhagen, Denmark Polyacrylamide nanosensor embedded Scharff-Poulsen, c Hong Gu, d Wolf B. Fromme, b Iver Jakobsen, a Kristoffer Almdal a The Danish Polymer-linked polymer in nanometer scale, have several advantages over direct loading of cells with fluorescent probes

  15. Polymers in a Vacuum J. M. Deutsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutsch, Josh

    Polymers in a Vacuum J. M. Deutsch Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz polymer molecules are found in a vacuum, and here we examine their properties. Angular momentum The properties of polymer chains have been investigated extensively over the past 50 years [1], but the vast

  16. North Dakota State University Postoc Biobased Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    North Dakota State University Postoc ­ Biobased Polymers A postdoctoral position is available in the area of synthesis and characterization of novel biobased thermosetting polymer systems for coatings will include the synthesis of monomers and polymers, preparation of coatings, thermosets, etc., preparation

  17. Selfattractive random polymers Remco van der Hofstad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klenke, Achim

    Self­attractive random polymers Remco van der Hofstad Stieltjes Institute of Mathematics Delft polymer of finite length in Zd . Its law is that of a finite simple random walk path in Zd receiving that for > the attraction dominates the repulsion, i.e., with high probability the polymer is contained in a finite box

  18. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

  19. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  20. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

    1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.