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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure (Rhode Island) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DSIRE1 Summary Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation...

2

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and...

3

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

4

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

5

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

6

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N{sub 2}O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N{sub 2}O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N[sub 2]O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N[sub 2]O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

9

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

10

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)...

11

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

12

Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations

13

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

nitrous oxide emisssions from industrial sources, 1990, 2005, 2008, and 2009 4.5. Waste management sources In 2009, treatment of residential and commercial wastewater produced 92...

14

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7- Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or...

15

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

16

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

17

Rhode Island.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island www.effi cientwindows.org March 2013 1. Meet the Energy Code and Look for the ENERGY STAR ® Windows must comply with your local energy code. Windows that are ENERGY STAR qualifi ed typically meet or exceed energy code requirements. To verify if specific window energy properties comply with the local code requirements, go to Step 2. 2. Look for Effi cient Properties on the NFRC Label The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label is needed for verifi cation of energy code compliance (www.nfrc. org). The NFRC label displays whole- window energy properties and appears on all fenestration products which are part of the ENERGY STAR program.

18

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Facilities which compost putrescible waste andor leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The...

19

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 19, 2010 CX-000940: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Generation Wind Power at Navy Sites - Second Meteorological tower at Naval Station Newport, Rhode...

20

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Small-Scale Solar Grants (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

22

Rhode Island Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rhode Island Quick Facts. Rhode Island had the lowest per capita total energy consumption, the third-lowest per capita petroleum consumption, and the ...

23

Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island) Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island) Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Interconnection Provider Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission Rhode Island enacted legislation (HB 6222) in June 2011 to standardize the application process for the interconnection of customer-sited renewable-energy systems to the state's distribution grid. Rhode Island's interconnection policy is not nearly as comprehensive as

24

Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rhode Island Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Rhode Island No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Rhode Island No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Rhode Island No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Rhode Island Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

25

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Information to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information on AddThis.com... Rhode Island Information This state page compiles information related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles in Rhode Island and includes new incentives and laws, alternative fueling station locations, truck stop electrification sites, fuel prices, and local points of contact.

26

Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the RI State Energy Office (SEO), and the Governor's office convened the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Stakeholder Project in...

27

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island enacted legislation (H.B. 6104) in June 2011 establishing a feed-in tariff for new distributed renewable energy generators up to three megawatts (MW) in...

28

Rhode Island Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional...

29

Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations (Rhode Island) Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public...

30

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe possibilities for exemptions (i.e., for sources which have the potential to emit 50 tons but do not actually reach that level) and Reasonably Available Control

31

Rhode Island Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... including hydroelectric power, municipal solid waste, and landfill gas. Rhode Island has potential wind energy generation from offshore wind farms.

32

Spatiotemporal modelling in estimation of nitrous oxide emissions from soil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nitrous oxide is a major greenhouse gas emission. The aim of this research was to develop and apply statistical models to characterize the complex spatial… (more)

Huang, Xiaodong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Rhode Island | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Last updated on 2013-11-05 Current News 2012 IECC adopted July 1, 2013 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2012 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information The Rhode Island commercial code is the 2012 IECC with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Rhode Island (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2012 IECC Effective Date 07/01/2013 Adoption Date 07/01/2013 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: Yes Rhode Island DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Rhode Island State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes

34

Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Rhode Island) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

increased efficiency standards for the products currently covered may be adopted Test Methods Specified in standards or State Building Code of Rhode Island Date added to...

35

Geothermometry At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful...

36

Rhode Island Datos del Precio de la Gasolina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Busqueda por Ciudad o Cdigo Postal) - GasBuddy.com Rhode Island Gas Prices (Ciudades Selectas) - GasBuddy.com Rhode Island Gas Prices (Organizado por Condado) -...

37

Rhode Island/EZ Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are included in National Grid's tariffs, which are accessible via the PUC's web site. Job Creation Guaranty Program (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Loan Program Yes StateProvince...

38

Job Training Tax Credit (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Job Training Tax Credit (Rhode Island) Job Training Tax Credit (Rhode Island) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial InstallerContractor Savings For...

39

Microsoft Word - rhode_island.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rhode Island Rhode Island NERC Region(s) ....................................................................................................... NPCC Primary Energy Source........................................................................................... Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) ....................................................................... 1,782 49 Electric Utilities ...................................................................................................... 7 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power ................................ 1,775 37 Net Generation (megawatthours) ........................................................................... 7,738,719 47

40

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires any facility that emits 25 tons or more of NOx and/or 25 tons or more of VOC during the calendar year and is located in a county designated as nonattainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone submit emission statements. Any facility that is located in a county described above is exempt from these requirements. If NOx

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluation of Partial Oxidation Reformer Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, a gasoline fuel processor and an ethanol fuel processor were operated under conditions simulating both startup and normal operation. Emissions were measured before and after the AGB in order to quantify the effectiveness of the burner catalyst in controlling emissions. The emissions sampling system includes CEM for O2, CO2, CO, NOx, and THC. Also, integrated gas samples are collected in evacuated canisters for hydrocarbon speciation analysis via GC. This analysis yields the concentrations of the hydrocarbon species required for the California NMOG calculation. The PM concentration in the anode burner exhaust was measured through the placement of a filter in the exhaust stream. The emissions from vehicles with fully developed on board reformer systems were estimated.

Unnasch, Stefan; Fable, Scott; Waterland, Larry

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Points of Contact  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Rhode Island Points of Rhode Island Points of Contact to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Points of Contact on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Points of Contact on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Points of Contact on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Points of Contact on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Points of Contact on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Points of Contact on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Points of Contact The following people or agencies can help you find more information about Rhode Island's clean transportation laws, incentives, and funding

43

Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island: Energy Resources Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5800945,"lon":-71.4774291,"alt":0,"address":"Rhode

44

Bluewater Wind Rhode Island | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search Name Bluewater Wind Rhode Island Facility Bluewater Wind Rhode Island Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner NRG Bluewater Wind Developer NRG Bluewater Wind Location Atlantic Ocean RI Coordinates 41.357°, -71.152° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.357,"lon":-71.152,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

University of Rhode Island | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name University of Rhode Island Address Department of Ocean Engineering, Sheets Building, Bay Campus Place Narragansett, Rhode Island Zip 02882 Sector Hydro Phone number (401) 874-6139 Website http://www.oce.uri.edu/baycamp Coordinates 41.3983403°, -71.4893013° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3983403,"lon":-71.4893013,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Job Creation Guaranty Program (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RIEDC’s Job Creation Guaranty Program provides businesses looking to expand or relocate in Rhode Island with access to capital and credit. RIEDC guarantees loans by private lenders or guarantees...

47

Recovery Act State Memos Rhode Island  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Rhode Island For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

48

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Rhode Island Laws and Rhode Island Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

49

Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo Rhode Island has substantial natural resources, including wind and biomass. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Rhode Island are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from weatherization to smart grid workforce training. Through these investments, Rhode Island's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Rhode Island to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Guam Recovery Act State Memo

50

Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation Rhode Island's Public Utilities Restructuring Act of 1996 created the nation's first public benefits fund (PBF) for renewable energy and demand-side management (DSM). The Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund's (RIREF) renewable-energy component is administered by the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC), and the fund's demand-side

51

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place Rhode Island Utility Id 22509 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

52

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives Listed below are the summaries of all current Rhode Island laws, incentives, regulations, funding opportunities, and other initiatives

53

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Rhode Island...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing National Grid (formerly Narragansett Electric...

54

On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions by agriculture. Nutr.1998. Nitrous oxide emission in three years as affected by2008. Soil-surface gas emissions. p.851-861. In: M.R. Carter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Rhodes Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase:

56

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

57

The Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the implementation and initial evaluation of the nation's first statewide conservation and load management program, the Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program (RISLP). Rhode Island's program is unique because it is a voluntary collaborative effort and because three utilities use a single delivery mechanism for their programs. The Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program is a unique attempt to improve the efficiency of electricity use in the commercial/industrial sector on a statewide basis. The cooperative nature of program design and implementation has strengthened communication among the participants. The process evaluation showed that both the participants and the customers are satisfied with the program. The program has had a significant effect on customer behavior.

Pierce, B.; Bjoerkqvist, O.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES from motor vehicles because unlike emissions of CO2, which are relatively easy to estimate, emissions-related emissions. In the U.S., for example, emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the production and use of motor

Kammen, Daniel M.

59

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel

60

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final project report describes a three-year long EPRI supplemental project entitled "Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions." This EPRI-sponsored project investigated an innovative approach to developing large-scale, cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that potentially can be implemented across broad geographic areas of the United States and internationally.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nitrogen oxide emissions from coal fired MHD plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this topical report, the nitrogen oxide emission issues from a coal fired MHD steam combined cycle power plant are summarized, both from an experimental and theoretical/calculational viewpoint. The concept of staging the coal combustion to minimize NO{sub x} is described. The impact of NO{sub x} control design choices on electrical conductivity and overall plant efficiency are described. The results of the NO{sub x} measurements in over 3,000 hours of coal fired testing are summarized. A chemical kinetics model that was used to model the nooks decomposition is described. Finally, optimum design choices for a low nooks plant are discussed and it is shown that the MHD Steam Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant can be designed to operate with nooks emissions less than 0.05 lbm/MMBTU.

Chapman, J.N. [ed.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the first two years of a three-year long project entitled "Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions." This EPRI-sponsored project is investigating an innovative approach to developing large-scale and potentially cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that could be implemented across broad geographic areas of the U.S. and internationally. The tools and information developed in this project will broaden the GHG emissions offset ...

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

64

" Electric Utilities",602076,"Florida","Rhode Island"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highest","Lowest" Highest","Lowest" "United States" "Primary Energy Source","Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",1039062,"Texas","District of Columbia" " Electric Utilities",602076,"Florida","Rhode Island" " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",436986,"Texas","Alaska" "Net Generation (megawatthours)",4125059899,"Texas","District of Columbia" " Electric Utilities",2471632103,"Florida","New Jersey" " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1653427796,"Texas","District of Columbia" "Emissions (thousand metric tons)"

65

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Eligibility Commercial...

66

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Rhode Island Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Rhode Island Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Rhode Island. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2013 CX-010757: Categorical Exclusion Determination The New England Solar cost-Reduction Challenge Partnership CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): Vermont, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut Offices(s): Golden Field Office February 4, 2013 CX-010572: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brown University - Marine Hydro-Kinetic Energy Harvesting Using Cyber-Physical Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/04/2013 Location(s): Rhode Island Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy October 18, 2012 CX-009518: Categorical Exclusion Determination

67

The Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) The Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation The Jobs Development Act provides an incremental reduction in the corporate income tax rate (9%) to companies creating jobs in Rhode Island. For every ten new jobs created for companies with fewer than 100 employees, companies can reduce the tax by a quarter percentage point. For companies with more

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Fuel Cells to someone by E-mail Hydrogen Fuel Cells to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Acquisition / Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Acquisition / Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

70

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

71

Influence of fuel sulfur content on emissions from diesel engines equipped with oxidation catalysts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) are a viable exhaust aftertreatment alternative for alleviating regulated exhaust emissions of hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matter (PM)… (more)

Evans, Jason Carter.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island) Rhode Island) Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Climate Policies Provider Department of Environmental Management In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the

73

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode...

74

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

75

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

76

Rhode Island - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief. ... US Virgin Islands: Overview; Data; Economy; ... Rhode Island’s energy resources include fuelwood in the south and wind power on and ...

77

Rhode Island/EZFeed Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Nuclear Photovoltaics Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy StateProvince RIEDC's Job Creation Guaranty Program provides businesses looking to expand or relocate in Rhode...

78

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

79

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005...

80

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

82

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

83

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update covers the first year of a three-year-long EPRI research project entitled Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production. The report provides a project overview and explains the preliminary results yielded from the first year of on-farm research.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

85

Engines - Emissions Control - cerium-oxide catalyst, diesel,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Control Heavy duty diesel vehicles product particulate matter emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that heavy-duty diesel vehicles have...

86

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island) Rhode Island) Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Rhode Island as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance

87

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP combined heat and power dBA A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency MW megawatt NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards

88

Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14 MAY 1999 TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14 A report on three projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between: The U.S. Department of Energy and * The Babcock & Wilcox Company * Energy and Environmental Research Corporation * New York State Electric & Gas Corporation MAY 1999 Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers Cover image: Schematic of reburning technology Source: Energy and Environmental Research Corporation Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers Executive Summary ..................................................................................................

89

Rules and Regulations Governing the Establishment of Various Fees (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Establishment of Various Fees the Establishment of Various Fees (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations Governing the Establishment of Various Fees (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations describe the fees associated with several Department of Environmental Management regulatory programs, including programs pertaining

90

Process Modeling of Global Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas and is a major ozone-depleting substance. To understand and

Saikawa, E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

US hydropower resource assessment for Rhode Island  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Rhode Island.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... the program provided an economic incentive for coal-fired power plants to reduce emissions by installing pollution contro ...

93

ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Developer Industrial State/Provincial Govt Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Under the Forward Capacity Market (FCM), ISO New England projects the capacity needs of the region's power system three years in advance and then holds an annual auction to purchase the power resources that will satisfy those future regional requirements. Resources that clear in the auction are obligated to provide power or curtail demand when called upon by the ISO. The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New

94

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Providence, Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Providence, Rhode Island Providence, Rhode Island FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Providence, Rhode Island October 7, 2013 - 2:51pm Addthis Image of the FUPWG logo which displays an illustration of a sailboat on water. The logo reads Efficiency Promotion by the Ocean; FUPWG April 14-15, 2010; Providence, Rhode Island. April 14-15, 2010 Hosted by National Grid The following outlines sessions and presentations held during the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Tuesday, April 13, 2010 FUPWG held a utility energy service contract (UESC) workshop prior to the Spring 2010 meeting. The workshop materials are available (PDF 5.0 MB) Wednesday, April 14, 2010 8:30 am Welcome

95

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations aim to prevent the release of fugitive dust by forbidding

96

Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Rhode Island Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island October 29, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Updated October 2012 What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? Rhode Island's restructuring law includes a system benefits charge of 2 mill/kWh for energy efficiency programs, and 0.3 mills/kWh for renewable energy programs, through 2012. Over $35 million was budgeted for energy efficiency across all program types (including low-income and residential) in 2010; figures for 2011 are not available. The programs are administered by the local utilities. Rebates are available state-wide through the Cool Choice program, which provides rebates for high-efficiency HVAC equipment, including split system and single packaged air conditions and heat pumps. Dual enthalpy economizer

97

Local Option - Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing (Rhode Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing (Rhode Island) Local Option - Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a statement in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period

98

Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

99

Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

100

Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

102

Green Power Purchase Commitment (Rhode Island) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

commitment will begin in the first quarter of 2005. The incremental cost of green power for the State House will be covered by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund....

103

Bristol County, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County is a county in Rhode Island. Its FIPS County Code is 001. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in...

104

Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

105

Rhode Island/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island/Wind Resources Rhode Island/Wind Resources < Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Rhode Island Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

106

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Oxidation of Mercury Across  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidation of Mercury Across SCR Catalysts in Coal-Fired Power Plants Burning Low Rank Fuels Oxidation of Mercury Across SCR Catalysts in Coal-Fired Power Plants Burning Low Rank Fuels The objective of the proposed research is to assess the potential for the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalysts in a coal fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. Results from the project will contribute to a greater understanding of mercury behavior across SCR catalysts. Additional tasks include: review existing pilot and field data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts and propose a mechanism for mercury oxidation and create a simple computer model for mercury oxidation based on the hypothetical mechanism. Related Papers and Publications: Final Report - December 31, 2004 [PDF-532KB]

107

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Rhode Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND Rhode Island Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Rhode Island. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted

108

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Other to someone by E-mail Other to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other The list below contains summaries of all Rhode Island laws and incentives

110

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Other to someone by E-mail Other to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other The list below contains summaries of all Rhode Island laws and incentives

111

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Rhode Island laws and incentives

112

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for EVs  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

EVs to someone by E-mail EVs to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for EVs on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for EVs on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for EVs on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for EVs on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for EVs on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for EVs on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for EVs The list below contains summaries of all Rhode Island laws and incentives

113

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Other to someone by E-mail Other to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Other The list below contains summaries of all Rhode Island laws and incentives

114

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1- Visible Emissions (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The regulations state that no person shall emit into the atmosphere from any source any air contaminant for a period or periods aggregating more than three minutes in any one hour which is greater...

115

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

116

State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations State House  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Rhode Island and Providence Plantations State House Providence, Rhode Island 02903-1 196 401 -222-2080 Donald L. Carcieri Governor February 26,2009 The Honorable Steven Chu Secretary U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: State Energy Program Assurances Dear Secretary Chu: As a condition of receiving our State's share of the 53.1 billion funding for the State Energy Program (SEP) under the American Recovery and Renewal Act of 2009 (H.R.l) (ARRA), 1 am providing the following assurances. I have written to our public utilities commission and requested that they consider additional actions to promote energy efficiency, consistent with the Federal statutory language contained in H.R. 1 and their obligations to maintain just and reasonable

117

The Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the implementation and initial evaluation of the nation`s first statewide conservation and load management program, the Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program (RISLP). Rhode Island`s program is unique because it is a voluntary collaborative effort and because three utilities use a single delivery mechanism for their programs. The Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program is a unique attempt to improve the efficiency of electricity use in the commercial/industrial sector on a statewide basis. The cooperative nature of program design and implementation has strengthened communication among the participants. The process evaluation showed that both the participants and the customers are satisfied with the program. The program has had a significant effect on customer behavior.

Pierce, B.; Bjoerkqvist, O.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Propane  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane (LPG) to someone by E-mail Propane (LPG) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG)

119

Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island) Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island) Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Home Weatherization Water Maximum Rebate $75,000 Program Info Funding Source Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF); Alternative Compliance Payments (ACPs) Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Rhode Island Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount 20% of project funding Provider Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides

120

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Natural  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Idle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction

122

Integrated assessment of the spatial variability of ozone impacts from emissions of nitrogen oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the ozone (O{sub 3}) damages caused by nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in different locations around the Atlanta metropolitan area during a summer month. Ozone impacts are calculated using a new integrated assessment model that links pollution emissions to their chemical transformation, transport, population exposures, and effects on human health. It was found that increased NOx emissions in rural areas around Atlanta increase human exposure to ambient O{sub 3} twice as much as suburban emissions. However, increased NOx emissions in central city Atlanta actually reduce O{sub 3} exposures. For downtown emissions, the reduction in human exposures to O{sub 3} from titration by NO in the central city outweighs the effects from increased downwind O{sub 3}. The results indicate that the marginal damage from NOx emissions varies greatly across a metropolitan area. The results raise concerns if cap and trade regulations cause emissions to migrate toward higher marginal damage locations. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Daniel Q. Tong; Nicholas Z. Muller; Denise L. Mauzerall; Robert O. Mendelsohn [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States). Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Petroleum",2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

124

renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, DC 20036 WWW on Energy and Commerce Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 Washington, DC 20515 Dear Chairman Waxman and Ranking Member Barton

125

1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW WASHINGTON, DC 20036  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, DC 20036 WWW.ENERGYRECOVERYCOUNCIL.ORG renewable energy from waste Testimony of Ted Michaels President, Energy Recovery Council Before the Connecticut the reclassification of trash-to-energy facilities as Class 1 renewable energy sources. Chairman Meyer, Chairman Roy

Columbia University

126

Effects of the Thickness of Niobium Surface Oxide Layers on Field Emission  

SciTech Connect

Field emission on the inner surfaces of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities is still one of the major obstacles for reaching high accelerating gradients for SRF community. Our previous experimental results* seemed to imply that the threshold of field emission was related to the thickness of Nb surface oxide layers. In this contribution, a more detailed study on the influences of the surface oxide layers on the field emission on Nb surfaces will be reported. By anodization technique, the thickness of the surface pentoxide layer was artificially fabricated from 3 nm up to 460 nm. A home-made scanning field emission microscope was employed to perform the scans on the surfaces. Emitters were characterized using a scanning electron microscope together with an energy dispersive x-ray analyzer. The SFEM experimental results were analyzed in terms of surface morphology and oxide thickness of Nb samples and chemical composition and geographic shape of the emitters. A model based on the classic electromagnetic theory was developed trying to understand the experimental results. Possibly implications for Nb SRF cavity applications from this study will be discussed.

A.T. Wu, S. Jin, J.D. Mammosser, R.A. Rimmer, X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production: Experience Validating a New GHG Offset Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project report describes in part the second phase (years four through six, 2010–2012) of a two-phase, six-year long EPRI-sponsored research project entitled “Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions.” This project investigated an innovative approach to developing large-scale, cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that potentially can be implemented across broad geographic areas of the ...

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Adsorption of collagen to indium oxide nanoparticles and infrared emissivity study thereon  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption of collagen to indium oxide nanoparticles was carried out in water-acetone solution at volumetric ratio of 1:1 with pH value varying from 3.2 to 9.3. As indicated by TGA, maximum collagen adsorption to indium oxide nanoparticles occurred at pH of 3.2. It was proposed that noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic and electrostatic interactions made main contributions to collagen adsorption. The IR emissivity values (8-14 {mu}m) of collagen-adsorbed indium oxide nanoparticles decreased significantly compared to either pure collagen or indium oxide nanoparticles possibly due to the interfacial interactions between collagen and indium oxide nanoparticles. And the lowest infrared emissivity value of 0.587 was obtained at collagen adsorption of 1.94 g/100 g In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. On the chance of improved compatibility with organic adhesives, the chemical activity of adsorbed collagen was further confirmed by grafting copolymerization with methyl methacrylate by formation of polymer shell outside, as evidenced by IR spectrum and transmission electron microscopy.

Zhou Yuming [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)], E-mail: fchem@seu.edu.cn; Shan Yun; Sun Yanqing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Ju Huangxian [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

129

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Climate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Climate Change / Energy Initiatives to someone by E-mail Climate Change / Energy Initiatives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Climate Change / Energy Initiatives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Climate Change / Energy Initiatives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Climate Change / Energy Initiatives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Climate Change / Energy Initiatives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Climate Change / Energy Initiatives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Climate Change / Energy Initiatives on

130

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fleet  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fleet Purchaser/Manager to someone by E-mail Fleet Purchaser/Manager to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

131

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Owner/Driver to someone by E-mail Vehicle Owner/Driver to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

132

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for AFV  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFV Manufacturer/Retrofitter to someone by E-mail AFV Manufacturer/Retrofitter to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for AFV Manufacturer/Retrofitter on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for AFV Manufacturer/Retrofitter on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for AFV Manufacturer/Retrofitter on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for AFV Manufacturer/Retrofitter on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for AFV Manufacturer/Retrofitter on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for AFV Manufacturer/Retrofitter on AddThis.com...

133

Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Mapped present-day borate evaporites in Teels and Rhodes Marsh with ASTER satellite imagery References C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin (2006) Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Kratt,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=511014"

134

Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm March 15, 2010 - 6:38pm Addthis Rhode Island’s first offshore wind farm will be built in Block Island. | File photo Rhode Island's first offshore wind farm will be built in Block Island. | File photo Block Island, a small town with only 1,000 full-time, residents, is the site for a big project, when it will become home to Rhode Island's first offshore wind farm. Powerful ocean winds lie right off Block Island's south shore. That's the benefit of offshore wind farms - they can take advantage of the harder, stronger winds found a few miles off the coast Deepwater Wind LLC is leading the effort with plans to construct up to eight wind turbines three miles off of Block Island's shore.

135

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Economy / Efficiency to someone by E-mail Fuel Economy / Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fuel Economy / Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fuel Economy / Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fuel Economy / Efficiency on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fuel Economy / Efficiency on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fuel Economy / Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Fuel Economy / Efficiency on AddThis.com... More in this section...

136

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Rhode Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Rhode Island Summary Rhode Island has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above- grade intended for permanent living (hotel/motel is not "residential"). The code applies to new buildings and

137

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Driving  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

138

Pascoag, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pascoag, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Pascoag, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9556539°, -71.7022899° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9556539,"lon":-71.7022899,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

139

Tiverton, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tiverton, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Tiverton, Rhode Island: Energy Resources (Redirected from Tiverton, RI) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6259357°, -71.2133801° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6259357,"lon":-71.2133801,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

Glocester, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glocester, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Glocester, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9043113°, -71.691066° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9043113,"lon":-71.691066,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Central Falls, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island: Energy Resources Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8906553°, -71.3922785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8906553,"lon":-71.3922785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

142

Narragansett, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Narragansett, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Narragansett, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4501021°, -71.4495005° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4501021,"lon":-71.4495005,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

143

Providence County, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Providence County, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Providence County, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8881582°, -71.4774291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8881582,"lon":-71.4774291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

Cumberland Hill, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island: Energy Resources Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9745431°, -71.4670043° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9745431,"lon":-71.4670043,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

Burrillville, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burrillville, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Burrillville, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9810947°, -71.691066° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9810947,"lon":-71.691066,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 257 951 718 594 102 130 182 109 391 219 1990's 51 92 155 126 0 27 42 18 1 1 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Rhode Island Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

147

Harrisville, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harrisville, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Harrisville, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9656539°, -71.6745112° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9656539,"lon":-71.6745112,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

East Providence, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Providence, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Providence, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8137116°, -71.3700545° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8137116,"lon":-71.3700545,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

Woonsocket, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Woonsocket, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Woonsocket, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0028761°, -71.5147839° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0028761,"lon":-71.5147839,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

Valley Falls, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island: Energy Resources Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9067663°, -71.3906119° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9067663,"lon":-71.3906119,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

151

Pawtucket, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pawtucket, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Pawtucket, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.878711°, -71.3825558° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.878711,"lon":-71.3825558,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

152

Rhode Island Offshore Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island Offshore Wind Farm Island Offshore Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rhode Island Offshore Wind Farm Facility Rhode Island Offshore Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Developer Deepwater Wind Location Offshore from Sakonnet RI Coordinates 40.96°, -71.44° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.96,"lon":-71.44,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

153

Cranston, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cranston, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Cranston, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7798226°, -71.4372796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7798226,"lon":-71.4372796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

154

Zinc ion and neutral emission from single crystal zinc oxide during 193-nm excimer laser exposure  

SciTech Connect

Mass resolved time-of-flight measurements on neutral zinc atoms and zinc ions show energetic ions and neutrals during 193-nm irradiation of single crystals of semiconducting zinc oxide. Typical Zn+ kinetic energies are 3-5 eV. At fluences (energy per unit area per pulse) below 200 mJ/cm2, the ion intensities (per laser pulse) decrease monotonically to low values with laser pulse number. The depletion kinetics change from exponential to second order near 50 mJ/cm2. We attribute this change to the annihilation of defects yielding Zn+ emission when Zn+ or other surface defects become mobile. At fluences between 200 and 300 mJ/cm2, Zn+ emission becomes more sustained due to defects created by the laser. In this same fluence range, we observe the onset of detectable neutral atomic zinc emission. These neutral atoms display Maxwell-Boltzmann kinetic energy distributions w th effective surface temperatures that approach 5000 K as the fluence is raised to 350 mJ/cm2. These high surface temperatures are remarkable given the low etch rates observed at these fluences, suggesting that heated layer is extremely thin. We propose emission mechanisms and experiments to resolve outstanding questions.

Kahn, E. H. [Washington State University; Langford, S. C. [Washington State University; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dickinson, J. T. [Washington State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

MINIMIZING NET CO2 EMISSIONS BY OXIDATIVE CO-PYROLYSIS OF COAL / BIOMASS BLENDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents a set of thermodynamic calculations on the optimal mode of solid fuel utilization considering a wide range of fuel types and processing technologies. The technologies include stand-alone combustion, biomass/coal cofiring, oxidative pyrolysis, and straight carbonization with no energy recovery but with elemental carbon storage. The results show that the thermodynamically optimal way to process solid fuels depends strongly on the specific fuels and technologies available, the local demand for heat or for electricity, and the local baseline energy-production method. Burning renewable fuels reduces anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions as widely recognized. In certain cases, however, other processing methods are equally or more effective, including the simple carbonization or oxidative pyrolysis of biomass fuels.

Todd Lang; Robert Hurt

2001-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

156

2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two-meter survey work at Rhodes Marsh began in December of 2007 followed by more recent activity in May of 2008. More than 65 2-meter-deep temperatures have been measured over a distance of 7 km (Figure 4). At the foot of the Pilot Mountains these data roughly parallel the southern end of Benton Springs fault. Anomalous temperatures up to 26.7°C occur adjacent to opalized sands and reveal a significant NW elongate temperature anomaly more than 5 km long. Cold shallow groundwater at the playa's eastern margin

157

Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Kratt et al. (2006) demonstrate the effectiveness of using a field-portable ASD Fieldspec spectroradiometer and satellite-based Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and emitted Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) imagery for mapping borate minerals in the field. Borate crusts that were partially mined during the 1800s were identified and mapped at Rhodes, Teels, and Columbus Marshes (playas), all in western Nevada (Figure 1).

158

Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

159

Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 162°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=387552"

160

TBU-0058 - In the Matter of Donald R. Rhodes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TBU-0058 - In the Matter of Donald R. Rhodes TBU-0058 - In the Matter of Donald R. Rhodes TBU-0058 - In the Matter of Donald R. Rhodes Donald R. Rhodes (Rhodes or the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his August 25, 2006 complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. He filed the complaint with the Whistleblower Program Manager (WP Manager) of the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center (NNSA/SC), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. As explained below, the WP Manager's November 16, 2006 dismissal of the complaint should be upheld, and the appeal denied. tbu0058.pdf More Documents & Publications TBU-0052 - In the Matter of John Merwin TBU-0071 - In the Matter of Jeffrey R. Burnette TBU-0114 - In the Matter of Dennis Rehmeier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rhode Island/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island/Wind Resources/Full Version Rhode Island/Wind Resources/Full Version < Rhode Island‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Rhode Island Wind Resources RhodeIslandMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

162

MINIMIZING NET CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS BY OXIDATIVE CO-PYROLYSIS OF COAL/BIOMASS BLENDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid fuels vary significantly with respect to the amount of CO{sub 2} directly produced per unit heating value. Elemental carbon is notably worse than other solid fuels in this regard, and since carbon (char) is an intermediate product of the combustion of almost all solid fuels, there is an opportunity to reduce specific CO{sub 2} emissions by reconfiguring processes to avoid char combustion wholly or in part. The primary goal of this one-year Innovative Concepts project is to make a fundamental thermodynamic assessment of three modes of solid fuel use: (1) combustion, (2) carbonization, and (3) oxidative pyrolysis, for a wide range of coal and alternative solid fuels. This period a large set of thermodynamic calculations were carried out to assess the potential of the three processes. The results show that the net carbon dioxide emissions and the relative ranking of the different processes depends greatly on the particular baseline fossil fuel being displaced by the new technology. As an example, in a baseline natural gas environment, it is thermodynamically more advantageous to carbonize biomass than to combust it, and even more advantageous to oxidatively pyrolyze the biomass.

Robert Hurt; Todd Lang

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

163

ZERO EMISSION POWER PLANTS USING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS AND OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over 16,700 hours of operational experience was gained for the Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) elements of the proposed SOFC/OTM zero-emission power generation concept. It was repeatedly demonstrated that OTMs with no additional oxidation catalysts were able to completely oxidize the remaining depleted fuel in a simulated SOFC anode exhaust at an O{sub 2} flux that met initial targets. In such cases, neither residual CO nor H{sub 2} were detected to the limits of the gas chromatograph (<10 ppm). Dried OTM afterburner exhaust streams contained up to 99.5% CO{sub 2}. Oxygen flux through modified OTMs was double or even triple that of the standard OTMs used for the majority of testing purposes. Both the standard and modified membranes in laboratory-scale and demonstration-sized formats exhibited stable performance over extended periods (2300 to 3500 hours or 3 to 5 months). Reactor contaminants, were determined to negatively impact OTM performance stability. A method of preventing OTM performance degradation was developed and proven to be effective. Information concerning OTM and seal reliability over extended periods and through various chemical and thermal shocks and cycles was also obtained. These findings were used to develop several conceptual designs for pilot (10 kWe) and commercial-scale (250 kWe) SOFC/OTM zero emission power generation systems.

G. Maxwell Christie; Troy M. Raybold

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005). Particulate emissions from construction activities.M. S. , (2000b). In-use emissions from heavy- duty dieseland nitrogen dioxide emissions from gasoline- and diesel-

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Neutron Emission Characteristics of Two Mixed-Oxide Fuels: Simulations and Initial Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate the neutron emission characteristics of two mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and it's Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) campaign. This analysis used the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and energy spectra of the different neutron source terms within these fuels, and then used this data to simulate the detection and measurement of these emissions using an array of liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers. These calculations accounted for neutrons generated from the spontaneous fission of the actinides in the MOX fuel as well as neutrons created via (alpha,n) reactions with oxygen in the MOX fuel. The analysis was carried out to allow for characterization of both neutron energy as well as neutron coincidences between multiple detectors. Coincidences between prompt gamma rays and neutrons were also analyzed. Experiments were performed at INL with the same materials used in the simulations to benchmark and begin validation tests of the simulations. Data was collected in these experiments using an array of four liquid scintillators and a high-speed waveform digitizer. Advanced digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithms were developed and used to collect this data. Results of the simulation and modeling studies are presented together with preliminary results from the experimental campaign.

D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury; E. M. Gantz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Microsoft PowerPoint - TA-21_LASO_Rhodes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use Case Study for Technical Area Land Use Case Study for Technical Area Land Use Case Study for Technical Area- -21 at 21 at Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Residential or Industrial Cleanup Standards Residential or Industrial Cleanup Standards Los Alamos Site Office 1 David S. Rhodes, Supervisory Federal Project Director Environmental Restoration Projects and Decontamination and Decommissioning Team Los Alamos Site Office Regulations Regulations Public Law 105-119, Title VI, Section 632 - Authorizes and directs transfer of land to the County of Los Alamos and to Department Of the Interior, in trust for the Pueblo of San Ildefonso 40 CFR 264, Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (RCRA) and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act

167

Geothermometry At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Geothermometry At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Borate crusts that were partially mined during the 1800s were identified and mapped at Rhodes, Teels, and Columbus Marshes (playas), all in western Nevada (Figure 1). Subsequent field verification and chemical analyses of well, spring and groundwater samples indicated the presence of hidden subsurface geothermal reservoirs. Cation and quartz geothermometry indicate subsurface reservoir temperatures between 118°C and 162°C at all three areas based on results from waters sampled proximal to borate crusts. References Lisa Shevenell, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Chris

168

Rhode Island Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Rhode Island Regions Rhode Island Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Rhode Island Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Rhode Island Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

169

Rhode Island Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Rhode Island Regions Rhode Island Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Rhode Island Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Rhode Island Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

170

2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Coolbaugh et al. (2007), Sladek et al. (2007), and Kratt, et al. (2008, this volume) describe a shallow temperature survey system in which temperatures can be measured quickly and inexpensively at 2 m depths. This system was tested at Desert Queen based on its structural setting and availability of thermal gradient well data obtained in the 1970's from which to make thermal anomaly comparisons. The system was subsequently used at Tungsten Mountain and Teels and Rhodes Marshes to help locate blind geothermal systems. References Lisa Shevenell, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Chris

171

Zero Emission Power Plants Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Oxygen Transport Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. (SWPC) is engaged in the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stationary power systems. SWPC has combined DOE Developmental funds with commercial customer funding to establish a record of successful SOFC field demonstration power systems of increasing size. SWPC will soon deploy the first unit of a newly developed 250 kWe Combined Heat Power System. It will generate electrical power at greater than 45% electrical efficiency. The SWPC SOFC power systems are equipped to operate on lower number hydrocarbon fuels such as pipeline natural gas, which is desulfurized within the SOFC power system. Because the system operates with a relatively high electrical efficiency, the CO2 emissions, {approx}1.0 lb CO2/ kW-hr, are low. Within the SOFC module the desulfurized fuel is utilized electrochemically and oxidized below the temperature for NOx generation. Therefore the NOx and SOx emissions for the SOFC power generation system are near negligible. The byproducts of the power generation from hydrocarbon fuels that are released into the environment are CO2 and water vapor. This forward looking DOE sponsored Vision 21 program is supporting the development of methods to capture and sequester the CO2, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system. To accomplish this, SWPC is developing a SOFC module design, to be demonstrated in operating hardware, that will maintain separation of the fuel cell anode gas, consisting of H2, CO, H2O and CO2, from the vitiated air. That anode gas, the depleted fuel stream, containing less than 18% (H2 + CO), will be directed to an Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) Afterburner that is being developed by Praxair, Inc.. The OTM is supplied air and the depleted fuel. The OTM will selectively transport oxygen across the membrane to oxidize the remaining H2 and CO. The water vapor is then condensed from the totally 1.5.DOC oxidized fuel stream exiting the afterburner, leaving only the CO2 in gaseous form. That CO2 can then be compressed and sequestered, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system operating on hydrocarbon fuel that adds only water vapor to the environment. Praxair has been developing oxygen separation systems based on dense walled, mixed electronic, oxygen ion conducting ceramics for a number of years. The oxygen separation membranes find applications in syngas production, high purity oxygen production and gas purification. In the SOFC afterburner application the chemical potential difference between the high temperature SOFC depleted fuel gas and the supplied air provides the driving force for oxygen transport. This permeated oxygen subsequently combusts the residual fuel in the SOFC exhaust. A number of experiments have been carried out in which simulated SOFC depleted fuel gas compositions and air have been supplied to either side of single OTM tubes in laboratory-scale reactors. The ceramic tubes are sealed into high temperature metallic housings which precludes mixing of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel and air streams. In early tests, although complete oxidation of the residual CO and H2 in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel was achieved, membrane performance degraded over time. The source of degradation was found to be contaminants in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream. Following removal of the contaminants, stable membrane performance has subsequently been demonstrated. In an ongoing test, the dried afterburner exhaust composition has been found to be stable at 99.2% CO2, 0.4% N2 and 0.6%O2 after 350 hours online. Discussion of these results is presented. A test of a longer, commercial demonstration size tube was performed in the SWPC test facility. A similar contamination of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream occurred and the performance degraded over time. A second test is being prepared. Siemens Westinghouse and Praxair are collaborating on the preliminary design of an OTM equipped Afterburner demonstration unit. The intent is to test the afterburner in conjunction with a reduced size SOFC test module that has the anode gas separati

Shockling, Larry A.; Huang, Keqin; Gilboy, Thomas E. (Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation); Christie, G. Maxwell; Raybold, Troy M. (Praxair, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nitrogen oxides emission control through reburning with biomass in coal-fired power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxides of nitrogen from coal-fired power stations are considered to be major pollutants, and there is increasing concern for regulating air quality and offsetting the emissions generated from the use of energy. Reburning is an in-furnace, combustion control technology for NOx reduction. Another environmental issue that needs to be addressed is the rapidly growing feedlot industry in the United States. The production of biomass from one or more animal species is in excess of what can safely be applied to farmland in accordance with nutrient management plans and stockpiled waste poses economic and environmental liabilities. In the present study, the feasibility of using biomass as a reburn fuel in existing coal-fired power plants is considered. It is expected to utilize biomass as a low-cost, substitute fuel and an agent to control emission. The successful development of this technology will create environment-friendly, low cost fuel source for the power industry, provide means for an alternate method of disposal of biomass, and generate a possible revenue source for feedlot operators. In the present study, the effect of coal, cattle manure or feedlot biomass, and blends of biomass with coal on the ability to reduce NOx were investigated in the Texas A&M University 29.31 kW (100,000 Btu/h) reburning facility. The facility used a mixture of propane and ammonia to generate the 600 ppm NOx in the primary zone. The reburn fuel was injected using air. The stoichiometry tested were 1.00 to 1.20 in the reburn zone. Two types of injectors, circular jet and fan spray injectors, which produce different types of mixing within the reburn zone, were studied to find their effect on NOx emissions reduction. The flat spray injector performed better in all cases. With the injection of biomass as reburn fuel with circular jet injector the maximum NOx reduction was 29.9 % and with flat spray injector was 62.2 %. The mixing time was estimated in model set up as 936 and 407 ms. The maximum NOx reduction observed with coal was 14.4 % and with biomass it was 62.2 % and the reduction with blends lay between that of coal and biomass.

Arumugam, Senthilvasan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

New School Year Means New Energy Systems for Two Rhode Island Schools |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New School Year Means New Energy Systems for Two Rhode Island New School Year Means New Energy Systems for Two Rhode Island Schools New School Year Means New Energy Systems for Two Rhode Island Schools August 16, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis New energy recovery systems and occupancy sensors are greatly reducing energy costs at Woonsocket Middle School at Hamlet. | Photo courtesy of Woonsocket Education Department New energy recovery systems and occupancy sensors are greatly reducing energy costs at Woonsocket Middle School at Hamlet. | Photo courtesy of Woonsocket Education Department Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Systems and occupancy sensors save 172,365 kWh and $26,000 annually $181,000 Recovery Act grant funded installation Systems also monitor CO2 levels to provide optimal indoor air quality When city officials in Woonsocket, R.I. were planning the construction of

174

New School Year Means New Energy Systems for Two Rhode Island Schools |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

School Year Means New Energy Systems for Two Rhode Island School Year Means New Energy Systems for Two Rhode Island Schools New School Year Means New Energy Systems for Two Rhode Island Schools August 16, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis New energy recovery systems and occupancy sensors are greatly reducing energy costs at Woonsocket Middle School at Hamlet. | Photo courtesy of Woonsocket Education Department New energy recovery systems and occupancy sensors are greatly reducing energy costs at Woonsocket Middle School at Hamlet. | Photo courtesy of Woonsocket Education Department Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Systems and occupancy sensors save 172,365 kWh and $26,000 annually $181,000 Recovery Act grant funded installation Systems also monitor CO2 levels to provide optimal indoor air quality When city officials in Woonsocket, R.I. were planning the construction of

175

Reducing Emissions of Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, and Mercury from Electric Power Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis responds to a request from Senators Bob Smith, George Voinovich, and Sam Brownback to examine the costs of specific multi-emission reduction strategies

J. Alan Beamon

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NETL: News Release - Solid Oxide Fuel Cells to Advance Zero-Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 percent, focus on solving the remaining issues in developing solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for commercial use. "The President's Hydrogen and Climate Initiatives envision...

177

Observation of green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Green emission at around 500 nm is observed in Gd2O3:Ce3+ nanoparticles and the intensity is highly dependent on the concentration of Ce3+ in the nanoparticles. The luminescence of this emission displays both picosecond and millisecond lifetimes. The msec lifetime is over four orders of magnitude longer than typical luminescence lifetimes (10-40 ns) of Ce3+ in traditional Ce3+ doped phosphors and therefore likely originates from defect states. The picosecond lifetime is shorter than the typical Ce3+ value and is also likely due to defect or surface states. When the samples are annealed at 700 oC, this emission disappears possibly due to changes in the defect moieties or concentration. In addition, a blue emission at around 430 nm is observed in freshly-prepared Gd2O3 undoped nanoparticles which is attributed to the stabilizer, polyethylene glycol biscarboxymethyl ether. Upon aging, the undoped particles show similar emission to the doped particles with similar luminescence lifetimes. When Eu3+ ions are co-doped in Gd2O3:Ce nanoparticles, both the green emission and the emission at 612 nm from Eu3+ are observed.

Woo, Boon K.; Joly, Alan G.; Chen, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Rhode Island - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Puerto Rico US Virgin Islands: Overview; Data; Economy; Prices; Reserves ...

179

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of vanadium oxides and related compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lithium-ion battery comprises a lithium containing transition metal oxide (TMO) cathode,ion battery using a Li- TMO cathode [95] (e.g. LiCoO 2 ), lithium

Schmitt, Thorsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modeling global atmospheric CO2 with improved emission inventories and CO2 production from the oxidation of other carbon species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of global three-dimensional (3-D) models with satellite observations of CO2 in inverse modeling studies is an area of growing importance for understanding Earth s carbon cycle. Here we use the GEOS-Chem model (version 8-02-01) CO2 mode with multiple modifications in order to assess their impact on CO2 forward simulations. Modifications include CO2 surface emissions from shipping (0.19 PgC yr 1), 3-D spatially-distributed emissions from aviation (0.16 PgC yr 1), and 3-D chemical production of CO2 (1.05 PgC yr 1). Although CO2 chemical production from the oxidation of CO, CH4 and other carbon gases is recognized as an important contribution to global CO2, it is typically accounted for by conversion from its precursors at the surface rather than in the free troposphere. We base our model 3-D spatial distribution of CO2 chemical production on monthly-averaged loss rates of CO (a key precursor and intermediate in the oxidation of organic carbon) and apply an associated surface correction for inventories that have counted emissions of CO2 precursors as CO2. We also explore the benefit of assimilating satellite observations of CO into GEOS-Chem to obtain an observation-based estimate of the CO2 chemical source. The CO assimilation corrects for an underestimate of atmospheric CO abundances in the model, resulting in increases of as much as 24% in the chemical source during May June 2006, and increasing the global annual estimate of CO2 chemical production from 1.05 to 1.18 Pg C. Comparisons of model CO2 with measurements are carried out in order to investigate the spatial and temporal distributions that result when these new sources are added. Inclusion of CO2 emissions from shipping and aviation are shown to increase the global CO2 latitudinal gradient by just over 0.10 ppm (3%), while the inclusion of CO2 chemical production (and the surface correction) is shown to decrease the latitudinal gradient by about 0.40 ppm (10%) with a complex spatial structure generally resulting in decreased CO2 over land and increased CO2 over the oceans. Since these CO2 emissions are omitted or misrepresented in most inverse modeling work to date, their implementation in forward simulations should lead to improved inverse modeling estimates of terrestrial biospheric fluxes.

Nassar, Ray [University of Toronto; Jones, DBA [University of Toronto; Suntharalingam, P [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Chen, j. [University of Toronto; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Wecht, K. J. [Harvard University; Yantosca, R. M. [Harvard University; Kulawik, SS [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Bowman, K [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Worden, JR [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Machida, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Influence of solid fuel on the carbon-monoxide and nitrogen-oxide emissions on sintering  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory and industrial research now underway at the sintering plant of AO Mittal Steel Temirtau is focusing on the preparation of fuel of optimal granulometric composition, the replacement of coke fines, and the adaptation of fuel-input technology so as to reduce fuel consumption and toxic emissions without loss of sinter quality.

M.F. Vitushchenko; N.L. Tatarkin; A.I. Kuznetsov; A.E. Vilkov [AO Mittal Steel Temirtau, Temirtau (Kazakhstan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rules for the Discharge of Non-Sanitary Wastewater and Other Fluids To or Below the Ground Surface (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of these rules to protect and preserve the quality of the groundwater of the State of Rhode Island (the “State”) and to prevent contamination of groundwater resources from the discharge...

184

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains a minimum of 92 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

MHK Projects/Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4501,"lon":-71.4495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

188

Rhode Island Disaster Recovery Business Alliance CEO and Business Needs Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural and person-caused disasters are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and these disasters are taking an ever-increasing economic and personal toll. This report describes the early steps of a statewide project in Rhode Island to offset the effects of these catastrophic events. The project involves the efforts of EPRI, the Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS), and many other public and private organizations.

1998-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

"1. Rhode Island State Energy Partners","Gas","FPL Energy Operating Serv Inc",528  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "1. Rhode Island State Energy Partners","Gas","FPL Energy Operating Serv Inc",528 "2. Manchester Street","Gas","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",447 "3. Tiverton Power Plant","Gas","Tiverton Power Inc",250 "4. Ocean State Power II","Gas","Ocean State Power II",219 "4. Ocean State Power","Gas","Ocean State Power Co",219 "6. Pawtucket Power Associates","Gas","Pawtucket Power Associates LP",63 "7. Ridgewood Providence Power","Other Renewables","Ridgewood Power Management LLC",24 "8. Central Power Plant","Gas","State of Rhode Island",10

190

HIGH EFFICIENCY, LOW EMISSIONS, SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS FOR MULTIPLE APPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology Management Inc. (TMI), teamed with the Ohio Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, has engineered, constructed, and demonstrated a stationary, low power, multi-module solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) prototype system operating on propane and natural gas. Under Phase I, TMI successfully operated two systems in parallel, in conjunction with a single DC-AC inverter and battery bus, and produced net AC electricity. Phase II testing expanded to include alternative and renewable fuels typically available in rural regions of Ohio. The commercial system is expected to have ultra-low pollution, high efficiency, and low noise. The TMI SOFC uses a solid ceramic electrolyte operating at high temperature (800-1000 C) which electrochemically converts gaseous fuels (hydrogen or mixed gases) and oxygen into electricity. The TMI system design oxidizes fuel primarily via electrochemical reactions and uses no burners (which pollute and consume fuel)--resulting in extremely clean exhaust. The use of proprietary sulfur tolerant materials developed by TMI allows system operation without additional fuel pre-processing or sulfur removal. Further, the combination of high operating temperatures and solid state operation increases the potential for higher reliability and efficiencies compared to other types of fuel cells. Applications for the TMI SOFC system cover a wide range of transportation, building, industrial, and military market sectors. A generic technology, fuel cells have the potential to be embodied into multiple products specific to Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program areas including: Fuel Cells and Microturbines, School Buildings, Transportation, and Bioenergy. This program focused on low power stationary applications using a multi-module system operating on a range of common fuels. By producing clean electricity more efficiently (thus using less fuel), fuel cells have the triple effect of cleaning up the environment, reducing the amount of fuel consumed and, for energy intensive manufacturers, boosting their profits (by reducing energy expenses). Compared to conventional power generation technologies such as internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and coal plants, fuel cells are extremely clean and more efficient, particularly at smaller scales.

Sara Ward; Michael A. Petrik

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Environmental Assessment for the Partial Funding of a Proposed Life Sciences Building at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment for the Partial Funding of a Environmental Assessment for the Partial Funding of a Proposed Life Sciences Building at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island FINAL July 2003 National Aeronautics and Space Administration Washington, D.C. 20546-0001 U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Operations Office Argonne, Illinois 60439 Environmental Assessment for the Partial Funding of a Proposed Life Sciences Building at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island Environmental Assessment for the Partial Funding of a Proposed Life Sciences Building at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island FINAL Lead Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Proposed Action: Partial funding for a new Life Sciences Building at Brown

193

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sri_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sri_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:55 AM"

194

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Proto col for US Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben, JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for US Midwest Agriculture. In Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change,Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. Link to Journal Publication: See Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Redu ction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben; JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture. In Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. A peer-reviewed journal article that identifies, describes and analyzes socio-economic factors that may encourage or inhibit farmers from participat...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management has adopted

198

Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.73 0.33 0.39 1970's 0.33 0.38 0.38 0.42 0.41 0.55 0.75 1.67 2.08 2.06 1980's 2.92 4.74 4.53 4.74 4.05 4.53 3.55 2.87 2.20 4.19 1990's 3.74 3.41 2.94 3.31 2.69 2.21 3.35 3.15 3.00 2.53 2000's 4.67 5.20 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices

199

Rhode Island Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,742 1,080 1,411 1990's 330 0 0 0 0 0 1,010 2,405 4,679 5,524 2000's 6,070 5,380 3,912 3,176 3,015 2,834 2,673 3,764 3,663 3,430 2010's 4,062 4,669 4,503 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others Rhode Island Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

200

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Residential market for fuelwood in Rhode Island: demand, supply, and policy implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuelwood consumption in Rhode Island has tripled since the 1973 oil shortage as a result of household substitution of wood for relatively more expensive heating fuels. A telephone survey of 515 randomly selected households in Rhode Island determined the incidence of wood-burning (25%), the quantities of wood households consumed, their reasons for burning wood, the manner in which they obtained the wood, etc. Households were hypothesized to behave like cost-minimizing firms in producing heat from the lowest-cost combination of inputs (wood and stove efficiency). It was further hypothesized that households process their own firewood as an alternative to purchasing it where the opportunity cost of household labor is less than the commercial value added, thus freeing household income for other uses. These hypotheses were put into testable form as a four-level econometric model containing (1) the discrete household decision to participate in wood heat production, (2) the determination of the cost-minimizing vector of inputs given heat output and relative input prices, (3) the discrete household decision to harvest its own wood and, (4) the determination of how much wood to harvest, how much household labor to invest in wood processing, and the implicit price of fuelwood. Both these hypotheses were well validated via econometric testing.

Mackenzie, J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method for Determining Performance of Sulfur Oxide Adsorbents for Diesel Emission Control Using Online Measurement of SO2 and SO3 in the Effluent  

SciTech Connect

Upcoming regulations regarding diesel engine emissions require substantial reduction in particulate matter and nitrogen oxides through aftertreatment methods. Since sulfur oxides in the exhaust greatly reduce the performance of the aftertreatment system, a dedicated trap for removal of sulfur oxides has been considered. Most adsorbents are more effective in removing SO{sub 3} than SO{sub 2}; hence oxidation catalysts have been employed to maximize the concentration of SO{sub 3} in the effluent. Although SO{sub 2} concentrations are easily measured, SO3 is less easily quantified. As a result, the only figure of merit for the SOx trap performance has been total capacity, provided by post-characterization. In this paper we describe a chromatographic method for measurement of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} adsorption in real time, which provides adsorbent performance data on breakthrough capacities and sulfur slip, especially important when operating at high space velocities. We also provide experimental measurements of break through capacities for SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} adsorption for some common metal oxide adsorbents using this analytical system.

Li, Liyu; King, David L.

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effects of Emissions Reductions on Ozone Predictions by the Regional Oxidant Model during the July 1988 Episode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Oxidant Model, ROM2.2, was applied to a 2?10 July 1988 episode to test the regional episodic ozone response to different combinations of the across-the-board nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile ...

Shao-Hang Chu; William M. Cox

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Offshore Wind Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area W. Musial, D. Elliott, J. Fields, Z. Parker, and G. Scott Produced under direction of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement M13PG00002 and Task No WFS3.1000. Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-58091 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Analysis of Offshore Wind

206

The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

Tehan, Terry

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-11-013 Rhode Island EC.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 SECTION A. Project Title: Reactor Upgrade Grant - Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission SECTION B. Project Description The objectives of this project are to upgrade the Area Radiation Monitoring System and Confinement Air Handling System I&C with Opto-22 systems, add a Reactor Power Level Trend display that shows power trend data from each of the power level channels, and to replace the Control Rod Magnet Power Supplies and the Control Room Instrumentation Master Switch with new components. Each of these displays will make reactor system data more observable to reactor operators, reactor operator trainees, and laboratory students that are taking data in the control room. The replacement of the Control Rod Magnet Power Supplies and the Control Room

208

The conversion of the 2 MW reactor at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2 MW Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission reactor is required to convert from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using a standard LEU fuel plate which is thinner and contains more U-235 than the current HEU plate. These differences, coupled with a desire to upgrade the characteristics and capability of the reactor, have resulted in core design studies and thermal hydraulic studies not only at the current 2 MW but also at the maximum power level of the reactor, 5 MW. In addition, during 23 years of operation, it has become clear that the main uses of the reactor have been neutron scattering and neutron activation analysis. The requirement to convert to LEU presents and opportunity to optimize the core for the utilization and to restudy the thermal hydraulics using modern techniques. This paper presents the current conclusions of both aspects. 2 refs., 9 figs.

DiMeglio, A.F.; Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.; Spring, E.F. (Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center; Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

210

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EMISS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three types of emission factors are currently included: carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide. Emissions factors are specified separately for six different end-use...

211

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9- Air Pollution Control Permits (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe permitting procedures and requirements for minor and major sources of emissions.

212

The Inevitable Universe---Parker-Rhodes' peculiar mixture of ontology and physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When asked to give a lecture on Parker-Rhodes' physics, I was somewhat non-plused. I almost replied What physics '' --- a point of view that Frederick expresses himself more than once in the book he was working on when he died. But that would be unjust. Whatever his view, I assert that the discovery of the Combinational Hierarchy is one of the most important discoveries'' --- or whatever you want to call it --- in physics made in this century. His calculation of the proton-electron mass ratio is also a fantastic result that we are still trying to come to grips with. And his insight into early cosmology --- what he called a cold big bang'' --- which appeared in an early version of the Theory of Indistinguishables, also had merit. His early universe is a lot closer to my own views now than I realized when I first encountered it. We will mention other insights as I go along. But his views are so different from those of anyone I know or knew, that I have decided to let him speak for himself by reading passages from his manuscript The Inevitable Universe, or TIU, which was still unpublished at the time of his death, and add a few comments on them.

Noyes, H.P.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NO ) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers X Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment March 2000 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

214

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 ERRATA Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard July 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information Adminis- tration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler @eia.doe.gov), Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Scott B. Sitzer (202/586-2308,

215

Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

218

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission factors for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides,  nitrogen dioxide, emission factors were determined for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide, 

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 3. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume III of III. This is the third volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 2. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume II of III. This is the second volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 1. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume I of III. This is the first volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1994, July 1994--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise evaluation of the following NOx reduction technologies: Advanced overfire air (AOFA), Low NOx burners (LNB), LNB, with AOFA, and Advanced Digital Controls and Optimization Strategies. Baseline, AOFA, LNB, and LNB plus AOFA test segments have been completed. Based on a preliminary analysis, approximately 17 percent of the incremental change in NOx emissions between the LNB and LNB+AOFA configurations is the result of AOFA, the balance of the NOx reduction resulting from other operational adjustments. Preliminary diagnostic testing was conducted during August and September. The purpose of these tests was to determine the emissions and performance characteristics of the unit prior to activation of the advanced control/optimization strategies. Short-term, full load NOx emissions were near 0.47 lb/MBtu, slightly higher than that seen during the LNB+AOFA test phase. Long-term NO{sub x} emissions for this quarter averaged near 0.41 lb/MBtu. Due to turbine problems, a four week outage has been planned for Hammond 4 starting October 1. Two on-line carbon-in-ash monitors are being installed at Hammond Unit 4 as part of the Wall-Fired Project. These monitors will be evaluated as to their accuracy, repeatability, reliability, and serviceability.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2004  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2005  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

226

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1994  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products July 6, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research to help find ways of converting into useful products CO2 captured from emissions of power plants and industrial facilities will be conducted by six projects announced today by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects are located in North Carolina, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia, and Quebec, Canada (through collaboration with a company based in Lexington, Ky.) and have a total value of approximately $5.9 million over two-to-three years, with $4.4 million of DOE funding and $1.5 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the

236

The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser radiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: The generation of atomic Zn line emission at laser fluences below breakdown  

SciTech Connect

The production of gas phase atomic and ionic line spectra accompanying the high laser fluence irradiation of solid surfaces is well known and is most often due to the production and interaction of high densities of atoms, ions, and electrons generated from laser-induced breakdown. The resulting plasma expands and moves rapidly away from the irradiated spot and is accompanied by intense emission of light. This type of plume is well studied and is frequently exploited in the technique of chemical analysis known as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Here, we describe a similar but weaker emission of light generated in vacuum by the laser irradiation of single crystal ZnO at fluences well below breakdown; this emission consists entirely of optical line emission from excited atomic Zn. We compare the properties of the resulting laser-generated gas-phase light emission (above and below breakdown) and describe a mechanism for the production of the low-fluence optical emission resulting from a fortuitous choice of material and laser wavelength.

Kahn, E. H. [Washington State University, Pullman; Langford, S. C. [Washington State University, Pullman; Dickinson, J. T. [Washington State University, Pullman; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter, 1994, October 1994--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. The project provides a stepwise evaluation of the following NOx reduction technologies: Advanced overfire air (AOFA), Low NOx burners (LNB), LNB with AOFA, and Advanced Digital Controls and Optimization Strategies. The project has completed the baseline, AOFA, LNB, and LNB+AOFA test segments, fulfilling all testing originally proposed to DOE. Analysis of the LNB long-term data collected show the full load NOx emission levels to be near 0.65 lb/MBtu. This NOx level represents a 48 percent reduction when compared to the baseline, full load value of 1.24 lb/MBtu. These reductions were sustainable over the long-term test period and were consistent over the entire load range. Full load, fly ash LOI values in the LNB configuration were near 8 percent compared to 5 percent for baseline. Results from the LNB+AOFA phase indicate that full load NOx emissions are approximately 0.40 lb/MBtu with a corresponding fly ash LOI value of near 8 percent. Although this NOx level represents a 67 percent reduction from baseline levels, a substantial portion of the incremental change in NOx emissions between the LNB and LNB+AOFA configurations was the result of operational changes and not the result of the AOFA system. Phase 4 of the project is now underway.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Observation-Based Assessment of the Impact of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions Reductions on Ozone Air Quality over the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ozone is produced by chemical interactions involving nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds in the presence of sunlight. At high concentrations, ground-level ozone has been shown to be harmful to human health and to the environment. ...

Edith Gégo; P. Steven Porter; Alice Gilliland; S. Trivikrama Rao

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

240

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electron Emission From Slightly Oxidized Delta-stabilized Plutonium Generated by its Radioactivity, and Radiation Induced Ionization and Dissociation of Hydrogen at its Surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy dependent electron emission between zero and 1.4 keV generated by the natural reactivity of plutonium was measured by an electrostatic spectrometer with known acceptance angle and acceptance area. The electron spectral intensity decreases continuously except for a distinctive feature of unknown origin at approximately 180eV. The spectrum was converted to energy dependent electron flux (e/cm{sup 2} s) using the assumption that the emission has a cosine angular distribution. The energy dependent electron mean free path in gases and literature cross sections for electron induced reactions were used to determine the number of ionization and dissociation reactions per cm{sup 2} second, found to be about 8*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.5*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively, for hydrogen. These results are to be used with caution until complementary measurements can be made, e.g. independent measurement of the total emitted electron current, since the results here are based on the assumption that the electron emission has a cosine angular distribution. That is unlikely to be correct.

Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

243

Electron Emission from Slightly Oxidized Depleted Uranium Generated by its Own Radioactivity Measured by Electron Spectroscopy, and Electron-Induced Dissociation and Ionization of Hydrogen Near its Surface.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy dependent electron emission (counts per second) between zero and 1.4 keV generated by the natural reactivity of uranium was measured by an electrostatic spectrometer with known acceptance angle and acceptance area. The electron intensity decreases continuously with energy, but at different rates in different energy regimes, suggesting that a variety of processes may be involved in producing the observed electron emission. The spectrum was converted to energy dependent electron flux (e-/cm{sup 2} s) using the assumption that the emission has a cosine angular distribution. The flux decreased rapidly from {approx}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s in the energy range from zero to 200 eV, and then more slowly from {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}3*10{sup 4}/cm{sup 2} s in the range from 200 to 1400 eV. The energy dependent electron mean free path in gases together with literature cross sections for electron induced reactions were used to determine the number of ionization and dissociation reactions per cm{sup 2}s within the inelastic mean free path of electrons, and found to be about 1.3*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.5*10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively, for hydrogen. An estimate of the number of ionization and dissociation reactions occurring within the total range, rather than the mean free path of electrons in gases resulted in 6.2*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.3*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively. The total energy flux carried by electrons from the surface is suspiciously close to the total possible energy generated by one gram of uranium. A likely source of error is the assumption that the electron emission has a cosine distribution. Angular distribution measurements of the electron emission would check that assumption, and actual measurement of the total current emanating from the surface are needed to confirm the value of the current calculated in section II. These results must therefore be used with caution - until they are confirmed by other measurements.

Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Innovative clean coal technology: 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Final report, Phases 1 - 3B  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project was conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The technologies demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NOx burner. The primary objective of the demonstration at Hammond Unit 4 was to determine the long-term effects of commercially available wall-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. Short-term tests of each technology were also performed to provide engineering information about emissions and performance trends. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications was established for the project. Short-term and long-term baseline testing was conducted in an {open_quotes}as-found{close_quotes} condition from November 1989 through March 1990. Following retrofit of the AOFA system during a four-week outage in spring 1990, the AOFA configuration was tested from August 1990 through March 1991. The FWEC CF/SF low NOx burners were then installed during a seven-week outage starting on March 8, 1991 and continuing to May 5, 1991. Following optimization of the LNBs and ancillary combustion equipment by FWEC personnel, LNB testing commenced during July 1991 and continued until January 1992. Testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration was completed during August 1993. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NOx burners and advanced overfire systems.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

247

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

248

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

249

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminant...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

250

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1 - Visible Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

251

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

252

The use of onboard diagnostics to reduce emissions in automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emissions from automobiles are very harmful and include gases such as Carbon Dioxide, Nitrous Oxide, and Sulfur Dioxide. One of the main reasons OBD was created was to control emissions however it currently only monitors ...

Perez, Alberto, Jr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Unintended Impacts of Increased Truck Loads on Pavement Supply-Chain Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Long?term changes in emissions of nitrogen oxides and of alternative fuel  vehicles: emissions, energy,  and cost Its Effect On CO 2   Emissions.  Transport Policy, 1, 125?

Sathaye, Nakul; Horvath, Arpad; Madanat, Samer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000 Executive Summary  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Executive Summary on the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methane, and nitrous oxide) from on-site fuel combustion and purchased electricity and district heating and cooling. Portfolio Manager also enables tracking of avoided emissions...

256

Census Snapshot: Rhode Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of a senior or disabled partner in a couple mayleast one partner who is disabled: 33% of same-sex couples,partner over 65 Percent disabled Average household income

Romero, Adam P; Baumle, Amanda; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Rhode Island.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lets you compare window performance options by calculating performance based on utility rates for your climate, house design options, and window design options. 5. Ensure...

258

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

259

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

260

Controlling diesel NOx & PM emissions using fuel components and enhanced aftertreatment techniques: developing the next generation emission control system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following research thesis focuses on methods of controlling nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) and particulate matter (PM) emissions emitted from a low temperature diesel exhaust. This… (more)

Gill, Simaranjit Singh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

262

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

Zero emission coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Diesel hybridization and emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

Biruduganti, Munidhar S. (Naperville, IL); Gupta, Sreenath Borra (Naperville, IL); Sekar, R. Raj (Naperville, IL); McConnell, Steven S. (Shorewood, IL)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

267

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

268

Mechanical Stability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are devices that convert chemical energy into electricity with high efficiency and low pollutant emissions. In case ...

269

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January – December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...

273

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mozambique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mozambique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mozambique image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mozambique...

274

CO2 Emissions - Macau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Macau CO2 Emissions from Macau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macau...

275

CO2 Emissions - Guadeloupe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guadeloupe Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guadeloupe...

276

CO2 Emissions - Ghana  

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Africa Ghana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Ghana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ghana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ghana...

277

CO2 Emissions - Ireland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ireland CO2 Emissions from Ireland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ireland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ireland...

278

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

279

CO2 Emissions - Kyrgyzstan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Kyrgyzstan CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kyrgyzstan...

280

CO2 Emissions - Mali  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Mali Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mali Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mali image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mali...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CO2 Emissions - Portugal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Portugal CO2 Emissions from Portugal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Portugal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Portugal...

282

CO2 Emissions - Paraguay  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paraguay Graphics CO2 Emissions from Paraguay Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Paraguay image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Paraguay...

283

CO2 Emissions - Macedonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Macedonia CO2 Emissions from Macedonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macedonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macedonia...

284

CO2 Emissions - Malawi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Malawi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Malawi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malawi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malawi...

285

CO2 Emissions - Gabon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Gabon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gabon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gabon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gabon...

286

CO2 Emissions - Grenada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grenada Graphics CO2 Emissions from Grenada Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Grenada image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Grenada...

287

CO2 Emissions - Kiribati  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Kiribati Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kiribati Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kiribati image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kiribati...

288

CO2 Emissions - Israel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Israel Graphics CO2 Emissions from Israel Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Israel image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Israel...

289

CO2 Emissions - Phillippines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Phillippines CO2 Emissions from Phillippines Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Phillippines image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Phillippines...

290

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

291

CO2 Emissions - Mauritius  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Mauritius Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritius Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritius image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritius...

292

CO2 Emissions - Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malaysia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malaysia...

293

CO2 Emissions - Reunion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reunion Graphics CO2 Emissions from Reunion Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Reunion image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Reunion...

294

CO2 Emissions - Guatemala  

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Guatemala Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guatemala Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guatemala image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guatemala...

295

CO2 Emissions - Iceland  

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Iceland CO2 Emissions from Iceland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iceland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iceland...

296

CO2 Emissions - Mongolia  

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Asia Mongolia CO2 Emissions from Mongolia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mongolia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mongolia...

297

CO2 Emissions - Romania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Romania CO2 Emissions from Romania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Romania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Romania...

298

CO2 Emissions - Panama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Panama...

299

CO2 Emissions - Madagascar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Madagascar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Madagascar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Madagascar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Madagascar...

300

CO2 Emissions - Netherlands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Netherlands CO2 Emissions from Netherlands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherlands image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Netherlands...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CO2 Emissions - Greenland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Greenland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greenland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greenland...

302

CO2 Emissions - Norway  

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Norway CO2 Emissions from Norway Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Norway image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Norway...

303

CO2 Emissions - Guyana  

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Guyana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guyana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guyana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guyana...

304

CO2 Emissions - Mauritania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Mauritania Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritania...

305

CO2 Emissions - Lithuania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Lithuania CO2 Emissions from Lithuania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lithuania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lithuania...

306

CO2 Emissions - Kenya  

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Africa Kenya Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kenya Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kenya image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kenya...

307

CO2 Emissions - Latvia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Latvia CO2 Emissions from Latvia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Latvia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Latvia...

308

CO2 Emissions - Georgia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Georgia CO2 Emissions from Georgia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Georgia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Georgia...

309

CO2 Emissions - Gambia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gambia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gambia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gambia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gambia...

310

CO2 Emissions - Montenegro  

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Centrally Planned Europe Montenegro CO2 Emissions from Montenegro Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montenegro image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Montenegro...

311

CO2 Emissions - Oman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Oman Graphics CO2 Emissions from Oman Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Oman image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Oman...

312

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait  

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Middle East Kuwait Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kuwait Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kuwait image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kuwait...

313

CO2 Emissions - Lebanon  

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Middle East Lebanon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Lebanon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lebanon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lebanon...

314

CO2 Emissions - Nigeria  

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Africa Nigeria Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nigeria Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nigeria image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nigeria...

315

CO2 Emissions - Maldives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Maldives CO2 Emissions from Maldives Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Maldives image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Maldives...

316

CO2 Emissions - Morocco  

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Morocco Graphics CO2 Emissions from Morocco Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Morocco image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Morocco...

317

CO2 Emissions - Pakistan  

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Far East Pakistan CO2 Emissions from Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Pakistan...

318

CO2 Emissions - Palau  

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Oceania Palau CO2 Emissions from Palau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Palau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Palau...

319

CO2 Emissions - Qatar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Qatar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Qatar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Qatar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Qatar...

320

CO2 Emissions - Guam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Guam Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guam image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guam...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Rwanda Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda...

322

CO2 Emissions - Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea...

323

CO2 Emissions - Luxembourg  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Luxembourg CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Luxembourg...

324

CO2 Emissions - Liberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Liberia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Liberia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Liberia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Liberia...

325

CO2 Emissions - Haiti  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Haiti Graphics CO2 Emissions from Haiti Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Haiti image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Haiti...

326

CO2 Emissions - Iraq  

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Iraq Graphics CO2 Emissions from Iraq Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iraq image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iraq...

327

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

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Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

328

CO2 Emissions - Nepal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Nepal CO2 Emissions from Nepal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nepal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nepal...

329

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

330

CO2 Emissions - Myanmar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Myanmar CO2 Emissions from Myanmar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Myanmar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Myanmar...

331

Glossary Term - Neutron Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Previous Term (Neutron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Niobe) Niobe Neutron Emission After neutron emission, an atom contains one less neutron. Neutron emission is one...

332

Glossary Term - Proton Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Previous Term (Proton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Quark) Quark Proton Emission After proton emission, an atom contains one less proton. Proton emission is one process...

333

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

334

CO2 Emissions - Greece  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Greece CO2 Emissions from Greece Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greece image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greece...

335

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

337

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels Exhaust emissions from engines operating in advanced combustion modes such as PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) and HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) are analyzed with an array of analytical tools. Furthermore, emissions from a variety of alternative fuels and mixtures thereof with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels are also measured. In addition to measuring the criteria pollutants nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HCs) are also measured and categorized based on chemistry. These chemical details of the emissions provide important information for optimizing combustion processes to maximize fuel efficiency while minimizing emissions

338

Low emission combustor  

SciTech Connect

A low emission combustor assembly particularly suited for an automotive gas turbine engine has an inlet plenum supplied with regenerated compressor discharge, an exhaust plenum, a diffusion flame combustion chamber disposed between the inlet and exhaust plenums, and a catalytic combustion chamber also disposed between the inlet and exhaust plenums so that parallel flow paths are established between the inlet and exhaust plenums. During engine start-up, fuel is supplied only to the diffusion flame combustion chamber and regenerated compressor discharge simultaneously flowing through the catalytic combustion chamber heats the catalyst to operating temperature and cools and dilutes exhaust from the diffusion flame combustion chamber. When the catalyst reaches operating temperature fuel is directed only to the catalytic combustion chamber wherein an ultra lean air/fuel ratio mixture is catalytically oxidized, the exhaust from this reaction being cooled and diluted by regenerated compressor discharge simultaneously flowing through the diffusion flame combustion chamber.

Cornelius, W.; Klomp, E.D.; Kosek, T.P.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Pollution Markets with Imperfectly Observed Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Another example with similar monitoring requirements is the Southern California RECLAIM program that implemented separated markets for nitrogen oxide (NOx) and SO2 emissions from power plants, refineries and other large stationary sources. This program did... to the allocation of permits, an emission standard specific to buses. It may also be optimal to use 28 I thank one of the referees for pointing out this case and its relevance for the Los Angeles’ RECLAIM market. 26 different utilization factors (eq) for each group...

Montero, Juan-Pablo

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

340

Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems  

SciTech Connect

Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

stationary combustion—primarily from wood com-bustion for residential heating—increased. • Emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2O) increased by 0.4 MMTCO 2e (0.1 ...

342

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Phase 3A, Low NO{sub x} burner tests  

SciTech Connect

This Phase 3A test report summarizes the testing activities and results for the third testing phase of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. Described in this report are the test plans, data measurements, and data analyses performed during the Phase 3A effort. The present report also contains sufficient background material to provide an understanding of the overall program scope, the relationship of Phase 3A to the overall program, the testing methodologies, testing procedures, and unit configuration. Results from 66 short-term tests indicate increasing NO{sub x} emissions over the load range ranging from 0.5 lb/MBtu at 300 NM to around 0.65 lb/MBtu at 480 MW. Fly ash loss-on-ignition (LOI) for these loads ranged from 5.4 to 8.6 percent. Long-term test results indicated high load (480 MW) NO{sub x} emissions of approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. At the 300 MW mid load point, the emissions dropped to 0.47 lb/MBtu which is slightly lower than the 0.50 lb/MBtu shown for the short-term data. The annual and 30-day average achievable NO{sub x} emissions were determined to be 0.55 and 0.64 lb/MBtu, respectively, for the load scenario experienced during the Phase 3A, long-term test period. Based on the long-term test results for Phase 3A, at full-load the low NO{sub x} burners (LNB) retrofit resulted in a NO{sub x} reduction of 48 percent from baseline, while at 300 MW the reduction was approximately 50 percent. A series of tests was also conducted to evaluate the effects of various burner equipment settings and mill coal flow biasing on both NO{sub x} and LOI emissions.

Not Available

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Multifunctional Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3) Electric, ferroelectric, magnetic and photonic properties of oxides 4) Theoretical modeling of epitaxial growth, interfaces and microstructures 5) Composition ...

344

Mercury Oxidation Performance of Advanced SCR Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts to oxidize mercury is an important aspect of many utilities’ mercury control strategies. Improved SCR mercury oxidation will facilitate its capture in downstream wet–flue gas desulfurization systems and will generally result in lower emission rates. Recently, catalyst manufacturers have attempted to maximize mercury oxidation through advanced catalyst formulations.This study documents the performance of an advanced ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

346

CO2 Emissions - Peru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Peru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Peru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

347

CO2 Emissions - Bolivia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Bolivia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Bolivia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Bolivia image Per capita CO2 Emission...

348

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

349

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

350

Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1: Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1. Data set prepared by J.T. Randerson, G.R. van der Werf, L. Giglio, G.J. Collatz, and P.S. Kasibhatla. This data set provides monthly burned area, and monthly and annual fire emissions data from July 1996 to February 2012. Emissions data are available for carbon (C), dry matter (DM), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), particulate matter 2.5 micron (PM2p5), total particulate matter (TPM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) among others. The C4 fraction of

351

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOBILE6 Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm Cost: Free References: http://www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Particulate Matter (PM), and toxics from cars, trucks, and motorcycles under various conditions. MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon

352

Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Control R&D Emission Control R&D The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research and development of aftertreatment technologies to control advanced combustion engine exhaust emissions. All engines that enter the vehicle market must comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's emissions regulations. Harmful pollutants in these emissions include: Carbon monoxide Nitrogen oxides Unburned hydrocarbons Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) Particulate matter The energy required for emission control often reduces vehicle fuel economy and increases vehicle cost. VTO's Emission Control R&D focuses on developing efficient, durable, low-cost emission control systems that complement new combustion strategies while minimizing efficiency losses. VTO often leverages the national laboratories' unique capabilities and facilities to conduct this research.

353

CO2 Emissions - Montserrat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Montserrat Graphics CO2 Emissions from Montserrat Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montserrat image Per capita CO2...

354

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

355

CO2 Emissions - Honduras  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Honduras Graphics CO2 Emissions from Honduras Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Honduras image Per capita CO2...

356

CO2 Emissions - Nicaragua  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Nicaragua Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua image Per capita CO2...

357

Trends Online Methane Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Introduction Annual Estimates of Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions: 1860-1994 - D.I. Stern and R.K. Kaufmann Contents-Trends | CDIAC Home 102001...

358

Harmful Exhaust Emissions Monitoring of Road Vehicle Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road vehicle improve the quality of people's life, however harmful vehicle exhaust emissions, such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydrocarbon (HC), and sulphur dioxide (SO2), have become more and more unacceptable ... Keywords: optic absorption spectroscopy based gas sensor, harmful exhaust emission monitoring, engine vibration

Chuliang Wei; Zhemin Zhuang; H. Ewald; A. I. Al-Shamma'a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Novel Application of Air Separation Membranes Reduces Engine NOx Emissions  

Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions pose risks to human health, and so they need to be reduced. One very effective tool for reducing engine in-cylinder temperature and, hence NOx emissions (NOx is a strong function of temperature), is Exhaust Gas ...

360

Measuring of exhaust gas emissions using absorption spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an optical fibre sensor for the detection of NOx (NO2 and NO) and CO2 in the exhaust system of a road vehicle. The measurement is based on a free path interaction zone which is interrogated using ... Keywords: absorption spectroscopy, air pollution, carbon dioxide, emissions measurement, exhaust gas emissions, gas sensors, infrared, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, optical fibre sensors, ultraviolet, vehicle emissions

Eamonn Hawe; Gerard Dooly; Colin Fitzpatrick; Paul Chambers; Elfed Lewis; W. Z. Zhao; T. Sun; K. T. V. Grattan; M. Degner; H. Ewald; S. Lochmann; G. Bramman; C. Wei; D. Hitchen; J. Lucas; A. Al-Shamma'a; E. Merlone-Borla; P. Faraldi; M. Pidria

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

362

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controlling NOx emissions from lean engines is challenging. Traditionally, for the stoichiometric gasoline engine vehicles that dominate the U.S. passenger car market, a three-way...

363

nitrogen oxides | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279720 Varnish cache server nitrogen oxides Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

364

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "NERC Region(s)",,"NPCC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",1782,49 " Electric Utilities",7,50 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1775,37 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",7738719,47 " Electric Utilities",10827,47 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",7727892,33 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide","*",50 " Nitrogen Oxide",3,49 " Carbon Dioxide",3217,48 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)","*",50 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.8,42 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",916,39

365

Ultra supercritical steamside oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 goals. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Vision 21 goals include steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems. Emphasis is placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David A.; Ochs, Thomas L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Title Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Edward J. Dlugokencky, Colm Sweeney, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 39 Issue 16 Keywords atmospheric transport, inverse modeling, nitrous oxide Abstract We estimate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Central California for the period of December 2007 through November 2009 by comparing N2O mixing ratios measured at a tall tower (Walnut Grove, WGC) with transport model predictions based on two global a priori N2O emission models (EDGAR32 and EDGAR42). Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models. Regression analyses show that the slopes of predicted on measured N2O from both emission models are low, suggesting that actual N2O emissions are significantly higher than the EDGAR inventories for all seasons. Bayesian inverse analyses of regional N2O emissions show that posterior annual N2O emissions are larger than both EDGAR inventories by factors of 2.0 ± 0.4 (EDGAR32) and 2.1 ± 0.4 (EDGAR42) with seasonal variation ranging from 1.6 ± 0.3 to 2.5 ± 0.4 for an influence region of Central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. These results suggest that if the spatial distribution of N2O emissions in California follows the EDGAR emission models, then actual emissions are 2.7 ± 0.5 times greater than the current California emission inventory, and total N2O emissions account for 8.1 ± 1.4% of total greenhouse gas emissions from California.

367

Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10.62 10.07 6.70 10.05 8.22 4.11 1984-2012 10.62 10.07 6.70 10.05 8.22 4.11 1984-2012 Residential 16.66 16.89 17.06 16.48 15.33 14.29 1967-2012 Commercial 14.91 15.53 15.14 14.46 13.33 12.31 1967-2012 Industrial 12.58 13.26 12.58 12.13 10.98 9.78 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 10.96 12.62 10.72 11.71 8.61 16.32 1990-2012 Electric Power 8.06 10.50 4.98 5.45 5.10 3.98 1997-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1973-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 1,093 656 698 468 430 517 1980-2012 Withdrawals 1,089 730 954 698 436 457 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals 4 -74 -256 -230 -7 60 1980-2012 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 87,972 89,256 92,743 94,110 100,455 95,477 1997-2012

368

Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4.07 NA 1989-2013 Residential Price 12.09 12.58 13.85 14.59 18.74 17.45 1989-2013 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0...

369

Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 10.62 10.07 6.70 10.05 8.22 4.11 1984-2012 Residential Price 16.66 16.89 17.06 16.48 15.33 14.29 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 14.91 15.53 15.14 14.46 13.33 12.31 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 66.5 66.2 68.0 61.2 56.9 55.4 1990-2012 Industrial Price 12.58 13.26 12.58 12.13 10.98 9.78 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 11.6 11.7 9.2 6.5 6.0 6.3 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 10.96 12.62 10.72 11.71 8.61 16.32 1990-2012 Electric Power Price

370

The Enterprise Zone (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone offers tax incentives to business expanding their workforce by 5% at facilities in designated enterprise zones. The tax credit is equal to 50% of the annual wages paid to a new...

371

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 11, 2010 CX-000939: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ponaganet Alternative Energy Laboratory and Biomass Facilities Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02112010...

372

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5,"Monthly","92013","1151989" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",1,"Monthly","121996","1151994" ,"Data 3","Consumption",6,"Monthly","92013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1212...

373

Department of Energy - Rhode Island  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

class"field-item even" property"content:encoded">

Facilities which compost putrescible waste andor leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The...

374

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

up to 100% of the electricity that a home or other facility uses. Systems that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, ocean-thermal energy, geothermal energy,...

375

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mid-Sized Business Program is for business customers with an average demand of 200 kilowatts or less per month. The program aids qualifying business customers in installing...

376

WHAT'S NEWS @ Rhode Island College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over 52,000 Little East Champions! Continued on page 6 Kinsey Durgin drives for a layup in class 3, Portrait of a Plant in Cultivation. She received third prize in class 4, Rock Garden Scene on a sophomore guard Tirrell Hill layup. Keene State threatened with 5:29 left to go, cutting the lead down

Rhode Island, University of

377

Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

17.45 NA 20.88 NA 1989-2013 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2002-2013 Commercial Price 12.43 13.23 15.54 NA...

378

Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

17.06 16.48 15.33 NA 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 14.91 15.53 15.14 14.46...

379

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Near-Zero Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Project No.: DE-NT0005341 Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment. Praxair Inc. will develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing coal-fired power plants retrofit with oxy-combustion technology. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and mercury (Hg) will be reduced by at least 99 percent, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions will be reduced by greater than 90 percent without the need for wet flue gas desulfurization and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Two separate processes are proposed depending on the sulfur content of the coal. For high-sulfur coal, SO2 and NOx will be recovered as product sulfuric acid and nitric acid, respectively, and Hg will be recovered as

380

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

382

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Title Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Kean, Andrew J., David Littlejohn, George Ban-Weiss, Robert A. Harley, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Melissa M. Lunden Journal Atmospheric Environment Abstract Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 ± 6%, from 640 ± 40 to 400 ± 20 mg kg-1. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

383

NETL: News Release - Record Run by Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Comes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the equivalent of 65 kilowatts of thermal energy in the form of hot water to the local district heating system. Air emissions from the unit - nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides,...

384

Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in support of nuclear waste management. [HHDECMP (hexyl hexyl-N,N diethylcarbamolymethylphosphonate) and n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide  

SciTech Connect

Simulated complex nuclear waste solutions are characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AEC). The system uses and ICP source focused on both a polychromator and a computer-controlled scanning monochromator for intensity measurements. This instrumentation allows for simultaneous and sequential measurements of liquid extraction distribution coefficients needed in the development of process flow sheets for component separations. A large number of elements are determined rapidly with adequate sensitivity and accuracy. The focus of this investigation centers on the analysis of nuclear fission products. 13 references, 13 tables.

Huff, E.A.; Horwitz, E.P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 81. Carbon diioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2007 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 82. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 83. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rate of Increase in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Slows in the Projections Even with rising energy prices, growth in energy use leads to increasing

386

Ethanol oxidation on metal oxide-supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on the standard three-way catalysts, the conversion of unburned ethanol is low because both ethanol and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of “stoves” that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the “final” products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of “stoves” that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the “final” products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.

L. M. Petkovic 090468; Sergey N. Rashkeev; D. M. Ginosar

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26-29, 1979 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INLBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INl·. LBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN

Gullberg, G.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

389

Excess Emissions (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

390

CO2 Emissions - Guinea Bissau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guinea Bissau Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea Bissau...

391

CO2 Emissions - Peninsular Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Far East Peninsular Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia image Per...

392

CO2 Emissions - New Caledonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Caledonia Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Caledonia...

393

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

394

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

395

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - Nox Budget Trading 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These regulations apply to units that serve generators with a nameplate capacity greater than 15 MWe and sell any amount of electricity, as well as to units that have a maximum

396

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

398

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

399

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emission Impacts of Ethanol-Diesel Blends in Urban Buses and Farming Tractors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................................... 14 Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Corn Fields........................................................ 34 Appendix B: Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Corn Fields) LHV lower heating value LPG liquefied petroleum gas LS low-sulfur LSD low-sulfur diesel MTBE methyl

Argonne National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

Ceyer, Sylvia T. (Cambridge, MA); Lahr, David L. (Cambridge, MA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

402

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

403

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

404

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

405

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

406

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

407

Mercury Emissions Data Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the visual materials included in presentations given at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on April 3, 2002. Participants included representatives from EPRI, DOE, RMB Consulting & Research, and EERC. The MACT Working Group gave a presentation on "Variability in Hg Emissions Based on SCEM Data." The visuals in the report are a set of graphs documenting results of mercury emissions over time, using semi-continuous emissions monitor (SCEM) data. The EPA Utility Working Group gave a ...

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fuel Sulfur Effects on a Medium-Duty Diesel Pick-Up with a NOx Adsorber, Diesel Particle Filter Emissions Control System: 2000-Hour Aging Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the emission results of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst and a diesel particle filter in a medium-duty, diesel pick-up truck.

Thornton, M.; Webb, C. C.; Weber, P. A.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

SF6 Emissions Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emissions Overview Joanna Eckstein and Penny Avery Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned...

411

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

412

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

413

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for controlling NOx from lean engines are studied in great detail at FEERC. Lean NOx Traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are two catalyst technologies of interest. Catalysts are studied from the nanoscale to full scale. On the nanoscale, catalyst powders are analyzed with chemisorptions techniques to determine the active metal surface area where catalysis occurs. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is used to observe the chemical reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during catalyst operation. Both powder and coated catalyst samples are analyzed on bench flow reactors in controlled simulated exhaust environments to better characterize the chemical

416

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Tracking Emission Rate Dynamics of NV Centers in Nanodiamonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spontaneous emission from crystal centers is influenced by both the photonic local density of states and non-radiative processes. Here we monitor the spontaneous emission of single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers as their host diamond is reduced in size from a large monolithic crystal to a nanocrystal by successive cycles of oxidation. The size reduction induces a quenching of the NV radiative emission. New non-radiative channels lead to a decrease of the fluorescence intensity and the excited state lifetime. In one case we observe the onset of blinking which may provide a route to understand these additional non-radiative decay channels.

Faraz A Inam; Andrew M Edmonds; Michael J Steel; Stefania Castelletto

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

FGDExpert Demonstration at NIPSCO Schahfer Unit 17: Oxidation Reduction Potential Effects on Scrubber Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have been shown to remove soluble oxidized mercury (Hg), as well as selenium (Se), from flue gas. However, one phenomenon that has been observed, but not well characterized, is the re-emission of oxidized Hg captured in the FGD scrubber as elemental Hg. Several studies have shown that oxidation reduction potential (ORP) influences the re-emission of Hg from FGD scrubbers. Other studies have demonstrated that ORP influences the speciation of Se in the scrubber ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Partial oxidation power plant with reheating and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are disclosed for generating power having an air compression/partial oxidation system, a turbine, and a primary combustion system. The air compression/partial oxidation system receives a first air stream and a fuel stream and produces a first partially oxidized fuel stream and a first compressed air stream therefrom. The turbine expands the first partially oxidized fuel stream while being cooled by the first compressed air stream to produce a heated air stream. The heated air stream is injected into the expanding first partially oxidized fuel stream, thereby reheating it in the turbine. A second partially oxidized fuel stream is emitted from the turbine. The primary combustion system receives said second partially oxidized fuel stream and a second air stream, combusts said second partially oxidized fuel stream, and produces rotating shaft power and an emission stream therefrom. 2 figs.

Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Bannister, R.L.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Partial oxidation power plant with reheating and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for generating power having an air compression/partial oxidation system, a turbine, and a primary combustion system. The air compression/partial oxidation system receives a first air stream and a fuel stream and produces a first partially oxidized fuel stream and a first compressed air stream therefrom. The turbine expands the first partially oxidized fuel stream while being cooled by the first compressed air stream to produce a heated air stream. The heated air stream is injected into the expanding first partially oxidized fuel stream, thereby reheating it in the turbine. A second partially oxidized fuel stream is emitted from the turbine. The primary combustion system receives said second partially oxidized fuel stream and a second air stream, combusts said second partially oxidized fuel stream, and produces rotating shaft power and an emission stream therefrom.

Newby, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yang, Wen-Ching (Export, PA); Bannister, Ronald L. (Winter Springs, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Trends in on-road vehicle emissions of ammonia  

SciTech Connect

Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 {+-} 6%, from 640 {+-} 40 to 400 {+-} 20 mg kg{sup -1}. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

Kean, A.J.; Littlejohn, D.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; Harley, R.A.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Lunden, M. M.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

424

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ford Motor Company, with ExxonMobil and FEV, participated in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuels Program with the goal to develop an innovative emission control system for light-duty diesel vehicles. The focus on diesel engine emissions was a direct result of the improved volumetric fuel economy (up to 50%) and lower CO2 emissions (up to 25%) over comparable gasoline engines shown in Europe. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with aqueous urea as the NOx reductant and a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF) were chosen as the primary emission control system components. The program expected to demonstrate more than 90% durable reduction in particulate matter (PM) and NOx emissions on a light-duty truck application, based on the FTP-75 drive cycle. Very low sulfur diesel fuel (<15 ppm-wt) enabled lower PM emissions, reduced fuel economy penalty due to the emission control system and improved long-term system durability. Significant progress was made toward a durable system to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 emission standards on a 6000 lbs light-duty truck. A 40% reduction in engine-out NOx emissions was achieved with a mid-size prototype diesel engine through engine recalibration and increased exhaust gas recirculation. Use of a rapid warm-up strategy and urea SCR provided over 90% further NOx reduction while the CDPF reduced tailpipe PM to gasoline vehicle levels. Development work was conducted to separately improve urea SCR and CDPF system durability, as well as improved oxidation catalyst function. Exhaust gas NOx and ammonia sensors were also developed further. While the final emission control system did not meet Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx after 120k mi of aging on the dynamometer, it did meet the standards for HC, NMOG, and PM, and an improved SCR catalyst was shown to have potential to meet the NOx standard, assuming the DOC durability could be improved further. Models of DOC and SCR function were developed to guide the study of several key design factors for SCR systems and aid in the development of urea control strategy for maximum NOx reduction with minimum NH3 slip. A durable co-fueling system was successfully built and tested, with the help of service station nozzle and dispenser manufacturers, for simultaneous delivery of diesel fuel and aqueous urea to the vehicle. The business case for an aqueous urea infrastructure in the US for light-duty vehicles was explored.

Lambert, Christine

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

CO2 Emissions - New Zealand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania New Zealand Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Zealand Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Zealand image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Zealand...

427

CO2 Emissions - Hong Kong  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Hong Kong CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hong Kong...

428

CO2 Emissions - Wake Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Wake Island Graphics CO2 Emissions from Wake Island Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Wake Island image Per capita CO2...

429

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

430

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

431

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

432

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles Graphics CO2 Emissions from Netherland Antilles Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherland...

433

CO2 Emissions - Ryukyu Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Ryukyu Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands image...

434

CO2 Emissions - Leeward Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Leeward Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands image...

435

carbon emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity carbon emissions energy demand Energy Generation fossil fuels GHG emissions UK Data applicationvnd.openxmlformats-office...

436

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Advanced NOx Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Advanced NOx Emissions Control Adv....

437

Improved field emission characteristic of carbon nanotubes by an Ag micro-particle intermediation layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient way to improve field emission characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through an Ag micro-particle intermediation layer is presented. In this way, the intermediation layer is deposited on an indium tin oxide glass substrate by electrochemical ... Keywords: Ag micro-particle intermediation layer, Carbon nanotubes, Field emission

Wenhui Lu; Hang Song; Yixin Jin; Haifeng Zhao; Zhiming Li; Hong Jiang; Guoqing Miao

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Key Issues in the Design of NOx Emission Trading Programs to Reduce Ground-Level Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As NOx control requirements grow more stringent and expensive, interest in emission trading as a means of controlling costs and increasing flexibility has risen. This report provides background information for and analysis of the design of emission trading programs for control of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from stationary sources, including fossil fuel electric generating plants.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Study on Zero CO2 Emission SOFC Hybrid Power System with Steam Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a traditional SOFC hybrid power system, a zero CO2 emission SOFC hybrid power system with steam injection is proposed in this paper and its performance is analyzed. Oxy-fuel combustion can burn the fuel gas from anode thoroughly, and increases ... Keywords: solid oxide fuel cell, Aspen Plus, hybrid power system, zero CO2 emission, steam injection

Liqiang Duan; Xiaoyuan Zhang; Yongping Yang; Gang Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Engines - Emissions Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are attractive options for increasing vehicle fuel economy and reducing emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases. Two automobile manufacturers have already introduced HEVs, and other manufacturers are planning to introduce their own models. One available HEV combines mass reduction (also applicable to conventional vehicles) with idle-stop, regenerative braking, and electric-drive assist to achieve a fuel economy more than 2.5 times the current Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard. The second HEV combines idle-stop, regenerative braking, electric assist acceleration, and continuously variable transmission (CVT) to achieve a fuel economy of more than twice the current CAFÉ standard, qualifying as a super ultra-low emissions vehicle (SULEV).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Pulsar Emission Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission spectrum is calculated for a weak axisymmetric pulsar. Also calculated are the observed spectrum, efficiency, and the observed efficiency. The underlying flow of electrons and positrons turns out to be curiously intricate.

Gruzinov, Andrei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

China Energy and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2 nd Edition) David Fridley, Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou, Jing Ke, Ali Hasanbeigi, Bill Morrow, and Lynn Price China Energy Group, Energy...

443

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, which offers many advantages over traditional energy conversion systems including low emission and high efficiency, has become increasingly attractive to the utility, automotive, and defense industries (as shown in Figure 1). As an all solid-state energy conversion device, the SOFC operates at high temperatures (700-1,000 C) and produces electricity by electrochemically combining the fuel and oxidant gases across an ionically conducting oxide membrane. To build up a useful voltage, a number of cells or PENs (Positive cathode-Electrolyte-Negative anode) are electrically connected in series in a stack through bi-polar plates, also known as interconnects. Shown in Figure 2 (a) is a schematic of the repeat unit for a planar stack, which is expected to be a mechanically robust, high power-density and cost-effective design. In the stack (refer to Figure 2 (b)), the interconnect is simultaneously exposed to both an oxidizing (air) environment on the cathode side and a reducing (fuels such as hydrogen or natural gas) environment on the anode side for thousands of hours at elevated temperatures (700-1,000 C). Other challenges include the fact that water vapor is likely to be present in both of these environments, and the fuel is likely to contain sulfide impurities. Also, the interconnect must be stable towards any sealing materials with which it is in contact, under numerous thermal cycles. Furthermore, the interconnect must also be stable towards electrical contact materials that are employed to minimize interfacial contact resistance, and/or the electrode materials. Considering these service environments, the interconnect materials should possess the following properties: (1) Good surface stability (resistance to oxidation and corrosion) in both cathodic (oxidizing) and anodic (reducing) atmospheres. (2) Thermal expansion matching to the ceramic PEN and other adjacent components, all of which typically have a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the range of 10.5-12.0 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1}. (3) High electrical conductivity through both the bulk material and in-situ formed oxide scales. (4) Satisfactory bulk and interfacial mechanical/thermomechanical reliability and durability at the SOFC operating temperatures. (5) Good compatibility with other materials in contact with interconnects such as seals and electrical contact materials. Until recently, the leading candidate material for the interconnect was doped lanthanum chromite (LaCrO3), which is a ceramic material which can easily withstand the traditional 1000 C operating temperature. However, the high cost of raw materials and fabrication, difficulties in obtaining high-density chromite parts at reasonable sintering temperatures, and the tendency of the chromite interconnect to partially reduce at the fuel gas/interconnect interface, causing the component to warp and the peripheral seal to break, have plagued the commercialization of planar SOFCs for years. The recent trend in developing lower temperature, more cost-effective cells which utilize anode-supported, several micron-thin electrolytes and/or new electrolytes with improved conductivity make it feasible for lanthanum chromite to be supplanted by metals or alloys as the interconnect materials. Compared to doped lanthanum chromite, metals or alloys offer significantly lower raw material and fabrication costs.

Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies are getting a better grasp of emissions, but there are still problem areas, particularly CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The lag in data has resulted in the imposition of a CO reactor as BACT for the gas turbine. With the renewed concern about the environment, air permits will have a high profile with offsets being the next fix beyond BACT. 'The manner in which technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry....' (1) Therefore, it becomes increasingly important that the proponents of gas turbine-based facilities establish more reliable data on their proposed emissions. This paper addresses the gas turbine emissions experiences of eight cogeneration plants utilizing: 1) steam injection for both NOx control and power augmentation, 2) CO reactors, 3) selective catalytic reduction units. It also looks at possible regulatory actions.

Frederick, J. D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

Ruether, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Catalyst vendors take aim at emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standards for emissions of air pollutants from stationary sources are expected to become more stringent under the 1990 U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA). For years, scrubbing, incineration and other end-of-pipe methods have been used to reduce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from chemical and hydrocarbon processes. This paper reports that operating companies are now looking to catalyst manufacturers for technologies to meet higher standards. For the most part, development efforts have been centered on reducing emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) and VOCs for attainment of national ambient air quality standards for ozone under CAA's Title I. Now though, catalyst manufacturers are setting their sights on NO{sub x}.

Matthey, J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Regional emissions of air pollutants in China.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the China-MAP program, sponsored by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, regional inventories of air pollutants emitted in China are being characterized, in order that the atmospheric chemistry over China can be more fully understood and the resulting ambient concentrations in Chinese cities and the deposition levels to Chinese ecosystems be determined with better confidence. In addition, the contributions of greenhouse gases from China and of acidic aerosols that counteract global warming are being quantified. This paper presents preliminary estimates of the emissions of some of the major air pollutants in China: sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and black carbon (C). Emissions are estimated for each of the 27 regions of China included in the RAINS-Asia simulation model and are subsequently distributed to a 1{degree} x 1{degree} grid using appropriate disaggregation factors. Emissions from all sectors of the Chinese economy are considered, including the combustion of biofuels in rural homes. Emissions from larger power plants are calculated individually and allocated to the grid accordingly. Data for the period 1990-1995 are being developed, as well as projections for the future under alternative assumptions about economic growth and environmental control.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

449

Apparatus for photocatalytic destruction of internal combustion engine emissions during cold start  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the destruction of emissions from an internal combustion engine wherein a substrate coated with TiO.sub.2 is exposed to a light source in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine thereby catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions between gaseous hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and oxygen in the exhaust of the internal combustion engine.

Janata, Jiri (Richland, WA); McVay, Gary L. (Richland, WA); Peden, Charles H. (West Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Brian Weiss Effect of mercury emissions in China on North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is available in the flue gas that is cleaned (natural oxidation). Alternatively the calcium sulphite can thermodynamic stability on the other: CaSO4 is not stable above around 1250EC in typical flue gases from coal introduced during the 1970-1980s, significant sulphur oxides ("SOx") emission reductions of were rapidly

Columbia University

451

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

452

Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

Hadley, SW

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Emissions estimation for lignite-fired power plants in Turkey  

SciTech Connect

The major gaseous emissions (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide), some various organic emissions (e.g. benzene, toluene and xylenes) and some trace metals (e.g. arsenic, cobalt, chromium, manganese and nickel) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are estimated. The estimations are made separately for each one of the thirteen plants that produced electricity in 2007, because the lignite-fired thermal plants in Turkey are installed near the regions where the lignite is mined, and characteristics and composition of lignite used in each power plant are quite different from a region to another. Emission factors methodology is used for the estimations. The emission factors obtained from well-known literature are then modified depending on local moisture content of lignite. Emission rates and specific emissions (per MWh) of the pollutants from the plants without electrostatic precipitators and flue-gas desulfurization systems are found to be higher than emissions from the plants having electrostatic precipitators and flue -gas desulfurization systems. Finally a projection for the future emissions due to lignite-based power plants is given. Predicted demand for the increasing generation capacity based on the lignite-fired thermal power plant, from 2008 to 2017 is around 30%. 39 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs.

Nurten Vardar; Zehra Yumurtaci [Yildiz Technical University Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Have a question, comment, or suggestion for a future article? Send your feedback to todayinenergy@eia.gov

455

Reducing Nitrogen Oxide Emissions: 1996 Compliance with Title IV Limits  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The purpose of this article is to summarize the existing Federal Nox regulations and the 1996 performance of the 239 Title IV generating units. It also reviews the basics of low-Nox burner technology and presents cost and performance data for retrofits at Title IV units.

Information Center

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... acid rain program in the eastern half of the United States. ... and settlements under the Clean Air Act's New Source Review ...

457

Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for lean Burn Engine Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

reactor tests to engine laboratory tests of full-scale prototype catalysts, and microstructural characterization of catalyst material before and after test stand and/or engine testing.

McGill, R.N.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

458

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations may apply to reciprocating engines, fuel-burning equipment, or waste combusting equipment which are either attached to major stationary sources of NOx or have high potential NOx...

459

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control - Energy Innovation ...  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels;

460

Proposal to Designate an Emission Control Area for Nitrogen Oxides,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a massive scale. These processes include catalytic reforming (to increase the octane number), catalytic

Hanson, Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Effects of Chlorine and Other Flue Gas Parameters on Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology for Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technologythe technology of choice for meeting stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission limits for coal-fired electric generating plantshas potential for oxidizing mercury, which would provide enhanced removal in downstream systems. Catalyst behavior is relatively well understood for deNOx and SO2 oxidation, but less is known about mercury oxidation behavior. This test program was designed to determine general behavior of typical SCR catalysts on mercury oxidation and ...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

Emissions from premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion and affect on emission control devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A light-duty diesel engine has been operated in advanced combustion modes known generally as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The emissions have been characterized for several load and speed combinations. Fewer NO{sub x} and particulate matter (PM) emissions are produced by PCCI, but higher CO and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions result. In addition, the nature of the PM differs from conventional combustion; the PM is smaller and has a much higher soluble organic fraction (SOF) content (68% vs. 30% for conventional combustion). Three catalyst technologies were studied to determine the affects of HECC on catalyst performance; the technologies were a lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT), diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), and diesel particulate filter (DPF). The LNT benefited greatly from the reduced NO{sub x} emissions associated with PCCI. NO{sub x} capacity requirements are reduced as well as overall tailpipe NO{sub x} levels particularly at low load and temperature conditions where regeneration of the LNT is difficult. The DOC performance requirements for PCCI are more stringent due to the higher CO and HC emissions; however, the DOC was effective at controlling the higher CO and HC emissions at conditions above the light-off temperature. Below light-off, CO and HC emissions are problematic. The study of DPF technology focused on the fuel penalties associated with DPF regeneration or 'desoot' due to the different PM loading rates from PCCI vs. conventional combustion. Less frequent desoot events were required from the lower PM from PCCI and, when used in conjunction with an LNT, the lower PM from less frequent LNT regeneration. The lower desoot frequency leads a {approx}3% fuel penalty for a mixture of PCCI and conventional loads vs. {approx}4% for conventional only combustion.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

GHG emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG emissions GHG emissions Dataset Summary Description These datasets include GHG and CO2 emissions statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2 Emissions for EU (xls, 853.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions by Sector, all member countries (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions from Transport, all member countries (xls, 1.3 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by sector, all member countries (xls, 2.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by transport, all member countries (xls, 1.5 MiB)

464

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

465

Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model, Version 6. 0. User's manual. Report for November 1984-August 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is a user's manual for the Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model. It summarizes user options and software characteristics, and describes both the input data files and procedures for operating the model. It discusses proper formatting of files and creation of job-control language. The model projects for each state the emissions of sulfur oxides, sulfates, and nitrogen oxides from fossil-fuel combustion in industrial boilers. Emissions and costs of boiler generation, including emission-control costs, are projected for the years 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2010, 2020, and 2030.

Hogan, T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Lipid Oxidation Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews state-of-the-art developments in the understanding of the oxidation of lipids and its connection with the oxidation of other biological molecules such as proteins and starch. Lipid Oxidation Pathways Hardback Books Health - Nutrition -

467

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields under relatively mild reaction conditions. Results in this document are reported under the headings: methane oxidation over silica, methane oxidation over Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, and oxidative coupling of methane over sulfate-doped Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. 24 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Emissions of Transport Refrigeration Units with CARB Diesel, Gas-to-Liquid Diesel, and Emissions Control Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel in situ method was used to measure emissions and fuel consumption of transport refrigeration units (TRUs). The test matrix included two fuels, two exhaust configurations, and two TRU engine operating speeds. Test fuels were California ultra low sulfur diesel and gas-to-liquid (GTL) diesel. Exhaust configurations were a stock muffler and a Thermo King pDPF diesel particulate filter. The TRU engine operating speeds were high and low, controlled by the TRU user interface. Results indicate that GTL diesel fuel reduces all regulated emissions at high and low engine speeds. Application of a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions, sometimes almost entirely. The application of both GTL diesel and a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions at high engine speed, but showed an increase in oxides of nitrogen at low engine speed.

Barnitt, R. A.; Chernich, D.; Burnitzki, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Miyasato, M.; Lucht, E.; van der Merwe, D.; Schaberg, P.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

470

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys  

SciTech Connect

Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 2 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the second phase of a lubricants project, which investigated the impact of engine oil formulation on diesel vehicle emissions and the performance of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst (NAC).

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on transition metal oxide catalysts for high temperature fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with its high energy conversion efficiency, low emissions, silent operation and its ability to utilize commercial fuels has the potential to create a large impact on the energy landscape. ...

La O', Gerardo Jose Cordova

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Pt–metal oxide aerogel catalysts: X-ray photoemission investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray photoemission spectroscopy was used to study Pt–metal oxide aerogel catalysts that have been developed to respond to increased NO x emissions of lean-burn engines. Lean-burn engines

A. J. Nelson; John G. Reynolds; R. D. Sanner; P. R. Coronado; L. M. Hair

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Mechanistic, sensitivity, and uncertainty studies of the atmospheric oxidation of dimethylsulfide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global-scale emissions and reactivity of dimethylsulfide (CH3SCH3, DMS) make it an integral component in the atmospheric sulfur cycle. DMS is rapidly oxidized in the atmosphere by a complex gas-phase mechanism involving ...

Lucas, Donald David, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

Thermal oxidation vitrification flue gas elimination system  

SciTech Connect

With minor modifications to a Best Demonstrated Available Technology hazardous waste incinerator, it is possible to obtain combustion without potentially toxic emissions by using technology currently employed in similar applications throughout industry. Further, these same modifications will reduce waste handling over an extended operating envelope while minimizing energy consumption. Three by-products are produced: industrial grade carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and a final waste form that will exceed Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedures requirements and satisfy nuclear waste product consistency tests. The proposed system utilizes oxygen rather than air as an oxidant to reduce the quantities of total emissions, improve the efficiency of the oxidation reactions, and minimize the generation of toxic NO{sub x} emissions. Not only will less potentially hazardous constituents be generated; all toxic substances can be contained and the primary emission, carbon dioxide -- the leading ``greenhouse gas`` contributing to global warming -- will be converted to an industrial by-product needed to enhance the extraction of energy feedstocks from maturing wells. Clearly, the proposed configuration conforms to the provisions for Most Achievable Control Technology as defined and mandated for the private sector by the Clear Air Act Amendments of 1990 to be implemented in 1997 and still lacking definition.

Kephart, W. [Foster-Wheeler Environmental Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Angelo, F. [Resource Energy Corp. (United States); Clemens, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

CO2 Emissions - Puerto Rico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Puerto Rico Graphics CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico image Per capita...

480

Reducing SF6 Emissions @ PPPL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

96.4 88.4 Fuel Consumption Emissions 2015 1823.8 Fugitive Emissions Refrigerant 160 241.2 SF6 38360 21042.8 Scope 2 -Indirect Electricity Purchase 13816 13855 Scope 3 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emissions rhode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

BPA SF6 Emission Info  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPA SF 6 Emission Info Steve Lowder - 2012.12 slide 1 Discovering Emission Locations slide 2 BPA uses a FLIR leak detection camera (other methods available) Allows leaks to...

482

Photo-oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Smith, R. Davis (Golden, CO)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

483

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

484

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

CO2 Emissions - Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Graphics CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah image Per capita CO2 Emission...

486

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the public from airborne radionuclide emissions. We requestfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

489

Trace element emissions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Multifunctional Oxides: Multifunctional Oxides: Synthesis and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy to Explore Magneoelectric Coupling in Multiferroic Oxide Heterostructures: Y-M Sheu1; S. Trugman1; L Yan1; C-P Chuu 1; ...

491

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement performance has not been considered adequately in pavement design. Part of the reason is that the process of asphalt oxidation in pavement is not well understood. This work focused on understanding the asphalt oxidation kinetics and on developing pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation and hardening in pavement under environmental conditions. A number of asphalts were studied in laboratory condition. Based on kinetics data, a fast-rate ? constant-rate asphalt oxidation kinetics model was developed to describe the early nonlinear fast-rate aging period and the later constant-rate period of asphalt oxidation. Furthermore, reaction kinetics parameters for the fast-rate and constant-rate reactions were empirically correlated, leading to a simplified model. And the experimental effort and time to obtain these kinetics parameters were significantly reduced. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanism of asphalt oxidation, two antioxidants were studied on their effectiveness. Asphalt oxidation was not significantly affected. It was found that evaluation of antioxidant effectiveness based on viscosity only is not reliable. The asphalt oxidation kinetics model was incorporated into the pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation in pavement. The pavement oxidation model mimics the oxidation process of asphalt in real mixture at pavement temperatures. A new parameter, diffusion depth, defined the oxygen diffusion region in the mastic. A field calibration factor accounted for the factors not considered in the model such as the effect of small aggregate particles on oxygen diffusion. Carbonyl area and viscosity of binders recovered from field cores of three pavements in Texas were measured and were used for model calibration and validation. Results demonstrated that the proposed model estimates carbonyl growth over time in pavement, layer-by-layer, quite well. Finally, this work can be useful for incorporating asphalt oxidation into a pavement design method that can predict pavement performance with time and for making strategic decisions such as optimal time for maintenance treatments.

Jin, Xin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Bench Scale Kinetics of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench Scale Kinetics of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors Bench Scale Kinetics of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors When research into the measurement and control of Hg emissions from coal-fired power plants began in earnest in the early 1990s, it was observed that oxidized mercury can be scrubbed at high efficiency in wet FGD systems, while elemental mercury can not. In many cases, elemental mercury concentrations were observed to increase slightly across wet FGD systems, but this was typically regarded as within the variability of the measurement methods. However, later measurements have shown substantial re-emissions from some FGD systems. The goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the aqueous chemistry of mercury (Hg) absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing liquors. Specifically, the project will determine the chemical reactions that oxidized mercury undergoes once absorbed, the byproducts of those reactions, and reaction kinetics.

493

Task 1: Steam Oxidation,”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Need to improve efficiency, decrease emissions (esp. CO2) associated with the continued use of coal for power generation

I. G. Wright and G. R. Holcomb

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Air Pollution Control Systems for Stack and Process Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strict environmental regulations at the federal and local levels require that industrial facilities control emissions of particulates, nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants. To comply with regulations, industries must either modify the processes or fuels they use to limit the generation of air pollutants, or remove the pollutants from the process gas streams before release into the atmosphere. This report provides a comprehensive disc...

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

495

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report is the fifth annual update, covering national emissions over the period 1989--1995, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1996. The estimates contained in this report have been revised from those in last year`s report. Emissions estimates for carbon dioxide are reported in metric tons of carbon; estimates for other gases are reported in metric tons of gas. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapter 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Five appendixes are included with this report. 216 refs., 11 figs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Environmental software systems for emission inventories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric emission inventories are important tools for environmental decision making. The need to include transparency and reproducibility in emission calculation also fostered the development of environmental software systems for emission inventories. ... Keywords: Emission inventory theory, Model validation, Upper Austria

Wilfried Winiwarter; Gerald Schimak

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Cermet Filters To Reduce Diesel Engine Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pollution from diesel engines is a significant part of our nation's air-quality problem. Even under the more stringent standards for heavy-duty engines set to take effect in 2004, these engines will continue to emit large amounts of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, both of which affect public health. To address this problem, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) invented a self-cleaning, high temperature, cermet filter that reduces heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. The main advantage of the INEEL cermet filter, compared to current technology, is its ability to destroy carbon particles and NOx in diesel engine exhaust. As a result, this technology is expected to improve our nation's environmental quality by meeting the need for heavy-duty diesel engine emissions control. This paper describes the cermet filter technology and the initial research and development effort.Diesel engines currently emit soot and NOx that pollute our air. It is expected that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will begin tightening the regulatory requirements to control these emissions. The INEEL's self-cleaning, high temperature cermet filter provides a technology to clean heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. Under high engine exhaust temperatures, the cermet filter simultaneously removes carbon particles and NOx from the exhaust gas. The cermet filter is made from inexpensive starting materials, via net shape bulk forming and a single-step combustion synthesis process, and can be brazed to existing structures. It is self-cleaning, lightweight, mechanically strong, thermal shock resistant, and has a high melting temperature, high heat capacity, and controllable thermal expansion coefficient. The filter's porosity is controlled to provide high removal efficiency for carbon particulate. It can be made catalytic to oxidize CO, H2, and hydrocarbons, and reduce NOx. When activated by engine exhaust, the filter produces NH3 and light hydrocarbon gases that can effectively destroy the NOx in the exhaust. The following sections describe cermet filter technology and properties of the INEEL filter.

Kong, Peter

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

498

REDUCTION OF INHERENT MERCURY EMISSIONS IN PC COMBUSTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mercury emission compliance is one of the major potential challenges raised by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Simple ways of controlling emissions have not been identified. The variability in the field data suggests that inherent mercury emissions may be reduced if the source of this inherent capture can be identified and controlled. The key mechanisms appear to involve the oxidation of the mercury to Hg{sup 2}, generally producing the more reactive HgCl{sub 2} , followed by its capture by certain components of the fly ash or char. This research focuses on identifying the rate-limiting steps associated with the oxidation step. Work in this reporting period focused on the development and application of a kinetics model to the oxidation data developed in the present program and literature data under MSW conditions. The results indicate that the pathway Hg + Cl = HgCl followed by HgCl + HCl = HgCl{sub 2} + H predominates over Hg + Cl{sub 2} under high-temperature conditions. This primarily occurs because Cl{sub 2} concentrations are too low under the present conditions to contribute significantly.

John C. Kramlich; Rebecca N. Sliger; David J. Going

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

499

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) This report-the eighteenth annual report-presents the U.S. Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. Download the GHG Report Introduction For this report, activity data on coal and natural gas consumption and electricity sales and losses by sector were obtained from the January 2011 Monthly Energy Review (MER). In keeping with current international practice, this report presents data on greenhouse gas emissions in million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data can be converted to carbon equivalent units by

500

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z