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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

2

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

3

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 ERRATA Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard July 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information Adminis- tration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler @eia.doe.gov), Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Scott B. Sitzer (202/586-2308,

4

Emissions Standards and Ambient Environmental Quality Standards in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions Standards and Ambient Environmental Quality Standards in Stochastic Receiving Media quality standards, for in- stance SO2 emissions are capped under Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments while ambient SO2 concentrations are limited under National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS

Silver, Whendee

5

Fact #825: June 16, 2014 Tier 3 Non-Methane Organic Gases Plus Nitrogen Oxide Emission Standards, Model Years 2017-2025  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Environmental Protection Agency finalized Tier 3 emission standards in a rule issued in March 2014. One effect of the rule is a decrease in the combined amount of non-methane organic gases ...

6

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

7

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

8

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Municipal Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Municipal Landfill ... Due to the small area of landfills as compared to other land-use classes, the total N2O emissions from landfills are estimated to be of minor importance for the total emissions from Finland. ...

Janne Rinne; Mari Pihlatie; Annalea Lohila; Tea Thum; Mika Aurela; Juha-Pekka Tuovinen; Tuomas Laurila; Timo Vesala

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration DPF regeneration experiments verified the...

10

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires any facility that emits 25 tons or more of NOx and/or 25 tons or more of VOC during the calendar year and is located in a county designated as nonattainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone submit emission statements. Any facility that is located in a county described above is exempt from these requirements. If NOx

11

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Maine has adopted the California motor vehicle emissions standards

12

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards New Jersey has adopted California motor vehicle emissions standards as set

13

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Washington adopted the California motor vehicle emission standards in Title

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Maryland has adopted the California motor vehicle emission standards in

15

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards California's LEV II exhaust emissions standards apply to Model Year (MY)

16

Nitrogen oxides emission trends in Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides from space provide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5 Nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia Abstract Monthly emission estimates present first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric

Haak, Hein

17

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Connecticut Low Emission Vehicles II Program requires that all new

18

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle Standards New vehicles sold or offered for sale in Vermont must meet California emissions and compliance requirements in Title 13 of the California Code of

19

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Any new light-duty passenger car, light-duty truck, or medium-duty

20

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Under the Oregon LEV Program, all new passenger cars, light-duty trucks,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Pennsylvania Clean Vehicles Program requires that all new passenger

22

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management has adopted

23

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Massachusetts LEV Program requires all new passenger cars and

24

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Under the Clean Cars Act of 2008, the Mayor of the District of Columbia

25

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards All new passenger vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty vehicles

26

Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission...

27

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers....

28

Influence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on the distribution of atmospheric CO 2 : Implications for inversion analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on thedescription of reduced carbon emission and oxidationInfluence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on the

Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Randerson, James T; Krakauer, Nir; Logan, Jennifer A; Jacob, Daniel J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ? ?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend1 ? ?)? i + ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect toSeries RegulationofGHGemissionsfromtransportation

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nitrogen oxide emissions from a kraft recovery furnace  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions from a rebuilt kraft recovery furnace slightly exceeded the specified limit of 1.1 lb/ton (0.55 kg/metric ton) of black-liquor solids. Mill trials were undertaken to determine whether NOx emissions could be minimized by modifying furnace operation. NOx emissions increased when secondary air was shifted to tertiary ports. NOx emissions fell when the amounts of primary and total air were decreased, but this increased emissions of other pollutants. After demonstrating that best operation of the furnace could not meet the permit with an emissions limit that matched the furnace's performance at best operation.

Prouty, A.L.; Stuart, R.C. (James River Corp., Camas, WA (United States)); Caron, A.L. (NCASI West Coast Regional Office, Corvallis, OR (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specific ammonia oxidation rate. Symbols represent...Research Council (ARC) for funding this...correlated to its ammonia oxidation rate. 51 Arp, D...1146/annurev.micro.61.080706.093449...1146/annurev.micro.61.080706.093449...2004 Anaerobic oxidation of inorganic nitrogen...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers.

34

Are renewables portfolio standards cost-effective emission abatement policy?  

SciTech Connect

Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) could be an important policy instrument for 3P and 4P control. The authors examine the costs of renewable power, accounting for the federal production tax credit, the market value of a renewable credit, and the value of producing electricity without emissions of SO{sub 2}, NOx, mercury, and CO{sub 2}. The focus is on Texas, which has a large RPS and is the largest U.S. electricity producer and one of the largest emitters of pollutants and CO{sub 2}. The private and social costs of wind generation in an RPS is compared with the current cost of fossil generation, accounting for the pollution and CO{sub 2} emissions. It was found that society paid about 5.7 cents/kWh more for wind power, counting the additional generation, transmission, intermittency, and other costs. The higher cost includes credits amounting to 1.1 cents/kWh in reduced SO{sub 2}, NOx, and Hg emissions. These pollution reductions and lower CO{sub 2} emissions could be attained at about the same cost using pulverized coal (PC) or natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS); the reductions could be obtained more cheaply with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CCS. 35 refs., 7 tabs.

Katerina Dobesova; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Standard Test Method for Thermal Oxidative Resistance of Carbon Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the apparatus and procedure for the determination of the weight loss of carbon fibers, exposed to ambient hot air, as a means of characterizing their oxidative resistance. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to inch-pound units which are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific hazard information, see Section 8.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DPF regeneration experiments verified the effects of NO2 and O2 emissions found from the thermogravimetric analyzer soot oxidation.

37

Evaluation of oxides of nitrogen emissions for the purpose of their transient regulation from a direct injection diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of defining a regulatory standard for the maximum allowable emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from a heavy-duty diesel engine on an instantaneous basis is presented. The significance of this concept from a regulatory point of view is the possibility to realise a steady brake specific NOx emissions result independent of the test schedule used. The emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a state-of-the-art direct injection diesel engine have been examined on an integral as well as on an instantaneous basis over the Federal Test Procedure as well as over several other arbitrary transient cycles generated for this study. Three candidate standards of specific NOx emissions have been evaluated on a real-time, continuous basis. These include brake power specific, fuel mass specific, and carbon dioxide mass specific NOx emissions. Retaining the stock engine control module, the carbon dioxide specific emissions of NOx have been shown to be the most uniform, varying only by about 30% of its mean value regardless of the test schedule or engine operation. The instantaneous fuel specific NOx emissions are shown to be relatively less invariant and the least steady are the brake power specific emissions with a coefficient of variation of up to 200%. Advancing injection timing has been shown to have a wide range of authority over the specific emissions of oxides of nitrogen regardless of the units used, when operating at full load in the vicinity of peak torque speeds. The carbon dioxide specific NOx emissions have shown a linear dependence on the power specific emissions, independent of the examined operating conditions. The trade-off between better brake thermal efficiency, lower exhaust gas temperature at advanced timing and lower NOx emissions has also been shown to be independent of the units of the specific standard used.

Yasser Yacoub; Chris Atkinson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Regulated Emissions from Biodiesel Tested in Heavy-Duty Engines Meeting 2004 Emission Standards  

SciTech Connect

Biodiesel produced from soybean oil, canola oil, yellow grease, and beef tallow was tested in two heavy-duty engines. The biodiesels were tested neat and as 20% by volume blends with a 15 ppm sulfur petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The test engines were the following: 2002 Cummins ISB and 2003 DDC Series 60. Both engines met the 2004 U.S. emission standard of 2.5 g/bhp-h NO{sub x}+HC (3.35 g/kW-h) and utilized exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All emission tests employed the heavy-duty transient procedure as specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Reduction in PM emissions and increase in NO{sub x} emissions were observed for all biodiesels in all engines, confirming observations made in older engines. On average PM was reduced by 25% and NO{sub x} increased by 3% for the two engines tested for a variety of B20 blends. These changes are slightly larger in magnitude, but in the same range as observed in older engines. The cetane improver 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate was shown to have no measurable effect on NO{sub x} emissions from B20 in these engines, in contrast to observations reported for older engines. The effect of intake air humidity on NO{sub x} emissions from the Cummins ISB was quantified. The CFR NO{sub x}/humidity correction factor was shown to be valid for an engine equipped with EGR, operating at 1700 m above sea level, and operating on conventional or biodiesel.

McCormick, R. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Black, S.; Ireland, J.; McDaniel, T.; Williams, A.; Frailey, M.; Sharp, C. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE;2 #12;MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N 20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE cli- mate has on natural emissions of N2 0 and CH4 from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere

40

Reduction of carbon monoxide emissions with regenerative thermal oxidizers  

SciTech Connect

Regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) have been extensively used for the control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from various sources. However, very little information is available on the ability of RTOs to control carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. This paper presents the results of extensive tests conducted on two RTOs to determine their VOC and CO control efficiencies. The inlet gas stream to the RTOs includes VOC and CO concentrations as high as 2,000 ppm and 3,600 ppm, respectfully. The testing demonstrated that both RTOs were capable of controlling greater than 98% of both inlet VOCs and CO. While the destruction efficiencies within the combustion chambers exceeded 99.9%, direct leakage past valves accounted for the lower control efficiencies. The tests indicated that the overall VOC and CO control efficiencies of the RTOs may be limited by valve leakage. The design and permitting of a RTO should include conservative control estimates which account for possible valve leakage.

Firmin, S.M.; Lipke, S.; Baturay, A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air PollutantsCalendar Year 2013 INL Report for Radionuclides (2014)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of catalyst materials to facilitate the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons and CO in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) emissions.

43

ZERO EMISSION POWER PLANTS USING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS AND OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

Over 16,700 hours of operational experience was gained for the Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) elements of the proposed SOFC/OTM zero-emission power generation concept. It was repeatedly demonstrated that OTMs with no additional oxidation catalysts were able to completely oxidize the remaining depleted fuel in a simulated SOFC anode exhaust at an O{sub 2} flux that met initial targets. In such cases, neither residual CO nor H{sub 2} were detected to the limits of the gas chromatograph (<10 ppm). Dried OTM afterburner exhaust streams contained up to 99.5% CO{sub 2}. Oxygen flux through modified OTMs was double or even triple that of the standard OTMs used for the majority of testing purposes. Both the standard and modified membranes in laboratory-scale and demonstration-sized formats exhibited stable performance over extended periods (2300 to 3500 hours or 3 to 5 months). Reactor contaminants, were determined to negatively impact OTM performance stability. A method of preventing OTM performance degradation was developed and proven to be effective. Information concerning OTM and seal reliability over extended periods and through various chemical and thermal shocks and cycles was also obtained. These findings were used to develop several conceptual designs for pilot (10 kWe) and commercial-scale (250 kWe) SOFC/OTM zero emission power generation systems.

G. Maxwell Christie; Troy M. Raybold

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclides concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2013, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from 0.2% to a maximum of 10.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000011 mrem/yr, more than 900,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Warren, R.

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

47

Upgraded recovery boiler meets low air emissions standards  

SciTech Connect

In the fall of 1990, the Boise Cascade mill in International Falls, MN, carried out a millwide modernization project. One critical element of the project was the upgrade of their recovery boiler. As a result of the recovery boiler upgrade, the mill was required to obtain a prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) air permit. A best available control technology (BACT) assessment was performed as a requirement of the PSD regulations. Ultimately, a number of more stringent air pollution emission limits were established for the boiler, and a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) was purchased and installed to report daily results to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. This paper describes efforts to achieve increased firing capacity in the mill's recovery boiler while meeting more severe air emissions regulations. The authors will show that each of the emissions limits, including CO, SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], TRS, and opacity, are met by the upgraded boiler, while achieving an increase in firing capacity over pre-upgrade levels of up to 40%.

La Fond, J.F.; Jansen, J.H. (Jansen Combustion and Boiler Technologies, Inc., Woodinville, WA (United States)); Eide, P. (Boise Cascade Corp., International Falls, MN (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Standby gen-set meets increased noise, exhaust emissions standards  

SciTech Connect

Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison worked with Floyd Manufacturing to develop an enclosure that would address the noise and exhaust requirements for standby generator sets. Specially designed sound baffles knock down the sound in critical areas. An architectural sound insulated wall further isolates the noise. The installation is equipped with a DeSOP oxidation silencer with a sound attenuation rating of 53 dB(A). The silencer incorporates a catalytic converter that reduces CO, VOC, SO[sub 2] and particulates in the 80 to 90% range. Diesel odor is virtually eliminated. 3 figs.

McNeely, M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Nitric oxide emissions from the high-temperature viscous boundary layers of hypersonic aircraft within the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect

The authors study the nitric oxide emission characteristics of supersonic aircraft resulting from heating of viscous boundary layers along the skin of the aircraft. Previous study has concentrated on nitric oxide emissions coming from combustion products from the scramjet engines. This work shows that above mach 8, emissions from viscous heating become a significant factor in total emission of nitric oxide. Above mach 16 it becomes the dominant source of emission.

Brooks, S.B.; Lewis, M.J.; Dickerson, R.R. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14 MAY 1999 TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14 A report on three projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between: The U.S. Department of Energy and * The Babcock & Wilcox Company * Energy and Environmental Research Corporation * New York State Electric & Gas Corporation MAY 1999 Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers Cover image: Schematic of reburning technology Source: Energy and Environmental Research Corporation Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers Executive Summary ..................................................................................................

51

Process Modeling of Global Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas and is a major ozone-depleting substance. To understand and

Saikawa, E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Methods of reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides at thermal power plants burning solid domestic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Essentially all the major methods of reducing the emissions of nitrogen oxides from flue gases employed in power generation have been tested on plants in Moscow which burn solid domestic waste for production of h...

A. N. Tugov; V. F. Moskvichev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Boron by Titrimetry 7 to 13 Separation of Boron for Mass Spectrometry 14 to 19 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 20 to 23 Separation of Halides by Pyrohydrolysis 24 to 27 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 28 to 30 Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 31 to 33 Trace Elements by Emission Spectroscopy 34 to 46 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (F...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Oxidation of Mercury Across  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidation of Mercury Across SCR Catalysts in Coal-Fired Power Plants Burning Low Rank Fuels Oxidation of Mercury Across SCR Catalysts in Coal-Fired Power Plants Burning Low Rank Fuels The objective of the proposed research is to assess the potential for the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalysts in a coal fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. Results from the project will contribute to a greater understanding of mercury behavior across SCR catalysts. Additional tasks include: review existing pilot and field data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts and propose a mechanism for mercury oxidation and create a simple computer model for mercury oxidation based on the hypothetical mechanism. Related Papers and Publications: Final Report - December 31, 2004 [PDF-532KB]

55

Regulatory Reform to Promote Clean Energy: The Potential of Output-Based Emissions Standards  

SciTech Connect

Barriers to industrial energy-efficient technologies hinder their use. A number of EPA analyses and industrial experts have found that the utilization of input-based emissions standards (measured in parts-per-million or pounds/MMBtu) in the Clean Air Act creates a regulatory barrier to the installation and deployment of technologies that emit fewer criteria pollutants and use energy more efficiently. Changing emission management strategies to an output-based emissions standard (measured in tons of pollutant emitted) is a way to ameliorate some of these barriers. Combined heat and power (CHP) is one of the key technologies that would see increased industrial application if the emissions standards were modified. Many states have made this change since the EPA first approved it in 2000, although direction from the Federal government could speed implementation modifications. To analyze the national impact of accelerated state adoption of output-based standards on CHP technologies, this paper uses detailed National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and spreadsheet analysis illustrating two phased-in adoption scenarios for output-based emissions standards in the industrial sector. Benefit/cost metrics are calculated from a private and public perspective, and also a social perspective that considers the criteria and carbon air pollution emissions. These scenarios are compared to the reference case of AEO 2010 and are quite favorable, with a social benefit-cost ratio of 16.0 for a five-year phase-in scenario. In addition, the appropriateness of the Federal role, applicability, technology readiness, and administrative feasibility are discussed.

Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Preparation of pure neptunium oxide for nondestructive assay standards  

SciTech Connect

Accurate nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, particularly with gamma spectrometry, require pure material standards. The purity of materials used as standards is verified by reliable chemical techniques, and these materials are then used to calibrate and certify NDA instruments. So that they can be used for this purpose, impure NpO{sub 2} and metal were each purified by a different procedure. The NpO{sub 2}, which contained more than 2500 ppm plutonium, was purified by a double peroxide precipitation, followed by ion exchange and oxalate precipitation of the eluate. All impurities, including plutonium, were below 10 ppm in the product. The metal, which contained more than 10,000 ppm of tantalum, was dissolved in 12 M HCl and then precipitated as the Np(4) oxalate. The final product was below 100 ppm of all impurities except calcium. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

Yarbro, S.L.; Dunn, S.L.; Schreiber, S.B.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Influence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on the distribution of atmospheric CO2: Implications for inversion analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on the distribution of atmospheric CO2 carbon emissions. We used TransCom3 annual mean simulations from three transport models to evaluate carbon emission and oxidation processes in deriving inversion estimates of CO2 surface fluxes. Citation

Krakauer, Nir Y.

58

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Modeling of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from CFB Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, a simplified description of combustion and nitrogen oxides chemistry was implemented in a 1.5D model framework with the aim to compare the results with ones earlier obtained with a detailed react...

S. Kallio; M. Keinonen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Persistent sensitivity of Asian aerosol to emissions of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a chemical transport model and its adjoint to examine the sensitivity of secondary inorganic aerosol formation to emissions of precursor trace gases from Asia. Sensitivity simulations indicate that secondary inorganic ...

Kharol, S. K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

Minnesota, University of

62

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING in strategies for climate protection. 1. Introduction Carbon sequestration has been highlighted recently concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmo- sphere include sequestering carbon (C) in soils

63

Assessment of soil nitrogen oxides emissions and implementation in LOTOS-EUROS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the formation and transport of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, particulate matter and other species throughout EuropeAssessment of soil nitrogen oxides emissions and implementation in LOTOS-EUROS Date 18 March 2013, climate and nitrogen availability. Nitrogen availability is in turn determined by N-deposition from

Haak, Hein

64

Inverse modeling of emissions for local photo-oxidant pollution : Testing a new methodology with kriging constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse modeling of emissions for local photo-oxidant pollution : Testing a new methodology. Abstract For chemistry-transport models operating at regional scales, surface emissions are the input data a methodology to optimize surface emissions at local scale i.e. to compute correction factors for the available

Menut, Laurent

65

1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reducing Emissions of a Diesel Engine Using Fumigation Ethanol and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reducing Emissions of a Diesel Engine Using Fumigation Ethanol and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst ... Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China ... In contrast to the conventional approach of using ethanol in spark-ignition engines, this study demonstrates the potential of ethanol utilization in diesel engines using dual-fuel combustion, where ethanol is injected into the intake manifold and diesel ... ...

K. S. Tsang; Z. H. Zhang; C. S. Cheung; T. L. Chan

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

The COMPLY computer program for demonstrating compliance with national radionuclide air emission standards  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed national radionuclide air emission standards for a number of source categories. One of these standards applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and non-Department of Energy facilities having the potential to release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Approximately 6000 facilities are subject to the standard, which limits the effective whole-body dose commitment to the maximally exposed individual from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere. A computer program to assist the regulated community in determining compliance has been developed by the EPA's Office of Radiation Programs. The computer program COMPLY calculates the dose to an individual residing outside the facility. The program considers dose from inhalation, ingestion of contaminated food, air immersion, and ground deposition. It is based on models developed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Compliance procedures provided in COMPLY are designed to reduce the burden on the regulated community. The approach begins with simple-to-use methods that are very conservative in determining compliance. The methods become progressively less conservative but more complicated at succeeding levels. Each higher level requires the input of site-specific information, but allows a more realistic estimate of dose. This paper describes the COMPLY program, and provides estimates of the work required and the degree of conservatism in the dose computed at each level.

Colli, A.; Beal, S.; Loomis, D. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide from soil receiving urban wastewater for maize (Zea mays L.) cultivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated how amending maize with wastewater at 120kg N ha?1 affected crop growth, soil characteristics and emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) compared to plants ferti...

Fabin Fernndez-Luqueo; Vernica Reyes-Varela

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Process for treating ammonia and nitrite containing waters to prevent nitric oxide emissions therefrom  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for controlling the emission of nitrogen dioxide from, and the amount of one or more organisms, selected from the group consisting of fungi, algae and bacteria, growing in a system for handling a flow of condensate of steam, the condensate containing ammonia, ammonia precursors, or a mixture thereof. It comprises contacting the condensate in a substantially continuous manner with an amount of an oxidizing biocide which substantially prevents the emission of nitrogen dioxide from the condensate handling system but which does not substantially inhibit the growth of the organisms in the condensate handling system; and periodically contacting the condensate with an amount of a second biocide which substantially reduces the amount of the organisms.

Gallup, D.L.; Featherstone, J.L.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

On Emissions Trading and Market Structure: Cap-and-Trade versus Intensity Standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the interdependence between imperfect competition and emissions trading. We particularly analyze the long run equilibrium ... of a cap-and-trade scheme with an emissions trading scheme based o...

Frans P. de Vries; Bouwe R. Dijkstra

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Field emission effects of nitrogenated carbon nanotubes on chlorination and oxidation  

SciTech Connect

With reference to our recent reports [Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 192107 (2007); Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 202102 (2007)] about the electronic structure of chlorine treated and oxygen-plasma treated nitrogenated carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs), here we studied the electron field emission effects on chlorination (N-CNT:Cl) and oxidation (N-CNT:O) of N-CNT. A high current density (J) of 15.0 mA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved on chlorination, whereas low J of 0.0052 mA/cm{sup 2} is observed on oxidation compared to J=1.3 mA/cm{sup 2} for untreated N-CNT at an applied electric field E{sub A} of {approx}1.9 V/{mu}m. The turn-on electric field (E{sub TO}) was {approx}0.875. The 1.25 V/{mu}m was achieved for N-CNT:Cl and N-CNT:O, respectively, with respect to E{sub TO}=1.0 V/{mu}m for untreated one. These findings are due to the formation of different bonds with carbon and nitrogen in the N-CNT during the process of chlorine (oxygen)-plasma treatment by the charge transfer, or else that changes the density of free charge carriers and hence enhances (reduces) the field emission properties of N-CNTs:Cl (N-CNTs:O)

Ray, S. C.; Palnitkar, U.; Pao, C. W.; Tsai, H. M.; Pong, W. F.; Lin, I-N. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [NRI, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim BT37OQB, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ganguly, Abhijit; Chen, L. C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, K. H. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments  

SciTech Connect

The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan [1] has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

Kumar Sridharan; Todd Allen; Mark Anderson; Guoping Cao; Gerald Kulcinski

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.

Deru, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report  

SciTech Connect

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Standard rock For at least two generations, the depth of underground muon experiments has been reduced to depth in "standard rock." This is by definition the overburden of the Cayuga Rock Salt Mine near Ithaca, New York, where K. Greisen and collaborators made seminal observations of muons at substantial depths[1]. Ref. 1 says only "Most of the ground consists of shales of various types, with average density 2.65 g/cm 2 and average atomic number 11." Menon and Murthy later extended the definition: Z 2 /A = 5.5, Z/A = 0.5, and and ρ = 2.65 g/cm 2 [2]. It was thus not-quite-sodium. Lohmann[3] further assumed the mean excitation energy and density effect parameters were those of calcium carbonate, with no adjustments for the slight density difference. We use their definition for this most important material. (Extracted from D.E. Groom, N.V. Mokhov, and S.I. Striganov,

77

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the extra emissions that are generated from manufacturing the material used to make CNG tanks); they can amount tc more than 2% of the emissions from 32 the fuel production and...

78

Zero Emission Power Plants Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. (SWPC) is engaged in the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stationary power systems. SWPC has combined DOE Developmental funds with commercial customer funding to establish a record of successful SOFC field demonstration power systems of increasing size. SWPC will soon deploy the first unit of a newly developed 250 kWe Combined Heat Power System. It will generate electrical power at greater than 45% electrical efficiency. The SWPC SOFC power systems are equipped to operate on lower number hydrocarbon fuels such as pipeline natural gas, which is desulfurized within the SOFC power system. Because the system operates with a relatively high electrical efficiency, the CO2 emissions, {approx}1.0 lb CO2/ kW-hr, are low. Within the SOFC module the desulfurized fuel is utilized electrochemically and oxidized below the temperature for NOx generation. Therefore the NOx and SOx emissions for the SOFC power generation system are near negligible. The byproducts of the power generation from hydrocarbon fuels that are released into the environment are CO2 and water vapor. This forward looking DOE sponsored Vision 21 program is supporting the development of methods to capture and sequester the CO2, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system. To accomplish this, SWPC is developing a SOFC module design, to be demonstrated in operating hardware, that will maintain separation of the fuel cell anode gas, consisting of H2, CO, H2O and CO2, from the vitiated air. That anode gas, the depleted fuel stream, containing less than 18% (H2 + CO), will be directed to an Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) Afterburner that is being developed by Praxair, Inc.. The OTM is supplied air and the depleted fuel. The OTM will selectively transport oxygen across the membrane to oxidize the remaining H2 and CO. The water vapor is then condensed from the totally 1.5.DOC oxidized fuel stream exiting the afterburner, leaving only the CO2 in gaseous form. That CO2 can then be compressed and sequestered, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system operating on hydrocarbon fuel that adds only water vapor to the environment. Praxair has been developing oxygen separation systems based on dense walled, mixed electronic, oxygen ion conducting ceramics for a number of years. The oxygen separation membranes find applications in syngas production, high purity oxygen production and gas purification. In the SOFC afterburner application the chemical potential difference between the high temperature SOFC depleted fuel gas and the supplied air provides the driving force for oxygen transport. This permeated oxygen subsequently combusts the residual fuel in the SOFC exhaust. A number of experiments have been carried out in which simulated SOFC depleted fuel gas compositions and air have been supplied to either side of single OTM tubes in laboratory-scale reactors. The ceramic tubes are sealed into high temperature metallic housings which precludes mixing of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel and air streams. In early tests, although complete oxidation of the residual CO and H2 in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel was achieved, membrane performance degraded over time. The source of degradation was found to be contaminants in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream. Following removal of the contaminants, stable membrane performance has subsequently been demonstrated. In an ongoing test, the dried afterburner exhaust composition has been found to be stable at 99.2% CO2, 0.4% N2 and 0.6%O2 after 350 hours online. Discussion of these results is presented. A test of a longer, commercial demonstration size tube was performed in the SWPC test facility. A similar contamination of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream occurred and the performance degraded over time. A second test is being prepared. Siemens Westinghouse and Praxair are collaborating on the preliminary design of an OTM equipped Afterburner demonstration unit. The intent is to test the afterburner in conjunction with a reduced size SOFC test module that has the anode gas separati

Shockling, Larry A.; Huang, Keqin; Gilboy, Thomas E. (Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation); Christie, G. Maxwell; Raybold, Troy M. (Praxair, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

Potential energy savings and reduction of CO2 emissions through higher efficiency standards for polyphase electric motors in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japan has shut down more than 70% of its nuclear power plants since the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the ensuing accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The country has been challenged with power shortages in the short-term and faces complex energy security decisions in the long-term. Japan has a long history of implementing energy conservation policies, such as the Top Runner Program, which covers 23 products including appliances and industrial equipment. However, Japan's efficiency policy for polyphase electric motors is considered below international standards. Polyphase electric motors accounted for about 55% of the nation's total power consumption in 2008. The aim of this study is to estimate potential energy savings and reduction in CO2 emissions (20142043) by examining scenarios involving adopting two different polyphase motor efficiency standards and comparing them to a base case and concludes by suggesting pathways for further policy development using the results obtained. The study finds that if level IE2 of the international efficiency standard IEC 60034-30 were implemented, it would save 8.3TWh (or 0.03 quads) per year, which is equivalent to about 0.8% of Japan's total electric power consumption in 2010. If level IE3 of the IEC 60034-30 were implemented instead, it would save about 13.3TWh (or 0.05 quads) per year. The corresponding cumulative energy savings and reduction in CO2 emissions for the IE2 scenario would be 249TWh (or 0.85 quads) and 93Mt. The corresponding cumulative energy savings and reduction in CO2 emissions for the IE3 scenario would be 398TWh (or 1.36 quads) and 149Mt.

Chun Chun Ni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

SCR SYSTEMS FOR HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS: PROGRESS TOWARDS MEETING EURO 4 EMISSION STANDARDS IN 2005  

SciTech Connect

Emissions of diesel engines contain some components, which support the generation of smog and which are classified hazardous. Exhaust gas aftertreatment is a powerful tool to reduce the NOx and Particulate emissions. The NOx-emission can be reduced by the SCR technology. SCR stands for Selective Catalytic Reduction. A reduction agent has to be injected into the exhaust upstream of a catalyst. On the catalyst the NOx is reduced to N2 (Nitrogen) and H2O (Water). This catalytic process was developed in Japan about 30 years ago to reduce the NOx emission of coal-fired power plants. The first reduction agent used was anhydrous ammonia (NH3). SCR technology was used with diesel engines starting mid of the 80s. First applications were stationary operating generator-sets. In 1991 a joint development between DaimlerChrysler, MAN, IVECO and Siemens was started to use SCR technology for the reduction of heavy duty trucks. Several fleet tests demonstrated the durability of the systems. To day, SCR technology is the most promising technology to fulfill the new European Regulations EURO 4 and EURO 5 being effective Oct. 2005 and Oct. 2008. The efficient NOx reduction of the catalyst allows an engine calibration for low fuel consumption. DaimlerChrysler decided to use the SCR technology on every heavy duty truck and bus in Europe and many other truck manufacturers will introduce SCR technology to fulfill the 2005 emission regulation. The truck manufacturers in Europe agreed to use aqueous solution of Urea as reducing agent. The product is called AdBlue. AdBlue is a non toxic, non smelling liquid. The consumption is about 5% of the diesel fuel consumption to reduce the NOx emissions. A small AdBlue tank has to be installed to the vehicle. With an electronically controlled dosing system the AdBlue is injected into the exhaust. The dosing system is simple and durable. It has proven its durability during winter and summer testing as well as in fleet tests. The infrastructure for AdBlue is under evaluation in Europe by Urea Producers and Mineral Oil companies to be readily available in time. Urea is one of the most common chemical products in the world and the production and the distribution very much experienced. However, a pure grade is needed for automotive application and requires special attention.

Frank, W; Huethwohl, G; Maurer, B

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Does the location of aircraft nitrogen oxide emissions affect their climate impact?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approximately balancing the IRF associated with aviation CO2 emissions (28 mWm?2 yr (TgNO2)?1 ). The overall climate impact of global aviation is often represented by a simple multiplier for CO2 emissions­3% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions [Lee et al., 2009], yet these emissions fall outside the remit

82

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, EmissionsAllowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables PortfolioStandards  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-one states and the District of Columbia have adopted mandatory renewables portfolio standards (RPS) over the last ten years. Renewable energy attributes-such as the energy source, conversion technology, plant location and vintage, and emissions-are usually required to verify compliance with these policies, sometimes through attributes bundled with electricity, and sometimes with the attributes unbundled from electricity and traded separately as renewable energy certificates (RECs). This report summarizes the treatment of renewable energy attributes in state RPS rules. Its purpose is to provide a source of information for states considering RPS policies, and also to draw attention to certain policy issues that arise when renewable attributes and RECs are used for RPS compliance. Three specific issues are addressed: (1) the degree to which unbundled RECs are allowed under existing state RPS programs and the status of systems to track RECs and renewable energy attributes; (2) definitions of the renewable energy attributes that must be included in order to meet state RPS obligations, including the treatment of available emissions allowances; and (3) state policies on whether renewable energy or RECs sold through voluntary green power transactions may count towards RPS obligations.

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , (2008a). Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions fromstudy of indoor nitrogen dioxide levels and respiratoryand modeled nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) concentrations. All

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Meeting future exhaust emissions standards using natural gas as a vehicle fuel: Lessons learned from the natural gas vehicle challenge '92  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge '92, organized by Argonne National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Energy, Mines, and Resources - Canada, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and many others, resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck, donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers strived to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student-modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors in achieving good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Meeting future exhaust emissions standards using natural gas as a vehicle fuel: Lessons learned from the natural gas vehicle challenge `92  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge `92, organized by Argonne National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Energy, Mines, and Resources - Canada, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and many others, resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck, donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers strived to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student-modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors in achieving good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Calculation of the emission of nitrogen oxides in electric resistance heating furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper is devoted to the least studied topic in the field of use of modern electric heating equipment, namely, pollution of the atmosphere by nitrogen oxides and reduction of the intensity of this e...

A. V. Aksenov; V. A. Belyakov; Z. G. Sadykova

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

91

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

92

Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from pelletized and nonpelletized poultry litter incorporated into soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While several studies have shown that the addition of animal manures to soil can increase N2O and CO2 emissions, limited information is available on the effect that manure physical characteristics can have on the...

M. L. Cabrera; S. C. Chiang; W. C. Merka; O. C. Pancorbo; S. A. Thompson

93

Economic impact analysis for proposed emission standards and guidelines for municipal waste combustors: A description of the basis for, and impacts of, proposed revisions to air pollutant emission regulations for new and existing municipal waste combustors under Clean Air Act Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129. Final report  

SciTech Connect

EPA is proposing revised and expanded air pollutant emission standards for new, and guidelines for existing, municipal waste combustors (MWCs), pursuant to Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129 of the Clean Air Act of 1990. The regulations will replace or supplement those promulgated by EPA on February 11, 1991. The standards and guidelines will apply to MWCs with a capacity to combust 35 or more Mg of municipal solid waste per day. The pollutants to be regulated are particulate matter (total and fine), opacity, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, lead, cadmium mercury, and dibenzofurans and dioxins. The report describes the standards and guidelines, their potential economic impacts, and related matters. EPA estimates the national annual cost of the standards in 1994 will be $44 million, plus the cost of the 1991 standards, $157 million, for a total of $201 million. EPA estimates the equivalent cost of the guidelines at $280 million plus $168 million for a total of $448 million.

Jellicorse, B.L.; Dempsey, J.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-produced electricity for battery electric vehicles. Already, vehicles powered by compressed natural gas, propane. LIPMAN AND MARK A. DELUCCHI example, promising strategies for powering motor vehicles with reduced GHGEMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES

Kammen, Daniel M.

95

High emissivity coatings on titanium alloy prepared by micro-arc oxidation for high temperature application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-arc oxidation coatings were prepared on Ti6Al4V alloy in...3PO4-based electrolyte with different additives such as FeSO4, Co(CH3COO)2, Ni(CH3COO)2, and K2ZrF6. The composition, structure, surface morphology...

H. Tang; Q. Sun; C. G. Yi; Z. H. Jiang; F. P. Wang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio StandardsGreen Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standardshave adopted mandatory renewables portfolio standards (RPS)

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Nitrous oxide emissions. Topical report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Published N{sub 2}O emissions data for experimental studies examining large numbers of coals are generally scarce at the pilot-scale fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) level, although some data are available at the laboratory scale. The primary objective of this study was to determine the atmospheric contribution of N{sub 2}O derived from coal combustion. Additionally, the goal was to establish a comprehensive engineering model to assist in the prediction of N{sub 2}O emissions based upon operating and design considerations. To meet the overall objectives of determining the overall contribution of N{sub 2}O derived from FBC and developing an engineering model seven tasks were originally proposed. The objective of each task as originally proposed and finally executed is presented in this topical report. The seven tasks were: (1) literature survey; (2) equipment design and test plan development; (3) experimental techniques; (4) pilot-scale determination of the impacts of coal properties and operating conditions on N{sub 2}O emissions; (5) role of coal char on N{sub 2}O formation and destruction; (6) homogeneous versus heterogeneous reactions; and (7) modeling of N{sub 2}O emissions.

Collings, M.E.; Mann, M.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Influence of solid fuel on the carbon-monoxide and nitrogen-oxide emissions on sintering  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory and industrial research now underway at the sintering plant of AO Mittal Steel Temirtau is focusing on the preparation of fuel of optimal granulometric composition, the replacement of coke fines, and the adaptation of fuel-input technology so as to reduce fuel consumption and toxic emissions without loss of sinter quality.

M.F. Vitushchenko; N.L. Tatarkin; A.I. Kuznetsov; A.E. Vilkov [AO Mittal Steel Temirtau, Temirtau (Kazakhstan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

Wayne Penrod

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

16 - Ultra-low nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions combustion in gas turbine systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The historical development of gas turbine low \\{NOx\\} combustion from the pioneering NASA work in the early 1970s to the present generation of ultra-low \\{NOx\\} industrial gas turbine combustors is reviewed. The principles of operation of single digit ultra-low \\{NOx\\} gas turbine combustion for industrial applications are outlined. The review shows the potential has been demonstrated by several investigators using different flame stabilizers for \\{NOx\\} to be reduced to 1ppm at 1700K, 2ppm at 1800K and 34ppm at 1900K with no influence of operating pressure and with a practical operating flame stability margin. Under these conditions it is shown that no thermal \\{NOx\\} should occur and all the \\{NOx\\} is formed by the prompt \\{NOx\\} mechanisms. The elimination of thermal \\{NOx\\} makes the \\{NOx\\} emissions independent of residence time or reference velocity and independent of pressure. Also there is no influence of air inlet temperature for the same flame temperature. Where legislation requires emissions to be as low as can be achieved, emissions below 4ppm in production engines are current technology and this review shows the potential to get even lower than this in the future.

G.E. Andrews

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Air Quality Standards & ATOC/CHEM 5151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Lecture 22 Air Quality Standards & Control ATOC/CHEM 5151 #12;2 Primary Pollutants Things to reduce air pollution emissions ­ Latest version ­ 1990 (original, 1963) ­ What is an "air pollutant that are directly emitted Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Hydrocarbons (VOCs) Carbon Monoxide (CO) #12;3 Secondary Pollutants

Toohey, Darin W.

102

The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an eligible renewable resource, and avoided emissions ofregions with abundant renewable resources may find it inWIRRC: The Wisconsin Renewable Resource Credit Tracking

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. Bromly, Reduction of Nitrogen Dioxide Emissions from Gasthan 10 ! lm), and nitrogen dioxide ( N0 2) standards areare nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (N0 2); although,

Traynor, G.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Reducing nitrogen oxides emissions from the combustion of LCV gas staged firing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with cotton gin tr ash, one of the primary fuels under consider ation, r esulted in flue NO levels ranging from 650-B60 ng/J (1. 5-2. 0 lb/MBtu). The Texas Air Control Board (TACB) will issue a facility a permit to operate only if NOx emissions are within... NO Methods of NOx Control Methods of NOx control may be lumped into two cate- gories: flue gas treatment (FGT) and combustion modifica- tion. The different processes are described below. Flue Gas Tr eatment Most of the research on FGT to date has been...

Finch, Stanley Frank

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

order for the low carbon fuel standard, 2012. URL http://mediated e?ects of low carbon fuel policies. AgBioForum, 15(Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? American

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Influence of Oxidized Biodiesel Blends on Regulated and Unregulated Emissions from a Diesel Passenger Car  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Few studies are available on modern passenger cars, employed common-rail engine systems, and after-treatment technologies, and even fewer studies report results, which are not necessarily representative of actual driving conditions, making it difficult to assess the fuel impact on diesel car fleet emissions. ... Although gasoline engines are expected to be replaced by hydrogen-powered fuel cells, compression-ignition engines, the diesel engines, are expected to remain in use for high-power applications because of limitations of hydrogen-storage densities. ... transesterification and sequential esterification-transesterification, followed by washing in water in both cases, in order to set out the most suitable operational conditions to achieve the highest FAME percentage in the shortest time. ...

Georgios Karavalakis; Evangelos Bakeas; Stamos Stournas

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

107

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Economic, Energy, and GHG Emissions Impacts of Proposed 20172025 Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in the U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards for 2017 to 2025 model year light-duty vehicles are currently under consideration. This analysis uses an economy-wide model with detail in the passenger ...

Karplus, Valerie

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico: generation of electricity through the use of renewable energyMexico: Legislation passed in March 2007 defines a renewable energyrenewable energy standards or any voluntary clean electricity market or voluntary clean electricity program. New Mexico

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Standard test methods for chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) powder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide powders to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Carbon by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion Selective Electrode C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Loss of Weight on Ignition 7-13 Sulfur by CombustionIodometric Titration Impurity Elements by a Spark-Source Mass Spectrographic C761 Test Methods for Chemical, Mass Spectrometric, Spectrochemical,Nuclear, and Radiochemical Analysis of Uranium Hexafluoride C1287 Test Method for Determination of Impurities In Uranium Dioxide By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Gadolinium Content in Gadolinium Oxid...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

Standard specification for uranium oxides with a 235U content of less than 5 % for dissolution prior to conversion to nuclear-grade uranium dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This specification covers uranium oxides, including processed byproducts or scrap material (powder, pellets, or pieces), that are intended for dissolution into uranyl nitrate solution meeting the requirements of Specification C788 prior to conversion into nuclear grade UO2 powder with a 235U content of less than 5 %. This specification defines the impurity and uranium isotope limits for such urania powders that are to be dissolved prior to processing to nuclear grade UO2 as defined in Specification C753. 1.2 This specification provides the nuclear industry with a general standard for such uranium oxide powders. It recognizes the diversity of conversion processes and the processes to which such powders are subsequently to be subjected (for instance, by solvent extraction). It is therefore anticipated that it may be necessary to include supplementary specification limits by agreement between the buyer and seller. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for prevent...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nitrogen Oxides, Sulphur Trioxide and Mercury Emissions during Oxy-Fuel Fluidized Bed Combustion of Victorian Brown Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates, for the first time, the NOX, N2O, SO3 and Hg emissions from combustion of a Victorian brown coal in a 10 kWth fluidized bed unit under oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Compared to air combustion, lower NOX emissions and higher N2O ...

Bithi Roy; Luguang Chen; Sankar Bhattacharya

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Estimation of nitrous oxide emissions (GHG) from wastewater treatment plants using closed-loop mass balance and data reconciliation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The amount of greenhouse gases (GHG), especially, nitrous oxide (N2O) emitted from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) using data reconciliation and closed-loop mass balance was estimated. This study is based on a...

JungJin Lim; Boddupalli Sankarrao; TaeSeok Oh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Scholastic Standards Scholastic Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scholastic Standards _______________ 1.8 Page 1 Scholastic Standards Center for Advising-7095 Gaye DiGregorio, Executive Director Scholastic standards are mandated by the faculty through the Faculty Council Committee on Scholastic Standards. Procedures relative to scholastic standards

117

Effect of encapsulated calcium carbide on dinitrogen, nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide emissions from flooded rice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficiency of N use in flooded rice is usually low, chiefly due to gaseous losses. Emission of CH4, a gas implicated in global warming, can also be substantial in flooded rice. In a greenhouse study, the nitr...

K. F. Bronson; A. R. Mosier

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

EPA Emissions | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPA Emissions ORNL research informs new EPA emissions standards July 11, 2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a streamlined method for determining vehicle...

119

Secretary Chu Announces More Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Water Heaters and Other Heating Products Secretary Chu Announces More Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Water Heaters and Other Heating Products April 1, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department has finalized higher energy efficiency standards for a key group of heating appliances that will together save consumers up to $10 billion and prevent up to 164 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions over 30 years. These new standards - for residential water heaters, pool heaters and direct heating equipment such as gas fireplaces - will reduce air pollution, prevent the release of harmful nitrogen oxides and mercury, and avoid emissions equivalent to taking 46 million cars off

120

Performance and emission enhancements of a variable geometry turbocharger on a heavy-duty diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variable Geometry Turbochargers (VGTs) have emerged in the heavy-duty diesel market with the simultaneous introduction of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) in meeting emission standards. From a military perspective, VGTs offer considerable promise of improving low speed torque and overall fuel economy. Despite these gains, nitric oxides (NOx) emissions generally increase with increased boost. During times when the military can reduce its environmental impact, VGTs can drive EGR and counter the increase in NOx emissions with relatively minor penalty in particulate matter (PM) emissions. This study highlights the performance and emission enhancements enabled by a VGT on a heavy-duty diesel engine.

Timothy J. Jacobs; Chad Jagmin; Wesley J. Williamson; Zoran S. Filipi; Dennis N. Assanis; Walter Bryzik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Calibration parameters from Monte Carlo simulations for neutron coincidence assay of MOX (mixed oxide) fuel elements: A substitute for standards  

SciTech Connect

Results from application of a calculational model for the two- parameter (singles and doubles) passive neutron coincidence assay of finished Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) subassemblies are compared with calibration measurements. Two assay instruments are considered; the Universal Fast Breeder Reactor Subassembly Counter (UFBC) and the Capsule Counter installed at the Japanese Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF). In the case of US Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel, the absolute ratio of calculations to measurements for the multiplication-corrected coincidence calibration constant is +1.1 /+-/ 1.0% (average of four subassemblies) for the UFBC and /minus/1.3 /+-/ 0.6% (average of five subassemblies) for the Capsule Counter. For initial measurements of Japanese fuel in the Capsule Counter, the absolute ratio is /minus/1.0 /+-/ 0.7% for three JOYO subassemblies and +0.8 /+-/ 0.7% for one MONJU subassembly. Calculations of relative effects such as the change in coincidence response from, for example, subassembly can thickness of U enrichment are more accurate (better than 0.5%) than absolute calibration parameters. This very good accuracy offers more effective and less costly inspector verification of finished FBR fuel elements by reducing reliance on physical standards to expand the cross-calibration databases. 11 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Stewart, J.E.; Ferran, R.R.; Simmonds, S.M.; Menlove, H.O.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Greenhouse Gas Reductions Under Low Carbon Fuel Standards?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LCFS limits carbon emissions per unit of current energycarbon fuel standard expressed as a limit on the emissions per energy

Holland, Stephen P.; Knittel, Christopher R; Hughes, Jonathan E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Greenhouse Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LCFS limits carbon emissions per unit of current energycarbon fuel standard expressed as a limit on the emissions per energy

Holland, Stephen P.; Knittel, Christopher R; Hughes, Jonathan E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters deer11johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Diesel Emission...

125

The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NO ) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers X Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment March 2000 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

126

Exhaust emissions from two intercity passenger locomotives  

SciTech Connect

To enhance the effectiveness of intercity passenger rail service in mitigating exhaust emissions in California, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) included limits on exhaust emissions in its intercity locomotive procurement specifications. Because there were no available exhaust emission test data on which emission reduction goals could be based, Caltrans funded a test program to acquire gaseous and particulate exhaust emissions data, along with smoke opacity data, from two state-of-the-art intercity passenger locomotives. The two passenger locomotives (an EMD F59PH and a GE DASH8-32BWH) were tested at the Association of American Railroads Chicago Technical Center. The EMD locomotive was equipped with a separate Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) 8V-149 diesel engine used to provide 480 V AC power for the trailing passenger cars. This DDC engine was also emission tested. These data were used to quantify baseline exhaust emission levels as a challenge to locomotive manufacturers to offer new locomotives with reduced emissions. Data from the two locomotive engines were recorded at standard fuel injection timing and with the fuel injection timing retarded 4 deg in an effort to reduce NO[sub x] emissions. Results of this emissions testing were incorporated into the Caltrans locomotive procurement process by including emission performance requirements in the Caltrans intercity passenger locomotive specification, and therefore in the procurement decision. This paper contains steady-state exhaust emission test results for hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]), and particulate matter (PM) from the two locomotives. Computed sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) emissions are also given, and are based on diesel fuel consumption and sulfur content. Exhaust smoke opacity is also reported.

Fritz, S.G. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Emissions Research)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Clean coal technology: selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses a project carried out under the US Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program which demonstrated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulphur coal-fired boilers under typical boilers conditions in the United States. The project was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc., who served as a co-funder and as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into boiler flue gas and passing the flue gas through a catalyst bed where the Nox and NH{sub 3} react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The results of the CCTDP project confirmed the applicability of SCR for US coal-fired power plants. In part as a result of the success of this project, a significant number of commercial SCR units have been installed and are operating successfully in the United States. By 2007, the total installed SCR capacity on US coal-fired units will number about 200, representing about 100,000 MWe of electric generating capacity. This report summarizes the status of SCR technology. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs., 10 photos.

NONE

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006,...

129

Exhaust and evaporative emissions from gasohol-type fuels  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was conducted at the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville (Okla.) Energy Technology Center in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency to determine the characteristics of gasohol-type fuels with respect to exhaust and evaporative emissions. Five fuels, 2 gasolines (reference and commercial unleaded) and 3 gasohols (90% gasoline/10% ethanol) were tested in a fleet of 10 late-model automobiles. Six were equipped with oxidation catalysts and 4 were equipped with three-way catalysts. The results obtained from the 1978 Federal test procedure indicate that the addition of ethanol to the base gasoline, whether it is a reference fuel (Indolene) or a commercial fuel, has measurable effects on exhaust and evaporative emissions. However, on the average, the magnitude of these effects was generally within the 1978 emission standards established by the EPA. More specifically, the addition of ethanol, in the case of vehicles with oxidation catalysts, decreased hydrocarbons by an average of 27%, decreased carbon monoxide by 43%, decreased volumetric fuel economy by 3%, and increased oxides of nitrogen by 16%. Evaporative emissions were increased by 40%. In the case of vehicles with three-way catalysts, the addition of ethanol to the base fuel, on the average, decreased carbon monoxide by 7%, decreased fuel economy by 5%, increased hydrocarbons by 12%, increased oxides of nitrogen by 7%, and increased evaporative emissions by 49%.

Naman, T.M.; Allsup, J.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Got Standards? "Got Standards?"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

certifications available. Some of these certifications include ISO 9002 1994, ISO 9003 1994 and ISO 9001 in order to bring harmony to global standards for international trade. Enter ISO 9000. The Basics In order to fully understand the concept of ISO 9000, it is very important to have a good idea of what a standard is

Vardeman, Stephen B.

131

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

132

Fuel saving, carbon dioxide emission avoidance, and syngas production by tri-reforming of flue gases from coal- and gas-fired power stations, and by the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flue gases from coal, gas, or oil-fired power stations, as well as from several heavy industries, such as the production of iron, lime and cement, are major anthropogenic sources of global CO2 emissions. The newly proposed process for syngas production based on the tri-reforming of such flue gases with natural gas could be an important route for CO2 emission avoidance. In addition, by combining the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide with the partial oxidation of the carbon source, an overall thermoneutral process can be designed for the co-production of iron and syngas rich in CO. Water-gas shift (WGS) of CO to H2 enables the production of useful syngas. The reaction process heat, or the conditions for thermoneutrality, are derived by thermochemical equilibrium calculations. The thermodynamic constraints are determined for the production of syngas suitable for methanol, hydrogen, or ammonia synthesis. The environmental and economic consequences are assessed for large-scale commercial production of these chemical commodities. Preliminary evaluations with natural gas, coke, or coal as carbon source indicate that such combined processes should be economically competitive, as well as promising significant fuel saving and CO2 emission avoidance. The production of ammonia in the above processes seems particularly attractive, as it consumes the nitrogen in the flue gases.

M. Halmann; A. Steinfeld

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from forest emissions measured at mid-mountain and high- elevation mountain sites in Whistler, BC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with fossil fuel combustion and marine emissions (Russell etfuel combustion, and biomass burning (BB). Natural sources include biogenic (from the biosphere), marine (

Schwartz, Rachel E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Technical Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review for Technical Standards of Interest Legend: Red Technical Standards Program Activities and Responsibilities Blue Directives Program Activities and Responsibilities...

135

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...

136

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

137

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Excitation mechanism and thermal emission quenching of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour depositionDo we need silicon nanoclusters?  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we will discuss the excitation and emission properties of Tb ions in a Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide (SRSO) matrix obtained at different technological conditions. By means of electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition, undoped and doped SRSO films have been obtained with different Si content (33, 35, 39, 50 at.%) and were annealed at different temperatures (600, 900, 1100?C). The samples were characterized optically and structurally using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time resolved PL, absorption, cathodoluminescence, temperature dependent PL, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how the matrix modifications influence excitation and emission properties of Tb ions.

Podhorodecki, A., E-mail: artur.p.podhorodecki@pwr.wroc.pl; Golacki, L. W.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W. [School of EECS, Ohio University, Stocker Center 363, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Fedus, K. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5/7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Wojcik, J.; Wilson, P. R. J.; Mascher, P. [Department of Engineering Physics and Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L7 (Canada)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, [October--December, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. During this quarter, tests of the LNCFS Level III system were conducted to determine the effect that fuel fineness has on NOx emissions and unburned carbon levels. Results showed that changing the fineness of the fuel has almost no effect on NOx emissions; however, unburned carbon levels can be reduced significantly by increasing fuel fineness.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

Reducing the contribution of the power sector to ground-level ozone pollution : an assessment of time-differentiated pricing of nitrogen oxide emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen oxide (NOx) is a prevalent air pollutant across the United States and a requisite precursor for tropospheric (ground-level) ozone formation. Both pollutants significantly impact human health and welfare, so National ...

Craig, Michael T. (Michael Timothy)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The effects of cycle-to-cycle variations on nitric oxide (NO) emissions for a spark-ignition engine: Numerical results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. To carry out the proposed study, an engine simulation model was used. The simulation determines engine performance and NO emissions as functions of engine operating conditions, engine design parameters, and combustion parameters. An automotive, spark-ignition...

Villarroel, Milivoy

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Brand Standards Brand StandardsBrand Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brand Standards 6.6.11 #12;Brand StandardsBrand Standards VISUAL IDENTITY AND BRANDING INITIATIVE, the visual image presented to the public by the units of the University and UMMC often is confusing the organizations' public image under a cohesive, easily recognized visual identity that relies upon a common

Weber, David J.

146

Standards, Ethics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards, Ethics Ombuds Standards and Ethics Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the Laboratory. Contact...

147

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

Not Available

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nationwide: New Efficiency Standards for Power Supplies Anticipate Energy Savings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

New energy efficiency standards for external power supplies will reduce energy consumption, energy bills, and carbon emissions.

149

500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulatecharacteristics and boiler efficiency. Baseline, AOFA, and LNB without AOFA test segments have been completed. Analysis of the 94 days of LNB long-term data collected show the full-load NO[sub x] emission levels to be approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. Flyash LOI values for the LNB configuration are approximately 8 percent at full-load. Corresponding values for the AOFA configuration are 0.94 lb/MBtu and approximately 10 percent. Abbreviated diagnostic tests for the LNB+AOFA configuration indicate that at 500 MWe, NO[sub x] emissions are approximately 0.55 lb/MBtu with corresponding flyash LOI values of approximately 11 percent. For comparison, the long-term full-load, baseline NO[sub x] emission level was approximately 1.24 lb/MBtu at 5.2 percent LOI. Comprehensive testing of the LNB+AOFA configuration will be performed when the stackparticulate emissions issue is resolved. Testing of a process optimization package on Plant Hammond Unit 4 was performed during this quarter. The software was configured to minimize NO[sub x] emissions using total combustion air flow and advanced overfire air distribution as the controlled parameters. Preliminary results from this testing indicate that this package shows promise in reducing NO[sub x] emissions while maintaining or improving other boiler performance parameters.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

On the temperature dependence of organic reactivity, nitrogen oxides, ozone production, and the impact of emission controls in San Joaquin Valley, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) experiences some of the worst ozone air quality in the US, frequently exceeding the California 8 h standard of 70.4 ppb. To improve our understanding of trends in the number of ozone violations ...

Pusede, S. E.

151

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO{sub x} emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO{sub x} emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO{sub x} combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO[sub x] emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO[sub x] emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO[sub x] combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Engines - Emissions Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are attractive options for increasing vehicle fuel economy and reducing emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases. Two automobile manufacturers have already introduced HEVs, and other manufacturers are planning to introduce their own models. One available HEV combines mass reduction (also applicable to conventional vehicles) with idle-stop, regenerative braking, and electric-drive assist to achieve a fuel economy more than 2.5 times the current Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard. The second HEV combines idle-stop, regenerative braking, electric assist acceleration, and continuously variable transmission (CVT) to achieve a fuel economy of more than twice the current CAFÉ standard, qualifying as a super ultra-low emissions vehicle (SULEV).

154

Electron Emission from Slightly Oxidized Depleted Uranium Generated by its Own Radioactivity Measured by Electron Spectroscopy, and Electron-Induced Dissociation and Ionization of Hydrogen Near its Surface.  

SciTech Connect

Energy dependent electron emission (counts per second) between zero and 1.4 keV generated by the natural reactivity of uranium was measured by an electrostatic spectrometer with known acceptance angle and acceptance area. The electron intensity decreases continuously with energy, but at different rates in different energy regimes, suggesting that a variety of processes may be involved in producing the observed electron emission. The spectrum was converted to energy dependent electron flux (e-/cm{sup 2} s) using the assumption that the emission has a cosine angular distribution. The flux decreased rapidly from {approx}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s in the energy range from zero to 200 eV, and then more slowly from {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}3*10{sup 4}/cm{sup 2} s in the range from 200 to 1400 eV. The energy dependent electron mean free path in gases together with literature cross sections for electron induced reactions were used to determine the number of ionization and dissociation reactions per cm{sup 2}s within the inelastic mean free path of electrons, and found to be about 1.3*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.5*10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively, for hydrogen. An estimate of the number of ionization and dissociation reactions occurring within the total range, rather than the mean free path of electrons in gases resulted in 6.2*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.3*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively. The total energy flux carried by electrons from the surface is suspiciously close to the total possible energy generated by one gram of uranium. A likely source of error is the assumption that the electron emission has a cosine distribution. Angular distribution measurements of the electron emission would check that assumption, and actual measurement of the total current emanating from the surface are needed to confirm the value of the current calculated in section II. These results must therefore be used with caution - until they are confirmed by other measurements.

Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis . Field Emission Measurements of Cobalt Implanted Porous Silicon Differences between the 1mplanted Porous Silicon Field Emission Devioe and the Al-anode Oxidized Porous Silicon Field Emission Diode VII CONCLUSION 70 94 99 REFERENCES... Emission Diode (OPSFED) was developed and studied [8] . The OPSFED was using the irregularity on the interface between the oxidized porous silicon film and silicon substrate as field emission cathodes, and a thin aluminum layer deposited...

Liu, Hongbiao

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, First quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO[sub x] combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

162

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions trading is a comparatively new policy instrument which ... electricity systems in Europe. The development of emissions trading thus represents an innovation in its own...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

Not Available

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

166

Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions- Fact Sheet, 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Utilizing Supplemental Ultra-Low-NOx Burner Technology to Meet Emissions Standards and Improve System Efficiency

167

Appliance and Equipment Standards Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office (BTO) implements minimum energy conservation standards for more than 50 categories of appliances and equipment. As a result of these standards, energy users saved about $55 billion on their utility bills in 2013. Since the beginning of 2009, 25 new or updated standards have been issued, which will help increase annual savings by more than 50 percent over the next decade. By 2030, cumulative operating cost savings from all standards in effect since 1987 will reach over $1.7 trillion, with a cumulative reduction of 6.8 billion tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 1.4 billion automobiles. Products covered by standards represent about 90% of home energy use, 60% of commercial building use, and 29% of industrial energy us

168

Reduction of NOx emission on NiCrAl-Titanium Oxide coated direct injection diesel engine fuelled with radish (Raphanus sativus) biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the experimental investigation of single cylinder DI diesel engine with and without coating. Diesel and radish (Raphanus sativus) oil Methyl Ester are used as fuels and the results are compared to find the effect of biodiesel in a thermal barrier coating engine. For this purpose engine cylinder head valves and piston crown are coated with 100??m of nickel-chrome-aluminium bond coat and 450??m of TiO2 by the plasma spray method. Radish oil methyl ester is produced by the transesterification process method. From the experimental investigation slight increase in specific fuel consumption in thermal barrier coating engine is observed when compared with the uncoated engine whereas NOx HC Smoke and CO emissions decreased with coated engine for all test fuels used in the coated engine when compared with that of the uncoated engine.

V. Ravikumar; D. Senthilkumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Aerosol Jet Printing of LSCF-CGO Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology has attracted great attention due to advantages such as low emissions and high efficiency. In this work, solid oxide (more)

Gardner, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Standards Actions, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

projects were recently ini- projects were recently ini- tiated. If you have any questions or are interested in participating in the development of these standards, please contact the per- sons listed below. • Work Smart Standards Users Handbook, Project Number MGMT-0002; Maggie Sturdivant, EH-31; 301-903-0077, FAX 301- 903-0557, Maggie.Sturdivant @eh.doe.gov. • Criteria for Preparing and Pack- aging Plutonium Metals and Oxides for Long-term Storage, Project Number PACK-0013 (re- vision of DOE-STD-3013-96); Ray Cooperstein, 301-903- 5353, 301-903-7065, Raymond .Cooperstein@dp.doe.gov. • Industrial Hygiene Functional Area Qualifications, Project Number TRNG-0012; M. Norman Schwartz, EH-31; 301- 903-2996, FAX 301-903-4594, Norm.Schwartz@eh.doe.gov. DOE Technical Standards Recently Sent for Coordination

171

Training Standardization  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the benefits of and required process and recommendations for implementing the standardization of training in the nuclear power industry in the United States and abroad. Current Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enable training standardization in the nuclear power industry. The delivery of training through the Internet, Intranet and video over IP will facilitate this standardization and bring multiple benefits to the nuclear power industry worldwide. As the amount of available qualified and experienced professionals decreases because of retirements and fewer nuclear engineering institutions, standardized training will help increase the number of available professionals in the industry. Technology will make it possible to use the experience of retired professionals who may be interested in working part-time from a remote location. Well-planned standardized training will prevent a fragmented approach among utilities, and it will save the industry considerable resources in the long run. It will also ensure cost-effective and safe nuclear power plant operation.

Agnihotri, Newal

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Standard Report Templates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü Metrics Included in Every Report "How To" Series Standard Report Templates EPA's Portfolio Manager offers you eight standard reports with key metrics and information you can use to easily assess your portfolio's performance and progress, and thereby make informed business decisions. This document lists the metrics included in each of the eight reports so you can see what each report offers. Standard Reports Performance Highlights Energy Performance Emissions Performance Water Performance Fuel Performance ENERGY STAR Certification Status

173

Innovative technical advances in the application of regenerative thermal oxidizers  

SciTech Connect

Regenerative Thermal Oxidizers (RTOs) have been applied in industry for over twenty (20) years to reduce the emissions of Volatile Organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere from industrial process emissions. The Clean Air Act and its amendments have established a regulatory framework setting standards for allowable levels of VOC emissions. Several forces are driving the increasing use and acceptance of this technology: (1) High efficiency and increasing stringent standards require higher destruction efficiency; (2) Low operating cost and control of emission streams with less VOCs (therefore, less fuel value) causing higher use of natural gas for combustion; (3) Low NO{sub x}--the overlapping concern of NO{sub x} generation from the combustion process; (4) Low process upsets with improved productivity of industrial process require continuous integration of VOC abatement equipment; and (5) Reduced capital cost--capital cost criteria is $/ton of VOC abated. The latest development in RTO technology is the Single Can Oxidizer (SCO). This regenerative thermal oxidizer is the accumulation of developments in many subsystems of RTOs, combined with a dramatic new configuration. Several features of the system offer unique benefits to industrial end users: (1) Single can configuration gives reduced weight, material usage, and cost; (2) Rotary valve design gives smooth operation, and low pressure fluctuations; (3) Structured block heat recovery media reduces pressure drop, and lowers HP/operating cost; and (4) SMART system lowers NO{sub x} output/reduced operation cost. This paper will present a discussion of the features listed above. In addition, it will provide analytical documentation of test results for a full scale commercial unit.

Grzanka, R.; Truppi, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3]. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Low-Load Dual-Fuel Compression Ignition (CI) Engine Operation with an On-Board Reformer and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst: Effects on Engine Performance and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ideally, homogeneous air fuel mixtures ignited spontaneously exhibit less pollutants and can improve engine efficiency compared to standard diesel combustion, which is based on diffusion combustion. ... Although optimization of the injection timing of the in-cylinder DI fuel (e.g., diesel) aims to ignite the mixture and control the start of combustion (SOC) for the different premixed fuel ratios, the fuel ignition timing is complicated and problematic for a dual-fueled engine under a number of engine-operating conditions (e.g., low loads and use of residual gas trapping). ... Deactivation due to coking of a single Ni/Pt-based catalyst is significant, but operation using a platinum-ceria catalyst in line with a Ni-based steam-reforming catalyst allows acceptable efficiencies. ...

A. Tsolakis; R. Torbati; A. Megaritis; A. Abu-Jrai

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Testing of Mercury Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents Testing of Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, Alabama Subcontractor- ARCADIS Geraghty & Miller The overall goal of this project is to test the effectiveness of calcium-based sorbents and oxidizing agents for controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plant boilers. ARCADIS Geraghty & Miller, with EPA support, has developed calcium-based sorbents to remove SO2 and mercury simultaneously. The sorbents consist of hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) and an added oxidant and a silica-modified calcium (CaSiO3) with an added oxidant. The mercury capacity in ug Hg/g sorbent for the two sorbents is 20 and 110-150, respectively, verses a mercury capacity for the current standard sorbent, activated carbon, of 70-100. The advantages of a lime based sorbent verses carbon is lower cost, simultaneous removal of sulfur, and allowance of ash to be utilized for a cement additive.

177

Find Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-Safe Use of Optical Fiber Communication Systems Utilizing Laser Diode and LED Sources API ASCE ASHRAE ASME ASME-BPVC ASQ ASSE ASTM AWS CGA standards - contact Timothy Lopez...

178

Data Standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data standards are common terms and methods for sharing data and exchange of information, which are used uniformly. The World Health Organization has proposed : collection in specific data forms, in alogical...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Dishwashers Residential Dishwashers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for residential dishwashers since 1988. Residential dishwashers use water and detergent to wash and rinse dishware, glassware, eating utensils, and most cooking utensils. Some dishwashers also dry dishes. Standards implemented in 1994 will save approximately 1.6 quads of energy and result in approximately $19.8 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2023. The standard will avoid about 50.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 9.7 million automobiles. Standards implemented in 2010 will save approximately 0.6 quads of energy and result in approximately $10.3 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. The standard will avoid about 32.5 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 6.4 million automobiles.

180

Polarimetric Standardization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of polarimetric techniques is nowadays widespread among solar and stellar astronomers. However, notwithstanding the recommandations that have often been made about the publication of polarimetric results in the astronomical literature, we are still far from having a standard protocol on which to conform. In this paper we review the basic definitions and the physical significance of the Stokes parameters, and we propose a standardization of the measurement of polarized radiation.

E. Landi Degl'Innocenti; S. Bagnulo; L. Fossati

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

182

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

183

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions trading is a market-based instrument to achieve ... The current international dissemination and intended linking of emissions trading schemes underlines the growing relevance of this ... . There are thr...

Edwin Woerdman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter covers a series of operations which are essential for the implementation of an efficient emissions trading market on the domestic and international level. An introduction to how a national emissions trading

Dr. Michael See

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Faucets Faucets Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the water consumption level of faucets since 1992. This standard covers kitchen faucets and kitchen replacement aerators, lavatory faucets and lavatory replacement aerators, and metering faucets. These faucets are used widely in residential and commercial settings. The current standard will save approximately 0.9 quads of energy and result in approximately $25.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2013. The standard will avoid about 49.1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 9.6 million automobiles. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure.

186

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Refrigerators and Freezers Residential Refrigerators and Freezers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for residential refrigerators and freezers since 1990. Residential refrigerators and freezers include refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers, such as standard-size residential units as well as compact units used in offices and dormitory rooms. Known collectively as "refrigeration products," these appliances chill and preserve food and beverages, provide ice and chilled water, and freeze food. The standard implemented in 1990 will save approximately 5.6 quads of energy and result in approximately $61.7 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1990-2019. The standard will avoid about 312.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 61.3 million automobiles.

187

Industry initiative sets standards for pumps  

SciTech Connect

Using API 682, operators can improve process uptime, reduce maintenance costs and control VOC (volatile organic compound) emissions on centrifugal and rotary pumps in heavy service. The standard`s focus on reliability and test-qualified seals leads the way for petroleum process industry to reduce costs while improving emission controls. The goal of API 682 is to help operators identify sealing systems that will operate uninterrupted for a minimum of three years and still comply with emission regulations. The paper discusses emission control, improved reliability and expenses, application of API 682, recommended designs, and technology beyond API 682.

Gabriel, R.; Lundy, W. [John Crane International, Morton Grove, IL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy Efficiency Standards for Refrigerators in Brazil: A Methodology for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Efficiency Standards for Refrigerators in Brazil: A Methodology for Energy Efficiency Standards for Refrigerators in Brazil: A Methodology for Impact Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Efficiency Standards for Refrigerators in Brazil: A Methodology for Impact Evaluation Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.scribd.com/doc/34712276/Energy-efficiency-standards-for-refrigerat Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-efficiency-standards-refrigera Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Emissions Standards" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

189

Standard Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard no es suficiente Standard no es suficiente Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Si bien el Modelo Standard proporciona una descripción muy buena de los fenómenos observados en los experimentos, todavía es una teoría incompleta. El problema es que el Modelo Standard no puede explicar la causa por la que existen algunas partículas, del modo en que lo hacen. Por ejemplo, aún cuando los físicos conocían las masas de todos los quarks, a excepción de la del quark top desde hace muchos años, no podían simplemente predecir en forma exacta la masa del top, sin utilizar evidencia experimental, dado que el Modelo Standard carece de un modelo matemático para calcular el patrón que siguen los valores de las masas de las partículas. Otra cuestión está relacionada con el hecho que existen tres pares de

190

EPA expands air quality emissions trading policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA expands air quality emissions trading policy ... The Environmental Protection Agency has expanded its old "bubble policy" into a wider-ranging, supposedly more effective, emissions trading program designed to speed up attainment of national air quality standards and save money. ... It also authorizes states to adopt generic emissions trading rules and extend these to all ... ...

1982-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

191

Synchrophasor Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development & Support Development & Support Kenneth Martin martin@electricpowergroup.com June 27-28, 2013 Washington, DC DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program 2 Introduction  Synchrophasor measurement systems widely deployed  Enable a new generation of power system monitor & control capability - Improved power system analysis & system models - Wide area, high-resolution visibility - Basis for a new generation of controls  Research challenge - standards to enable interoperability - Measurement performance - Communications  Research focus - facilitate development, testing, and validation of standards to promote interoperability Basic phasor concept well known . A phasor is the complex form of the AC waveform √2 A cos (2 π ω 0 t + φ) A e

192

Effect of E85 on Tailpipe Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

E85, which consists of nominally 85% fuel grade ethanol and 15% gasoline, must be used in flexible-fuel (or 'flexfuel') vehicles (FFVs) that can operate on fuel with an ethanol content of 0-85%. Published studies include measurements of the effect of E85 on tailpipe emissions for Tier 1 and older vehicles. Car manufacturers have also supplied a large body of FFV certification data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, primarily on Tier 2 vehicles. These studies and certification data reveal wide variability in the effects of E85 on emissions from different vehicles. Comparing Tier 1 FFVs running on E85 to similar non-FFVs running on gasoline showed, on average, significant reductions in emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 54%), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs; 27%), and carbon monoxide (CO; 18%) for E85. Comparing Tier 2 FFVs running on E85 and comparable non-FFVs running on gasoline shows, for E85 on average, a significant reduction in emissions of CO (20%), and no significant effect on emissions of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs). NOx emissions from Tier 2 FFVs averaged approximately 28% less than comparable non-FFVs. However, perhaps because of the wide range of Tier 2 NOx standards, the absolute difference in NOx emissions between Tier 2 FFVs and non-FFVs is not significant (P 0.28). It is interesting that Tier 2 FFVs operating on gasoline produced approximately 13% less NMOGs than non-FFVs operating on gasoline. The data for Tier 1 vehicles show that E85 will cause significant reductions in emissions of benzene and butadiene, and significant increases in emissions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in comparison to emissions from gasoline in both FFVs and non-FFVs. The compound that makes up the largest proportion of organic emissions from E85-fueled FFVs is ethanol.

Yanowitz, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

194

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

195

Geothermal Power Plants Meeting Clean Air Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

196

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small, Large, and Very Large Commercial Package Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Small, Large, and Very Large Commercial Package Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) regulates the energy efficiency of small, large, and very large commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps. Commercial air conditioners and heat pumps are air-cooled, water-cooled, evaporatively-cooled, or water source unitary air conditioners or heat pumps that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps, and SPVUs, will save approximately 1.7 quads of energy and result in approximately $28.9 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. These standards will avoid about 90.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 31.1 million automobiles. The standard implemented in 2010 for very large, air-cooled commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps will save approximately 0.43 quads of energy and result in approximately $4.3 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. The standard will avoid about 22.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 4.4 million automobiles.

197

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dehumidifiers Dehumidifiers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential dehumidifiers since 2007. Residential dehumidifiers reduce the level of humidity-the amount of water vapor-in the air. The standard mandatory in 2007 will save approximately 0.27 quads of energy and result in approximately $3.14 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2007-2031. The standard will avoid about 14.1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 2.8 million automobiles. The standard mandatory in 2012 will save approximately 0.3 quads of energy and result in approximately $4.7 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2012-2036. The standard will avoid about 15.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 3.1 million automobiles.

198

Safety Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOE Workshop US DOE Workshop September 19-20, 2012 International perspective on Fukushima accident Miroslav Lipár Head, Operational Safety Section M.Lipar@iaea.org +43 1 2600 22691 2 Content * The IAEA before Fukushima -Severe accidents management * The IAEA actions after Fukushima * The IAEA Action plan on nuclear safety * Measures to improve operational safety * Conclusions THE IAEA BEFORE FUKUSHIMA 4 IAEA Safety Standards IAEA Safety Standards F undamental S afety Principles Safety Fundamentals f o r p ro te c ti n g p e o p l e a n d t h e e n v i ro n m e n t IAEA Safety Standards Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material 2005 E dit ion Safety Requirements No. T S-R-1 f o r p ro te c ti n g p e o p l e a n d t h e e n v i ro n m e n t IAEA Safety Standards Design of the Reactor Core for Nuclear Power Plants

199

Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, WestStandard for Industrial Energy Efficiency A. McKane 1 , R.

McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Standard Soot Generator for Diesel Particulate Filter Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAMBUSTION A Standard Soot Generator for Diesel Particulate Filter Testing Poster - P10 Diesel Engine Emission Reduction Conference 2007 Chris Nickolaus ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxic emissions Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management District (BAAQMD). For more detailed information, see Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions... report permit renewal July 31 National Emissions Standards for...

202

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and Visible Emissions (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set emissions opacity standards for stationary sources with opacity continuous emissions monitoring equipment, stationary sources without such equipment, and mobile sources. The...

203

Energy Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hall Hall October 2011 Analysis of Impacts of a Clean www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall i Contacts This report, Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall, was prepared under the

204

Energy Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Bingaman Bingaman November 2011 Analysis of Impacts of a Clean www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman i Contacts This report, Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard, as requested by Chairman Bingaman, was prepared

205

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Water Heaters Residential Water Heaters Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy (DOE) energy conservation standards for residential water heaters since 1990. Residential water heaters are products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use upon demand for activities such as washing dishes or clothes, or bathing. Residential water heaters include storage type units that store heated water in an insulated tank and instantaneous type units that heat water on demand. The standard mandatory in 1990 will save approximately 3.2 quads of energy and result in approximately $34.8 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1990-2019. The standard will avoid about 180 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 35.3 million automobiles.

206

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ceiling Fan Light Kits Ceiling Fan Light Kits Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of ceiling fan light kits since 2007. Ceiling fan light kits are used to provide light from a ceiling fan. The kit can be attached to the ceiling fan prior to or after the time of retail sale. The current standard will save approximately 4.6 quads of energy and result in approximately $53.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2007-2031. The standard will avoid about 240 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 47 million automobiles. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information

207

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Clothes Dryers Residential Clothes Dryers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for residential clothes dryers since 1988. Residential clothes dryers use a tumble-type drum with forced air circulation to dry clothes. They are commonly used in homes, but are also used in some dormitory, apartment, or small business settings. The current standard will save approximately 0.9 quads of energy and result in approximately $9.6 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2023. The standard will avoid about 50.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 9.9 million automobiles.

208

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Showerheads Showerheads Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the water consumption level of showerheads since 1992. A showerhead is a perforated nozzle that distributes water over a large solid angle at point of use, generally overhead of the bather. They are used widely in residential and commercial settings. The current standard will save approximately 6 quads of energy and result in approximately $120 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2013. The standard will avoid about 329.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 64.5 million automobiles. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure.

209

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unit Heaters Unit Heaters Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of unit heaters since 2008. Unit heaters are self-contained fan-type heaters designed to be installed within the heated space, such as rooms, garages, or factory floors. Unit heaters do not include warm air furnaces. The current standard will save approximately 1.3 quads of energy and result in approximately $13.4 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2008-2032. The standard will avoid about 66.8 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 13.1 million automobiles. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information

210

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Clothes Washers Commercial Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap, detergent, or both and mechanical movement to clean clothes. Commercial clothes washers are used in commercial settings, multi-family housing, or laundromats. There are two classes of commercial clothes washers: front-loading and top-loading clothes washers. The current standard will save approximately 0.12 quads of energy and result in approximately $1.1 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2007-2036. The standard will avoid about 6.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 1.3 million automobiles.

211

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control CO and hydrocarbon emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion Effectiveness of a...

212

Development of non-premixed porous inserted regenerative thermal oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, a porous inserted regenerative thermal oxidizer (PRTO) system was developed for a... x emissions and high radiant efficiency. Zirconium dioxide (ZrO2...) ceramic ...

Jun-chun Zhang; Le-ming Cheng; Cheng-hang Zheng

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Volatile Carbon Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed & Volatile Carbon Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research...

214

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Emitting Diode Lamps Light Emitting Diode Lamps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products There are currently no energy conservation standards for light emitting diode (LED) lamps.LED lamps are comprised of an LED source, such as LED packages or LED arrays; an LED driver; an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard base, and other optical, thermal, mechanical, and electrical components. These LED lamps are primarily used in residential applications as replacement lamps. The Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct an analysis of the energy, emissions, and costs associated with LEDs during any future energy conservation standard rulemakings. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Light-Emitting Diode Lamps Test Procedure.

215

December 2007 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Standards Forum & Standards Actions Page 1 December 2007 The Standards Forum & Standards Actions Page 1 December 2007 Continued on next page Technical Standards Program Manager's Note 1 Teaching Standards Development- Inspiring the Next Generation 2 The EPA Radiation Standard for Spent-Fuel Storage in a Geological Repository 3 Expanded Access to Hydrogen Codes and Standards 4 Really Following the Building Code 6 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 7

216

Zero emission coal  

SciTech Connect

We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

218

Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

Biruduganti, Munidhar S. (Naperville, IL); Gupta, Sreenath Borra (Naperville, IL); Sekar, R. Raj (Naperville, IL); McConnell, Steven S. (Shorewood, IL)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

India's challenge of improving the living standards of its growing population through a low-emission development calls for early adaptation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) though the available  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-emission development calls for early adaptation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) though the available storage, sequestration or overseas shipment of CO .2 Rudra Kapila and Jon Gibbins getting India ready for carbon capture to become clearer, and the only way to contain it is, if fossil fuels are used, to employ carbon capture

220

The Response of the Auto Industry and Consumers to Changes in the Exhaust Emission and Fuel Economy Standards (1975-2003): A Historical Review of Changes in Technology, Prices and Sales of Various Classes of Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

income, inflation, and fuel prices over the same timeHistorical review of the effect of fuel prices and macro-because of the high fuel prices. When the CAFE standards

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan; Chen, Belinda

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

May 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2

222

Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...samples followed by GC analysis has been used in both laboratory scale reactors and full-scale plants...two laboratory scale reactors. Foley et al. [23...measurements. Combining the analyses of both the microsensor...significantly increases the reliability of data. Similar to...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reductions Emissions Reductions Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reductions Grants The Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program (Program) provides incentives to cover the incremental cost of purchasing engines and

224

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from pulverized-coal utility boilers using medium- to high-sulfur US coal. The prototype SCR facility, built in and around the ductwork of Plant Crist Unit 5, consisted of three large SCR reactor units (Reactors A, B, and C), each with a design capacity of 5,000 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) of flue gas, and six smaller reactors (Reactors D through J), each with a design capacity of 400 scfm of flue gas. The three large reactors contained commercially available SCR catalysts as offered by SCR catalyst suppliers. These reactors were coupled with small-scale air preheaters to evaluate (1) the long-term effects of SCR reaction chemistry on air preheater deposit formation and (2) the impact of these deposits on the performance of air preheaters. The small reactors were used to test additional varieties of commercially available catalysts. The demonstration project was organized into three phases: (1) Permitting, Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Preparation, and Preliminary Engineering; (2) Detail Design Engineering and Construction; and (3) Operation, Testing, Disposition, and Final Report Preparation. Section 2 discusses the planned and actual EMP monitoring for gaseous, aqueous, and solid streams over the course of the SCR demonstration project; Section 3 summarizes sampling and analytical methods and discusses exceptions from the methods specified in the EMP; Section 4 presents and discusses the gas stream monitoring results; Section 5 presents and discusses the aqueous stream monitoring results; Section 6 presents and discusses the solid stream monitoring results; Section 7 discusses EMP-related quality assurance/quality control activities performed during the demonstration project; Section 8 summarizes compliance monitoring reporting activities; and Section 9 presents conclusions based on the EMP monitoring results.

NONE

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Diesel Particulate Filters and NO2 Emission Limits | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Filters and NO2 Emission Limits Diesel Particulate Filters and NO2 Emission Limits EPAs New air quality standards for NO2 will impact future DPF designs deer09ibrahim.pdf More...

226

CAFE Standards (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Pursuant to the Presidents announcement of a National Fuel Efficiency Policy, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EPA have promulgated nationally coordinated standards for tailpipe Carbon Dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions and fuel economy for light-duty vehicles (LDVs), which includes both passenger cars and light-duty trucks. In the joint rulemaking, the Environmental Protection Agency is enacting CO2-equivalent emissions standards under the Clean Air Act (CAA), and NHTSA is enacting companion Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Conservation Standards Enforcement | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation Standards Enforcement Conservation Standards Enforcement Conservation Standards Enforcement The Office of the General Counsel is working to ensure that manufacturers of consumer products and commercial equipment meet the nation's conservation standards. Through its new focus on enforcement, the Department of Energy will save money for consumers and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. "For the sake of our environment and our economy, it's critical that we enforce our energy efficiency regulations," said Scott Blake Harris, former DOE General Counsel. "Strong enforcement of the rules will encourage compliance and keep manufacturers who break the law from having a competitive advantage over manufacturers who play by the rules." DOE enforces the energy and water conservation standards

228

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation by Erica Bickford A dissertation rights reserved. #12;Abstract Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford.S. transportation is the largest source of national nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and the third largest source

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

229

MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1 , L. Loyon2 , F. Guiziou2 , P to measure emissions factors of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from stored pig slurry and measured the variations of the emissions in time and space. In 2006, dynamic

Boyer, Edmond

230

Engine performance and exhaust emissions from a diesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Carbon monoxide emissions increased by an average 15% using B5 and by an average of 19% using B100. Hydrocarbon emissions decreased by 14% using B5 and by 26% using B100. Nitrogen oxide emissions decreased by four percent with B5, five percent with B20...

Powell, Jacob Joseph

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Metal Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal oxides are the class of materials having the widest application in gas sensors. This chapter presents information related to the application of various metal oxides in gas sensors designed on different p...

Ghenadii Korotcenkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

233

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clothes Washers Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential clothes washers since 1988. Residential clothes washers use a water solution of soap and/or detergent and mechanical agitation or other movement to clean clothes. These include automatic, semi-automatic, and "other" clothes washers (known collectively as "clothes washer products"). This category does not include commercial clothes washers used in commercial settings, multifamily housing, or coin laundries. Standards put in place in 1994, 2004, and 2007 will save approximately 16.4 quads of energy and result in approximately $346.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2036. The standards will avoid about 870.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 170.6 million automobiles.

234

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential room air conditioners since 1987. Residential room air conditioners are mounted in windows or through walls and deliver conditioned air to enclosed spaces. Room air conditioners typically extract heat from the room and vent it outdoors. These products are offered in a broad range of sizes and configurations. They are used in homes, apartments, and commercial settings. The standard implemented in 1990 will save approximately 0.7 quads of energy and result in approximately $8 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1990-2019. The standard will avoid about 41.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 8.1 million automobiles.

235

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of packaged terminal air conditioners and heat pumps since 1994. Packaged terminal air conditioners (PTACs) and packaged terminal heat pumps (PTHPs) are through-the-wall space conditioning units commonly used in lodging, townhouse office complexes, and extended care facilities. The current standard will save approximately 0.04 quads of energy and result in approximately $32 million in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2012-2042. The standard will avoid about 2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 392,000 automobiles.

236

March 2007 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2007 March 2007 Continued on next page TSP Manager's Notes 1 Domestic Programs (American National Standards) Overview 2 Aerospace Industry Advocates Standards Selection Based on Technical Merit, Not Semantics 3 Report Recommends Withdrawal of OMB Risk Assessment Bulletin 4 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 5 Topical Committee Developments 6 Welcome Aboard the TSMC! 7 Standards Actions 8 DOE Standards Actions 8

237

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

238

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Blend Biodiesel Blend Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Blend Standards Biodiesel blends are considered compliant with Texas Low Emissions Diesel Fuel (TxLED) regulations if the diesel fuel is compliant with TxLED

239

Snowmobile Contributions to Mobile Source Emissions in Yellowstone National Park  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1984?Arctic?Cat?Panthere ... light-duty carsa ... a?Car and truck distinction based on U.S. emissions certification standards derived from vin information. ...

Gary A. Bishop; Jerome A. Morris; Donald H. Stedman

2001-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the source of energy for producing ethanol from corn. TheWe assume that ethanol is priced for energy relative tocorn ethanol in gCO2e/liter Price of coal energy 0.0020 ($/

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pollution Markets with Imperfectly Observed Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the advantages of pollution permit markets over traditional standard regulations when the regulator has incomplete information on firms emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in large cities). Because...

Montero, Juan-Pablo

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

September 2004 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16 Cancellation in Progress - 3 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http:tis.eh.doe.govtechstds September 2004 The Standards Forum and...

243

May 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Actions 1 Standards Actions 1 New Projects and Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2

244

Radon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR,-Wendy Barnaby (August 28) writes on the problem of radon emission from the tailings of uranium milling in Sweden. This problem would arise from ... that has to be treated. She describes Professor Robert O. Pohl's report that "radon can escape more easily from the broken ground of a mine than from an undisturbed ...

SVEN-ERIC BRUNNSJO

1975-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

245

September 2006 Standards Forum/Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2006 September 2006 TSP Manager's Notes 1 TEN YEARS AFTER THE NTTAA: 1996-2006 2 Committee on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Approves Two New Standards 4 Renewable Portfolio Standards Help Wind Industry to Sail 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 5 World Standards Day 2006 in

246

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ceiling Fans Ceiling Fans Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has had the authority to regulate the energy efficiency level of ceiling fan since 2005. A ceiling fan is a "nonportable device that is suspended from a ceiling for circulating air via the rotation of fan blades" (42 U.S.C. 6291(49)). The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) amended the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA) setting standards for ceiling fans. DOE will conduct an analysis of energy, emission and cost reductions when it reviews these standards in future rulemakings. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information

247

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Commercial and Industrial Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Pumps are used in agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. Currently there are no energy conservation standards for pumps. The Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct an analysis of the energy use, emissions, costs, and benefits associated with this equipment during the commercial and industrial pumps energy conservation standards rulemaking. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document. 78 FR 7304 (Feb. 1, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking page.

248

Separate determination of PM10 emission factors of road traffic for tailpipe emissions and emissions from abrasion and resuspension processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Little is known about the relevance of mechanically produced particles of road traffic from abrasion and resuspension processes in relation to the exhaust pipe particles. In this paper, emission factors of PM10 and PM1 for light and heavy-duty vehicles were derived for different representative traffic regimes from concentration differences of particles and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in ambient air upwind and downwind of busy roads, or alternatively of kerbsides and nearby background sites. Hereby, PM1 was interpreted as direct exhaust emissions and PM10-PM1 as mechanically produced emissions from abrasion and resuspension processes. The results show that abrasion and resuspension processes represent a significant part of the total primary PM10 emissions of road traffic. At sites with relatively undisturbed traffic flow they are in the same range as the exhaust pipe emissions. At sites with disturbed traffic flow due to traffic lights, emissions from abrasion/resuspension are even higher than those from the exhaust pipes.

Robert Gehrig; Matz Hill; Brigitte Buchmann; David Imhof; Ernest Weingartner; Urs Baltensperger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Effects of Future Ship Emissions in the North Sea on Air Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By means of model simulations with the chemistry transport model CMAQ the influence of ship emissions in the North Sea on concentrations ... and nitrogen oxides over Europe was investigated. Ship emissions for th...

Armin Aulinger; Volker Matthias

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

China Cools with Tighter RAC Standards  

SciTech Connect

After boiling summer brought brown-out to most part of the country in 2004, China announced a new set of minimum energy efficiency standards for room air conditioners in September 2004, with the first tier going into effect on March 1, 2005 and the reach standard taking effect on January 1, 2009. This represents a milestone in China's standard setting process since the reach standard levels are significantly more stringent than previous standards for other appliances. This paper first analyzes cost-effectiveness of China's new standards for room air conditioners, and then attempts to evaluate the impact of the new standards on energy savings, electric generation capacity, and CO2 emissions reductions.

Lin, Jiang; Rosenquist, Gregory

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

City of Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings City of Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Asheville In April 2007, the Asheville City Council adopted carbon emission reduction goals and set LEED standards for new city buildings. The council committed to reducing carbon emissions by 2% per year until the city reaches an 80%

252

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels Exhaust emissions from engines operating in advanced combustion modes such as PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) and HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) are analyzed with an array of analytical tools. Furthermore, emissions from a variety of alternative fuels and mixtures thereof with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels are also measured. In addition to measuring the criteria pollutants nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HCs) are also measured and categorized based on chemistry. These chemical details of the emissions provide important information for optimizing combustion processes to maximize fuel efficiency while minimizing emissions

253

Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems  

SciTech Connect

Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2004 FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 199, STANDARDS FOR SECURITY Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology A new Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS), recently approved by the Secretary of Commerce, will help federal agencies

255

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

SciTech Connect

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

April 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 New Projects and Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status

257

Cow power: the energy and emissions benefits of converting manure to biogas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report consists of a top-level aggregate analysis of the total potential for converting livestock manure into a domestic renewable fuel source (biogas) that could be used to help states meet renewable portfolio standard requirements and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the US, livestock agriculture produces over one billion tons of manure annually on a renewable basis. Most of this manure is disposed of in lagoons or stored outdoors to decompose. Such disposal methods emit methane and nitrous oxide, two important GHGs with 21 and 310 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide, respectively. In total, GHG emissions from the agricultural sector in the US amounted to 536 million metric tons (MMT) of carbon dioxide equivalent, or 7% of the total US emissions in 2005. Of this agricultural contribution, 51 to 118 MMT of carbon dioxide equivalent resulted from livestock manure emissions alone, with trends showing this contribution increasing from 1990 to 2005. Thus, limiting GHG emissions from manure represents a valuable starting point for mitigating agricultural contributions to global climate change. Anaerobic digestion, a process that converts manure to methane-rich biogas, can lower GHG emissions from manure significantly. Using biogas as a substitute for other fossil fuels, such as coal for electricity generation, replaces two GHG sourcesmanure and coal combustionwith a less carbon-intensive source, namely biogas combustion. The biogas energy potential was calculated using values for the amount of biogas energy that can be produced per animal unit (defined as 1000 pounds of animal) per day and the number of animal units in the US. The 95 million animal units in the country could produce nearly 1 quad of renewable energy per year, amounting to approximately 1% of the US total energy consumption. Converting the biogas into electricity using standard microturbines could produce 88 20billion kWh, or 2.4 0.6% of annual electricity consumption in the US. Replacing coal and manure GHG emissions with the emissions from biogas would produce a net potential GHG emissions reduction of 99 59million metric tons or 3.9 2.3% of the annual GHG emissions from electricity generation in the US.

Amanda D Cullar; Michael E Webber

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

October 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Actions 1 Standards Actions 1 New Projects and DOE Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program

259

nitrogen oxides | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279720 Varnish cache server nitrogen oxides Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

260

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for residential central air conditioners and heat pumps since 1992. Residential central air conditioners and heat pumps are installed as part of a home's central heating and cooling system. They use ducts to distribute cooled or dehumidified air to more than one room. Residential central air conditioners and heat pumps include split system central air conditioners and heat pumps; single package central air conditioners, small-duct high-velocity products, and space constrained products. The standards mandatory in 1992 and 1993 will save approximately 2.9 quads of energy and result in approximately $29 billion in energy bill savings from 1993-2023. The standard will avoid about 160 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 31.4 million automobiles.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

November 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical DOE Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Revisions 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association

262

April 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Projects and Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 Technical Standards Published 2 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical

263

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement Number 13425)NPBF Effects on PM OxidationNPBF Effects on EGR System Performance Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels:...

264

Preliminary GHG Emissions Inventory for the Slovak Republic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a greenhouse gas emissions inventory for the Slovak Republic. The key gases included are carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Chlorofluorocarbons are excluded ...

Katarna Mare?kova; Pavol Bielek; Stanislav Kucirek

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

September 2005 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page September 2005 Page September 2005 TSP Manager's Notes 1 The Halo Effect: American National Standards and the rest 2 Standards Development for Report- ing of Declarable Substances 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 8 DOE Revises "Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health

266

The Standard Model Beyond the Standard Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

physics with top quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions 1 The Standard Model Building block quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions Building block The particles and forces The Standard Model the Standard Model New physics with top quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions Building block

267

December 2006 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2006 December 2006 TSP Manager's Notes 1 Meeting In The Middle 2 Plain Talk for a New Generation 3 Licensing New Nuclear Power Plants 4 ANSI Government Affairs Overview 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 7 Topical Committee Developments 8 Welcome Aboard the TSMC! 8 Standards Actions 9 DOE Standards Actions 9

268

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

003, June 2007, Figure 7-20, GHG Emissions for Electricity.68 5.1 Interactions with AB1493 (Pavley) GHG standards for50 Table 3-4: Selected estimates of GHG emissions

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

003, June 2007, Figure 7-20, GHG Emissions for Electricity.68 5.1 Interactions with AB1493 (Pavley) GHG standards for50 Table 3-4: Selected estimates of GHG emissions

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Drastic reduction of engine-out emissions and complicated aftertreatment system comprising of oxidation catalyst, particulate filter, and DeNOx catalyst are implemented to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 limits for U.S. market diesel engines.

271

Standards Actions, July 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Program Document Status 07-01-2002 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 46 Out for Comment - 14 Published this Month - 2 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 11 Reaffirmation in Progress - 12 Cancellation Pending - 7 Cancellation in Progress - 1 No Current Action - 19 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Published 1 American National Standards Institute 2 American Society for Testing and Materials International 4 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- July 2002 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated

272

Standards Actions, May 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-2001 30-2001 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 39 Out for Comment - 19 Published this Month - 0 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 4 Reaffirmation in Progress - 23 Cancellation Pending - 9 Cancellation in Progress - 18 No Current Action - 12 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standards Proposed for Reaffirmation 1 Proposed Cancellation of DOE Technical Standards 2 Published DOE Technical Standards 3 American National Standards Institute 3 American National Standards 6 American Society for Testing and Materials 6 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. May 2001 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated

273

DOE Technical Standards Program Standards Actions Newsletter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* * New DOE Standard, Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements * Workshops and Events * The Annual Energy Facility Contractors Group Safety Analysis Workshop * 2012 Chemical Safety and Life Cycle Management Workshop * Nuclear Safety- Related Standards Activity INSIDE THIS ISSUE April 2012 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ New DOE Standard, Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has a challenging mission to solve many problems posed by the legacy of the Cold War, including the transportation of unprecedented amounts of contaminated waste,

274

Elastic emission polishing  

SciTech Connect

Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

May 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Revisions 1 DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 04-27-2005 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 25

276

DOE Approved Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Technical Standards Program promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards at DOE, manages and facilitates DOE's efforts to develop and maintain necessary technical standards, and communicates information on technical standards activities to people who develop or use technical standards in DOE.

277

Ptmetal oxide aerogel catalysts: X-ray photoemission investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray photoemission spectroscopy was used to study Ptmetal oxide aerogel catalysts that have been developed to respond to increased NO x emissions of lean-burn engines. Lean-burn engines critical components of low and zero emission vehicles produce much higher levels of engine-out NO x and current three-way catalytic converters are not sufficient to meet Clean Air Act standards. Platinum catalysts were formed by the reaction of modified Pt coordination compounds with selected transitionmetal alkoxides through solgel techniques into aerogels. Photoemission measurements of the Pt 4f Si 2p Ti 2p O 1s and C 1s core lines were used to evaluate the chemistry of the material after each processing step. Results indicate PtO bonding and reduced Pt disbursed in the aerogel. In addition Si 2p Ti 2p and O 1s binding energies indicate an oxo-bridged network structure.

A. J. Nelson; John G. Reynolds; R. D. Sanner; P. R. Coronado; L. M. Hair

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of metal halide lamp fixtures since 2007. A metal halide lamp fixture uses a metal halide lamp and a metal halide lamp ballast. The lamp is the light source and the ballast starts and regulates current. Metal halide fixtures or lighting systems provide lighting for parking lots and streets, flood lighting, athletics facilities, big-box stores, and warehouses. The current standards will save approximately 6.4 quads of energy and result in approximately $9.6 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2009-2038. The standard will avoid about 93.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

279

Environmental Standardization for Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Standardization for Sustainability by Professor John W. Bagby College of Information that environmental controls are expressed as environmental standards, a traditional driver of investment in pollution control. Environmental standards spur investment in green technologies that promise to stimulate

Bagby, John

280

February 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

April 2011 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3009 3009 Revision * DOE Standard 1066 Revision * New DOE Standards Projects * Incidents of Security Concern Technical Standard * Explosives Safety * Operations Assessment Field Handbook * Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources Program * Occurrence Reporting Causal Analysis Guide * Nuclear Safety-Related Standards Activity INSIDE THIS ISSUE April 2011 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE Standard 3009 Revision The Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance (HS-21), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted workshops in January and March to support a major revision of Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3009, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor

282

Codes and Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Currently, thirteen U.S. and two international standards development organizations (SDOs) are developing and publishing the majority of the voluntary domestic codes and standards. These...

283

Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1: Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1. Data set prepared by J.T. Randerson, G.R. van der Werf, L. Giglio, G.J. Collatz, and P.S. Kasibhatla. This data set provides monthly burned area, and monthly and annual fire emissions data from July 1996 to February 2012. Emissions data are available for carbon (C), dry matter (DM), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), particulate matter 2.5 micron (PM2p5), total particulate matter (TPM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) among others. The C4 fraction of

284

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOBILE6 Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm Cost: Free References: http://www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Particulate Matter (PM), and toxics from cars, trucks, and motorcycles under various conditions. MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon

285

May 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2009 May 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

286

February 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2009 February 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

287

July 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

288

May 2010 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

289

REDD+ Social and Environmental Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REDD+ Social and Environmental Standards REDD+ Social and Environmental Standards Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: REDD+ Social and Environmental Standards Agency/Company /Organization: The Nature Conservancy, The Rainforest Alliance, Wildlife Conservation Society, Conservation International, CARE Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.climate-standards.org/redd+/docs/june2010/REDD_Social_Environmenta References: REDD+ Social and Environmental Standards[1] Standards "While activities that reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) and contribute to conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (REDD+) have the

290

Kinetics of Diesel Nanoparticle Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation rates in air of diesel nanoparticles sampled directly from the exhaust stream of a medium-duty diesel engine were measured over the temperature range of 800?1140 C using online aerosol techniques. ... Particulate emission from diesel engines is currently a topic of great concern from both pollution and public health standpoints. ... In addition, the fundamental carbon-to-hydrogen ratio may be different in diesel particles as compared to the commonly used surrogates (15). ...

Kelly J. Higgins; Heejung Jung; David B. Kittelson; Jeffrey T. Roberts; Michael R. Zachariah

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

291

Generation of gaseous tritium standards  

SciTech Connect

The determination of aqueous and non-aqueous tritium in gaseous samples is one type of determination often requested of radioanalytical laboratories. This determination can be made by introducing the sample as a gas into a sampling train containing two silica gel beds separated by.a catalytic oxidizer bed. The first bed traps tritiated water. The sample then passes into and through the oxidizer bed where non-aqueous tritium containing species are oxidized to water and other products of combustion. The second silica gel bed then traps the newly formed tritiated water. Subsequently, silica gel is removed to plastic bottles, deionized water is added, and the mixture is permitted to equilibrate. The tritium content of the equilibrium mixture is then determined by conventional liquid scintillation counting (LSC). For many years, the moisture content of inert, gaseous samples has been determined using monitors which quantitatively electrolyze the moisture present after that moisture has been absorbed by phosphorous pentoxide or other absorbents. The electrochemical reaction is quantitative and definitive, and the energy consumed during electrolysis forms the basis of the continuous display of the moisture present. This report discusses the experimental evaluation of such a monitor as the basis for a technique for conversion of small quantities of SRMs of tritiated water ({sup 3}HOH) into gaseous tritium standards ({sup 3}HH).

Hohorst, F.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Furnaces and Boilers Residential Furnaces and Boilers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential furnaces and boilers since 1987. Residential furnaces and boilers include gas, electric, and oil-fired furnaces and boilers that are used to provide central heating to residential dwellings. Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through the house using ducts. Boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Steam is distributed via pipes to steam radiators, and hot water can either be distributed via baseboard radiators, radiant floor systems, or can heat air via a coil. The standards for residential furnaces and boilers implemented in 1992 will save approximately 3.9 quads of energy and result in approximately $46.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1992-2021. The standard will avoid about 206 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 40.4 million automobiles.

293

Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Control R&D Emission Control R&D The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research and development of aftertreatment technologies to control advanced combustion engine exhaust emissions. All engines that enter the vehicle market must comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's emissions regulations. Harmful pollutants in these emissions include: Carbon monoxide Nitrogen oxides Unburned hydrocarbons Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) Particulate matter The energy required for emission control often reduces vehicle fuel economy and increases vehicle cost. VTO's Emission Control R&D focuses on developing efficient, durable, low-cost emission control systems that complement new combustion strategies while minimizing efficiency losses. VTO often leverages the national laboratories' unique capabilities and facilities to conduct this research.

294

December 2005 Standards Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page December 2005 Page December 2005 TSP Manager's Notes 1 Overview of the U.S. Standardization System 2 A Call for Greater Collaboration 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 6 Topical Committee Developments 7 Welcome Aboard the TSMC! 8 DOE Standards Actions 9 Non-Government Standards

295

CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS TELECOMMUNICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS Published JANUARY 2002 January 2002 Page 1 of 137 #12;CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS January 2002 Page 2 of 137 FOREWARD Approval to CR Telecommunications Standards. · The format of this document has been changed to resemble

California at Davis, University of

296

Technical Standards Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Technical Standards Program (TSP) promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards by the Department of Energy (DOE), provides DOE with the means to develop needed technical standards, and manages overall technical standards information, activities, issues, and interactions. Cancels DOE O 1300.2A. Canceled by DOE O 252.1A

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

297

Facilities Management CAD Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facilities Management CAD Standards 2011 #12;Facilities Management CAD Standards Providing: Layering Standards 2.1 Layer Name Format 2.2 Layer Name Modifiers 2.3 Layer Attributes 2.4 Special Layer of PDF and DWG Files APPENDIX A: DAL FM CAD Standard Layers APPENDIX B: DAL FM CAD Special Layers

Brownstone, Rob

298

Environmental Services Standard Tasks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Environmental Services Operations Standard Tasks The primary function of Environmental Services developed and implemented standard custodial tasks that meet industry standards. The standards are as follows: Exterior Building Cleaning Daily Clean ash urns Clean entry area glass Clean steps and remove

299

Technical Standards Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. Admin Chg 1 dated 3-12-13.

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

March 2006 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 March 2006 1 March 2006 TSP Manager's Notes 1 New ISO Policy Provides International Solutions to Market Needs 2 Plain Talk for a New Generation 5 The Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards within the Department of Energy 7 Two Change Notices for DOE Standard 1104 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

February 2013 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter U . S . D E PA R T M E N T O F O ffi ce O f nuclear SaFety ENERGY inSide thiS iSSue * Featured DOE Technical Standards Activities * DOE Technical Standards Cost- Savings and Access Improvement Initiative * Domestic and International Nuclear Energy Voluntary Consensus Standards Needs * Nuclear Safety- Related Standards Activity Featured dOe technical StandardS activitieS DOE Technical Standards Cost-Savings and Access Improvement Initiative By Helen Todosow, Brookhaven National Laboratory The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Managers (TSM) are actively exploring ways to save the government and tax payers' money while at the same time significantly improving efficiencies in access and use of voluntary consensus

302

Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650C to 800C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650C to 760C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

Holcomb, Gordon R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NETL Publication Standards Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards NETL Publication Standards Manual Publication Standards Manual Click on topic below to view Click "Contents" in the bookmarks panel at the left of your screen to return to this page Introduction * Overview * About This Manual - Point of Contact - Download Files - Permission - Signage - Special Applications Publication Standards * Design Elements * Fact Sheets * Font (Typeface) * Full-Size Brochures * Logo * Presentations * Report Covers NETL Publication Standards Manual Overview For over 60 years, we have been at the forefront

304

Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards... for contact recreation use. Preliminary public comment plus input from the Surface Water Quality Standards Advisory Work Group have provided guidance on options available for revising the standards, said Jim Davenport, leader of the TCEQ Water Quality...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions ... Life cycle GHG emissions were found to decrease by less than 4% in almost all scenarios modeled. ... Resulting changes in fuel use, life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides are estimated. ...

Aranya Venkatesh; Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimating Biomass Burnt and CarbonEstimating Biomass Burnt and Carbon Emissions from Large Wildfires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Biomass Burnt and CarbonEstimating Biomass Burnt and Carbon Emissions from Large: Global Biomass Burning & Carbon Emissions Standard Emissions Inventories: Burned Area & GFED recently daily. Fire occurrenceoccurrence Roy et al.Roy et al. Carbon emissions (C) = burned area . fuel

307

Correlation between speciated hydrocarbon emissions and flame ionization detector response for gasoline/alcohol blends .  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. renewable fuel standard has made it a requirement to increase the production of ethanol and advanced biofuels to 36 billion by 2022. Ethanol will be capped at 15 billion, which leaves 21 billion to come from other sources such as butanol. Butanol has a higher energy density and lower affinity for water than ethanol. Moreover, alcohol fueled engines in general have been shown to positively affect engine-out emissions of oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide compared with their gasoline fueled counterparts. In light of these developments, the variety and blend levels of oxygenated constituents is likely to increase in the foreseeable future. The effect on engine-out emissions for total hydrocarbons is less clear due to the relative insensitivity of the flame ionization detector (FID) toward alcohols and aldehydes. It is well documented that hydrocarbon (HC) measurement using a conventional FID in the presence of oxygenates in the engine exhaust stream can lead to a misinterpretation of HC emissions trends for alcohol fuel blends. Characterization of the exhaust stream for all expected hydrocarbon constituents is required to accurately determine the actual concentration of unburned fuel components in the exhaust. In addition to a conventional exhaust emissions bench, this characterization requires supplementary instrumentation capable of hydrocarbon speciation and response factor independent quantification. Although required for certification testing, this sort of instrumentation is not yet widely available in engine development facilities. Therefore, an attempt is made to empirically determine FID correction factors for oxygenate fuels. Exhaust emissions of an engine fueled with several blends of gasoline and ethanol, n-butanol and iso-Butanol were characterized using both a conventional FID and a Fourier transform infrared. Based on these results, a response factor predicting the actual hydrocarbon emissions based solely on FID results as a function of alcohol type and content is presented. Finally, the correlation derived from data presented in this study is compared with equations and results found in the literature.

Wallner, T. (Energy Systems)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Laboratory Method For Measuring The Ozone Emission From In-duct Air Cleaners.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Emission rate, HVAC air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators, coronas, standard test method 1 Introduction and to ozone byproducts. Currently there are standards and regulations that limit ozone emissions from portable cleaners (i.e., Viner et al., 1992), are generally exempt from standards and regulations because

Siegel, Jeffrey

309

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 6, October--December, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 5, July--September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 2, October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 3, January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, First quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

This project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 (LS-2) located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This quarterly update provides a description of the flow modeling study. This modeling effort centers on evaluating the in-furnace flow and mixing phenomena for the various low NOx firing systems being demonstrated at LS-2. Testing on the 1/12 scale model of the LS-2 boiler and the 1/6 scale model of the overfire air ductwork was completed. The test matrix included an analysis of the overfire air ductwork and three different boiler configurations. This report also contains results from the Phase 1 baseline tests. Data from the diagnostic, performance, and verification tests are presented. In addition, NOx emissions data and unit load profiles collected during long-term testing are reported. At the full load condition, the baseline NOx emission level at LS-2 is 0.62 lb/mBtu.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Process development for a field emission structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

self-aligned process technology has been developed to fabricate field emis- sion structures using standard semiconductor fabrication procedures. Arrays of field emission diode structures incorporating silicon cathodes have been fabricated... already been fa. bricated. The aim of' this research is focused on developing a process technology to fabri- cate field emission structures incorporating a low work function cathode material. In addition, this technology must allow for adjustable anode...

Legg, James Derek

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mercury emissions during cofiring of sub-bituminous coal and biomass (chicken waste, wood, coffee residue, and tobacco stalk) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor  

SciTech Connect

Four types of biomass (chicken waste, wood pellets, coffee residue, and tobacco stalks) were cofired at 30 wt % with a U.S. sub-bituminous coal (Powder River Basin Coal) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor. A cyclone, followed by a quartz filter, was used for fly ash removal during tests. The temperatures of the cyclone and filter were controlled at 250 and 150{sup o}C, respectively. Mercury speciation and emissions during cofiring were investigated using a semicontinuous mercury monitor, which was certified using ASTM standard Ontario Hydra Method. Test results indicated mercury emissions were strongly correlative to the gaseous chlorine concentrations, but not necessarily correlative to the chlorine contents in cofiring fuels. Mercury emissions could be reduced by 35% during firing of sub-bituminous coal using only a quartz filter. Cofiring high-chlorine fuel, such as chicken waste (Cl = 22340 wppm), could largely reduce mercury emissions by over 80%. When low-chlorine biomass, such as wood pellets (Cl = 132 wppm) and coffee residue (Cl = 134 wppm), is cofired, mercury emissions could only be reduced by about 50%. Cofiring tobacco stalks with higher chlorine content (Cl = 4237 wppm) did not significantly reduce mercury emissions. Gaseous speciated mercury in flue gas after a quartz filter indicated the occurrence of about 50% of total gaseous mercury to be the elemental mercury for cofiring chicken waste, but occurrence of above 90% of the elemental mercury for all other cases. Both the higher content of alkali metal oxides or alkali earth metal oxides in tested biomass and the occurrence of temperatures lower than 650{sup o}C in the upper part of the fluidized bed combustor seemed to be responsible for the reduction of gaseous chlorine and, consequently, limited mercury emissions reduction during cofiring. 36 refs., 3 figs. 1 tab.

Yan Cao; Hongcang Zhou; Junjie Fan; Houyin Zhao; Tuo Zhou; Pauline Hack; Chia-Chun Chan; Jian-Chang Liou; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (USA). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

August 2001 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-31-2001 7-31-2001 Activity Summary In Conversion-4 In Preparation-43 Out for Comment-17 Published this Month-0 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress-6 Reaffirmation in Progress-23 Cancellation Pending-4 Cancellation in Progress-12 Proposed for Cancellation-13 No Current Action-11 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Project Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standard Recently Reaffirmed 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published 2 American National Standards Institute 2 American National Standards 4 American Society for Testing and Materials 5 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- August 2001 Standards

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

November 2000 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2000 November 2000 Standards Technical Standards Program Document Status Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site: http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated If you have any questions or are interested in participating in the development of these standards, please contact the representatives listed below. Complete listings of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status are given on the Technical Standards Pro- gram (TSP) Web Site referenced at the bottom of this page. To access these lists from the home page, click on “DOE Technical Standards,” then click on “Projects” in the left- hand frame to show the links to the project lists. The following DOE Technical Standards projects were recently initiated: • Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds, Project Number OCSH-

322

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle Fuel Economy and GHG Emission Standards Around theVehicle Industry to Reduce GHG Emissions in Canada Part of2 (After Various Areas of GHG Actual Ethanol Mobile Light

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Impact of Canadas Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle Fuel Economy and GHG Emission Standards Around theVehicle Industry to Reduce GHG Emissions in Canada Part of2 (After Various Areas of GHG Actual Ethanol Mobile Light

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Third quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving 50% NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level 1 long-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Review - 2011 (so far) Tim Johnson October 4, 2011 DOE DEER Conference, Detroit JohnsonTV@Corning.com 2 Summary * California LD criteria emission regs are tightening....

326

Standards Actions, February 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published 1 Non-Government Standards 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 5 American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) 6 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 11 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 12 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 01-23-2004 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 36 Out for Comment - 23 Published in January - 3 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 13 Reaffirmation in Progress - 26 Cancellation Pending - 1 Cancellation in Progress - 3 No Current Action - 0 Inside This Visit the Technical Standards Program

327

July 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 06-28-2005 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 21 Out for Comment - 10 Published in June - 2 5-year Review Status Proposed for Revision-6 Revision in Progress-3

328

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Submittal - 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,500 km2 (1,350 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi)north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

Stuart Black; Yvonne Townsend

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Are Renewables Portfolio Standards Cost-Effective Emission Abatement Policy?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Big?Spring?Wind?Power ... We compare the power output from a year of electricity generation data from one solar thermal plant, two solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, and twenty Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) wind farms. ...

Katerina Dobesova; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

Nucleic Acid Standards - Standard Ref. Frame  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Reference Standard Reference Standard Reference Frame Supplemental Information Ideal Geometries X-PLOR Parameters Valence Geometries RNA Ontology Consortium mmCIF Resources PDBML Resources A Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-pair Geometry A common point of reference is needed to describe the three-dimensional arrangements of bases and base pairs in nucleic acid structures. [1]. For example, parts of a structure, which appear "normal" according to one computational scheme, may be highly unusual according to another and vice versa. It is thus difficult to carry out comprehensive comparisons of nucleic acid structures and to pinpoint unique conformational features in individual structures. In order to resolve these issues, a group of

331

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Title Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Edward J. Dlugokencky, Colm Sweeney, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 39 Issue 16 Keywords atmospheric transport, inverse modeling, nitrous oxide Abstract We estimate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Central California for the period of December 2007 through November 2009 by comparing N2O mixing ratios measured at a tall tower (Walnut Grove, WGC) with transport model predictions based on two global a priori N2O emission models (EDGAR32 and EDGAR42). Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models. Regression analyses show that the slopes of predicted on measured N2O from both emission models are low, suggesting that actual N2O emissions are significantly higher than the EDGAR inventories for all seasons. Bayesian inverse analyses of regional N2O emissions show that posterior annual N2O emissions are larger than both EDGAR inventories by factors of 2.0 ± 0.4 (EDGAR32) and 2.1 ± 0.4 (EDGAR42) with seasonal variation ranging from 1.6 ± 0.3 to 2.5 ± 0.4 for an influence region of Central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. These results suggest that if the spatial distribution of N2O emissions in California follows the EDGAR emission models, then actual emissions are 2.7 ± 0.5 times greater than the current California emission inventory, and total N2O emissions account for 8.1 ± 1.4% of total greenhouse gas emissions from California.

332

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology January 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative technology that could potentially help some coal-based power generation facilities comply with anticipated new mercury emissions standards was successfully demonstrated in a recently concluded milestone project at a Michigan power plant. Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), WE Energies demonstrated the TOXECON(TM) process in a $52.9million project at the Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Mich. TOXECON is a relatively cost-effective option for achieving significant reductions in mercury emissions and increasing the

333

Oxidation of Propane by Doped Nickel Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... present study, however, indicate that in the absence of excess oxygen, direct oxidation of propane by the oxide lattice can occur.

D. W. McKEE

1964-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

334

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Near-Zero Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Project No.: DE-NT0005341 Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment. Praxair Inc. will develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing coal-fired power plants retrofit with oxy-combustion technology. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and mercury (Hg) will be reduced by at least 99 percent, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions will be reduced by greater than 90 percent without the need for wet flue gas desulfurization and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Two separate processes are proposed depending on the sulfur content of the coal. For high-sulfur coal, SO2 and NOx will be recovered as product sulfuric acid and nitric acid, respectively, and Hg will be recovered as

335

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site, calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1992 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to an member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

Diediker, L.P.; Johnson, A.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K.; Klages, D.L.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rokkan, D.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

337

Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

Wohadlo, S.; Abbasi, H.; Cygan, D. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)] Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Standards Actions, July 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-27-2001 6-27-2001 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 42 Out for Comment - 15 Published this Month - 1 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 4 Reaffirmation in Progress - 2 Supersedure in Progress - 6 Cancellation Pending - 8 Cancellation in Progress - 2 No Current Action - 35 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Project Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standard Recently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standard Recently Published 1 American National Standards Institute 2 American National Standards 3 American Society for Testing and Materials 4 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. July 2001 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated

340

Standards Actions - April 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-28-2002 3-28-2002 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 44 Out for Comment - 13 Published this Month - 2 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 4 Reaffirmation in Progress - 2 Supersedure in Progress - 6 Cancellation Pending - 8 Cancellation in Progress - 2 No Current Action - 35 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Project Canceled 1 DOE Technical Standard Recently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Published 2 American National Standards Institute 2 American Society for Testing and Materials International 4 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- April 2002 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Project Canceled

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

February 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Technical Standards Program Document Status 1-18-2005 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 25 Out for Comment - 10 Published in January - 3 5-year Review Status Proposed for Revision-6 Revision in Progress-4 Proposed for Reaffirmation-3 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellation Pending-16 Cancellation in Progress-0 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ February 2005 Standards Actions 1.0 DOE Standards Actions The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) web page at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects,

342

July 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 06-28-2006 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 23 Out for Comment - 14 Published in June - 0 5-year Review Status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed for Reaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellation Pending-9 Cancellation in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/ techstds/ July 2006 Standards Actions 1.0 DOE Standards Actions The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) web page at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects,

343

January 2012 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* DOE Conduct of Operations Standards Revisions * New DOE Standards Projects * DOE Handbook of Operational Safety and Analysis Techniques * Nuclear Safety- Related Standards Activity INSIDE THIS ISSUE January 2012 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE Conduct of Operations Standards Revisions In the early 1990s, the Department of Energy (DOE) developed 17 technical standards to support DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The standards (STDs), listed below, provided examples, good practices, and expanded explanations of the topics in each chapter of the Order. In June 2010, the Order was revised and issued as DOE Order 422.1, Conduct of Operations. The

344

Detailed Information Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this standard is to increase the required information that must accompany any parts submitted to the Registry of Standard Biological Parts. This will give users of the parts better assurance of their ...

Culviner, Peter

2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

345

Clothing Quality Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clothing construction is a creative skill with certain standards for appearance and construction. This publication describes the standards that apply to general construction techniques such as preparing the fabric, creating darts and gathers...

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARD INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS The region should acquire all electric energy conservation measure designed model conservation standards to produce all electricity savings that are cost, architectural styles, and so forth) found in typical buildings constructed before the first standards were

347

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Title Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Kean, Andrew J., David Littlejohn, George Ban-Weiss, Robert A. Harley, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Melissa M. Lunden Journal Atmospheric Environment Abstract Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 ± 6%, from 640 ± 40 to 400 ± 20 mg kg-1. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

348

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

349

Enforcing Emissions Trading when Emissions Permits are Bankable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose enforcement strategies for emissions trading programs with bankable emissions permits that guarantee...

John K. Stranlund; Christopher Costello

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

November 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 10-25-2006 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 23 Out for Comment - 16 Published in September - 0 5-year Review Status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6

351

Practical implications of marine diesel engine emission regulations  

SciTech Connect

The main pollutants from marine diesel engines are oxides of nitrogen (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx) and particulates (soot). However, the proposed marine diesel engine emission regulations will primarily focus on the levels of NOx and SOx. In the future, once the proposed regulations are met, the limits and levels of other emissions will come under increasing scrutiny, such as particulates, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Regardless of the type of pollutant, there are generally two classes of emission control: (1) techniques that reduce the amount of pollutant formed in the combustion process, or (2) prevent the pollutants from reaching the atmosphere. Unfortunately, some of these control techniques will not be able to meet the incoming regulations. Therefore, this paper identifies the diesel engine emissions of concern, the impending regulations, and the merits of current and future emission control technologies required to meet these regulations.

Bowen, C.E.; Potter, I.J.; Reader, G.T. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Excellent oxidation endurance of boron nitride nanotube field electron emitters  

SciTech Connect

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are considered as a promising cold electron emission material owing to their negative electron affinity. BNNT field emitters show excellent oxidation endurance after high temperature thermal annealing of 600?C in air ambient. There is no damage to the BNNTs after thermal annealing at a temperature of 600?C and also no degradation of field emission properties. The thermally annealed BNNTs exhibit a high maximum emission current density of 8.39?mA/cm{sup 2} and show very robust emission stability. The BNNTs can be a promising emitter material for field emission devices under harsh oxygen environments.

Song, Yenan [Department of Micro/Nano Systems, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Ho [Nano Electron-Source Creative Research Center, Creative and Challenging Research Division, ETRI, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Milne, William I. [Electrical Engineering Division, Engineering Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Jin Lee, Cheol, E-mail: cjlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Micro/Nano Systems, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

353

Measurement and Meaning of Oxidatively Modified DNA Lesions in Urine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...commercially available kits presently on the market. Two are available from JICA, named...oxidative stress-inducing agents, such as diesel emission particles or potassium bromate...Moller P, et al. Repeated inhalations of diesel exhaust particles and oxidatively damaged...

Marcus S. Cooke; Ryszard Olinski; and Steffen Loft

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

SORORITY LIFE COMMUNITY STANDARDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& FRATERNITY SORORITY LIFE COMMUNITY STANDARDS & GREEK JUDICIAL BOARD HANDBOOK 2013 OFFICE Judicial Board Handbook 2 I. COMMUNITY STANDARDS Fraternity & Sorority Life is one of the most rewarding Councils have standards of conduct for all chapters and their members. It is the responsibilty of every

Hone, James

355

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 81. Carbon diioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2007 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 82. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 83. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rate of Increase in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Slows in the Projections Even with rising energy prices, growth in energy use leads to increasing

356

Grain-size effects in nanoscaled electrolyte and cathode thin films for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to their high energy conversion efficiencies and low emissions, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) show promise as a replacement for combustion-based electrical generators at (more)

Peters, Christoph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Multiwavelength Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

358

Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors Final Rule, TSD, Chapter 15  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48 48 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors March 2010 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR SMALL ELECTRIC MOTORS TABLE OF CONTENTS 15.1 INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................................1 15.2 AIR EMISSIONS ANALYSIS............................................................................................1 15.2.1 Air Emissions Descriptions......................................................................................1 15.2.1.1 Sulfur Dioxide................................................................................................... 2

359

Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EAS performance results following 500 DeSOx CyclesMeets Off-Road Final Tier 4 and HD On-road Emission Standards

360

Electrical Properties of Tungsten Oxide Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... appear that the mechanism of electron emission with oxide films is different from that with roughened electrodes. This would be the case for short gaps if the electrons were drawn ... located on the upper surface of the film, as envisaged by Paetov1, while with roughened electrodes it is possible that photo-ionization can take place throughout the gap due to ...

F. LLEWELLYN JONES

1946-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

April 2004 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE Technical Standards recently sent for coordination 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published 1 Non-Government Standards 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 7 American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) 8 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 12 National Fire Protection Association 12 ry DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 03-26-2004 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 37 Out for Comment - 21 Published in March - 2 5-Year Review Status Revision in Progress - 13 Reaffirmation inProgress - 26 Cancellation Pending - 1

362

Standards Actions - August 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Standards Technical Standards Program Document Status (2000-07-31) (2000-07-31) (2000-07-31) (2000-07-31) (2000-07-31) Activity Summary In Conversion – 4 In Preparation – 32 Out for Comment – 15 Published this Month – 1 5-year Reviews Revisions in Progress – 3 Reaffirmations in Progress – 0 Supersedures in Progress – 6 Cancellations Pending – 8 Cancellations in Progress – 2 No Current Action – 35 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site: http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE Technical Standards Project Initiated If you have any questions or are interested in participating in the development of this standard, please contact the person listed below. Complete listings of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status are given in the Web Site referenced at the bottom of this page. To access these

363

April 2008 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-27-2008 3-27-2008 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 24 Out for Comment - 26 Published in March - 0 Five Year Review status Proposed for Revision-4 Revision in Progress-3 Proposed for Reaffirmation-0 Reaffirmation in Progress-20 Cancellations Pending-6 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclear safety/techstds/ April 2008 Standards Actions 1.0 DOE Standards Actions The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) web page at http://hss.energy.gov/nuclear safetytechstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose

364

Appliance Efficiency Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Appliance Efficiency Standards Part 2 of 2: Policy process and consumer gains Part 1 of this article (CBS News, Spring 1995) discussed LBNL's role in setting federal appliance efficiency standards and presented an overview of the net national benefits of standards. Here, we examine the broader policy context for appliance standards and consumer benefits. Policy Context Appliance efficiency standards provide a minimum requirement for energy efficiency at the point of manufacture (or import). These standards seek to overcome market failures-including price distortions and transaction costs-that have historically given rise to a gap between observed and attainable product efficiencies. In this way, appliance standards complement information programs, utility DSM and other incentive programs,

365

July 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-27-2007 6-27-2007 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 27 Out for Comment - 24 Published in June - 0 5-year Review status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed forReaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellations Pending-9 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://hss.energy.gov/nuclear safetytechstds/ July 2007 Standards Actions 1.0 DOE Standards Actions The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) web page at http://hss.energy.gov/nuclear safetytechstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose

366

IHS Standards Expert  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards » Standards » IHS IHS Standards Expert1354608000000IHS Standards ExpertLANL researchers can access IHS Standards from offsite via Remote Access./No/Question? 667-5809library@lanl.gov IHS Standards Expert LANL researchers can access IHS Standards from offsite via Remote Access. Login For each collection (society), one person may access pdfs at a time, per the Library's subscription license. Please free up the collection for another user when finished: download or print your pdf, then Log Out. FAQs How do I use IHS? IHS Basic Tutorial (pdf) - see more on the "Training & Support" tab within IHS Contact IHS Customer support, 800-447-3352 (our Customer Support ID Number is 5926584) Contact the Research Library at 7-5809 or library@lanl.gov What if full-text is not available?

367

OSHA: Standards and Recordkeeping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OSHA: Standards & OSHA: Standards & Record keeping Frances E. Humphrey, CRNP, COHN-5/CM DOE Headquarters January 17, 2002 .. DOL Organizational Chart History of OSHA +11/14n8: Lead Standard Published * 5/23/80: Medical & Exposure Records Standard Finalized * 7/2/82: Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP) Created +11/25/83: HazCom Standard Promulgated * 9/1/89: Lockout/Tagout Standard Issued OSHA Mission Statement * "The mission of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is to save lives, prevent injuries and protect the health of America's workers" {OSHA, 2001) History of OSHA +12/29nO: President Nixon signed Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 * 5129n1: First Standards Adopted * 1/17n2: OSHA Training Institute Established * Nov-Dec 1972: First State Plans Approved

368

Derived Concentration Technical Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

196-2011 196-2011 April 2011 DOE STANDARD DERIVED CONCENTRATION TECHNICAL STANDARD U.S. Department of Energy AREA ENVR Washington, D.C. 20585 Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1196-2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Derived Concentration Technical Standard was a collaborative effort sponsored by the DOE Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, with support from Department subject matter experts (SMEs) in the field of radiation protection. This standard, which complements DOE Order (O) 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, was developed taking

369

Standards Actions, May 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-29-2002 4-29-2002 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 47 Out for Comment - 12 Published this Month - 6 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 10 Reaffirmation in Progress - 12 Supersedure in Progress - 0 Cancellation Pending - 7 Cancellation in Progress - 1 No Current Action - 20 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Proposed for Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Published 1 American National Standards Institute 2 American Society for Testing and Materials International 4 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- May 2002 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Proposed for Reaffirmation The following documents are currently being reevaluated under the 5-year

370

May 2008 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-25-2008 4-25-2008 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 24 Out for Comment - 26 Published in April - 2 Five Year Review status Proposed for Revision-4 Revision in Progress-3 Proposed for Reaffirmation-0 Reaffirmation in Progress-20 Cancellations Pending-6 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclear safety/techstds/ May 2008 Standards Actions 1.0 DOE Standards Actions The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) web page at http://hss.energy.gov/nuclear safetytechstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose

371

Standards Actions - August 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Standards Technical Standards Program Document Status (2000-07-31) (2000-07-31) (2000-07-31) (2000-07-31) (2000-07-31) Activity Summary In Conversion – 4 In Preparation – 32 Out for Comment – 15 Published this Month – 1 5-year Reviews Revisions in Progress – 3 Reaffirmations in Progress – 0 Supersedures in Progress – 6 Cancellations Pending – 8 Cancellations in Progress – 2 No Current Action – 35 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site: http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE Technical Standards Project Initiated If you have any questions or are interested in participating in the development of this standard, please contact the person listed below. Complete listings of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status are given in the Web Site referenced at the bottom of this page. To access these

372

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Title Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6541E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Greenblatt, J. Date Published 10/2013 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 μm) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

373

Modeling of Particulate Matter Emissions from Agricultural Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In this research, a process was developed to determine distances from emitting sources to where the estimated concentrations were less than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). These distances are a function of emission rates and meteorological...

Bairy, Jnana 1988-

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

Industrial emissions cause extreme urban ozone diurnal variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...network of large coal-fired power plants. Anthropogenic...treatment of standard gas-phase and heterogeneous...emissions from utility power plants located to the...Description of the Fifth Generation Penn State/National...

Renyi Zhang; Wenfang Lei; Xuexi Tie; Peter Hess

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

International Environmental Agreements: Emissions trade, safety valves and escape clauses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5 Escape clauses versus safety valves 13 6 Review of "standard model" of IEAs 14 6.1 Dynamics The effect of emissions trade on IEA participation 17 7.1 Ex ante heterogenous countries

Karp, Larry S.

376

Standard and non-standard primordial neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard cosmological model predicts the existence of a cosmic neutrino background with a present density of about 110 cm^{-3} per flavour, which affects big-bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background anisotropies, and the evolution of large scale structures. We report on a precision calculation of the cosmic neutrino background properties including the modification introduced by neutrino oscillations. The role of a possible neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry and the impact of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions on the relic neutrinos are also briefly discussed.

P. D. Serpico

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

377

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 8, April--June, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Photochemical Modeling of Emissions Trading of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds in Houston, Texas. 2. Incorporation of Chlorine Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of the State Implementation Plan for attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality has created a Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOC) Emissions Cap and Trade Program for ...

Linlin Wang; Tammy Thompson; Elena C. McDonald-Buller; David T. Allen

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

Influence of different configurations of a catalyst and a trap on particulate emission of a diesel passenger car  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New particulate emission measurements performed on a diesel passenger car to see the influence of different configurations of after-treatment systems are reported. Five combinations of a particle trap and an oxidation catalyst are investigated. These configurations are discussed in view of particulate emission, measured by number and mass. All measurements were carried out at a chassis dynamometer of the EMPA. A diesel passenger car with an IDI engine was operated at four steady state conditions. Exhaust gas was diluted in a standard constant volume sampler (CVS) device (full flow dilution tunnel). Particulate size distributions were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and gravimetric measurements were performed according to regulations. Furthermore, measurements without CVS tunnel were done by using external dilution units to see the influence of the sampling method. We used a thermo desorber to distinguish volatile and non-volatile aerosol fractions and we analysed filter samples for determination of organic soluble fraction, water-soluble fraction and sulphur content. Huge differences depending on the configuration of the after-treatment system and load were observed. In general it was found that a large reduction of particulate emission could be obtained by using a particle trap. A catalyst converter has minor effect on particulate emission. Nucleation of new particles was observed under certain conditions depending on configuration and sampling method.

Urs Lehmann; Martin Mohr

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 CAD Standards Guideline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 1 CAD Standards;CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION (pg.3) CAD Standards Survey/GIS Standards Design Standards 1.0.0 CAD STANDARDS CHECKLIST (pg.4) 2.0.0 CAD

Hanson, Stephen José

382

Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The guide presents topics pertaining to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers. Background information about various types of commercially available boilers is provided along with discussion about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and other important selection considerations. It is part of a suite of publications offered by the Department of Energy to improve steam system performance.

383

Standards Actions, October 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Initiated Project Initiated If you have any questions or are interested in participating in the development of this standard, please contact the representatives listed below. Complete listings of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status are given in the Technical Standards Pro- gram (TSP) Web Site referenced at the bottom of this page. To access these lists from the home page, click on “DOE Technical Standards,” then click on “Projects” in the left- hand frame to show the links to the project lists. The following DOE Technical Standards project was recently initiated: • Hoisting and Rigging Standard, Project Number SAFT-0077. This project is being pre- pared by the Hoisting and Rigging Technical Advisory Committee (HRTAC). If you de- sire to participate in this project, please contact your site representative to the HRTAC

384

October 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publication Staff Roster 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 09-26-2006 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 24 Out for Comment - 16 Published in September - 1 5-year Review Status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed for reaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellation Pending-9 Cancellation in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/ techstds/ October 2006 Standards Actions 1.0 DOE Standards Actions The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) web page at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. To access

385

Jenseits des Standard Modells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Standard Model The Standard Model Unngelöste Rätsel Jenseits des Standard Modells Das Standard Modell gibt auf viele Fragen, über Struktur und Stabilität der Materie eine Antwort. Dazu braucht es nur die sechs Sorten von Quarks und Leptonen und die vier fundamentalen Kräfte. Aber das Standard Modell ist nicht vollständig; es gibt noch viele unbeantwortete Fragen. Eigentlich sollten wir aus Gründen der Symmetrie im Weltraum gleichviel Materie wie Antimaterie beobachten. Wir finden aber praktisch nur normale Materie! Warum? Woraus besteht die "Dunkle Materie", die wir nicht sehen können, die aber im Universum sichtbare Gravitationswirkungen zeigt? Warum kann das Standard Modell die Massen der Teilchen nicht vorhersagen? Sind Quarks and Leptonen wirklich fundamentae Teilchen, oder sind sie aus noch elementareren Partikeln aufgebaut?

386

February 2001 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Technical Standards Program Document Status Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site: http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 35 Out for Comment - 18 Published this Month - 1 FY 2001 5-year Reviews Revisions in Progress - 2 Reaffirmations in Progress - 2 Supersedures in Progress - 6 Cancellations Pending - 11 Cancellations in Progress - 33 No Current Action - 16 DOE Technical Standards Project Canceled If you have any questions about this action, please contact the person listed be- low. The following DOE Technical Standards project was recently canceled: * EM Facility Hazard Categorization, Project Number SAFT-0029; EM Technical Standards Manager, John Serocki, 301-903-7999, John.Serocki@em.doe.gov, or Tom Wright, 301-903-3661, Tom.Wright@em.doe.gov. The need for this

387

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

PurposeThis procedure provides guidance on the conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs), also referred to as non-Government standards.

389

Approved DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

approved-doe-technical-standards Forrestal Building approved-doe-technical-standards Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 205851.800.dial.DOE en DOE-STD-1150-2013 http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/doe-std-1150-2013 DOE-STD-1150-2013

390

August 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 07-27-2007 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 27 Out for Comment - 24 Published in June - 0 5-year Review status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed for Reaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellations Pending-9 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at

391

October 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 09-27-2007 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 26 Out for Comment - 27 Published in September - 0 5-year Review status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed for Reaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellations Pending-9 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at

392

April 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notices 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 1 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 3-28-2005 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 25 Out for Comment - 11 Published in March - 0 5-year Review Status Proposed for Revision-6 Revisions in Progress-4 Proposed for Reaffirmation-3 Reaffirmations in Progress-24 Cancellations Pending-11 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards

393

Codes and Standards Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

TheFuel Cell Technologies Office works with code development organizations, code officials, industry experts, and national laboratory scientists to draft new model codes and equipment standards...

394

Appliance Standards Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The federal government, and some states, have established minimum efficiency standards for certain appliances and equipment, such as refrigerators and clothes washers.

395

National Certification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard for the Geothermal Heat Pump Industry Principal Investigator John Kelly Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium GSHP Demonstration Projects May 18, 2010 This...

396

State Building Energy Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In June 2007, South Carolina enacted legislation (the Energy Independence and Sustainable Construction Act of 2007) to promote effective energy and environmental standards for construction,...

397

August 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 07-26-2006 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 22 Out for Comment - 16 Published in July - 2 5-year Review Status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed for reaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellation Pending-9 Cancellation in Progress-0

398

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of medium base compact fluorescent lamps since 2005. Medium base compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or bulbs are the often curly, screw-in versions of the long tube fluorescent lights commonly found in kitchens or garages. CFLs are available in a range of light colors, including incandescent-like "warm" tones. Some CFLs are encased in a bulb-shaped cover to further diffuse the light. These can be used with clamp-on lampshades. CFLs can provide the same lighting as traditional incandescent bulbs for reading and room lighting. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) amended Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA) setting energy conservation standards for medium base compact fluorescent lamps. DOE will conduct an analysis of energy, emission and cost reductions when it reviews these standards in future rulemakings.

399

Nucleic Acid Standards - Standard Ref. Frame  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Standard Reference Frame for the Description A Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-pair Geometry Supplementary Material The report is available at Journal of Molecular Biology (2001) 313: 229 - 237 and The Nucleic Acid Cartesian coordinates for A, C, G, T, and U in the optimized reference frame Adenine, Cytosine, Guanine, Thymine, Uracil Standard chemical structures taken from Clowney et al. (1996), J. Am. Chem. Soc., 118, 509-518). These data do not include C1' atoms, which are placed here in the least-squares plane of the base atoms, with the purine C1'-N9 bond length and C1'-N9-C4 valence angle set respectively to 1.46 Å and 126.5° and the pyrimidine C1'-N1 bond and C1-N1-C2 angle to 1.47 Å and 118.1°. These distances and angles are based on the average glycosyl

400

Bureau of Energy Efficiency Standard & Labelling (India) Website | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bureau of Energy Efficiency Standard & Labelling (India) Website Bureau of Energy Efficiency Standard & Labelling (India) Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bureau of Energy Efficiency Standard & Labelling (India) Website Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.beeindia.in/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/bureau-energy-efficiency-standard-lab Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Voluntary Appliance & Equipment Labeling Regulations: "Building Codes,Energy Standards,Incandescent Phase-Out" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

June 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page 1 June 2006 Page 1 June 2006 Technical Standards Program Manager's Note 1 Safety for Electrical Workers 2 Significant Federal Laws and Policies 3 Clearance of Solid Materials from Nuclear Facilities 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 6 Topical Committee Developments 7 From the ANSI Web site 8 Don't Get "Board" With

402

Keeping up standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......24 Two major security standards have been revised to...2:2002 introduces a plan-docheck-act cycle...each section are: ? Plan: define the scope of...implemented controls, review the levels of residual...This became a British Standard in 1995 (BS 7799......

Willie List

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Universal software safety standard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper identifies the minimum subset required for a truly universal safety-critical software standard. This universal software standard could be used in but is not limited to the following application domains: commercial, military and space ... Keywords: software safety, system safety, validation, verification

P. V. Bhansali

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Introduction Format Proprietaire -Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Code for Information Interchange) 4. Unicode IFT-1215 Stefan Monnier 7 #12;BCD IFT-1215 Stefan MonnierSOMMAIRE Introduction Format Propri´etaire -Standard Code Alphanum´erique Entr´ee Alphanum : !, ?, ", (, . . . · Caract`eres sp´eciaux : *, $, ¿, . . . Quelques standards utilis´es pour les coder en binaires 1. BCD

Monnier, Stefan

405

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

406

Emissions from Ships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Turbine and Diesel) Engine Exhaust Emission...of relative fuel consumption. For commercial...Marine Diesel Engine and Gas Turbine...Turbine and Diesel) Engine Exhaust Emission...of relative fuel consumption. For commercial...

James J. Corbett; Paul Fischbeck

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Introduction to Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter constitutes an introduction to emissions trading. First, we detail the latest developments ... Second, we introduce the main characteristics of emissions trading, be it in terms of spatial and...2 al...

Dr. Julien Chevallier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Synthesis and characterizations of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide nanosheets  

SciTech Connect

Interest in graphene on its excellent mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties, its very high specific surface area, and our ability to influence these properties through chemical functionalization. Chemical reduction of graphene oxide is one of the main routes of preparation for large quantities of graphenes. Hydrazine hydrate used as reducing agent to prepare for the reduced graphene oxide (RGO). There are a number of methods for generating graphene and chemically modified graphene from natural graphite flakes, graphite derivative (such as graphite oxide) and graphite interaction compounds (i.e. expandable graphite). Here we review the use of colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with large scalable, and is adaptable to a wide variety of applications. The graphene oxide (GO) and the reduced material (RGO) were characterized by XRD, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and Field emission Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) etc.

Venkanna, M., E-mail: venkanna.pcu@gmail.com; Chakraborty, Amit K., E-mail: venkanna.pcu@gmail.com [Carbon Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, M.G. Avenue, Durgapur - 713209 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hydrogen Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards James Ohi National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Background The development and promulgation of codes and standards are essential if hydrogen is to become a significant energy carrier and fuel because codes and standards are critical to establishing a market-receptive environment for commercializing hydrogen-based products and systems. The Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), with the help of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) and other key stakeholders, are coordinating a collaborative national effort by government and industry to prepare, review, and promulgate hydrogen codes and standards needed to expedite hydrogen infrastructure development. The

410

Gold Standard Program Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gold Standard Program Model Gold Standard Program Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Gold Standard Program Model Agency/Company /Organization: World Wildlife Fund Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.cdmgoldstandard.org/project-certification/rules-and-toolkit Cost: Paid Related Tools Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ProForm ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A bottom-up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects and voluntary programs that result in verifiable co-benefits. Approach It is a bottom up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects as well as voluntary programs that result in verifiable

411

Maintaining Standards: Differences between the Standard Deviation and Standard Error, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintaining Standards: Differences between the Standard Deviation and Standard Error, and When to Use Each David L Streiner, PhD1 Many people confuse the standard deviation (SD) and the standard error of the findings. (Can J Psychiatry 1996;41:498­502) Key Words: statistics, standard deviation, standard error

California at Santa Cruz, University of

412

The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - June 2001 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - June 2001 The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - June 2001 The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - June 2001 The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - June 2001 Inside this issue: Should DOE Organizations Include DOE O 252.1 in their Contracts?....................................................... 1 Metrology/Accreditation Personnel and Nuclear Weapons Complex Managers Take Action Addressing Current Issues at Joint Annual Meeting........................................................................ 1 A Note from the Manager........................................................................................................................ 2 Welcome Aboard the TSMC!..................................................................................................................

413

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement.

414

About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About the Appliance and About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Buildings Technologies Office sets minimum energy efficiency standards for approximately 50 categories of appliances and equipment used in homes, businesses, and other applications, as required by existing law. The appliances and equipment covered provide services that are used by consumers and businesses each day, such as space heating and cooling, refrigeration, cooking, clothes washing and drying, and lighting. DOE's minimum efficiency standards significantly reduce U.S. energy demand, lower emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants, and save consumers billions of dollars every year, without lessening the

415

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement...

Jin, Xin

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

SciTech Connect

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbates storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

SciTech Connect

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbates storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Effects of diesel-water emulsion combustion on diesel engine NOx emissions. Final report, 1 January 1998--1 May 1999  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the effects of combusting a mixture of diesel fuel, water, and surfactant on the nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from a compression ignition diesel engine. Extensive previous research in the literature has attributed the observed reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions to a suppression of flame temperature due to quenching effects from the water, thereby reducing thermal NOx formation. The report highlights the relevant theory, operation, and design parameters of diesel internal combustion engines. Experimental procedures conducted using a Detroit Diesel 4-cylinder diesel engine are discussed. Results from testing diesel fuel with varying ratios of water balanced with a surfactant to stabilize the emulsion are presented and discussed. The data shows significant NOx emission reduction with up to 45 percent water, by volume, in the fuel. These results are correlated with thermodynamic first law and equilibrium combustion products analyses to estimate the adiabatic flame temperature of the standard fuel and fuel-water emulsion cases. Results indicate that thermal NOx is indeed reduced by quenching and flame temperature suppression, confirming reports in the literature. Recommendations are given for further studies, including improving the fuel-water emulsion and considerations for long-term testing.

Canfield, A.C.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Field Demonstration of 0.2 Grams Per Horsepower-Hour (g/bhp-hr) Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) Natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: · Reducing health and environmental impacts from air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions related pollution and greenhouse gas emissions beyond applicable standards, and that benefit natural gas ratepayers of nitrogen (NOx) emission standard of 0.20 g/bhp-hr for heavy duty engines to reduce levels of this critical

420

January 2008 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 12-27-2007 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 22 Out for Comment - 26 Published in December - 4 5-year Review status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed for Reaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellations Pending-9 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclear safety/techstds/

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

November 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 10-29-2007 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 24 Out for Comment - 30 Published in October - 0 5-year Review status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed for Reaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellations Pending-9 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://hss.energy.gov/nuclear safetytechstds/

422

Mechanical Systems Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61-2008 61-2008 June 2008 DOE STANDARD MECHANICAL SYSTEMS QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1161-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1161-2008 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1161-2008 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................1

423

February 2008 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 01-28-2008 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 22 Out for Comment - 24 Published in January - 3 5-year Review status Proposed for Revision-5 Revision in Progress-6 Proposed for Reaffirmation-1 Reaffirmation in Progress-21 Cancellations Pending-9 Cancellations in Progress-0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclear safety/techstds/

424

Sonication standard laboratory module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Standards Development Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

CALiPER test results and analyses are used to support the development of standards and test procedures for SSL especially those related to complex areas such as flicker, dimming, power quality, and long-term performance. In addition, DOE hosts annual CALiPER roundtables attended by representatives from industry, independent test laboratories, and key standards-setting groups to solicit input on test results and procedures and additional testing needs for SSL. The roundtable meetings provide an opportunity for these diverse groups to gather and discuss complex issues and standards development efforts related to SSL testing, and these targeted working sessions have paid off in the form of accelerated progress.

426

ORIGINAL PAPER Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions Pascal Boeckx negative to positive. We studied the short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions. We site, an intermediately aerated Luvisol in Belgium, were similar. Nitrous oxide and CO2 emissions were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

427

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

428

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the LaBrea Area: Year 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the LaBrea Area: Year 2 Mitchell J. Williams 140 Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-4 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions compared to the standard error of the mean measurements. #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions

Denver, University of

429

Determining the Volatility of Ultrafine (UF) PM Emissions from CNG Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions beyond applicable standards, and that benefit natural health and environmental impacts from air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions related to natural gas. Limited research has been done to characterize compressed natural gas (CNG) mass emissions and practically

430

Plutonium metal and oxide container weld development and qualification  

SciTech Connect

Welds were qualified for a container system to be used for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxide. Inner and outer containers are formed of standard tubing with stamped end pieces gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welded onto both ends. The weld qualification identified GTA parameters to produce a robust weld that meets the requirements of the Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94, ``Criteria for the Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides.``

Fernandez, R.; Horrell, D.R.; Hoth, C.W.; Pierce, S.W.; Rink, N.A.; Rivera, Y.M.; Sandoval, V.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs Massachusetts's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation authorized the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy (DTE)* to require certain electricity providers to disclose details on their fuel mix and emissions to end-use customers. In February 1998, the DTE issued final rules requiring competitive suppliers and distribution companies providing standard offer generation service or default generation service to provide this information to customers quarterly and upon request. * In 2007, the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy

432

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Minnesota Department of Commerice In September 2002, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued an order requiring the state's regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers details on the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation. Utilities must provide this information to customers in a standard format twice annually. Utilities may distribute this information to customers electronically. Disclosure information must also be filed with the PUC. In addition, in 2009, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency began to transition to an inventory data management system that consolidates

433

USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS Purpose This procedure identifies the process by which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction of DOE and contractor employees with Standards Development Organizations (SDOs). Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interaction with Standards Development Organizations (TSPP-03) More Documents & Publications DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interaction with Standards Development Organizations - August 1, 2000 DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with Non-Government Standards Bodies - July 1, 2009

434

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

International Standards for Telecommunications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article International Standards for Telecommunications M. B. Williams As soon as telegraph...surprising that the International Telecommunications Union, the forum for world-wide...and evolution of all branches of telecommunications. Increasingly, the distinction...

M. B. Williams

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Technical Standards Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes the DOE Technical Standards Program. Cancels DOE O 252.1 and DOE G 252.1-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-13 cancels DOE O 252.1A.

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

437

NETL Focused Standards List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safeguards and Security Program DOE Order 3750.1, Workforce Discipline DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1030-96, Guide to Good...

438

FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD  

SciTech Connect

This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

439

Approved DOE Technical Standards  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ehss908241 Approved DOE Technical Standards en DOE-STD-3009-2014 http:energy.govehssdownloadsdoe-std-3009-2014

440

Reliability Standards Owner  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This position is located in the Internal Operations and Asset Management group of Planning and Asset Management (TP). A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Reliability Standards...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Title Standards 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards 2001 Standards 2001 A guide for the preparation of title evidence in land acquisitions by the United States of America. Quick links to Contents: Table of Contents / Why Title Standards 2001, and who uses it? / Evidence of title / Abstract of Title Supplemental and Supporting Title Evidence / Title Insurance Policies and Certificates of Title / Final Title Evidence Title Evidence for Condemnations / The Deed to the United States / Special Standards for Texas / Sample Forms U.S. Department of Justice Environment and Natural Resources Division Land Acquisition Section Washington, D.C. 20530 December 29, 2000 (reprint March 23, 2001) [Editor's Note: The reprint of March 23, 2001, added page numbers to the table of contents; added a new item "3" to part B of Form # 1 of the Certificate of Inspection and Possession,

442

Standard costs for labor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STANDARD COSTS FOR LABOR A Thesis By MD. NURUL ABSAR KHAN Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texms in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Administration and the government of East Pakistan. CONTENTS Chapter Page I. Introduction and Prelisd. nary Discussion II. Installation and Accounting Aspects of Standard Costs for Labor III, Recording~ Analysing and Reporting of Labor Vaxlances . 45 IV...

Khan, Mohammed Nurul Absar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

444

Thermal emission in the ultrastrong coupling regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study thermal emission of a cavity quantum electrodynamic system in the ultrastrong-coupling regime where the atom-cavity coupling rate becomes comparable the cavity resonance frequency. In this regime, the standard descriptions of photodetection and dissipation fail. Following an approach that was recently put forward by Ridolfo et al.[arXiv:1206.0944], we are able to calculate the emission of systems with arbitrary strength of light matter interaction, by expressing the electric field operator in the cavity-emitter dressed basis. Here we present thermal photoluminescence spectra, calculated for given temperatures and for different couplings in particular for available circuit QED parameters.

A. Ridolfo; M. Leib; S. Savasta; M. J. Hartmann

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

445

DOE/EA-1664: Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 430 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps (June 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps June 2009 16-i CHAPTER 16. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 16.1 INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................... 16-1 16.2 AIR EMISSIONS ANALYSIS...................................................................................... 16-1 16.2.1 Air Emissions Descriptions............................................................................................ 16-1 16.2.2 Air Quality Regulation................................................................................................... 16-3 16.2.3 Global Climate Change..................................................................................................

446

ASH EMISSIVITY CHARACTERIZATION AND PREDICTION  

SciTech Connect

The increased use of western subbituminous coals has generated concerns regarding highly reflective ash disrupting heat transfer in the radiant zone of pulverized-fuel boilers. Ash emissivity and reflectivity is primarily a function of ash particle size, with reflective deposits expected to consist of very small refractory ash materials such as CaO, MgO, or sulfate materials such as Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. For biomass fuels and biomass-coal blends, similar reflectivity issues may arise as a result of the presence of abundant organically associated calcium and potassium, which can transform during combustion to fine calcium, and potassium oxides and sulfates, which may act as reflective ash. The relationship of reflectivity to ash chemistry is a second-order effect, with the ash particle size distribution and melting point being determined by the size and chemistry of the minerals present in the starting fuel. Measurement of the emission properties of ash and deposits have been performed by several research groups (1-6) using both laboratory methods and measurements in pilot- and full-scale combustion systems. A review of the properties and thermal properties of ash stresses the important effect of ash deposits on heat transfer in the radiant boiler zone (1).

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Charlene R. Crocker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

IX. Standards for Student Organizations Standards of all Student Organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 of 8 IX. Standards for Student Organizations Standards of all Student Organizations As stated to the same standards of conduct to which students are held on an individual basis. Standards for Fraternities on February 25, 1976 - the University has developed the following standards for fraternity/sorority life

Marsh, David

448

New gas turbine combustor supports emissions limits  

SciTech Connect

Gas Research Institute, in partnership with Allison Engine Co. of Indianapolis, has introduced a natural gas-fired, low-emissions combustor that it says will give customers of industrial gas turbines a least-cost approach for meeting US emissions regulations. The LE IV combustor uses dry, low-nitrogen oxides (DLN) technology to reduce emissions from the Allison 501K industrial gas turbine to 25 parts per million or less (corrected to 15 percent oxygen)--levels that are expected to meet pending federal emissions regulations. GRI is funding similar efforts with other manufacturers of turbines commonly used at pipeline compressor stations and industrial power generation sites. The Allison combustor features a dual operating mode. During the pilot mode of operation, fuel is directly injected into the combustor`s liner where it is consumed in a diffusion flame reaction. During higher power operation, the fuel and air are uniformly premixed in fuel-lean proportions to control NO{sub x} formation. In addition, optimum engine performance is maintained by the dry, lean-mixed combustion technology as it suppresses NO{sub x} formation in the turbine`s combustion section. An added advantage of the LE IV combustor is its ability to lower emissions without any adverse affect on engine performance and operations, according to GRI> The combustor is available as either a retrofit or as an option on a new engine.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NETL: News Release - Meeting Mercury Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 18, 2001 June 18, 2001 Meeting Mercury Standards DOE Selects 6 Projects to Develop Cost-Saving Technologies for Curbing Mercury Emissions from Coal Power Plants Power Plant with Fish - MORGANTOWN, WV - With President Bush's National Energy Plan calling for mandatory reductions in the release of mercury from electric power plants - part of the Plan's multi-pollutant reduction strategy - the U.S. Department of Energy today named six new projects to develop innovative technologies that can curb mercury emissions from coal plants more effectively and at a fraction of today's costs. The winning projects were submitted by the University of North Dakota's Energy & Environmental Research Center in Grand Forks; URS Group. Inc., of Austin, TX; CONSOL, Inc., of Library, PA; Southern Research Institute in

450

Technical Standards, Style Guide- August 1, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Style Guide for the Preparation of DOE Technical Standards (Standards, Handbooks, and Technical Standards Lists)

451

Beyond the Standard Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allá del Modelo Standard allá del Modelo Standard Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! El modelo standard explica muchas de las preguntas acerca de la estructura y la estabilidad de la materia, con sus seis tipos de quarks, sus seis tipos de leptones, y sus cuatro fuerzas fundamentales. Sin embargo, el modelo standard es una teoría incompleta porque todavía no puede explicar la naturaleza del mundo en forma completa. ¿Por qué hay tres generaciones de quarks y leptones? ¿Los quarks y leptones son realmente fundamentales, o están constituidos a su vez por partículas aún más fundamentales? ¿Por qué no puede el modelo standard predecir la masa de una partícula? De acuerdo con nuestros experimentos, las cantidades de materia y antimateria en el universo deberían ser iguales; pero, ¿por qué hemos

452

The Standard Cosmological Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Standard Model of Particle Physics (SMPP) is an enormously successful description of high energy physics, driving ever more precise measurements to find "physics beyond the standard model", as well as providing motivation for developing more fundamental ideas that might explain the values of its parameters. Simultaneously, a description of the entire 3-dimensional structure of the present-day Universe is being built up painstakingly. Most of the structure is stochastic in nature, being merely the result of the particular realisation of the "initial conditions" within our observable Universe patch. However, governing this structure is the Standard Model of Cosmology (SMC), which appears to require only about a dozen parameters. Cosmologists are now determining the values of these quantities with increasing precision in order to search for "physics beyond the standard model", as well as trying to develop an understanding of the more fundamental ideas which might explain the values of its parameters. Although it is natural to see analogies between the two Standard Models, some intrinsic differences also exist, which are discussed here. Nevertheless, a truly fundamental theory will have to explain both the SMPP and SMC, and this must include an appreciation of which elements are deterministic and which are accidental. Considering different levels of stochasticity within cosmology may make it easier to accept that physical parameters in general might have a non-deterministic aspect.

Douglas Scott

2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

454

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

455

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

456

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

457

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

458

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard for the Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy 1 Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program A Site Lead is an individual, normally at a senior General Schedule (GS) level or Excepted Service, who is assigned the responsibility to assess and evaluate management systems, safety and health programs, and technical activities associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. Typically, a Site Lead has previously qualified as a Nuclear Safety Specialist or a Senior Technical Safety Manager. For exceptionally qualified individuals,

460

Standard Model Holdout INSIDE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 2, 1997 May 2, 1997 Number 9 f Searching for the Standard Model Holdout INSIDE 2 University Close-Up: Pisa 5 Facilities Managers' Meeting 6 Birth of a Bison Photo by Reidar Hahn An international collaboration at Fermilab sets out to observe the elusive tau neutrino. by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs When two collaborations announced the discovery of the top quark at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 1995, many news outlets erroneously reported that the last remaining piece of the current theory of matter and energy, known as the Standard Model, had been found. What reporters and even a few physicists forgot is that the elusive tau neutrino, while firmly entrenched in the Standard Model, has never been directly observed. In the early 1980s, there was one minor attempt to find the tau neutrino

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oxide emission standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Standards Actions - May 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Canceled Project Canceled The following DOE Technical Standards project was recently canceled. If you have any questions about this action, please contact the person listed below. • Equipment Qualification Program for DOE-Owned Nuclear Facilities and Operations, Project Number FACR-0012; Samuel Rosenbloom, EH-31; 301-903-5749, Fax 301-903- 8693, Samuel.Rosenbloom@eh.doe.gov. The need for this document no longer ex- ists. DOE Technical Standards Recently Published The following DOE Technical Standard has recently been published: • DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, March 2000. This document updates and supersedes DOE-STD-1063-97, October 1997. DOE employees and DOE contractors may obtain copies from the ES&H Technical Infor- mation Services, U.S. Department of Energy; 1-800-473-4375, Fax 301-903-9823.

462

August 1999 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this document is available on the this document is available on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) Internet Site at the URL shown at the bottom of this page. If you wish to comment on this document, please notify your TSM. * Design Criteria Standard for Electronic Records Manage- ment Software, Project Number INFT-0001; Carol Blackston, MA-42; 301-903-4294, FAX 301- 903-4101; Carol.Blackston @hq.doe.gov. Comments are due August 30, 1999. This stan- dard was adapted from the De- partment of Defense standard 5015.2 and tailored for specific DOE use. DOE Documents Recently Published The following DOE document has recently been published: * DOE-HDBK-3027-99, Integrated Safety Management Systems (ISMS) Verification - Team Leader's Handbook, June 1999. DOE employees and DOE contractors may obtain copies from the

463

Standard Review Plan Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Framework for EM Projects Critical Decision (CD) Technical Framework for EM Projects Critical Decision (CD) Milestones Review & Approval Standard Review Plan (SRP) E n v i r o n m e n t a l M a n a g e m e n t DOE - EM - SRP - 2010 2nd Edition Overview March 2010 This page intentionally left blank. Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 1 Standard Review Plan Overview Technical Framework for EM Projects Critical Decision Milestones Review and Approval The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing the design, construction, operation, and eventual disposition of mission-critical projects/facilities. Coupled with this ongoing mission is the added responsibility for EM to diligently leverage and apply American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to accelerate the completion of its

464

Standards Actions - January 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Initiated Projects Initiated The following DOE Technical Standards projects were recently initiated. If you have any questions or are interested in participating in the development of these stan- dards, please contact the per- sons listed below. • Establishing and Maintaining a Facility Representative Pro- gram at DOE Facilities , Project Number MGMT-0003 (revision of DOE-STD-1063-97); David Compton, S-3.1, 202-586-1034, Fax 202-586-3472, David .Compton@hq.doe.gov. • Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Process, Project Number SAFT- 0074 (Revision of DOE-STD- 3015-97); Helmut Filacchione, DP-21, 301-903-7519, Fax 301- 903-8628, Helmut.Filacchione @hq.doe.gov. DOE Technical Standards Project Canceled The following DOE Technical Standards project was recently can- celed. If you have any questions about this action, please contact

465

ORISE: Work Smart Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work Smart Standards Work Smart Standards ORISE Work Smart Standards Set for Environment, Safety, and Health Revision #1, March 21, 2000 Revision #2, Sept. 29, 2000 Revision #3, June 28, 2001 Revision #4, Nov. 9, 2001 Revision #5, Nov. 30, 2001 Revision #6, Jan. 31, 2002 Revision #7, June 28, 2002 Revision #8, Oct. 17, 2002 Revision #9, Nov. 21, 2002 Revision #10, Feb. 28, 2003 Revision #11, May 23, 2003 Revision #12, May 30, 2003 Revision #13, Oct. 30, 2003 Revision #14, Jan. 21, 2004 Revision #15, May 24, 2004 Revision #16, Aug. 17, 2004 Revision #17, Aug. 27, 2004 Revision #18, Oct. 14, 2004 Revision #19, March 28, 2005 Revision #20, May 31, 2005 Revision #21, Aug. 24, 2005 Revision #22, Feb. 17, 2006 Revision #23, March 22, 2006 Revision #24, May 19, 2006 Revision #25, July 26, 2006 Revision #26, Nov. 28, 2006

466

CID Standard Reports  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CID Reports > Standard CID Reports > Standard Reports Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner Standard Reports Radioactive Waste WIMS-1: WASTE STREAM DISPOSITION FORECAST REPORT Adobe PDF Document Detailed waste stream disposition report by reporting site and disposition site that provides forecasted waste disposition volumes. Go directly to WIMS Exit CID Website to generate custom reports. Although WIMS Exit CID Website is a public site you will need to register and provide contact information the first time you enter WIMS Exit CID Website . Contaminated Groundwater GW-1: CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER REPORTS A link to the DOE Groundwater Database web site. This site provides detailed information about groundwater plumes at DOE sites. Information includes contaminants, hydrogeology, and cleanup technologies.

467

Hydrogen Purity Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Association Compressed Gas Association Roger A. Smith Technical Director April 26, 2004 Hydrogen Purity Standard Compressed Gas Association 2 Compressed Gas Association ‹ 150 Members „ Industrial Gas Companies „ Equipment Manufacturers „ Other Gas Industry Associations „ Other SDOs ‹ Manufacturers, Fillers, Distributors, and Transporters of Industrial and Medical Gases Compressed Gas Association 3 Hydrogen Activities ‹ Committees „ Hydrogen Fuel Technology „ Bulk Distribution Equipment „ Hazardous Materials Codes „ Gas Specifications „ Cylinders, Valves & PRD's ‹ International „ Europe (EIGA) „ Japan (JIGA) „ Asia (AIGA) „ United Nations Compressed Gas Association 4 Hydrogen Purity Standard ‹ Draft hydrogen purity standard for stationary fuel cells and ICE's in 10 months

468

Building Technologies Program: About Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Standards to About Standards to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Program: About Standards on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Program: About Standards on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Program: About Standards on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Program: About Standards on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Program: About Standards on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Program: About Standards on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement Rulemakings & Notices Further Guidance ENERGY STAR® Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Learn More. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Learn More. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Learn More.

469

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Tim Johnson October 16, 2012 2 Environmental Technologies Summary * Regulations - LEVIII finalized, Tier 3? RDE in Europe developing and very...

471

EMSL - emission spectra  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emission-spectra en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

472

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

473

New State Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.-State-Funded Buildings ?TAC Rules: ?19.31/?19.32/?19.33/?19.34 ? Chapter 388-TX Health & Safety Code ?Texas Building Energy Performance Stds. ?TAC Rules: ?19.53 ? IECC-IRC 2012 ? SECO Resources ?Q&A 2 CATEE-Dallas 11-09-2011 Texas Design Standards... Chapter 447.004-TX Gov. Code ? State that SECO shall establish and publish mandatory energy and water conservation design standards for each new state building or major renovation project ? SECO shall define ?major renovation project? and shall...

Lopez, F. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys  

SciTech Connect

Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Global and regional drivers of accelerating CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions from fossil-fuel combustion and industrial...flux from fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes...sources: national-level combustion of solid, liquid...oxidation of nonfuel hydrocarbons; and fuel from...renewables, mainly as heat from biomass...

Michael R. Raupach; Gregg Marland; Philippe Ciais; Corinne Le Qur; Josep G. Canadell; Gernot Klepper; Christopher B. Field

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Development of a New Chemiluminescence Detector for Sub-ppm Level Nitrous Oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......atmosphere (15) and sea water (7), sometimes...sub-ppm level atmospheric N2O without any...through a standard gas generator (Model SGGU-72...Lodger, Jr. Atmospheric ni- trious oxide...Measurement of atmospheric nitrous oxide using...oxide in air and water using a 5A molecular......

Shun Araki; Shigetaka Suzuki; Masaaki Yamada; Hiroshi Suzuki; Toshiyuki Hobo

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRsDEAR Crosswalk - February 2, 2002 DOE-STD-1037-93 All Active DOE Technical Standards Document...

478

Apparatus for photocatalytic destruction of internal combustion engine emissions during cold start  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the destruction of emissions from an internal combustion engine wherein a substrate coated with TiO.sub.2 is exposed to a light source in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine thereby catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions between gaseous hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and oxygen in the exhaust of the internal combustion engine.

Janata, Jiri (Richland, WA); McVay, Gary L. (Richland, WA); Peden, Charles H. (West Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Oxidation of propylene over copper oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the study of propylene oxidation. Dunlop (17) reported that small quantities of iron compounds substantially enhanced the catalytic activity of chromia-alumina catalysts with respect to propylene oxidation, Woodharn (72) has suggested that under... between 360 C and 430oC the rate of propane oxidation decreases as the teznperature is increased, and the rate of conversion to olefins, especially propylene, becomes progressively greater. Above 430 C the proportion of propane converted to ethylene in...

Billingsley, David Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

480

Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity  

SciTech Connect

Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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