National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ox yg enates

  1. Overall Photocatalytic Water Splitting with NiOx-SrTiO3 A Revised Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Troy K.; Browning, Nigel D.; Osterloh, Frank

    2012-11-01

    NiOx (0 < x < 1) modified SrTiO3 (STO) is one of the best studied photocatalyst for overall water splitting under UV light. The established mechanism for this and many other NiOx containing catalysts assumes water oxidation to occur at the early transition metal oxide and water reduction at NiOx. Here we show that NiOx-STO is more likely a three component Ni-STO-NiO catalyst, in which STO absorbs the light, Ni reduces protons, and NiO oxidizes water. This interpretation is based on systematic H2/O2 evolution tests of appropriately varied catalyst compositions using oxidized, chemically and photochemically added nickel and NiO nanoparticle cocatalysts. Surface photovoltage (SPV) measurements reveal that Ni(0) serves as an electron trap (site for water reduction) and that NiO serves as a hole trap (site for water oxidation). Electrochemical measurements show that the overpotential for water oxidation correlates with NiO content, whereas the water reduction overpotential depends on Ni content. Photodeposition experiments with NiCl2 and H2PtCl6 on NiO-STO show that electrons are available on the STO surface, not on the NiO particles. Based on photoelectrochemistry, both NiO and Ni particles suppress the Fermi level in STO, but the effect of this shift on catalytic activity is not clear. Overall, the results suggest a revised role for NiO in NiOx-STO and in many other nickel-containing water splitting systems, including NiOx-La:KTaO3, and many layered perovskites.

  2. Complex catalytic behaviors of CuTiOx mixed-oxide during CO oxidation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Hyun You; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-21

    Mixed metal oxides have attracted considerable attention in heterogeneous catalysis due to the unique stability, reactivity, and selectivity. Here, the activity and stability of the CuTiOx monolayer film supported on Cu(111), CuTiOx/Cu(111), during CO oxidation was explored using density functional theory (DFT). The unique structural frame of CuTiOx is able to stabilize and isolate a single Cu+ site on the terrace, which is previously proposed active for CO oxidation. Furthermore, it is not the case, where the reaction via both the Langmuir–Hinshelwood (LH) and the Mars-van Krevelen (M-vK) mechanisms are hindered on such single Cu+ site. Upon the formation ofmore » step-edges, the synergy among Cuδ+ sites, TiOx matrix, and Cu(111) is able to catalyze the reaction well. Depending on temperatures and partial pressure of CO and O2, the surface structure varies, which determines the dominant mechanism. In accordance with our results, the Cuδ+ ion alone does not work well for CO oxidation in the form of single sites, while the synergy among multiple active sites is necessary to facilitate the reaction.« less

  3. Imaging of electrical response of NiOx under controlled environment with sub-25-nm resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ievlev, Anton V.; Collins, Liam F.; Muckley, Eric S.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-07-19

    The spatially resolved electrical response of rf-sputtered polycrystalline NiOx films composed of 40 nm crystallites was investigated under different relative humidity levels (RH). The topological and electrical properties (surface potential and resistance) were characterized using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive scanning probe microscopy at 0%, 50%, and 80% relative humidity with sub 25nm resolution. The surface potential of NiOx decreased by about 180 mV and resistance decreased in a nonlinear fashion by about 2 G when relative humidity was increased from 0% to 80%. The dimensionality of surface features obtained through autocorrelation analysis of topological, surface potential andmore » resistance maps increased linearly with increased relative humidity as water was adsorbed onto the film surface. Spatially resolved surface potential and resistance of the NiOx films were found to be heterogeneous, with distinct features that grew in size from about 60 nm to 175 nm between 0% and 80% RH levels, respectively. Here, we find that the changes in the heterogeneous character of the NiO films are consistent through the topological, surface potential, and resistance measurements, suggesting that the nanoscale surface potential and resistance properties converge with the mesoscale properties as water is adsorbed onto the NiOx film.« less

  4. Kinetic simulation of the O-X conversion process in dense magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Asgarian, M. [Physics Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Physics Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824-1226 (United States); Verboncoeur, J. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824-1226 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824-1226 (United States); Parvazian, A. [Physics Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Trines, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)] [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    One scheme for heating a dense magnetized plasma core, such as in a tokamak, involves launching an ordinary (O) electromagnetic wave at the low density edge. It is converted to a reflected extraordinary (X) electromagnetic wave under certain conditions, and then transformed into an electron Bernstein wave able to reach high density regions inaccessible to most other waves. The O-X mode conversion is important in heating and diagnostic processes in different devices such as tokamaks, stellarators, and some types of pinches. The goal of this study has been to demonstrate that the kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) scheme is suitable for modeling the O-X conversion process as the first step toward a more complete simulation of O-X-B heating. The O-X process is considered and simulated with a kinetic particle model for parameters of the TJ-II stellarator using the PIC code, XOOPIC. This code is able to model the non-monotonic density and the magnetic profile of the TJ-II stellarator. It can also statistically represent the self-consistent distribution function of the plasma, which has not been possible in previous fluid models. By considering the electric and magnetic components of launched and reflected waves, the O-mode and X-mode waves can be detected, and the O-X conversion can be demonstrated. In this work, the optimum angle for conversion efficiency, as predicted by the previous theory and experimentally confirmed, is used. Via considering the power of the launched O-mode wave and the converted X-mode wave, the efficiency of 63% for O-X conversion for the optimum theoretical launch angle of 47{sup ?} is obtained, which is in good agreement with efficiencies computed via full-wave simulations.

  5. MicroRNAs expression in ox-LDL treated HUVECs: MiR-365 modulates apoptosis and Bcl-2 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Bing; Xiao, Bo; Liang, Desheng; Xia, Jian; Li, Ye; Yang, Huan

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} We evaluated the role of miRNAs in ox-LDL induced apoptosis in ECs. {yields} We found 4 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated miRNAs in apoptotic ECs. {yields} Target genes of the dysregulated miRNAs regulate ECs apoptosis and atherosclerosis. {yields} MiR-365 promotes ECs apoptosis via suppressing Bcl-2 expression. {yields} MiR-365 inhibitor alleviates ECs apoptosis induced by ox-LDL. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells (ECs) apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is thought to play a critical role in atherosclerosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse cell functions, including differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. However, whether miRNAs are associated with ox-LDL induced apoptosis and their effect on ECs is still unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated potential miRNAs and their involvement in ECs apoptosis in response to ox-LDL stimulation. Microarray and qRT-PCR analysis performed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to ox-LDL identified 15 differentially expressed (4 up- and 11 down-regulated) miRNAs. Web-based query tools were utilized to predict the target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs, and the potential target genes were classified into different function categories with the gene ontology (GO) term and KEGG pathway annotation. In particular, bioinformatics analysis suggested that anti-apoptotic protein B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) is a target gene of miR-365, an apoptomir up-regulated by ox-LDL stimulation in HUVECs. We further showed that transfection of miR-365 inhibitor partly restored Bcl-2 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, leading to a reduction of ox-LDL-mediated apoptosis in HUVECs. Taken together, our findings indicate that miRNAs participate in ox-LDL-mediated apoptosis in HUVECs. MiR-365 potentiates ox-LDL-induced ECs apoptosis by regulating the

  6. Nitrogen effects on crystallization kinetics of amorphous TiOxNy thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hukari, Kyle; Dannenberg, Rand; Stach, E.A.

    2001-03-30

    The crystallization behavior of amorphous TiOxNy (x>>y) thin films was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kozolog (JMAK) theory is used to determine the Avrami exponent, activation energy, and the phase velocity pre-exponent. Addition of nitrogen inhibits diffusion, increasing the nucleation temperature, while decreasing the growth activation energy. Kinetic variables extracted from individual crystallites are compared to JMAK analysis of the fraction transformed and a change of 6 percent in the activation energy gives agreement between the methods. From diffraction patterns and index of refraction the crystallized phase was found to be predominantly anatase.

  7. Effect of filler metal composition on the strength of yttria stabilized zirconia joints brazed with Pd-Ag-CuOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2008-09-08

    The Ag-CuOx system is of interest to be used to be used as an air braze filler metal for joining high temperature electrochemical devices. Previous work has shown that the melting temperatures can be increased by adding palladium to Ag-CuOx and it is expected that this may aid high temperature stability. This work compares the room temperature bend strength of joints made between yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air brazed using Ag-CuOx without palladium and with 5 and 15mol% palladium additions. It has been found that in general palladium decreases joint strength, especially in low copper oxide compositions filler metals. At high copper oxide contents, brittle fracture through both copper oxide rich phases and the YSZ limits joint strength.

  8. High critical currents in heavily doped (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3Ox superconductor tapes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Selvamanickam, V.; Gharahcheshmeh, M. Heydari; Xu, A.; Galstyan, E.; Delgado, L.; Cantoni, C.

    2015-01-20

    REBa2Cu3Ox superconductor tapes with moderate levels of dopants have been optimized for high critical current density in low magnetic fields at 77 K, but they do not exhibit exemplary performance in conditions of interest for practical applications, i.e., temperatures less than 50 K and fields of 2–30 T. Heavy doping of REBCO tapes has been avoided by researchers thus far due to deterioration in properties. Here, we report achievement of critical current densities (Jc) above 20 MA/cm2 at 30 K, 3 T in heavily doped (25 mol. % Zr-added) (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3Ox superconductor tapes, which is more than three times higher thanmore » the Jc typically obtained in moderately doped tapes. Pinning force levels above 1000 GN/m3 have also been attained at 20 K. A composition map of lift factor in Jc (ratio of Jc at 30 K, 3 T to the Jc at 77 K, 0 T) has been developed which reveals the optimum film composition to obtain lift factors above six, which is thrice the typical value. A highly c-axis aligned BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumn defect density of nearly 7 × 1011 cm–2 as well as 2–3nm sized particles rich in Cu and Zr have been found in the high Jc films.« less

  9. Mesoporous MnCeOx solid solutions for low temperature and selective oxidation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Yang, Shize; Shi, Hongliang; Zhu, Qiulian; Chen, Yinfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-10-15

    The development of noble-metal-free heterogeneous catalysts that can realize the aerobic oxidation of C–H bonds at low temperature is a profound challenge in the catalysis community. Here we report the synthesis of a mesoporous Mn0.5Ce0.5Ox solid solution that is highly active for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons under mild conditions (100–120 °C). Notably, the catalytic performance achieved in the oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone/cyclohexanol (100 °C, conversion: 17.7%) is superior to those by the state-of-art commercial catalysts (140–160 °C, conversion: 3-5%). Finally, the high activity can be attributed to the formation of a Mn0.5Ce0.5Ox solid solution with an ultrahigh manganesemore » doping concentration in the CeO2 cubic fluorite lattice, leading to maximum active surface oxygens for the activation of C–H bonds and highly reducible Mn4+ ions for the rapid migration of oxygen vacancies from the bulk to the surface.« less

  10. Some Lessons Learned from 20 Years in RedOx Flow Battery R&d | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Some Lessons Learned from 20 Years in RedOx Flow Battery R&d Some Lessons Learned from 20 Years in RedOx Flow Battery R&d Presentation by Steve Clarke, Applied Intellectual Capital, at the Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop held March 7-8, 2012, in Washington, DC. flowcells2012_clarke.pdf (1.38 MB) More Documents & Publications Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Summary Report Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Overview Energy Storage Systems 2014 Peer

  11. Constructing hierarchical interfaces: TiO2-supported PtFe-FeOx nanowires for room temperature CO oxidation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Wu, Zili; Dong, Su; Veith, Gabriel M.; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhang, Pengfei; Chai, Song -Hai; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-05

    This is a report of a facile approach to constructing catalytic active hierarchical interfaces in one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, exemplified by the synthesis of TiO2-supported PtFe–FeOx nanowires (NWs). The hierarchical interface, constituting atomic level interactions between PtFe and FeOx within each NW and the interactions between NWs and support (TiO2), enables CO oxidation with 100% conversion at room temperature. We identify the role of the two interfaces by probing the CO oxidation reaction with isotopic labeling experiments. Both the oxygen atoms (Os) in FeOx and TiO2 participate in the initial CO oxidation, facilitating the reaction through a redox pathway. Moreover, themore » intact 1D structure leads to the high stability of the catalyst. After 30 h in the reaction stream, the PtFe–FeOx/TiO2 catalyst exhibits no activity decay. These results provide a general approach and new insights into the construction of hierarchical interfaces for advanced catalysis.« less

  12. Highly dispersed SiOx/Al2O3 catalysts illuminate the reactivity of isolated silanol sites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mouat, Aidan R.; George, Cassandra; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; van Duyne, Richard P.; Marks, Tobin J.; Stair, Peter C.

    2015-09-23

    The reaction of γ-alumina with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) vapor at low temperatures selectively yields monomeric SiOx species on the alumina surface. These isolated (-AlO)3Si(OH) sites are characterized by PXRD, XPS, DRIFTS of adsorbed NH3, CO, and pyridine, and 29Si and 27Al DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The formation of isolated sites suggests that TEOS reacts preferentially at strong Lewis acid sites on the γ-Al2O3 surface, functionalizing the surface with “mild” Brønsted acid sites. As a result, for liquid-phase catalytic cyclohexanol dehydration, these SiOx sites exhibit up to 3.5-fold higher specific activity than the parent alumina with identical selectivity.

  13. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeen, Hyoung Jeen; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-12-18

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO2.5thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotacticmore » conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO3-δ). We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Furthermore, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.« less

  14. Catalytic activity in lithium-treated core–shell MoOx/MoS2 nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Kappera, Rajesh; Voiry, Damien; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Jasinski, Jacek; Kelly, Dan; Chhowalla, Manish; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; et al

    2015-09-22

    Significant interest has grown in the development of earth-abundant and efficient catalytic materials for hydrogen generation. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides present opportunities for efficient electrocatalytic systems. Here, we report the modification of 1D MoOx/MoS2 core–shell nanostructures by lithium intercalation and the corresponding changes in morphology, structure, and mechanism of H2 evolution. The 1D nanowires exhibit significant improvement in H2 evolution properties after lithiation, reducing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) onset potential by ~50 mV and increasing the generated current density by ~600%. The high electrochemical activity in the nanowires results from disruption of MoS2 layers in the outer shell, leadingmore » to increased activity and concentration of defect sites. This is in contrast to the typical mechanism of improved catalysis following lithium exfoliation, i.e., crystal phase transformation. As a result, these structural changes are verified by a combination of Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).« less

  15. Promotional effect of surface hydroxyls on electrochemical reduction of CO2 over SnOx/Sn electrode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cui, Chaonan; Han, Jinyu; Zhu, Xinli; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Hua; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

    2016-01-16

    In this study, tin oxide (SnOx) formation on tin-based electrode surfaces during CO2 electrochemical reduction can have a significant impact on the activity and selectivity of the reaction. In the present study, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to understand the role of SnOx in CO2 reduction using a SnO monolayer on the Sn(112) surface as a model for SnOx. Water molecules have been treated explicitly and considered actively participating in the reaction. The results showed that H2O dissociates on the perfect SnO monolayer into two hydroxyl groups symmetrically on the surface. CO2 energetically prefers to react withmore » the hydroxyl, forming a bicarbonate (HCO3(t)*) intermediate, which can then be reduced to either formate (HCOO*) by hydrogenating the carbon atom or carboxyl (COOH*) by protonating the oxygen atom. Both steps involve a simultaneous Csingle bondO bond breaking. Further reduction of HCOO* species leads to the formation of formic acid in the acidic solution at pH < 4, while the COOH* will decompose to CO and H2O via protonation. Whereas the oxygen vacancy (VO) in the oxide monolayer maybe formed by the reduction, it can be recovered by H2O dissociation, resulting in two embedded hydroxyl groups. The results show that the hydroxylated surface with two symmetric hydroxyls is energetically more favorable for CO2 reduction than the hydroxylated VO surface with two embedded hydroxyls. The reduction potential for the former has a limiting-potential of –0.20 V (RHE), lower than that for the latter (–0.74 V (RHE)). Compared to the pure Sn electrode, the formation of SnOx monolayer on the electrode under the operating conditions promotes CO2 reduction more effectively by forming surface hydroxyls, thereby providing a new channel via COOH* to the CO formation, although formic acid is still the major reduction product.« less

  16. Low pressure CO₂ hydrogenation to methanol over gold nanoparticles activated on a CeOx/TiO₂ interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Xiaofang; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal; Kattel, Shyam; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Nie, Xiaowa; Graciani, Jesus; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-07-28

    Capture and recycling of CO₂ into valuable chemicals such as alcohols could help mitigate its emissions into the atmosphere. Due to its inert nature, the activation of CO₂ is a critical step in improving the overall reaction kinetics during its chemical conversion. Although pure gold is an inert noble metal and cannot catalyze hydrogenation reactions, it can be activated when deposited as nanoparticles on the appropriate oxide support. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, it is shown that an electronic polarization at the metal–oxide interface of Au nanoparticles anchored and stabilized on a CeOx/TiO₂ substrate generates active centers formore » CO₂ adsorption and its low pressure hydrogenation, leading to a higher selectivity toward methanol. In conclusion, this study illustrates the importance of localized electronic properties and structure in catalysis for achieving higher alcohol selectivity from CO₂ hydrogenation.« less

  17. The susceptibility of TaOx-based memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLain, Michael Lee; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Mickel, Patrick R.; Hanson, Donald J.; McDonald, Joseph K.; Hughart, David Russell; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-11-11

    This paper investigates the effects of high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose (TID) on tantalum oxide (TaOx) memristors. Transient data were obtained during the pulsed exposures for dose rates ranging from approximately 5.0 ×107 rad(Si)/s to 4.7 ×108 rad(Si)/s and for pulse widths ranging from 50 ns to 50 μs. The cumulative dose in these tests did not appear to impact the observed dose rate response. Static dose rate upset tests were also performed at a dose rate of ~3.0 ×108 rad(Si)/s. This is the first dose rate study on any type of memristive memory technology. Inmore » addition to assessing the tolerance of TaOx memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation, we also evaluated their susceptibility to TID. The data indicate that it is possible for the devices to switch from a high resistance off-state to a low resistance on-state in both dose rate and TID environments. The observed radiation-induced switching is dependent on the irradiation conditions and bias configuration. Furthermore, the dose rate or ionizing dose level at which a device switches resistance states varies from device to device; the enhanced susceptibility observed in some devices is still under investigation. As a result, numerical simulations are used to qualitatively capture the observed transient radiation response and provide insight into the physics of the induced current/voltages.« less

  18. GoiOF'9yG535--jt; UCRL-JC-114699 PRcTRINT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of bathtub and flowthrough water contact alternatives and air contact are modeled. The air-mediated processes take place alone or in parallel if there is also water contact. ...

  19. Hierarchical heterogeneity at the CeOx-TiO? interface: Electronic and geometric structural influence on the photocatalytic activity of oxide on oxide nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2015-01-13

    Mixed oxide interfaces are critical for delivering active components of demanding catalytic processes such as the photo-catalytic splitting of water. We have studied CeOxTiO? catalysts with low ceria loadings of 1 wt%, 3 wt% and 6 wt% that were prepared with wet impregnation methods to favor a strong interaction between CeOx and TiO?. In these materials the interfaces between CeOx-TiO? have been sequentially loaded (1%, 3% and 6%), with and without Pt (0.5 wt%). The structure and properties of the catalysts were characterized using several X-ray and electron based techniques including XRD, XPS, UPS, NEXAFS, UV-Vis and HR-STEM/STEM-EELS, to unravelmorethe local morphology, bulk structure, surface states and electronic structure. The combination of all these techniques allow us to analyze in a systematic way the complete structural and electronic properties that prevail at the CeOx-TiO? interface. Fluorite structured nano crystallites of ceria on anatase-structured titania were identified by both XRD and NEXAFS. A sequential increasing of the CeOx loading led to the formation of clusters, then plates and finally nano particles in a hierarchical manner on the TiO? support. The electronic structures of these catalysts indicate that the interaction between TiO? and CeO? is closely related to the local morphology of nanostructured CeO?. Ce? cations were detected at the surface of CeO? and at the interface of the two oxides. In addition, the titania is perturbed by the interaction with ceria and also with Pt. The photocatalytic activity for the splitting of H?O using UV light was measured for these materials and correlated with our understanding of the electronic and structural properties. Optimal catalytic performance and photo response results were found for the 1 wt% CeOx-TiO? catalyst where low dimensional geometry of the ceria provided ideal electronic and geometrical properties. The structural and electronic properties of the interface were critical for the

  20. Advantages of MgAlOx over gamma-Al2O3 as a support material for potassium-based high temperature lean NOx traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Jinyong; Gao, Feng; Karim, Ayman M.; Xu, Pinghong; Browning, Nigel D.; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-08-07

    MgAlOx mixed oxides were employed as supports for potassium-based lean NOx traps (LNTs) targeted for high temperature applications. Effects of support compositions, K/Pt loadings, thermal aging and catalyst regeneration on NOx storage capacity were systematically investigated. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, NOx-TPD, TEM, STEM-HAADF and in-situ XAFS. The results indicate that MgAlOx mixed oxides have significant advantages over conventional gamma-Al2O3-supports for LNT catalysts, in terms of high temperature NOx trapping capacity and thermal stability. First, as a basic support, MgAlOx stabilizes stored nitrates (in the form of KNO3) to much higher temperatures than mildly acidic gamma-Al2O3. Second, MgAlOx minimizes Pt sintering during thermal aging, which is not possible for gamma-Al2O3 supports. Notably, combined XRD, in-situ XAFS and STEM-HAADF results indicate that Pt species in the thermally aged Pt/MgAlOx samples are finely dispersed in the oxide matrix as isolated atoms. This strong metal-support interaction stabilizes Pt and minimizes the extent of sintering. However, such strong interactions result in Pt oxidation via coordination with the support so that NO oxidation activity can be adversely affected after aging which, in turn, decreases NOx trapping ability for these catalysts. Interestingly, a high-temperature reduction treatment regenerates essentially full NOx trapping performance. In fact, regenerated Pt/K/MgAlOx catalyst exhibits much better NOx trapping performance than fresh Pt/K/Al2O3 LNTs over the entire temperature range investigated here. In addition to thermal aging, Pt/K loading effects were systemically studied over the fresh samples. The results indicate that NOx trapping is kinetically limited at low temperatures, while thermodynamically limited at high temperatures. A simple conceptual model was developed to explain the Pt and K loading effects on NOx storage. An optimized K loading, which allows balancing between the

  1. GeOx/Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite as an Anode for Li-ion Batteries: Enhanced Capacity via Reversible Utilization of Li2O along with Improved Rate Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Dongping; Gordin, Mikhail; Yi, Ran; Xu, Terrence (Tianren); Song, Jiangxuan; Jiang, Yingbing; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai

    2014-09-01

    A self-assembled GeOx/reduced graphene oxide (GeOx/RGO) composite, where GeOx nanoparticles were grown directly on reduced graphene oxide sheets, was synthesized via a facile one-step reduction approach and studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy elemental mapping, and other techniques. Electrochemical evaluation indicates that incorporation of reduced graphene oxide enhances both the rate capability and reversible capacity of GeOx, with the latter being due to the RGO enabling reversible utilization of Li2O. The composite delivers a high reversible capacity of 1600 mAhg-1 at a current density of 100 mAg-1, and still maintains a capacity of 410 mAhg-1 at a high current density of 20 Ag-1. Owing to the flexible reduced graphene oxide sheets enwrapping the GeOx particles, the cycling stability of the composite was also improved significantly. To further demonstrate its feasibility in practical applications, the synthesized GeOx/RGO composite anode was successfully paired with a high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode to form a full cell, which showed good cycling and rate performance.

  2. Quench degradation limit of multifilamentary AgBi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Liyang; Li, Pei; Shen, Tengming; Schwartz, Justin

    2016-02-02

    Understanding safe operating limits of composite superconducting wires is important for the design of superconducting magnets. Here we report measurements of quench-induced critical current density Jc degradation in commercial Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi-2212) round wires using heater-induced quenches at 4.2 K in self magnetic field that reveal a general degradation behavior. Jc degradation strongly depends on the local hot spot temperature Tmax, and is nearly independent of operating current, the temperature gradient along the conductor dTmax/dx, and the temperature rising rate dTmax/dt. Both Jc and n value (where n is an index of the sharpness of the superconductor-to-normal transition) exhibit small butmore » irreversible degradation when Tmax exceeds 400-450 K, and large degradation occurs when Tmax exceeds 550 K. This behavior was consistently found for a series of Bi-2212 wires with widely variable wire architectures and porosity levels in the Bi-2212 filaments, including a wire processed using a standard partial melt processing and in which Bi-2212 filaments are porous, an overpressure processed wire in which Bi-2212 filaments are nearly porosity-free and that has a Jc(4.2 K, self field) exceeding 8000 A/mm2, and a wire that has nearly no filament to filament bridges after reaction. Microstructural observations of degraded wires reveal cracks in the Bi-2212 filaments perpendicular to the wire axis, indicating that the quench-induced Ic degradation is primarily driven by strain. These results further suggest that the quench degradation temperature limit depends on the strain state of Bi-2212 filaments and this dependence shall be carefully considered when engineering a high-field Bi-2212 magnet.« less

  3. Average and local crystal structures of (Ga1–xZnx)(N1–xOx) solid solution nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; Tyson, Trevor A.; Schieber, Natalie; Han, Wei -Qiang

    2015-11-06

    We report the comprehensive study of the crystal structure of (Ga1–xZnx)(N1–xOx) solid solution nanoparticles by means of neutron and synchrotron x-ray scattering. In our study we used four different types of (Ga1–xZnx)(N1–xOx) nanoparticles, with diameters of 10–27 nm and x = 0.075–0.51, which show the narrow energy-band gaps from 2.21 to 2.61 eV. The Rietveld analysis of the neutron diffraction data revealed that the average crystal structure is the hexagonal wurtzite (space group P63mc), in agreement with previous reports on similar bulk materials. The pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis of the same data found that the local structure is more disorderedmore » than the average one. It is best described by the model with a lower symmetry space group P1, where atoms are quasirandomly distorted from their nominal positions in the hexagonal wurtzite lattice.« less

  4. Total ionizing dose effect of γ-ray radiation on the switching characteristics and filament stability of HfOx resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Runchen; Yu, Shimeng; Gonzalez Velo, Yago; Chen, Wenhao; Holbert, Keith E.; Kozicki, Michael N.; Barnaby, Hugh

    2014-05-05

    The total ionizing dose (TID) effect of gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation on HfOx based resistive random access memory was investigated by electrical and material characterizations. The memory states can sustain TID level ∼5.2 Mrad (HfO{sub 2}) without significant change in the functionality or the switching characteristics under pulse cycling. However, the stability of the filament is weakened after irradiation as memory states are more vulnerable to flipping under the electrical stress. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to ascertain the physical mechanism of the stability degradation, which is attributed to the Hf-O bond breaking by the high-energy γ-ray exposure.

  5. 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOx/CeO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-12-23

    Pulsing 15N18O onto an annealed 1% Mn16Ox/Ce16O2 catalyst resulted in very fast oxygen isotope exchange and 15N2 formation at 295 K. In the 1st 15N18O pulse, due to the presence of large number of surface oxygen defects, extensive 15N218O and 15N2 formations were observed. In subsequent pulses oxygen isotope exchange dominated as a result of highly labile oxygen in the oxide. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  6. Photocatalytic splitting of water under visible-light irradiation over the NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Xinde; Ye Hongqi; Liu Hui; Ma Chenxia; Zhao Zhi

    2010-01-15

    A new visible-light-response photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration crystallized in a cubic system with the space group Fd3m was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} showed high photocatalytic activities for H{sub 2} evolution from pure water under visible light irradiation (lambda>400 nm). Changes in the photocatalytic activity with the calcination temperature of Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} and the amount of NiOx loaded indicated that the combination of highly crystallized Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} and a high dispersion of NiOx particles led to high photocatalytic activity. The high photocatalytic performance of NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} supported the existing view that the photocatalytic activity correlated with the lattice distortion. Density functional theory calculation indicated that strong dispersion from the hybridized In 5s 5p orbitals at the bottom of the conduction band was responsible for the high activity of photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: A new visible-light-response photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration was developed. DFT calculation indicated that strong dispersion from the hybridized In 5s 5p orbitals was responsible for the high photocatalytic activity.

  7. High Catalytic Activity of Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) Controlled by the Nature of the Mixed Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.; Graciani, J; Evans, J; Stacchiola, D; Ma, S; Liu, P; Nambu, A; Sanz, J; Hrbek, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Mixed-metal oxides play a very important role in many areas of chemistry, physics, materials science, and geochemistry. Recently, there has been a strong interest in understanding phenomena associated with the deposition of oxide nanoparticles on the surface of a second (host) oxide. Here, scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission, and density-functional calculations are used to study the behavior of ceria nanoparticles deposited on a TiO2(110) surface. The titania substrate imposes nontypical coordination modes on the ceria nanoparticles. In the CeOx/TiO2(110) systems, the Ce cations adopt an structural geometry and an oxidation state (+3) that are quite different from those seen in bulk ceria or for ceria nanoparticles deposited on metal substrates. The increase in the stability of the Ce3+ oxidation state leads to an enhancement in the chemical and catalytic activity of the ceria nanoparticles. The codeposition of ceria and gold nanoparticles on a TiO2(110) substrate generates catalysts with an extremely high activity for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (H2O + CO ? H2 + CO2) or for the oxidation of carbon monoxide (2CO + O2 ? 2CO2). The enhanced stability of the Ce3+ state is an example of structural promotion in catalysis described here on the atomic level. The exploration of mixed-metal oxides at the nanometer level may open avenues for optimizing catalysts through stabilization of unconventional surface structures with special chemical activity.

  8. Cobalt-iron red-ox behavior in nanostructured La{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soldati, Analia L.; Baque, Laura; Napolitano, Federico; Serquis, Adriana

    2013-02-15

    Nano-sized La{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF) perovskite samples (prepared by a conventional acetate route and a novel acetate synthesis with HMTA additives), were tested simulating a red-ox cycle. The crystallography was studied by X-ray Powder Diffraction (XPD) and the changes in the oxidation state of the perovskite B-site were evaluated by synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). After a reducing treatment, LSFC particles show the appearance of a new phase that coexists with the original one. The structural change is accompanied by a Co and Fe formal oxidation states decrease, although Fe remains always closer to 4+ and Co closer to 3+. The treatment produces a B-site valence average reduction from 3.52+ to 3.26+ and the formation of oxygen vacancies. A re-oxidation treatment under O{sub 2} rich atmosphere at 800 Degree-Sign C for 10 h shows that the change is reversible and independent of the two chemical methods used to synthesize the LSCF nano-particles. - Graphical abstract: XANES and XPD measurements in nanostructured LSCF before (black) and after (red/green) a red/ox cycle. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Red-ox treatments in LSCF nano-particles cause a reversible reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPD analyses show that a new 'reduced' phase coexist with the oxidize one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The B-site formal oxidation state decreases and the {delta} increases upon reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe remains in a higher valence (closer to 4+) than Co (close to 3+). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The behavior seems to be independent of the synthesis method used.

  9. Hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol on CeOx/Cu(111) and ZnO/Cu(111) catalysts: Role of the metal-oxide interface and importance of Ce3+ sites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sanjaya D. Senanayake; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Kundu, Shankhamala; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Liu, Zongyuan; Liu, Zhi; Axnanda, Stephanus; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Evans, Jaime; et al

    2016-01-06

    The role of the interface between a metal and oxide (CeOx–Cu and ZnO–Cu) is critical to the production of methanol through the hydrogenation of CO2 (CO2 + 3H2 → CH3OH + H2O). The deposition of nanoparticles of CeOx or ZnO on Cu(111), θoxi < 0.3 monolayer, produces highly active catalysts for methanol synthesis. The catalytic activity of these systems increases in the sequence: Cu(111) < ZnO/Cu(111) < CeOx/Cu(111). The apparent activation energy for the CO2 → CH3OH conversion decreases from 25 kcal/mol on Cu(111) to 16 kcal/mol on ZnO/Cu(111) and 13 kcal/mol on CeOx/Cu(111). The surface chemistry of the highlymore » active CeOx–Cu(111) interface was investigated using ambient pressure X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (AP-IRRAS). Both techniques point to the formation of formates (HCOO–) and carboxylates (CO2δ–) during the reaction. Our results show an active state of the catalyst rich in Ce3+ sites which stabilize a CO2δ– species that is an essential intermediate for the production of methanol. Furthermore, the inverse oxide/metal configuration favors strong metal–oxide interactions and makes possible reaction channels not seen in conventional metal/oxide catalysts.« less

  10. New Processing and Characterization Approaches for Achieving Full Performance of High Temperature Superconducting Tapes of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.E. Hellstrom; D.C. Larbalestier

    2006-03-22

    The thrust of this research was to identify and understand current limiting mechanisms (CLMs) that limit the current carrying capacity of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (2223) in Ag-sheathed wire. Our program concentrated on developing new methods to identify CLMs at the micrometer scale and new processing techniques to eliminate CLMs. All of the DOE Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) programs are using 2223 wire, so increasing the critical current density (Jc) in the wire can improve the technical performance of the demonstration projects, and at the same time it can decrease the cost of the wire. The important cost metric for superconducting wire is $/kAm, so increasing Jc, which is in the denominator, decreases the wire cost. The obvious CLMs were micrometer size obstacles in the 2223 ceramic that block current flow, including: misaligned grains, cracks, pores, and nonsuperconducting phases. Pores and cracks - regions where there is no superconductor or the grains are not physically connected to one another ? cannot carry supercurrent, so they were the first CLMs we tried to eliminate with improved processing. Prior to the contract, we had started investigating overpressure (OP) processing with Williams at ORNL to heal cracks and remove pores. OP processing, which is a variant of hot isostatic pressing (HIP), uses an Ar/O2 gas mixture to apply a high pressure (up to 200 atm) to compress the sample and to set the oxygen partial pressure (pO2) to form 2223. Williams had a static pressure system we used to demonstrate that OP processing healed cracks and densified the wire, but the static system limited the processing parameters we could investigate. We proposed building a new gas-flow OP system to expand the experimental capabilities and to investigate new processing routes using the gas-flow OP system. Using the gas-flow OP system, we established new world records in 2003 for Jc and Ic. These records were finally matched by Sumitomo Electric Company in early

  11. Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  12. Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  13. Transient PrOx carbon monoxide measurement, control, and optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inbody, M. A.; Borup, R. L.; Tafoya, J.

    2002-01-01

    Fuel processing systems for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems require control of the carbon monoxide concentration to less than 100 ppm to 10 ppm in the anode feed. Conventional hydrocarbon fuel processors use a water-gas shift (WGS) reactor to react CO with water to form H2 and reduce the CO concentration. The CO conversion is limited by equilibrium at the outlet temperature of the WGS reactor. The WGS outlet CO concentration can range from over 1% to 2000 ppm depending on the system and its operating parameters. At these concentrations, CO poisons low temperature PEM fuel cells and the concentrations needs to be reduced further.

  14. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    films near topotactic phase transition Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides ... indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the ...

  15. Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and High Voltage Spinel Cathode

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  16. Large voltage-induced modification of spin-orbit torques in Pt/Co/GdOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emori, Satoru Bauer, Uwe; Woo, Seonghoon; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report on large modifications of current-induced spin-orbit torques in a gated Pt/Co/Gd-oxide microstrip due to voltage-driven O{sup 2−} migration. The Slonczewski-like and field-like torques are quantified using a low-frequency harmonic technique based on the polar magneto-optical Kerr effect. Voltage-induced oxidation of Co enhances the Slonczewski-like torque by as much as an order of magnitude and simultaneously reduces the anisotropy energy barrier by a factor of ∼5. Such magneto-ionic tuning of interfacial spin-orbit effects may significantly enhance the efficiency of magnetization switching and provide additional degrees of freedom in spintronic devices.

  17. Some Lessons Learned from 20 Years in RedOx Flow Battery R&d

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    metals recovery Advanced materials and nano-structures Novel catalysts High ... (low p) Materials Novel nano-structured non- carbon electrodes ...

  18. Adsorption and Reaction of C1-C3 Alcohols over CeOx(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Mullins; S Senanayake; T Chen

    2011-12-31

    This study reports the interaction of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol with well-ordered CeO{sub 2}(111) thin film surfaces. All of the alcohols adsorb at low temperature by forming alkoxy and hydroxyl species on the surface. On fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111), recombination occurs between some of the alkoxys and hydroxyls, resulting in alcohol desorption near 220 K. At the same temperature, some of the surface hydroxyls disproportionate to produce water and the loss of lattice O. The remaining alkoxys react above 550 K. The primary alcohols favor dehydrogenation products (aldehydes). There is a net loss of O from the system, resulting in a reduction of the ceria. The secondary alcohol, 2-propanol, undergoes primarily dehydration, producing propene with no net change in the cerium oxidation state. Reduced CeO{sub x}(111) competes with the gaseous products for available O. Little or no water is produced. The reaction selectivity for the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} alcohols shifts toward favoring dehydration products. The loss of O from the alcohols leads to oxidation of the reduced ceria. Compared with the oxidized surface, the alkene desorption shifts to lower temperature, whereas the aldehyde desorption shifts to higher temperature. This indicates that, on the reduced surface, it is easier to break the C-O bond but more difficult to break the O-substrate bond.

  19. Catalytic activity in lithium-treated core-shell MoOx/MoS2 nanowires...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The high electrochemical activity in the nanowires results ... 119; Journal Issue: 40; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-7447 Publisher: American Chemical Society Research Org: Los Alamos ...

  20. Interfacial engineering of solution-processed Ni nanochain-SiOx...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Interfacial engineering of solution-processed Ni ... 03755, USA Department of Chemical and Materials ... Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Journal ...

  1. Reversal of the Lattice Structure in SrCoOx Epitaxial Thin Films...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 111; Journal ... Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email ...

  2. Complex catalytic behaviors of CuTiOx mixed-oxide during CO oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION CO ...

  3. Reversible redox reactions in an epitaxially stabilized SrCoOx...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nature Materials; Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 11 Research Org: Oak ...

  4. Transient control of carbon monoxide with staged PrOx reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inbody, M. A.; Borup, R. L.; Tafoya, J.

    2002-01-01

    Fuel Processor systems generate hydrogen for fuel cell systems from hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline for automotive fuel cell systems and natural gas for stationary fuel cell systems. These fuel processor systems must remove any contaminants to levels that won't poison the fuel cell before the outlet hydrogen-rich gas stream can be used by the fuel cell to generate electricity. Carbon monoxide is a contaminant that must be removed to levels of < 100 ppm or < 10 ppm depending on the CO tolerance of the fuel cell. Typically, the last unit operation in a fuel processor is a preferential oxidation reactor or a selective oxidation reactor, which removes CO by oxidizing it to form C02. These are catalytic reactors where the catalyst and operating conditions are selected so that the oxidation rate of the carbon monoxide is higher than the oxidation rate of hydrogen, even though the hydrogen is present at much higher concentrations (> 30%) than carbon monoxide which is present at trace concentrations (< 1%).

  5. EPJ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y.G. Ma 1 Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800, China Received: date Revised version: date Abstract. Moment analysis method and ...

  6. Hydrogen Solar Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hydrogen Solar Ltd Place: Guildford, United Kingdom Zip: GU2 7YG Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar Product: Hydrogen Solar Ltd is...

  7. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. ... ICOSSAR-93. Innsbruck, AUSTRIA, 1993. Zhao, Y.-G., and T. Ono. "A general procedure ...

  8. Final Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of Muonium in ZnGeP', P.W. Mengyan, B.B. Baker, R.L. Lichti, K.H. Chow, Y.G. Celebi, T.K. ... Mengyan, R.L. Lichti, Y.G Celebi, B.B. Baker, B.R. Carroll, E. Catak, K.T. Zawilski and ...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 01_Schmid_AWG_Monterey_Intro.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STM, Monterey, CA Aerosol Working Group Breakout Session March 26, 2007 Beat Schmid AWG PIs (as of December 2006) AWG Instruments * Raman Lidar * Raman Lidar * Micropulse Lidars * Aerosol Observation Systems * Aerosol Observation Systems - scattering, absorption, number, size distribution, hygroscopicity, CCN, composition (major ions). yg p y, , p ( j ) * In situ Aerosol Profile (Cessna) - scattering, absorption, number, hygroscopicity, CO 2 g, p , , yg p y, 2 * Radiometers: - MFRSR, NIMFR, RSS,

  10. WIPP Update 8_15_14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A ugust 1 5, 2014 Town H all v ideo, a dditional p hotos o f S ecretary's v isit p osted Energy S ecretary E rnest M oniz, S enator T om U dall, S enator M artin H einrich, C ongressman S teve P earce, a nd N ew Mexico E nvironment S ecretary R yan F lynn v isited C arlsbad e arlier t his w eek, p articipating i n a t own h all m eeting and a n a ll---employee m eeting a t t he W IPP s ite. T hey a lso t oured t he a bove g round p ortions o f t he W IPP f acility. Photos a nd a l ink t o a v

  11. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic - oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria

  12. Mechanistic insights of ethanol steam reforming over Ni-CeOx(111): The importance of hydroxyl groups for suppressing coke formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zongyuan; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Duchon, Tomas; Wang, Huanru; Peterson, Erik W.; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Zhou, Jing; Matolin, Vladimir; Stacchiola, Dario J.; et al

    2015-07-10

    We have studied the reaction of ethanol and water over NiCeO2-x(111) model surfaces to elucidate the mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. Our results provide insights about the importance of hydroxyl groups to the ESR reaction over Ni-based catalysts. Systematically, we have investigated the reaction of ethanol on NiCeO2-x(111) at varying Ce? concentrations (CeO1.82.0) with absence/presence of water using a combination of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Consistent with previous reports, upon annealing, metallic Ni formed on reduced ceria while NiO was the main component on fully oxidized ceria. Ni? is themoreactive phase leading to both the CC and CH cleavage of ethanol but is also responsible for carbon accumulation or coking. We have identified a Ni?C phase that formed prior to the formation of coke. At temperatures above 600K, the lattice oxygen from ceria and the hydroxyl groups from water interact cooperatively in the removal of coke, likely through a strong metalsupport interaction between nickel and ceria that facilitates oxygen transfer.less

  13. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic -more » oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria« less

  14. Tunable Transmittance of Near-infrared and Visible Light in Reconstruc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... To identify the structural changes in the NbOx amorphous network, the authors performed Raman spectroscopy on pure amorphous NbOx and ITO-in-NbOx with different nanocrystal-glass ...

  15. Engineering helimagnetism in MnSi thin films (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A. A. 1 ; Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot, OX11 0DE 3 ; ... Kingdom) Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United ...

  16. Evidence for near-Surface NiOOH Species in Solution-Processed NiOx Selective Interlayer Materials: Impact on Energetics and the Performance of Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliff, Erin L.; Meyer, Jens; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Garcia, Andres; Berry, Joseph J.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.; Kahn, Antoine; Armstrong, Neal R.

    2011-11-22

    The characterization and implementation of solution-processed, wide bandgap nickel oxide (NiO{sub x}) hole-selective interlayer materials used in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are discussed. The surface electrical properties and charge selectivity of these thin films are strongly dependent upon the surface chemistry, band edge energies, and midgap state concentrations, as dictated by the ambient conditions and film pretreatments. Surface states were correlated with standards for nickel oxide, hydroxide, and oxyhydroxide components, as determined using monochromatic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurements show changes in the surface chemistries directly impact the valence band energies. O?-plasma treatment of the as-deposited NiO{sub x} films was found to introduce the dipolar surface species nickel oxyhydroxide (NiOOH), rather than the p-dopant Ni?O?, resulting in an increase of the electrical band gap energy for the near-surface region from 3.1 to 3.6 eV via a vacuum level shift. Electron blocking properties of the as-deposited and O?-plasma treated NiO{sub x} films are compared using both electron-only and BHJ devices. O?-plasma-treated NiO{sub x} interlayers produce electron-only devices with lower leakage current and increased turn on voltages. The differences in behavior of the different pretreated interlayers appears to arise from differences in local density of states that comprise the valence band of the NiO{sub x} interlayers and changes to the band gap energy, which influence their hole-selectivity. The presence of NiOOH states in these NiO{sub x} films and the resultant chemical reactions at the oxide/organic interfaces in OPVs is predicted to play a significant role in controlling OPV device efficiency and lifetime.

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AlOx Fe, oxidation at the Fe4N AlOx interface creates Fe3O4, leading to negativemore ... heterostructures with well-controlled crystallography and interface structures. ...

  18. A Theoretical Reassessment of Microbial Maintenance and Implications for Microbial Ecology Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng; Post, Wilfred M

    2012-01-01

    We attempted to reconcile three microbial maintenance models (Herbert, Pirt, and Compromise) through a critical reassessment. We provided a rigorous proof that the true growth yield coefficient (YG) is the ratio of the specific maintenance rate (a in Herbert) to the maintenance coefficient (m in Pirt). Other findings from this study include: (1) the Compromise model is identical to the Herbert for computing microbial growth and substrate consumption, but it expresses the dependence of maintenance on both microbial biomass and substrate; (2) the maximum specific growth rate in the Herbert ( max,H) is higher than those in the other two models ( max,P and max,C), and the difference is the physiological maintenance factor (mq = a); and (3) the overall maintenance coefficient (mT) is more sensitive to mq than to the specific growth rate ( G) and YG. Our critical reassessment of microbial maintenance provides a new approach for quantifying some important components in soil microbial ecology models.

  19. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of Cloud Properties in Major Reanalyses Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Wu, W., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Wu W, YG Liu, and AK Betts. 2012. "Observationally based evaluation of NWP reanalyses in modeling cloud properties over the Southern Great Plains." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D12202,

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OXON OX11 0QX ; Dipartimento di Fisica E. Amaldi, Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome ...

  1. Future Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Solutions Place: Didcot, United Kingdom Zip: OX11 0QR Product: Future Energy Solutions is a sustainable energy...

  2. 2degrees | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: OX2 7HT Product: Oxford-based collaborative network provider for sustainability professionals. Coordinates: 43.781517, -89.571699 Show Map Loading map......

  3. A two-parameter model for the infrared/submillimeter/radio spectral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States) Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom) Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of ...

  4. Project No 974 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project No 974 Place: Oxford, United Kingdom Zip: OX2 7SG Product: Biological fuel cell technology employing enzymatic catalysts. Project is at present without company name....

  5. ANL2014-JMA.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 8 Oxford Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom *Research sponsored by...

  6. Radiocarbon (Geochronology)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Belfast: Marine Reservoir Database Calib Calibomb CLAMBACON IntCal Database Oxford University Radiocarbon Unit: OxCal PaleoclimateEnvironmental Databases: Neotoma NOAA...

  7. Agrivert | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agrivert Jump to: navigation, search Name: Agrivert Place: Chipping Norton, England, United Kingdom Zip: OX7 4EB Product: String representation "Agrivert is a m ... aste...

  8. Sorption Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxford, England, United Kingdom Zip: OX1 2AY Product: Oxford-based firm developing adsorption air-conditioning and heating systems for domestic-scale products. Coordinates:...

  9. Oxford Catalysts Group plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxford Catalysts Group plc Place: Oxford, United Kingdom Zip: OX2 6UD Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Developer of catalysts for room-temperature hydrogen production, hot steam...

  10. Cornwall Light Power CLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cornwall Light Power CLP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cornwall Light & Power (CLP) Place: Didcot, England, United Kingdom Zip: OX11 9DD Sector: Wind energy Product:...

  11. Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Membrane Protein Crystallography Group, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ 5 ; Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... been a promising carbon capture technology in terms of fuel combustion for power generation. ... the attrition-resistance, the thermal stability in red-ox cycles and the ...

  13. Taurine protects HK-2 cells from oxidized LDL-induced cytotoxicity via the ROS-mediated mitochondrial and p53-related apoptotic pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chun-Yu; Shen, Chao-Yu; Kang, Chao-Kai; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.; Chang, Chia-Che; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2014-09-15

    Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) induces a pro-oxidative environment and promotes apoptosis, causing the progression of renal diseases in humans. Taurine is a semi-essential amino acid in mammals and has been shown to be a potent endogenous antioxidant. The kidney plays a pivotal role in maintaining the balance of taurine. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of taurine against oxLDL-induced injury in renal epithelial cells have not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of taurine on human proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells exposed to oxLDL and explored the related mechanisms. We observed that oxLDL increased the contents of ROS and of malondialdehyde (MDA), which is a lipid peroxidation by-product that acts as an indicator of the cellular oxidation status. In addition, oxLDL induced cell death and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. Pretreatment with taurine at 100 μM significantly attenuated the oxLDL-induced cytotoxicity. We determined that oxLDL triggered the phosphorylation of ERK and, in turn, the activation of p53 and other apoptosis-related events, including calcium accumulation, destabilization of the mitochondrial permeability and disruption of the balance between pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The malfunctions induced by oxLDL were effectively blocked by taurine. Thus, our results suggested that taurine exhibits potential therapeutic activity by preventing oxLDL-induced nephrotoxicity. The inhibition of oxLDL-induced epithelial apoptosis by taurine was at least partially due to its anti-oxidant activity and its ability to modulate the ERK and p53 apoptotic pathways. - Highlights: • Oxidized LDL induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. • Pretreatment with taurine attenuated oxLDL-induced nephrotoxicity. • Taurine protected against renal damages through inhibition of ROS generation. • Taurine prevented apoptosis through modulation of the p53 phosphorylation.

  14. CUSSSFIC4TION CMUXLLq

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CUSSSFIC4TION CMUXLLq RITE AUG 1 7 1962 Fcx the Atomic. Energy Commisaion~ Chief. Declaseifle@tlon Brar\qh F-mm A. B. Grsaingsr (Other ends tifmtioel) The die wae foutq3 to workvery satiafactorilywiti thlanew Qpeof incert, andncm,of tbepmvLouedsfeotaofeoo+tH&' iOitYwaslmd. D&e& ._: . . ..YG ~Kl.3. i>ro;rid3 -&I:: clcsuro on bct.k.mds of the .plece m & Die #l, is also to be tried outoo 4zgust22. Barr~l~or~~~Die~~hadalaobeenawlLfiedta' plwidesd~do~-

  15. FROti:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    p.1, , 1' 3 ' - j ttEMORANDUtl TO: FILE - FJ+u? /WI - /3 DATE 2 /I/ / 9 / ----------^--______ FROti: D. s-f&J ---------------- SUBJECT: SITE NAME: --_-__----__-_--- _____ &----w' I+& - f*/crq ALTERNATE A t=l r---i ted ____ NAME: -----------__-________ CITY: ~+ZZL------ _______ STATE: ------ ff+$- OWNER(S) --y;;g-- && - /??#A~ ------------------------ Current: &v CA-J--;cJ Owner contacted ~--yes 0 noi -.-------me-we------- if yes, date contacted _ //t*/4/ -e-----N------

  16. How to stabilize highly active Cu+ cations in a mixed-oxide catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Luo, Si; Kim, Hyun You; Yang, Xiaofang; Baber, Ashleigh E.; Hoffmann, Friedrich M.; Senanayake, Sananayake; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Chen, Jingguang G.; Liu, Ping; et al

    2015-09-12

    Mixed-metal oxides exhibit novel properties that are not present in their isolated constituent metal oxides and play a significant role in heterogeneous catalysis. In this study, a titanium-copper mixed-oxide (TiCuOx) film has been synthesized on Cu(111) and characterized by complementary experimental and theoretical methods. At sub-monolayer coverages of titanium, a Cu2O-like phase coexists with TiCuOx and TiOx domains. When the mixed-oxide surface is exposed at elevated temperatures (600–650 K) to oxygen, the formation of a well-ordered TiCuOx film occurs. Stepwise oxidation of TiCuOx shows that the formation of the mixed-oxide is faster than that of pure Cu2O. As the Timore » coverage increases, Ti-rich islands (TiOx) form. The adsorption of CO has been used to probe the exposed surface sites on the TiOx–CuOx system, indicating the existence of a new Cu+ adsorption site that is not present on Cu2O/Cu(111). Adsorption of CO on Cu+ sites of TiCuOx is thermally more stable than on Cu(111), Cu2O/Cu(111) or TiO2(110). The Cu+ sites in TiCuOx domains are stable under both reducing and oxidizing conditions whereas the Cu2O domains present on sub-monolayer loads of Ti can be reduced or oxidized under mild conditions. Furthermore, the results presented here demonstrate novel properties of TiCuOx films, which are not present on Cu(111), Cu2O/Cu(111), or TiO2(110), and highlight the importance of the preparation and characterization of well-defined mixed-metal oxides in order to understand fundamental processes that could guide the design of new materials.« less

  17. Expression and potential role of the peptide orexin-A in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valiante, Salvatore; Liguori, Giovanna; Tafuri, Simona; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Campese, Roberto; Monaco, Roberto; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Assisi, Loredana; Mirabella, Nicola; Forte, Maurizio; Costagliola, Anna; Vittoria, Alfredo

    2015-09-04

    The peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and their G protein-coupled OX1 and OX2 receptors are involved in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Altered expression or signaling dysregulation of orexins and their receptors have been associated with a wide range of human diseases including narcolepsy, obesity, drug addiction, and cancer. Although orexin-A, its precursor molecule prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor have been detected in the human normal and hyperplastic prostate tissues, their expression and function in the prostate cancer (PCa) remains to be addressed. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the immunohistochemical localization of orexin-A in human PCa specimens, and the expression of prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor at both protein and mRNA levels in these tissues. Orexin-A administration to the human androgen-dependent prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP up-regulates OX1 receptor expression resulting in a decrease of cell survival. Noteworthy, nanomolar concentrations of the peptide counteract the testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of the androgen receptor in the cells: the orexin-A action is prevented by the addition of the OX1 receptor antagonist SB-408124 to the test system. These findings indicate that orexin-A/OX1 receptor interaction interferes with the activity of the androgen receptor which regulates PCa onset and progression, thus suggesting that orexin-A and its receptor might represent novel therapeutic targets to challenge this aggressive cancer. - Highlights: • Orexin-A and OX1 receptor are present in human cancer prostate tissues. • Orexin-A up-regulates OX1 receptor expression in LNCaP cells. • Orexin-A inhibits testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of androgen receptor.

  18. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no

  19. Property:Zip | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 21-Century Silicon, Inc. + 75081-1881 + 21st century Green Solutions LLC + 48439 + 25 x 25 America s Energy Future + 21093 + 2OC + BA1 7AB + 2degrees + OX2 7HT + 2e Carbon...

  20. Nexeon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: OX14 3DB Product: UK-based company developing advanced Li-ion rechargeable battery technology. Coordinates: 51.813938, -1.2937 Show Map Loading map......

  1. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbenebis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(?4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(?4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(?4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(?4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(?-Cl)(?2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}Rh(?-H)(?-Cl)Rh(?2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(?3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in CH bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis-[Ir](H)(Ph) complex

  2. YetallurgIaal Laboratory.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    mginoor to bo trained in tbe uao and nervIae of &Is inatmmOx% At the ond of hi6 training period, the MB and the InrtnwntwIll be momd ta Cblaago td pelt form testing work. ...

  3. Oxis Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: OX14 3DB Product: Oxfordshire-based Oxis Energy is developing a rechargeable lithium-sulphur battery with more capacity than lithium ion, it claims. References: Oxis...

  4. Biojoule Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biojoule Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biojoule Ltd Place: Oxford, England, United Kingdom Zip: OX4 1RQ Product: Biojoule is a pellets producer who has developed its own...

  5. Climate Care | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Care Jump to: navigation, search Name: Climate Care Place: Oxford, England, United Kingdom Zip: OX4 1RQ Sector: Carbon Product: Oxford-based carbon offsetting firm- making...

  6. LeekSeek International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LeekSeek International Jump to: navigation, search Name: LeekSeek International Place: Oxford, England, United Kingdom Zip: OX4 4GA Product: UK-based group who detect and prevent...

  7. PV Crystalox Solar AG formerly PV Silicon AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PV Crystalox Solar AG formerly PV Silicon AG Jump to: navigation, search Name: PV Crystalox Solar AG (formerly PV Silicon AG) Place: Abingdon, England, United Kingdom Zip: OX14 4SE...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Poster-PIRs to WISG 2007.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3-7 July 2006, Final R eport. 2. Albrecht, B ., and C ox, S .K., 1977. Procedures ... Reda et al.: Win K0 + K1 * V + K2 * Wr + K3 * (Wd - Wr ) Albrecht & Cox, 2Ks ...

  9. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of cerium oxide (ceria) in contact with copper will form metal-oxide interfaces that ... Scanning tunneling microscope image of a cerium oxide (CeOx) and copper (Cu) catalyst used ...

  10. Structure of the oxygen-annealed chalcogenide superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe1.08Te0.55Se0.45Ox Authors: Hu, Hefei ; Zuo, Jian-Min ; Zheng, Mao ; Eckstein, James N. ; Park, Wan Kyu ; Greene, Laura H. ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Xu, Zhijun ; Lin, Zhiwei ; Li,...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ), a ceramic-metal material showing a highmore electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. ...

  12. DOE/EV-0005/26 ANL-OHS/HP-82-100

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... annually (in mrem) beyond that received from background radiation and medical exposures. ... Spot on flocd Rest of Survey was BXGD Isotope Laboratory Room ox Area No. 404D 404E ' ...

  13. Approaches to Safe Nanotechnology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... How- ever, since this approach relies primarily on static or area sampling, some ... Environ Health Perspect 114(1):51-58. Fuchs NA 1964. The mechanics of aerosols. Ox- ...

  14. Electro Chem Technic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Oxford, United Kingdom Zip: OX3 7LA Product: The company makes and sells a novel small fuel cell. They sell as well a wide range of educational material about fuel...

  15. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from 0 to 3.3 WmK. Thus, the dominant thermal carrier in TaOx switches between vibrations and charge carriers and is controllable either by oxygen content during deposition,...

  16. Bio Energy Investments BEI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investments BEI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bio Energy Investments (BEI) Place: Chinnor, United Kingdom Zip: OX39 4TW Sector: Biomass Product: UK-based company involved in...

  17. James L. Liveman, Acting AssLBtaOt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SD:ZTJ cc: B. ' veen, UL w. Smith, Am ' A. Baker, Utivc-oity of Nevada W. E. Not:, ECT, EQ Robert H. Bauc xanager . ' bc: OX , OFFICE SfiEfm,r SAFE -, -*-r SURNAME ias ce --&%y ...

  18. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  19. Multi-stage, isothermal CO preferential oxidation reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skala, Glenn William; Brundage, Mark A.; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Pettit, William Henry; Stukey, Kevin; Hart-Predmore, David James; Fairchok, Joel

    2000-01-01

    A multi-stage, isothermal, carbon monoxide preferential oxidation (PrOx) reactor comprising a plurality of serially arranged, catalyzed heat exchangers, each separated from the next by a mixing chamber for homogenizing the gases exiting one heat exchanger and entering the next. In a preferred embodiment, at least some of the air used in the PrOx reaction is injected directly into the mixing chamber between the catalyzed heat exchangers.

  20. Q-Switched Nd: YAG Laser Micro-Machining System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messaoud, S.; Allam, A.; Siserir, F.; Bouceta, Y.; Kerdja, T.; Ouadjaout, D.

    2008-09-23

    In this paper, we present the design of a low cost Q-switched Nd: YAG laser micro-machining system for photo masks fabrication. It consists of: Nd:YAG laser source, beam delivery system, X-Y table, PC, The CCD camera and TV monitor. The synchronization between the laser source and the X-Y table is realised by NI PCI-7342, the two axis MID-7602 and LabVIEW based program. The first step of this work consists of engraving continuous and discontinuous lines on a thin film metal with a 100 {mu}m resolution by using the YG 980 Quantel Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

  1. I!' L;I)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ".>;jy i.~jp.~[~~ i,Zz>-c C,+;) ir,i:%J :' 0 p 'd-i I /) f) ic.c iq -.I ,'c i - * w. 3'2 , phi ': r-t;, ; *.i .; I!' L;I) --, -II s;.,yE;J-~,~;~* I' ;, f: >,p.yg ,p ' .L (3 i!>;' !i.3 y/y!-; x>:-y rJgbf;..qp: \' :sF*:l,' 5-".13, -9 _ ..-;~c~-' ~;Li;-~~~~;, 3h' ;[;i-y ; c; ' 1' 1.b y&k' 2 1 , . ..l =i. 1; G.1 ;Tr.; .j. i-:. I qr:i.gky, M,C. Jp, 2.1 F... ii, Ross CENTRAL F ILES ~"CTIVE OF TXIP m --w- The 0' 0 jet% ive Of this trip xas to evaluate tkie !- .zalth

  2. Mild partial deoxygenation of esters catalyzed by an oxazolinylborate-coordinated rhodium silylene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Songchen; Boschen, Jeffery S.; Biswas, Abhranil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-08-17

    An electrophilic, coordinatively unsaturated rhodium complex supported by borate-linked oxazoline, oxazoline-coordinated silylene, and N-heterocyclic carbene donors [{κ³-N,Si,C-PhB(OxMe²)(OxMe²SiHPh)ImMes}Rh(H)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] (2, OxMe² = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImMes = 1-mesitylimidazole) is synthesized from the neutral rhodium silyl {PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (1) and B(C6F5)3. The unusual oxazoline-coordinated silylene structure in 2 is proposed to form by rearrangement of an unobserved isomeric cationic rhodium silylene species [{PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiHPh)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] generated by H abstraction. Complex 2 catalyzes reductions of organic carbonyl compounds with silanes to give hydrosilylation products or deoxygenation products. The pathway to these reactions is primarily influenced by the degree of substitution of the organosilane. Reactions with primary silanes give deoxygenationmore » of esters to ethers, amides to amines, and ketones and aldehydes to hydrocarbons, whereas tertiary silanes react to give 1,2-hydrosilylation of the carbonyl functionality. In contrast, the strong Lewis acid B(C₆F₅)₃ catalyzes the complete deoxygenation of carbonyl compounds to hydrocarbons with PhSiH₃ as the reducing agent.« less

  3. Complexation of Am(III) by oxalate in NaClO{sub 4} media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choppin, G.R.; Chen, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    The complexation of Am(III) by oxalate has been investigated in solutions of NaClO{sub 4} up to 9.0 M ionic strength at 25{degrees}C. The dissociation constants of oxalic acid were determined by potentiometric titration, while the stability constants of the Am(III)-oxalate complexation were measured by the solvent extraction technique. A thermodynamic model was constructed to predict the apparent equilibrium constants at different ionic strengths by applying the Pitzer equation using parameters for the Na{sup +}-HOx{sup -}, Na{sup +}-Ox{sup -}, AmOx{sup +}-ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, and Na{sup +}-Am(Ox){sub 2}{sup -} interactions obtained by fitting the data.

  4. High temperature crystalline superconductors from crystallized glasses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Donglu

    1992-01-01

    A method of preparing a high temperature superconductor from an amorphous phase. The method involves preparing a starting material of a composition of Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.3 Cu.sub.4 Ox or Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.4 Cu.sub.5 Ox, forming an amorphous phase of the composition and heat treating the amorphous phase for particular time and temperature ranges to achieve a single phase high temperature superconductor.

  5. Development of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es056_zhang_2011_o.pdf (841.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Development of High Energy Cathode for Li-ion Batteries Phase Behavior and Solid State Chemistry in Olivines Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials

  6. kE.O?-3.1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    in ofdor that the bynyoraoontnotnthortllw ot l ppurod to be aeoommry boomu. pd.0 oould bo Cixod 08 tho ltmu pur&aro pd.7 brlre . . . . . . i. xfy-wkabo ailyarmP qu..t1olm ox'thsd...

  7. Microsoft Word - TRUPACT-III Quick Facts.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C ommission C ertificate N umber 9 305 General D escription: A r ectangular c ontainer u sed t o t ransport t ransuranic w aste i n a S tandard L arge B ox 2 (SLB2) b y h ighway t...

  8. Selective adsorption in two porous triazolate–oxalate-bridged antiferromagnetic metal-azolate frameworks obtained via in situ decarboxylation of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Juan-Juan; Xu, Xia; Jiang, Ning; Wu, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2015-03-15

    Solvothermal reactions of metal salts, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid (H{sub 2}atzc) and ammonium oxalate in different temperature produced two metal azolate frameworks, namely, [Cu{sub 3}(atzc){sub 2}(atz)(ox)]·1.5H{sub 2}O (1) and [Co{sub 5}(atz){sub 4}(ox){sub 3}(HCOO){sub 2}]·DMF (2) (H{sub 2}atzc=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid, Hatz=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, and ox=oxalate), in which the atzc precusor was in situ decarboxylated. Structural determination reveals that 1 contains [Cu{sub 3}(atzc){sub 2}(atz)]{sup 2−} layers of mixed μ{sub 4}-atzc and μ{sub 3}-atz ligands, which are pillared by ox{sup 2−} groups to form a 3D porous framework. Compound 2 contains 2D layers with basic spindle-shaped decanuclear units, which extended by ox{sup 2−} and formates to form 3D porous framework. Gas adsorption investigation revealed that two kinds of frameworks exhibited selective CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} sorption. Moreover, activated 2 shows H{sub 2} storage capacity. Additionally, magnetic properties of both the compounds have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal reactions of metal salts, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylate and oxalate produced two metal azolate frameworks, which could store gas molecules, especially H{sub 2} due to small pores. in situ decarboxylation of precursor was observed. - Highlights: • Two MAFs were synthesized via in situ decarboxylation of H{sub 2}atzc. • Both activated frameworks exhibited selective CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} sorption. • Activated 2 could adsorb H{sub 2}, which makes it promising candidates for gas storage.

  9. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Takahashi, Miyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-κB)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-κB inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-κB. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  10. Structure and Reactivity of Alkyl Ethers Adsorbed on CeO2(111) Model Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F Calaza; T Chen; D Mullins; S Overbury

    2011-12-31

    The effect of surface hydroxyls on the adsorption of ether on ceria was explored. Adsorption of dimethyl ether (DME) and diethyl ether (DEE) on oxidized and reduced CeO{sub 2}(111) films was studied and compared with Ru(0001) using RAIRS and sXPS within a UHV environment. On Ru(0001) the ethers adsorb weakly with the molecular plane close to parallel to the surface plane. On the ceria films, the adsorption of the ethers was stronger than on the metal surface, presumably due to stronger interaction of the ether oxygen lone pair electrons with a cerium cation. This interaction causes the ethers to tilt away from the surface plane compared to the Ru(0001) surface. No pronounced differences were found between oxidized (CeO{sub 2}) and reduced (CeOx) films. The adsorption of the ethers was found to be perturbed by the presence of OH groups on hydroxylated CeOx. In the case of DEE, the geometry of adsorption resembles that found on Ru, and in the case of dimethyl ether DME is in between that one found on clean CeOx and the metal surface. Decomposition of the DEE was observed on the OH/CeOx surface following high DEE exposure at 300 K and higher temperatures. Ethoxides and acetates were identified as adsorbed species on the surface by means of RAIRS and ethoxides and formates by s-XPS. No decomposition of dimethyl ether was observed on the OH/CeOx at these higher temperatures, implying that the dissociation of the C-O bond from ethers requires the presence of {beta}-hydrogen.

  11. Structure and Reactivity of Alkyl Ethers Adsorbed on CeO(2)(111) Model Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calaza, Florencia C; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mullins, David R; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2011-01-01

    The effect of surface hydroxyls on the adsorption of ether on ceria was explored. Adsorption of dimethyl ether (DME) and diethyl ether (DEE) on oxidized and reduced CeO{sub 2}(111) films was studied and compared with Ru(0001) using RAIRS and sXPS within a UHV environment. On Ru(0001) the ethers adsorb weakly with the molecular plane close to parallel to the surface plane. On the ceria films, the adsorption of the ethers was stronger than on the metal surface, presumably due to stronger interaction of the ether oxygen lone pair electrons with a cerium cation. This interaction causes the ethers to tilt away from the surface plane compared to the Ru(0001) surface. No pronounced differences were found between oxidized (CeO{sub 2}) and reduced (CeOx) films. The adsorption of the ethers was found to be perturbed by the presence of OH groups on hydroxylated CeOx. In the case of DEE, the geometry of adsorption resembles that found on Ru, and in the case of dimethyl ether DME is in between that one found on clean CeOx and the metal surface. Decomposition of the DEE was observed on the OH/CeOx surface following high DEE exposure at 300 K and higher temperatures. Ethoxides and acetates were identified as adsorbed species on the surface by means of RAIRS and ethoxides and formates by s-XPS. No decomposition of dimethyl ether was observed on the OH/CeOx at these higher temperatures, implying that the dissociation of the C-O bond from ethers requires the presence of {beta}-hydrogen.

  12. HI!$PQ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    §¦ ¨ ©    "!$#&%('£¢)10 2 %435©687 @9BADCE9GF HI!$PQ 7 HR9BHR¢¥¢)S¢T C5UV¡£¢)@9 ADCW9 X©Y CWF F U$!`%4ba ¢c%¥F Hd  e5a#f "F g CihY"¢ prqtsvuxwyq€ƒ‚…„‡†‰ˆv’‘”“–•˜—d™ew’fdgcˆ˜shi„kj’lcwDfkm)—8nBˆv‘o’qpdDq–rbs5’q‡•t— u wys nBg(stsv“yg • —kjw€hxDˆvytwyq m

  13. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox.more » Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent actinides and early lanthanides to ionic strength of 6.60 m in low temperature environments in the presence of Ox. Furthermore, the work is also applicable to the accurate modeling transport of rare earth elements in various environments under the surface conditions.« less

  14. Hierarchical Heterogeneity at the CeO x –TiO 2 Interface: Electronic and Geometric Structural Influence on the Photocatalytic Activity of Oxide on Oxide Nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Si; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Barrio, Laura; Sallis, Shawn; Arena, Dario A.; Kundu, Shankhamala; Xu, Wenqian; Piper, Louis F. J.; Stach, Eric A.; et al

    2015-01-13

    Mixed oxide interfaces are critical for delivering active components of demanding catalytic processes such as the photo-catalytic splitting of water. We have studied CeOxTiO₂ catalysts with low ceria loadings of 1 wt%, 3 wt% and 6 wt% that were prepared with wet impregnation methods to favor a strong interaction between CeOx and TiO₂. In these materials the interfaces between CeOx-TiO₂ have been sequentially loaded (1%, 3% and 6%), with and without Pt (0.5 wt%). The structure and properties of the catalysts were characterized using several X-ray and electron based techniques including XRD, XPS, UPS, NEXAFS, UV-Vis and HR-STEM/STEM-EELS, to unravelmore » the local morphology, bulk structure, surface states and electronic structure. The combination of all these techniques allow us to analyze in a systematic way the complete structural and electronic properties that prevail at the CeOx-TiO₂ interface. Fluorite structured nano crystallites of ceria on anatase-structured titania were identified by both XRD and NEXAFS. A sequential increasing of the CeOx loading led to the formation of clusters, then plates and finally nano particles in a hierarchical manner on the TiO₂ support. The electronic structures of these catalysts indicate that the interaction between TiO₂ and CeO₂ is closely related to the local morphology of nanostructured CeO₂. Ce³⁺ cations were detected at the surface of CeO₂ and at the interface of the two oxides. In addition, the titania is perturbed by the interaction with ceria and also with Pt. The photocatalytic activity for the splitting of H₂O using UV light was measured for these materials and correlated with our understanding of the electronic and structural properties. Optimal catalytic performance and photo response results were found for the 1 wt% CeOx-TiO₂ catalyst where low dimensional geometry of the ceria provided ideal electronic and geometrical properties. The structural and electronic properties of the interface

  15. Thermal transport in tantalum oxide films for memristive applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Landon, Colin Donald; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Blea-Kirby, Mia Angelica; Ihlefeld, Jon; Marinella, Matthew; Thomas Edwin Beechem

    2015-07-15

    The thermal conductivity of amorphous TaOx memristive films having variable oxygen content is measured using time domain thermoreflectance. Furthermore, the thermal transport is described by a two-partmodel where the electrical contribution is quantified via the Wiedemann-Franz relation and the vibrational contribution by the minimum thermal conductivity limit for amorphous solids. Additionally, the vibrational contribution remains constant near 0.9 W/mK regardless of oxygen concentration, while the electrical contribution varies from 0 to 3.3 W/mK. Thus, the dominant thermal carrier in TaOx switches between vibrations and charge carriers and is controllable either by oxygen content during deposition, or dynamically by field-induced chargemore » state migration.« less

  16. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, Jesse, L; Witmer, Dennis, PhD

    2012-07-29

    The overall goal of this project was to design, evaluate, and engineer a Vanadium Red-Ox Flow Battery's integration into an existing wind site and micro-grid environment to determine if it is possible to achieve a fifteen percent reduction of diesel fuel usage during periods of peak load and otherwise stabilize the grid in potential high wind penetration systems. The bulk of the work was done by modeling the existing hybrid wind-diesel system and the proposed system with added flow battery storage. The flow battery was changed from a Vanadium Red-Ox to a Zinc Bromine flow battery by a different manufacturer during the modeling process. Several complications arose, but modeling proved to be successful and is ongoing. The development of a modeling platform for flow battery energy storage is a key element in evaluating both economic benefits and dispatch strategies for high penetration in micro-grid wind-diesel systems.

  17. Molecular mechanics approach for design and conformational studies of macrocyclic ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohini,; Akbar, Rifat; Kanungo, B. K.

    2015-08-28

    Computational Chemistry has revolutionized way of viewing molecules at the quantum mechanical scale by allowing simulating various chemical scenarios that are not possible to study in a laboratory. The remarkable applications of computational chemistry have promoted to design and test of the effectiveness of various methods for searching the conformational space of highly flexible molecules. In this context, we conducted a series of optimization and conformational searches on macrocyclic based ligands, 9N3Me5Ox, (1,4,7-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) and 12N3Me5Ox, (1,5,9-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,5,9-triazacyclododecane) and studied their selectivity and coordination behavior with some lanthanide metal ions in molecular mechanics and semiempirical methods. The methods include both systematic and random conformational searches for dihedral angles, torsion angles and Cartesian coordinates. Structural studies were carried out by using geometry optimization, coordination scans and electronic properties were evaluated. The results clearly show that chair-boat conformational isomer of 9N3Me5Ox ligand is more stable due to lower eclipsing ethane interaction and form stronger adduct complexes with lanthanide metal ion. This is because of the fact that, in a central unit of 9N3 of the ligand form six endo type bonds out of nine. The rest of bonds have trans conformation. In contrast, for the adduct of 12N3Me5Ox, two C-C bonds have on eclipsed conformation, and others have synclinal and antiperiplanar confirmations. The distortion of the two eclipsed conformations may affect the yields and the stability of the complexes.

  18. Cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazoline) magnesium and zirconium complexes in aminoalkene hydroaminations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eedugurala, Naresh; Hovey, Megan; Ho, Hung -An; Jana, Barun; Lampland, Nicole L.; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-11-25

    Here, a new class of cyclopentadiene-bis(oxazoline) compounds and their piano-stool-type organometallic complexes have been prepared as catalysts for hydroamination of aminoalkenes. The two compounds MeC(OxMe2)2C5H5 (BoMCpH; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline) and MeC(OxMe2)2C5Me4H (BoMCptetH) are synthesized from C5R4HI (R = H, Me) and MeC(OxMe2)2Li. These cyclopentadiene-bis(oxazolines) are converted into ligands that support a variety of metal centers in piano-stool-type geometries, and here we report the preparation of Mg, Tl, Ti, and Zr compounds. BoMCpH and BoMCptetH react with MgMe2(O2C4H8)2 to give the magnesium methyl complexes {BoMCp}MgMe and {BoMCptet}MgMe. BoMCpH and BoMCptetH are converted to BoMCpTl and BoMCptetTl by reaction with TlOEt. Themore » thallium derivatives react with TiCl3(THF)3 to provide [{BoMCp}TiCl(μ-Cl)]2 and [{BoMCptet}TiCl(μ-Cl)]2, the former of which is crystallographically characterized as a dimeric species. BoMCpH and Zr(NMe2)4 react to eliminate dimethylamine and afford {BoMCp}Zr(NMe2)3, which is crystallographically characterized as a monomeric four-legged piano-stool compound. {BoMCp}Zr(NMe2)3, {BoMCp}MgMe, and {BoMCptet}MgMe are efficient catalysts for the hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes under mild conditions.« less

  19. 06.01.16 BVO - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoanode Development Through Combinatorial Integration of mixed-metal Oxide Catalysts on Bismuth vanadate Guevarra, D. et al. Development of solar fuels photoanodes through combinatorial integration of Ni-La-Co-Ce oxide catalysts on BiVO4. Energy & Environmental Science, DOI: 10.1039/C5EE03488D (2015). Scientific Achievement Multi-metal compositions of (Ni-La-Co-Ce)Ox oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst coatings improve the photoelectrochemical power conversion efficiency 20-fold

  20. 15.02.10 RH Transparent Catalytic - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Catalytic Nickel Oxide Protecting Films for Photoanodes Sun, K. et al. Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films. PNAS 112 ( 12), 3612-3617, DOI: 10.1073/ pnas . 1423034112 (2015). Scientific Achievement Reactively sputtered NiOx layer provides a transparent, anti-reflective, conductive, chemically stable, inherently catalytic coating that stabilizes many efficient and technologically important

  1. Water–gas shift reaction over gold nanoparticles dispersed on nanostructured CeOx–TiO2(110) surfaces: Effects of high ceria coverage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grinter, D. C.; Park, J. B.; Agnoli, S.; Evans, J.; Hrbek, J.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    We used scanning tunnelling microscopy to study the morphology of an overlayer of ceria in contact with a TiO2(110) substrate. Two types of domains were observed after ceria deposition. An ordered ceria film covered half of the surface and high-resolution imaging suggested a near-c(6 × 2) relationship to the underlying TiO2(110)-(1 × 1). For the other half of the surface, it comprised CeOx nanoparticles and reconstructed TiOx supported on TiO2(110)-(1 × 1). Exposure to a small amount of gold resulted in the formation of isolated gold atoms and small clusters on the ordered ceria film and TiO2(110)-(1 × 1) areas,more » which exhibited significant sintering at 500 K and showed strong interaction between the sintered gold clusters and the domain boundaries of the ceria film. The Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) model system proved to be a good catalyst for the water–gas shift (WGS) exhibiting much higher turnover frequencies (TOFs) than Cu(111) and Pt(111) benchmarks, or the individual Au/TiO2(110) and Au/CeO2(111) systems. Finally, for Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) catalysts, there was a decrease in catalytic activity with increasing ceria coverage that correlates with a reduction in the concentration of Ce3 + formed during WGS reaction conditions.« less

  2. High Temperature Strength of YSZ Joints Brazed with Palladium Silver Copper Oxide Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2010-06-09

    The Ag-CuOx system is being investigated as potential filler metals for use in air brazing high-temperature electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells and gas concentrators. The current study examines the effects of palladium addition on the high temperature joint strength of specimens prepared from yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) bars brazed with the binary Ag-CuOx, and 15Pd-Ag-CuO. It was found that while the binary Ag-CuOx system exhibits stronger room temperature strength than the 15Pd system the strength is reduced to values equivalent of the 15Pd system at 800C. The 15Pd system exhibits a lower ambient temperature strength that is retained at 800C. In both systems the failure mechanism at high temperature appears to be peeling of the noble metal component from the oxide phases and tearing through the noble metal phase whereas sufficient adhesion is retained at lower temperatures to cause fracture of the YSZ substrate.

  3. Role of precursor chemistry in the direct fluorination to form titanium based conversion anodes for lithium ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adcock, Jamie; Dai, Sheng; Veith, Gabriel M.; Bridges, Craig A.; Powell, Jonathan M.

    2015-10-13

    In this study, a new synthetic route for the formation of titanium oxydifluoride (TiOF2) through the process of direct fluorination via a fluidized bed reactor system and the associated electrochemical properties of the powders formed from this approach are reported. The flexibility of this synthetic route was demonstrated using precursor powders of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, as well as a reduced TiOxNy. An advantage of this synthetic method is the ability to directly control the extent of fluorination as a function of reaction temperature and time. The reversible capacity of TiOF2 anodes was found to depend greatly upon the precursormore » employed. The TiOF2 synthesized from TiO2 and TiOxNy showed reversible capacities of 300 mAh g-1 and 440 mAh g-1, respectively, over 100 cycles. The higher reversible capacity of the TiOF2 powders derived from TiOxNy likely relate to the partial reduction of the Ti in the fluorinated electrode material, highlighting a route to optimize the properties of conversion electrode materials.« less

  4. Introducing improved structural properties and salt dependence into a coarse-grained model of DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snodin, Benedict E. K. Mosayebi, Majid; Schreck, John S.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Randisi, Ferdinando; ulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Tsukanov, Roman; Nir, Eyal; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-06-21

    We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures, such as DNA origami, which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na{sup +}] = 0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.

  5. Hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol: Importance of metal–oxide and metal–carbide interfaces in the activation of CO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, José A.; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; White, Michael G.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the high thermochemical stability of CO2 makes it very difficult to achieve the catalytic conversion of the molecule into alcohols or other hydrocarbon compounds, which can be used as fuels or the starting point for the generation of fine chemicals. Pure metals and bimetallic systems used for the CO2 → CH3OH conversion usually bind CO2 too weakly and, thus, show low catalytic activity. Here, we discuss a series of recent studies that illustrate the advantages of metal–oxide and metal–carbide interfaces when aiming at the conversion of CO2 into methanol. CeOx/Cu(111), Cu/CeOx/TiO2(110), and Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) exhibit an activity formore » the CO2 → CH3OH conversion that is 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than that of a benchmark Cu(111) catalyst. In the Cu–ceria and Au–ceria interfaces, the multifunctional combination of metal and oxide centers leads to complementary chemical properties that open active reaction pathways for methanol synthesis. Efficient catalysts are also generated after depositing Cu and Au on TiC(001). In these cases, strong metal–support interactions modify the electronic properties of the admetals and make them active for the binding of CO2 and its subsequent transformation into CH3OH at the metal–carbide interfaces.« less

  6. Omega-3 fatty acid oxidation products prevent vascular endothelial cell activation by coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majkova, Zuzana; Layne, Joseph; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2011-02-15

    Coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may facilitate development of atherosclerosis by stimulating pro-inflammatory pathways in the vascular endothelium. Nutrition, including fish oil-derived long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6{omega}-3), can reduce inflammation and thus the risk of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that cyclopentenone metabolites produced by oxidation of DHA can protect against PCB-induced endothelial cell dysfunction. Oxidized DHA (oxDHA) was prepared by incubation of the fatty acid with the free radical generator 2,2-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Cellular pretreatment with oxDHA prevented production of superoxide induced by PCB77, and subsequent activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). A{sub 4}/J{sub 4}-neuroprostanes (NPs) were identified and quantitated using HPLC ESI tandem mass spectrometry. Levels of these NPs were markedly increased after DHA oxidation with AAPH. The protective actions of oxDHA were reversed by treatment with sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), which concurrently abrogated A{sub 4}/J{sub 4}-NP formation. Up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by PCB77 was markedly reduced by oxDHA, but not by un-oxidized DHA. These protective effects were proportional to the abundance of A{sub 4}/J{sub 4} NPs in the oxidized DHA sample. Treatment of cells with oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5{omega}-3) also reduced MCP-1 expression, but less than oxDHA. Treatment with DHA-derived cyclopentenones also increased DNA binding of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and downstream expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), similarly to the Nrf-2 activator sulforaphane. Furthermore, sulforaphane prevented PCB77-induced MCP-1 expression, suggesting that activation of Nrf-2 mediates the observed protection against PCB77 toxicity. Our data implicate A{sub 4}/J{sub 4}-NPs as mediators of omega-3 fatty acid-mediated protection against the

  7. Fe/SSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIR/Mössbauer Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Kollar, Marton; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Washton, Nancy M.; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles H.F.

    2015-03-01

    Using a traditional aqueous solution ion-exchange method under a protecting atmosphere of N2, an Fe/SSZ-13 catalyst active in NH3-SCR was synthesized. Mössbauer and FTIR spectroscopies were used to probe the nature of the Fe sites. In the fresh sample, the majority of Fe species are extra-framework cations. The likely monomeric and dimeric ferric ions in hydrated form are [Fe(OH)2]+ and [HO-Fe-O-Fe-OH]2+, based on Mössbauer measurements. During the severe hydrothermal aging (HTA) applied in this study, a majority of cationic Fe species convert to FeAlOx and clustered FeOx species, accompanied by severe dealumination of the SSZ-13 framework. The clustered FeOx species do not give a sextet Mössbauer spectrum, indicating that these are highly disordered. However, some Fe species in cationic positions remain after aging as determined from Mössbauer measurements and CO/NO FTIR titrations. NO/NH3 oxidation reaction tests reveal that dehydrated cationic Fe are substantially more active in catalyzing oxidation reactions than the hydrated ones. For NH3-SCR, enhancement of NO oxidation under ‘dry’ conditions promotes SCR rates below ~300 • C. This is due mainly to contribution from the “fast” SCR channel. Above ~300 • C, enhancement of NH3 oxidation under ‘dry’ conditions, however, becomes detrimental to NOx conversions. The HTA sample loses much of the SCR activity below ~300 • C; however, above ~400 • C much of the activity remains. This may suggest that the FeAlOx and FeOx species become active at such elevated temperatures. Alternatively, the high-temperature activity may be maintained by the remaining extra-framework cationic species. For potential practical applications, Fe/SSZ-13 may be used as a co-catalyst for Cu/CHA as integral aftertreatment SCR catalysts on the basis of the stable high temperature activity after hydrothermal aging. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  8. Development and characterization of a hydrogen peroxide-resistant cholangiocyte cell line: A novel model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanan, Raynoo; Techasen, Anchalee; Hou, Bo; Jamnongkan, Wassana; Armartmuntree, Napat; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Murata, Mariko

    2015-08-14

    Oxidative stress is a cause of inflammation–related diseases, including cancers. Cholangiocarcinoma is a liver cancer with bile duct epithelial cell phenotypes. Our previous studies in animal and human models indicated that oxidative stress is a major cause of cholangiocarcinoma development. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) can generate hydroxyl radicals, which damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to cell death. However, some cells can survive by adapting to oxidative stress conditions, and selective clonal expansion of these resistant cells would be involved in oxidative stress-related carcinogenesis. The present study aimed to establish H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell line from an immortal cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1) by chronic treatment with low-concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (25 μM). After 72 days of induction, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell lines (ox-MMNK1-L) were obtained. The ox-MMNK1-L cell line showed H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant properties, increasing the expression of the anti-oxidant genes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), and superoxide dismutase-3 (SOD3) and the enzyme activities of CAT and intracellular SODs. Furthermore, the resistant cells showed increased expression levels of an epigenetics-related gene, DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), when compared to the parental cells. Interestingly, the ox-MMNK1-L cell line had a significantly higher cell proliferation rate than the MMNK1 normal cell line. Moreover, ox-MMNK1-L cells showed pseudopodia formation and the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion (multi-layers) under additional oxidative stress (100 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). These findings suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cells can be used as a model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis through molecular changes such as alteration of gene expression and epigenetic changes. - Highlights: • An H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant ox-MMNK1-L cells was established from

  9. Transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates: Catalysts for asymmetric olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory

    2012-12-17

    The research presented and discussed in this dissertation involves the synthesis of transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates, and their application in catalytic enantioselective olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation. Neutral oxazolinylboranes are excellent synthetic intermediates for preparing new borate ligands and also developing organometallic complexes. Achiral and optically active bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are synthesized by reaction of 2-lithio-2-oxazolide and 0.50 equiv of dichlorophenylborane. These bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are oligomeric species in solid state resulting from the coordination of an oxazoline to the boron center of another borane monomer. The treatment of chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes with sodium cyclopentadienide provide optically active cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates H[PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}] [Ox{sup R} = Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4R-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4S-tBu]}. These optically active proligands react with an equivalent of M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) to afford corresponding cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 complexes {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}}M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} in high yields. These group 4 compounds catalyze cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature or below, providing pyrrolidine, piperidine, and azepane with enantiomeric excesses up to 99%. Our mechanistic investigations suggest a non-insertive mechanism involving concerted C?N/C?H bond formation in the turnover limiting step of the catalytic cycle. Among cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 catalysts, the zirconium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}){sub 2}}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} ({S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}) displays highest activity and enantioselectivity. Interestingly, {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} also desymmetrizes olefin moieties of achiral non-conjugated aminodienes and aminodiynes during cyclization

  10. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox. Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent

  11. Organic waste amendments effect on zinc fraction of two soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, L.M.

    1999-10-01

    Organic soil amendments can ameliorate metal toxicity to plants by redistributing metals to less available fractions. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of organic amendments on Zn distribution among soil fractions. Two soils were amended with five organic waste materials (some of which contained Zn) or commercial humic acid with and without 400 mg kg{sup {minus}1} Zn, incubated, and fractionated using a sequential extraction technique. Where no Zn was added most of the metals were in the residual fraction. Commercial compost, poultry litter, and industrial sewage sludge increased Zn in the exchangeable (EXC), organic (OM), and manganese oxide (MnOx) fractions due to Zn in the materials. Spent mushroom compost (SMC) redistributed Zn from the EXC fraction to the MnOx fraction for the coarse-textured soil. Where Zn was added, most of the metal was in the EXC and OM fractions. The SMC and humic acid lowered Zn in the EXC fraction and increased Zn in the other fractions. Effects of the organic materials on Zn in soil fractions were more evident for the sandy soil dominated by quartz in the clay than for the finer-textured soil dominated by kaolinite in the clay-size fraction. It was concluded that organic materials high in Zn can increase Zn in the EXC, OM, and MnOx fractions where the soil is not contaminated and others such as SMC and HA can lower the potential availability of Zn in contaminated soils by redistributing it from the EXC to less soluble fractions.

  12. When ruthenia met titania: Achieving extraordinary catalytic activity at low temperature by nanostructuring of oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Graciani, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Yang, F.; Evans, J.; Vidal, A. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Sanz, J. F.

    2015-09-09

    Nanostructured RuOx/TiO2(110) catalysts have a remarkable catalytic activity for CO oxidation at temperatures in the range of 350–375 K. Furthermore, the RuO2(110) surface has no activity. The state-of-the-art DFT calculations indicate that the main reasons for such an impressive improvement in the catalytic activity are: (i) a decrease of the diffusion barrier of adsorbed O atoms by around 40%, from 1.07 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.66 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110), which explains the shift of the activity to lower temperatures and (ii) a lowering of the barrier by 20% for the association of adsorbed CO and O species to give CO2more » (the main barrier for the CO oxidation reaction) passing from around 0.7 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.55 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110). We show that the catalytic properties of ruthenia are strongly modified when supported as nanostructures on titania, attaining higher activity at temperatures 100 K lower than that needed for pure ruthenia. As in other systems consisting of ceria nanostructures supported on titania, nanostructured ruthenia shows strongly modified properties compared to the pure oxide, consolidating the fact that the nanostructuring of oxides is a main way to attain higher catalytic activity at lower temperatures.« less

  13. Fundamental Bulk/Surface Structure Photoactivity Relationships of Supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phivilay, Somphonh; Roberts, Charles; Puretzky, Alexander A; Domen, Kazunari Domen; Wachs, Israel

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN photocatalyst was examined as a model nitride photocatalyst system to assist in the development of fundamental structure photoactivity relationships for UV activated water splitting. Surface characterization of the outermost surface layers by High Sensitivity-LEIS and High Resolution-XPS revealed for the first time that the GaN support consists of a GaOx outermost surface layer and a thin film of GaOxNy in the surface region. HR-XPS also demonstrates that the supported (Rh2-yCryO3) mixed oxide nanoparticles (NPs) exclusively consist of Cr+3 and Rh+3 cations and are surface enriched for the supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN photocatalyst. Bulk analysis by Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy show that the bulk molecular and electronic structures, respectively, of the GaN support are not perturbed by the deposition of the (Rh2-yCryO3) mixed oxide NPs. The function of the GaN bulk lattice is to generate photoexcited electrons/holes, with the electrons harnessed by the surface Rh+3 sites for evolution of H2 and the holes trapped at the Ga oxide/oxynitride surface sites for splitting of water and evolving O2. These new structure-photoactivity relationships for supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN also extend to the best performing visible light activated supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/(Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx) photocatalyst.

  14. A Comparative Kinetics Study between Cu/SSZ-13 and Fe/SSZ-13 SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Kollar, Marton; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-11-09

    Cu- and Fe/SSZ-13 catalysts with the same Cu(Fe)/Al ratios are synthesized using the same parent SSZ-13 starting material. The catalytic performance for both fresh and hydrothermally aged catalysts is tested with NO and NH3 oxidation, and standard SCR reactions under steady-state conditions, and standard and fast SCR under temperature-programmed conditions. For standard SCR, Cu/SSZ-13 shows much better low-temperature performance which can be explained by NH3-inhibition of Fe/SSZ-13. During hydrothermal aging, both catalysts undergo dealumination but Fe/SSZ-13 dealuminates more severely. For aged catalysts, Cu/SSZ-13 gains oxidation activities due to formation of CuOx. However, Fe/SSZ-13 loses oxidation activities although formation of FeOx clusters and FeAlOx species also occur. Because of such physical properties differences, aged Cu/SSZ-13 loses while Fe/SSZ-13 maintains high-temperature SCR selectivities. A physical mixture of aged catalysts provides stable SCR performance in a wide temperature range and is able to decrease N2O formation at high reaction temperatures. This suggests that Fe/SSZ-13 can be used as a cocatalyst for Cu/SSZ-13 for transportation applications. During temperature-programmed SCR reactions, weak hysteresis is found during standard SCR due to NH3 inhibition. For fast SCR, hysteresis caused by NH4NO3 inhibition is much more significant. NH4NO3 deposition is greatly enhanced by Brønsted and Lewis acidity of the catalysts.

  15. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet; Dylla, III, Henry Frederick

    1997-01-01

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  16. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

    1997-11-04

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

  17. I|ex~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I|ex~ ~ ILKE&y~~~ *ORNL/RASA-92/14 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Results of the Radiological Survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory Site *z riiiriri-lrirfZ Properties, Oxford, Ohio (OX001) M. E. Murray K. S. Brown R. A. Mathis MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY | ~~DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Techni-

  18. Cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazoline) magnesium and zirconium complexes in aminoalkene hydroaminations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eedugurala, Naresh; Hovey, Megan; Ho, Hung -An; Jana, Barun; Lampland, Nicole L.; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-11-25

    Here, a new class of cyclopentadiene-bis(oxazoline) compounds and their piano-stool-type organometallic complexes have been prepared as catalysts for hydroamination of aminoalkenes. The two compounds MeC(OxMe2)2C5H5 (BoMCpH; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline) and MeC(OxMe2)2C5Me4H (BoMCptetH) are synthesized from C5R4HI (R = H, Me) and MeC(OxMe2)2Li. These cyclopentadiene-bis(oxazolines) are converted into ligands that support a variety of metal centers in piano-stool-type geometries, and here we report the preparation of Mg, Tl, Ti, and Zr compounds. BoMCpH and BoMCptetH react with MgMe2(O2C4H8)2 to give the magnesium methyl complexes {BoMCp}MgMe and {BoMCptet}MgMe. BoMCpH and BoMCptetH are converted to BoMCpTl and BoMCptetTl by reaction with TlOEt. The thallium derivatives react with TiCl3(THF)3 to provide [{BoMCp}TiCl(μ-Cl)]2 and [{BoMCptet}TiCl(μ-Cl)]2, the former of which is crystallographically characterized as a dimeric species. BoMCpH and Zr(NMe2)4 react to eliminate dimethylamine and afford {BoMCp}Zr(NMe2)3, which is crystallographically characterized as a monomeric four-legged piano-stool compound. {BoMCp}Zr(NMe2)3, {BoMCp}MgMe, and {BoMCptet}MgMe are efficient catalysts for the hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes under mild conditions.

  19. Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation Catalytic properties of Au-CuOx/SiO2 are investigated in removing pollutants from simulated automotive exhaust to meet an increasing demand for high emissions control at low temperatures. p-02_bauer.pdf (718.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Low Temperature Emission Control Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Low Temperature Emission Control to

  20. BAKELITE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    G BAKELITE CORPORATION ,-----, K-- ,., ,".\ 1; / "_.~~, "N,i OF "N,ON CARBIDE AND CARBON tORPORATlON ' ./--z&.u; ?.C"CL ,' .. I: Em ; 00 US, . ..myq "LI 70s.. ,, ., .:, RIVER ROAD _ ., ' :, _ BOUND BROOK, N.J. , ip. 0. zox 710) S' hject: Zakelite Corp. G-7405 - eng. 283 ' .,,:.. ' ,. ., ,\ ___: I\, ".' i ! : ;1. v .\. December 15, 19>4A'. Major J. ; . Christenson bar Department i\letiat ;tan Sngineer District ??ew York Area - P. 0. P.ox 265 Church Street

  1. CONTRACTOR AND ADDRESS COEPPRACT FOR: TERM: COMMT.SSION OBLIGATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CONTRACTOR AND ADDRESS COEPPRACT FOR: TERM: COMMT.SSION OBLIGATION PAYMENT TO m MADE BY: CONTRACT NO. AT(30-l)-1247 CONTRACT pl AMERICAN MACHINE Ah'D FOUNDRY COMP'N' Second Avenue and 56th Street Brooklyn, New York MA$HR\?No AND OTHER WORK AND SERVICES August o' 19% to December 31 9 0 'lyj! 512O,ox).OO Division of Disbursement, United States Treasury Department,' New York, New York. Subn-it invoices to: United States Atomic Energy Corrcni&ion, P. 0. %x 30, Ansonia Station New York 23, l!tw

  2. FRm : John A. Deny, DitiSion Of

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    to : lieads of Divisions am3 Man DAW.: December 6, 1954 FRm : John A. Deny, DitiSion Of SPNBOL : csm-R:AcB The attached tabulation of active AEC contracts over $l,ooO,Mx) haa been ,xepared as a result of recurring requests fcr infmmatirm cm ow larger contracts. It consists ox- Pa-t I - E+ime contracts and Pert II - Sub- ccdxacts, and lists the contracts alphabetically bq Operations Office to shar; (1) tne of work being prformed by the contractcr; (2) contract rmter; (3).ac&ated dollar

  3. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I & -Ty( p-3, ' W. r( * t P.O. B L a. /I 24, / Clin CHEMICALS GROUP OX 652 l PASADENA. TEXAS 77601 l (713) 472.3641 LJ/ April 12, 1979 Mr. William E. Mott Acting Director Environmental Control Technology Division Department of Energy Washington, D. C. 20545 Dear Mr. Mott: The following information has been developed in line with the questionaire enclosed with your letter of March 13th, 1979 on the AEC Project at Pasadena. 1. The site is located on the Houston Ship Channel near Pasadena

  4. Electric control of magnetism at the Fe/BaTiO3 interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Radaelli, G.; Petti, D.; Plekhanov, E.; Fina, I.; Torelli, P.; Salles, B. R.; Cantoni, M.; Rinaldi, C.; Gutiérrez, D.; Panaccione, G.; et al

    2014-03-03

    Interfacial magnetoelectric coupling (MEC) is a viable path to achieve electrical writing of magnetic information in spintronic devices. For the prototypical Fe/BaTiO3 (BTO) system, only tiny changes of the interfacial Fe magnetic moment upon reversal of the BTO dielectric polarization have been predicted so far. Here, by using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism in combination with high resolution electron microscopy and first principles calculations, we report on an undisclosed physical mechanism for interfacial MEC in the Fe/BTO system. At the Fe/BTO interface, an ultrathin FeOx layer exists, whose magnetization can be electrically and reversibly switched on-off at room-temperature by reversing themore » BTO polarization. The suppression / recovery of interfacial ferromagnetism results from the asymmetric effect that ionic displacements in BTO produces on the exchange coupling constants in the adjacent FeOx layer. The observed giant magnetoelectric response holds potential for optimizing interfacial MEC in view of efficient, low-power spintronic devices.« less

  5. Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2006-10-03

    Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

  6. High-Performance Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells by Using a Combination of Ultrasonic Spray-Coating and Low Thermal Budget Photonic Curing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjib, Das; Yang, Bin; Gu, Gong; Joshi, Pooran C; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Aytug, Tolga; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the commercialization of high-performance and robust perovskite solar cells urgently requires the development of economically scalable processing techniques. Here we report a high-throughput ultrasonic spray-coating (USC) process capable of fabricating perovskite film-based solar cells on glass substrates with power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 13.04%. Perovskite films with high uniformity, crystallinity, and surface coverage are obtained in a single step. Moreover, we report USC processing on TiOx/ITO-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates to realize flexible perovskite solar cells with PCE as high as 8.02% that are robust under mechanical stress. In this case, an optical curing technique was used to achieve a highly-conductive TiOx layer on flexible PET substrates for the first time. The high device performance and reliability obtained by this combination of USC processing with optical curing appears very promising for roll-to-roll manufacturing of high-efficiency, flexible perovskite solar cells.

  7. Bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts with low amounts of Rh for the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane for fuel-cell applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrandon, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Krause, T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-05-15

    Mono-metallic nickel and rhodium catalysts and bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeZrO{sub 2} and CeMgOx were prepared and evaluated for catalyzing the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane. The binary Ni-Rh supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with low weight loading of rhodium exhibited higher H{sub 2} yields than Ni or Rh alone. The Ni-Rh/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst exhibited higher performance and no coke formation, compared to the same metals on other supports. A NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase was obtained on all Ni and Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The presence of rhodium stabilized the spinel phase as well as NiOx species upon reforming while Ni alone was mostly reduced into metallic species. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis showed evidence of Ni-Rh alloy during preparation and even further after an accelerated aging at 900C in a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmosphere.

  8. Enhanced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by metal-modified silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brahiti, N.; Hadjersi, T.; Menari, H.; Amirouche, S.; El Kechai, O.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • SiNWs modified with Pd, Au and Pt were used as photocatalysts to degrade MB. • Yield of photodegardation increases with UV irradiation time. • SiNWs modified with Pd nanoparticles show the best photocatalytic activity. • A degradation of 97% was obtained after 200 min of UV irradiation. - Abstract: Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) modified with Au, Pt and Pd nanoparticles were used as heterogeneous photocatalysts for the photodegradation of methylene blue in water under UV light irradiation. The modification of SiNWs was carried out by deposition of metal nanoparticles using the electroless metal deposition (EMD) technique. The effect of metal nanoparticles deposition time on the photocatalytic activity was studied. It was found that the photocatalytic activity of modified SiNWs was enhanced when the deposition time of metal nanoparticles was increased. In addition of modified SiNWs with Pt, Au and Pd nanoparticles, oxidized silicon substrate (Ox-Si), oxidized silicon nanowires (Ox-SiNWs) and hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs) were also evaluated for the photodegradation of methylene blue.

  9. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  10. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were foundmore » to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.« less

  11. Piano-stool lutetium amido and imido compounds supported by a constrained bis(oxazoline)cyclopentadienyl ligand

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lampland, Nicole L.; Zhu, Jing; Hovey, Megan; Jana, Barun; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-06-25

    {BoMCptet}Lu(CH2Ph)2 (1; BoMCptet = MeC(OxMe2 2C5Me4; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline) was prepared in 95% yield from the reaction of BoMCptetH and Lu(CH2Ph)3THF3. Compound 1 reacts with 1 or 2 equiv of H2NCH2R (R = C6H5, 1-C10H7) to give the corresponding imido complexes [{BoMCptet}LuNCH2R]2 (R = C6H5 (2a), 1-C10H7 (2b)) or amido complexes {BoMCptet}Lu(NHCH2R)2 (R = C6H5 (3a), 1-C10H7 (3b)). When isolated, the imido species are insoluble in nonprotic organic solvents. Crystallographic characterization reveals dimeric [{BoMCptet}LuNCH2(1-C10H7)]2 in the solid state. The reaction of 1 and NH3B(C6F5)3 affords crystallographically characterized {BoMCptet}Lu{NHB(C6F5)2}C6F5. This species is proposed to form via a transient lutetium imido, whichmore » undergoes C6F5 migration to the lutetium center.« less

  12. An In-Situ XAS Study of the Structural Changes in a CuO-CeO2/Al2O3 Catalyst during Total Oxidation of Propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silversmith, Geert; Poelman, Hilde; Poelman, Dirk; Gryse, Roger de; Olea, Maria; Balcaen, Veerle; Heynderickx, Philippe; Marin, Guy B.

    2007-02-02

    A CuOx-CeOx/Al2O3 catalyst was studied with in-situ transmission Cu K XAS for the total oxidation of propane as model reaction for the catalytic elimination of volatile organic compounds. The local Cu structure was determined for the catalyst as such, after pre-oxidation and after reduction with propane. The catalyst as such has a local CuO structure. No structural effect was observed upon heating in He up to 600 deg. C or after pre-oxidation at 150 deg. C. A full reduction of the Cu2+ towards metallic Cu0 occurred, when propane was fed to the catalyst. The change in local Cu structure during propane reduction was followed with a time resolution of 1 min. The {chi}(k) scans appeared as linear combinations of start and end spectra, CuO and Cu structure, respectively. However, careful examination of the XANES edge spectra indicates the presence of a small amount of additional Cu1+ species.

  13. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  14. Plasma interface of the EC waves to the LHD peripheral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo, S. Igami, H.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Shimozuma, T.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Makino, R.; Mutoh, T.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-12-10

    In order to realize an efficient ECRH and also to reduce stray radiation due to non-absorbed power during ECRH, it is necessary to excite a wave that is absorbed well near the electron cyclotron resonance. In the normal fusion magnetic field confinement machine and in the electron cyclotron frequency range, WKB approximation is valid almost all the way from antenna to the absorption region due to the large scale-length of the plasma density λ{sub n} and the magnetic shear τ{sub s} as compared with the local wavelength λ{sub 0}. In these situation, it is well known that the O/X mode propagates as O/X mode if τ{sub s} ≫ λ{sub 0}. Even in these situation, if τ{sub s} and λ{sub n} are comparable and |1/λ{sub O}−1/λ{sub X}|τ{sub s} ≪ 1, there still remains the question from where ”X” - or ”O” - mode become ”X” - or ”O” mode at the peripheral region. In order to simulate this situation, one dimensional full wave calculation code which solve electromagnetic wave equation under arbitrary magnetic field configuration and arbitrary density profile for a given polarization state are developed and incorporated in the upgraded ray tracing code LHDGauss. It is tried to find the density and shear scale lengths region where the mode mixing effect is not negligible.

  15. A biotemplated nickel nanostructure: Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashtari, Khadijeh; Fasihi, Javad; Mollania, Nasrin; Khajeh, Khosro

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: Nickel nanostructure-encapsulated bacteria were prepared using electroless deposition. Bacterium surface was activated by red-ox reaction of its surface amino acids. Interfacial changes at cell surfaces were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. TEM and AFM depicted morphological changes. Antibacterial activity of nanostructure was examined against different bacteria strains. - Abstract: Nickel nanostructure-encapsulated bacteria were prepared using the electroless deposition procedure and activation of bacterium cell surface by red-ox reaction of surface amino acids. The electroless deposition step occurred in the presence of Ni(II) and dimethyl amine boran (DMAB). Interfacial changes at bacteria cell surfaces during the coating process were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence of tryptophan residues was completely quenched after the deposition of nickel onto bacteria surfaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) depicted morphological changes on the surface of the bacterium. It was found that the Ni coated nanostructure was mechanically stable after ultrasonication for 20 min. Significant increase in surface roughness of bacteria was also observed after deposition of Ni clusters. The amount of coated Ni on the bacteria surface was calculated as 36% w/w. The antibacterial activity of fabricated nanostructure in culture media was examined against three different bacteria strains; Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Xantomonas campestris. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined as 500 mg/L, 350 mg/L and 200 mg/L against bacteria, respectively.

  16. Air Brazing: A New Method of Ceramic-Ceramic and Ceramic-Metal Joining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, K. Scott; Darsell, Jens T.; Kim, Jin Yong

    2011-10-01

    A new method of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal joining has emerged over the past several years. Referred to as air brazing, the technique was originally designed and developed for use in fabricating high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices such as planar SOFCs and oxygen and hydrogen concentrators. The primary advantage of air brazing is that a predominantly metallic joint can be formed directly in air without need of an inert cover gas or the use of surface reactive fluxes. The resulting bond is hermetic, offers excellent room temperature strength, and is inherently resistant to oxidation at high temperature. The key to developing a successful filler metal composition for air brazing is to identify a metal oxide wetting agent that is mutually soluble in a molten noble metal solvent. One particular oxide-metal combination that appears readily suited for this purpose is CuOx-Ag, a system originally of interest in the development of silver clad cuprate-based superconductors. Studies of the equilibrium phases studies in this system indicate that there are two invariant points in the pseudobinary CuOx-Ag phase diagram around which new braze compositions can be developed: 1) a monotectic reaction at 9691C, where CuO and a Ag-rich liquid L1 coexist with a second CuOx-rich liquid phase L2 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.100.03 Ag and 2) a eutectic reaction at 9421C, where CuO and Ag coexist with L1 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.990.005. Specifically, near-eutectic Ag-CuO filler metal compositions have shown good promise in joining electrochemically active ceramics such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, lanthanum strontium manganite, and barium strontium cobalt ferrite, as well as alumina and magnesia. More recently it has been found that various ternary additions can further improve the wetting characteristics of these filler metals, increase their potential operating temperatures, and/or increase the resulting strength of the joint

  17. Three-dimensional fully-coupled electrical and thermal transport model of dynamic switching in oxide memristors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Xujiao; Mamaluy, Denis; Mickel, Patrick R.; Marinella, Matthew

    2015-09-08

    In this paper, we present a fully-coupled electrical and thermal transport model for oxide memristors that solves simultaneously the time-dependent continuity equations for all relevant carriers, together with the time-dependent heat equation including Joule heating sources. The model captures all the important processes that drive memristive switching and is applicable to simulate switching behavior in a wide range of oxide memristors. The model is applied to simulate the ON switching in a 3D filamentary TaOx memristor. Simulation results show that, for uniform vacancy density in the OFF state, vacancies fill in the conduction filament till saturation, and then fill outmore » a gap formed in the Ta electrode during ON switching; furthermore, ON-switching time strongly depends on applied voltage and the ON-to-OFF current ratio is sensitive to the filament vacancy density in the OFF state.« less

  18. Three-dimensional fully-coupled electrical and thermal transport model of dynamic switching in oxide memristors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Xujiao; Mamaluy, Denis; Mickel, Patrick R.; Marinella, Matthew

    2015-09-08

    In this paper, we present a fully-coupled electrical and thermal transport model for oxide memristors that solves simultaneously the time-dependent continuity equations for all relevant carriers, together with the time-dependent heat equation including Joule heating sources. The model captures all the important processes that drive memristive switching and is applicable to simulate switching behavior in a wide range of oxide memristors. The model is applied to simulate the ON switching in a 3D filamentary TaOx memristor. Simulation results show that, for uniform vacancy density in the OFF state, vacancies fill in the conduction filament till saturation, and then fill out a gap formed in the Ta electrode during ON switching; furthermore, ON-switching time strongly depends on applied voltage and the ON-to-OFF current ratio is sensitive to the filament vacancy density in the OFF state.

  19. Investigation of forced and isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    1993-09-01

    Mechanical properties of two different layups for each of the forced CVI (41 specimens) and isothermal CVI (36 specimens) materials were investigated in air at room temperature (RT), 1000C, and at room temperature after thermal shock (RT/TS) and exposure to oxidation (RT/OX). The FCVI specimens had a nominal interfacial coating thickness of 0.3 {mu}m of pyrolytic carbon, while CVI specimens had a coating thickness of 0.1 {mu}m. Effect of reinforcement and interfacial bond on mechanical properties of composite were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the fiber-matrix interface and the toughening mechanisms in this ceramic composite system.

  20. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; Godeke, Arno; National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL; Ye, Liyang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramicmore » sleeve.« less

  1. Argon–germane in situ plasma clean for reduced temperature Ge on Si epitaxy by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Douglas, Erica A.; Sheng, Josephine J.; Verley, Jason C.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2015-06-04

    We found that the demand for integration of near infrared optoelectronic functionality with silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has for many years motivated the investigation of low temperature germanium on silicon deposition processes. Our work describes the development of a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition process that uses a low temperature (<460 °C) in situ germane/argon plasma surface preparation step for epitaxial growth of germanium on silicon. It is shown that the germane/argon plasma treatment sufficiently removes SiOx and carbon at the surface to enable germanium epitaxy. Finally, the use of this surface preparation step demonstrates anmore » alternative way to produce germanium epitaxy at reduced temperatures, a key enabler for increased flexibility of integration with CMOS back-end-of-line fabrication.« less

  2. Acetaldehyde Adsorption and Reaction onCeO2(100) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    This study reports and compares the adsorption and dissociation of acetaldehyde on oxidized and reduced CeOX(100) thin films. Acetaldehyde reacts and decomposes on fully oxidized CeO2(100) whereas it desorbs molecularly at low temperature on CeO2(111). The primary products are CO, CO2 and water along with trace amounts of crotonaldehyde and acetylene. The acetaldehyde adsorbs as the 2-acetaldehyde species, dioxyethylene. Decomposition proceeds by dehydrogenation through acetate and enolate intermediates. The reaction pathway is similar on the reduced CeO2-X(100) surface however the inability to react with surface O on the reduced surface results in H2 rather than H2O desorption and C is left on the surface rather than producing CO and CO2. C-O bond cleavage in the enolate intermediate followed by reaction with surface H results in ethylene desorption.

  3. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  4. Integrated atomistic chemical imaging and reactive force field molecular dynamic simulations on silicon oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumpala, Santoshrupa; Broderick, Scott R.; Rajan, Krishna; Khalilov, Umedjon; Neyts, Erik C.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Provine, J; Howe, Roger T.

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, we quantitatively investigate with atom probe tomography, the effect of temperature on the interfacial transition layer suboxide species due to the thermal oxidation of silicon. The chemistry at the interface was measured with atomic scale resolution, and the changes in chemistry and intermixing at the interface were identified on a nanometer scale. We find an increase of suboxide (SiOx) concentration relative to SiO{sub 2} and increased oxygen ingress with elevated temperatures. Our experimental findings are in agreement with reactive force field molecular dynamics simulations. This work demonstrates the direct comparison between atom probe derived chemical profiles and atomistic-scale simulations for transitional interfacial layer of suboxides as a function of temperature.

  5. Thermal-mechanical Properties of Epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Pei [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wang, Yang [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Godeke, Arno [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ye, Liyang [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Flanagan, Gene [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Shen, Tengming [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-11-26

    Knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poissons ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramic sleeve.

  6. Optimization of conditions of thorium oxalate precipitation. I. solubility of thorium oxalate in the presence of like ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazhukhin, E.M.; Kochergin, S.M.; Krivokhatskii, A.S.; Pazukhina, Y.L.; Smirnova, E.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors determine the solubility of thorium oxalate hexahydrate precipitate in solutions with various compositions, in which the C/sub 2/O/sup 2 -//sub 4/ ion concentration was varied from 10/sup -9/ to 5 X 10/sup -1/ M. It is been shown that in the C/sub 2/O/sup 2 -//sub 4/ ion concentration interval from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -2/ M, the solubility of the Th(C/sub 2/O/sub 4/) X 6H/sub 2/O precipitate follows a parabolic equation log. Beginning at an oxalate ion concentration of 10/sup -2/ M, the content of thorium in the solution varies linearly with C/sub 2/O/sup 2 -//sub 4/ and follows the equation log(Th) = 8.93 X 10/sup -1/ X log (OX/sup -/)8.52 X 10/sup -1/.

  7. Supported catalyst systems and method of making biodiesel products using such catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Manhoe; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2015-10-20

    A heterogeneous catalyst system, a method of preparing the catalyst system and a method of forming a biodiesel product via transesterification reactions using the catalyst system is disclosed. The catalyst system according to one aspect of the present disclosure represents a class of supported mixed metal oxides that include at least calcium oxide and another metal oxide deposited on a lanthanum oxide or cerium oxide support. Preferably, the catalysts include CaO--CeO.sub.2ZLa.sub.2O.sub.3 or CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3/CeO.sub.2. Optionally, the catalyst may further include additional metal oxides, such as CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3--GdOxZLa.sub.2O.sub.3.

  8. Detection and characterization of multi-filament evolution during resistive switching

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mickel, Patrick R.; Lohn, Andrew J.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-08-05

    We present resistive switching data in TaOx memristors displaying signatures of multi-filament switching modes, and develop a geometrically defined equivalent circuit to separate the individual resistances and powers dissipated in each filament. Using these resolved values, we compare the individual switching curves of each filament and demonstrate that the switching data of each filament collapse onto a single switching curve determined by the analytical steady-state resistive switching solution for filamentary switching. Analyzing our results in terms of this solution, we determine the switching temperature, heat flow, conductivity, and time evolving areas of each filament during resistive switching. Finally, we discussmore » operational modes which may limit the formation of additional conducting filaments, potentially leading to increased device endurance.« less

  9. Enabling unassisted solar water splitting by iron oxide and silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jang, Ji-Wook; Du, Chun; Ye, Yifan; Lin, Yongjing; Yao, Xiahui; Thorne, James; Liu, Erik; McMahon, Gregory; Zhu, Junfa; Javey, Ali; et al

    2015-06-16

    A solution for large-scale solar energy storage is photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. However, its development has been impeded by the poor performance of photoanodes, particularly in their capability for photovoltage generation. Many examples employing photovoltaic modules to correct the deficiency for unassisted solar water splitting have been reported to-date. We show that, by using the prototypical photoanode material of haematite as a study tool, structural disorders on or near the surfaces are important causes of the low photovoltages. We develop a facile re-growth strategy to reduce surface disorders and as a consequence, a turn-on voltage of 0.45 V (versus reversiblemore » hydrogen electrode) is achieved. In conclusion, this result permits us to construct a photoelectrochemical device with a haematite photoanode and Si photocathode to split water at an overall efficiency of 0.91%, with NiFeOx and TiO2/Pt overlayers, respectively.« less

  10. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basoli, Francesco; Senesi, Roberto; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  11. United States Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    .---.-.-.--.- -.--..- Department of Enery y memorandum si!%.rE:.c;. Letter Re,porr on "Sandi;;, Natianai .I:,al-ji~;.utory-?L'::'~~i bIe.xieo Stetdent hitern Saf2i-y Training" INS.-L.-OX-46 ('hspeztion 'i'4o. SOS:IS007:) Mzfiager:, Sandla Size 0fr"ice '7'his I.,etter Xtepor? provid.es the results of an CBffice ofInspec1-or Gel~eriii inspection of the student intern safety P P . O ~ T . ~ I X J af the Dcpaxtn~cnt of Energy's (Di:>Ilys] Srnnr1i.a National X,;ll,r>ratr>ry

  12. Thermally integrated staged methanol reformer and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skala, Glenn William; Hart-Predmore, David James; Pettit, William Henry; Borup, Rodney Lynn

    2001-01-01

    A thermally integrated two-stage methanol reformer including a heat exchanger and first and second reactors colocated in a common housing in which a gaseous heat transfer medium circulates to carry heat from the heat exchanger into the reactors. The heat transfer medium comprises principally hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methanol vapor and water vapor formed in a first stage reforming reaction. A small portion of the circulating heat transfer medium is drawn off and reacted in a second stage reforming reaction which substantially completes the reaction of the methanol and water remaining in the drawn-off portion. Preferably, a PrOx reactor will be included in the housing upstream of the heat exchanger to supplement the heat provided by the heat exchanger.

  13. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  14. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  15. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; et al

    2015-02-25

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based onmore » the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. In conclusion, the detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions.« less

  16. Identification and overexpression of a knotted1-like transcription factor in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) for lignocellulosic feedstock improvement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wuddineh, Wegi A.; Mazarei, Mitra; Zhang, Ji -Yi; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Sykes, Robert W.; Decker, Stephen R.; Davis, Mark F.; Udvardi, Michael K.; C. Neal Stewart, Jr.

    2016-04-28

    High biomass production and wide adaptation has made switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) an important candidate lignocellulosic bioenergy crop. One major limitation of this and other lignocellulosic feedstocks is the recalcitrance of complex carbohydrates to hydrolysis for conversion to biofuels. Lignin is the major contributor to recalcitrance as it limits the accessibility of cell wall carbohydrates to enzymatic breakdown into fermentable sugars. Therefore, genetic manipulation of the lignin biosynthesis pathway is one strategy to reduce recalcitrance. Here, we identified a switchgrass Knotted1 transcription factor, PvKN1, with the aim of genetically engineering switchgrass for reduced biomass recalcitrance for biofuel production. Gene expressionmore » of the endogenous PvKN1 gene was observed to be highest in young inflorescences and stems. Ectopic overexpression of PvKN1 in switchgrass altered growth, especially in early developmental stages. Transgenic lines had reduced expression of most lignin biosynthetic genes accompanied by a reduction in lignin content suggesting the involvement of PvKN1 in the broad regulation of the lignin biosynthesis pathway. Moreover, the reduced expression of the Gibberellin 20-oxidase (GA20ox) gene in tandem with the increased expression of Gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox) genes in transgenic PvKN1 lines suggest that PvKN1 may exert regulatory effects via modulation of GA signaling. Furthermore, overexpression of PvKN1 altered the expression of cellulose and hemicellulose biosynthetic genes and increased sugar release efficiency in transgenic lines. Our findings demonstrated that switchgrass PvKN1 is a putative ortholog of maize KN1 that is linked to plant lignification and cell wall and development traits as a major regulatory gene. Therefore, targeted overexpression of PvKN1 in bioenergy feedstocks may provide one feasible strategy for reducing biomass recalcitrance and simultaneously improving plant growth characteristics.« less

  17. Inherent interface defects in thermal (211)Si/SiO{sub 2}:{sup 29}Si hyperfine interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iacovo, Serena E-mail: andre.stesmans@fys.kuleuven.be; Stesmans, Andre E-mail: andre.stesmans@fys.kuleuven.be

    2014-10-21

    Low temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out on ‘higher index’ (211)Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces thermally grown in the temperature range T{sub ox} = 400–1066°C. The data reveal the presence of two species of a P{sub b}-type interface defect, exhibiting a significant difference in defect density. On the basis of the pertinent ESR parameters and interface symmetry, the basic defect is typified as P{sub b0}{sup (211)}, close to the Pb0 center observed in standard (100)Si/SiO{sub 2}. The dominant type is found to pertain to defected Si atoms at (111)Si-face terraces with the dangling bond along the [111] direction at ∼19.5°C with the interface normal, these sites thus apparently predominantly accounting for interface mismatch adaptation. The total of the P{sub b}-type defect appearance clearly reflects the higher-index nature of the interface. It is found that T{sub ox} = 750°C is required to minimize the P{sub b0}{sup (211)} defect density through relaxation of the oxide (interface). Q-band ESR saturation spectroscopy reveals an anisotropic {sup 29}Si (nuclear spin I=1/2) hyperfine (hf) doublet associated with the central P{sub b0}{sup (211)} Zeeman signal, with hf parameters closest to those of the similar hf structure of the P{sub b0}{sup (110)} defect in thermal (110)Si/SiO{sub 2}, adducing independent support to the P{sub b0}{sup (211)} typification.

  18. Plate-Based Fuel Processing System Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Faz; Helen Liu; Jacques Nicole; David Yee

    2005-12-22

    On-board reforming of liquid fuels into hydrogen is an enabling technology that could accelerate consumer usage of fuel cell powered vehicles. The technology would leverage the convenience of the existing gasoline fueling infrastructure while taking advantage of the fuel cell efficiency and low emissions. Commercial acceptance of on-board reforming faces several obstacles that include: (1) startup time, (2) transient response, and (3) system complexity (size, weight and cost). These obstacles are being addressed in a variety of projects through development, integration and optimization of existing fuel processing system designs. In this project, CESI investigated steam reforming (SR), water-gas-shift (WGS) and preferential oxidation (PrOx) catalysts while developing plate reactor designs and hardware where the catalytic function is integrated into a primary surface heat exchanger. The plate reactor approach has several advantages. The separation of the reforming and combustion streams permits the reforming reaction to be conducted at a higher pressure than the combustion reaction, thereby avoiding costly gas compression for combustion. The separation of the two streams also prevents the dilution of the reformate stream by the combustion air. The advantages of the plate reactor are not limited to steam reforming applications. In a WGS or PrOx reaction, the non-catalytic side of the plate would act as a heat exchanger to remove the heat generated by the exothermic WGS or PrOx reactions. This would maintain the catalyst under nearly isothermal conditions whereby the catalyst would operate at its optimal temperature. Furthermore, the plate design approach results in a low pressure drop, rapid transient capable and attrition-resistant reactor. These qualities are valued in any application, be it on-board or stationary fuel processing, since they reduce parasitic losses, increase over-all system efficiency and help perpetuate catalyst durability. In this program, CESI

  19. Hydroxylation of p-substituted phenols by tyrosinase: Further insight into the mechanism of tyrosinase activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz-Munoz, Jose Luis; Berna, Jose; Garcia-Molina, Maria del Mar; Garcia-Molina, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio; Varon, Ramon [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales de Albacete, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, Avda. Espana s and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action the copper complexes and tyrosinase on phenols is equivalent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope effect showed that nucleophilic attack to copper atom may be the slower step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The value of {rho} (Hammett constant) supports an electrophilic aromatic substitution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data obtained in steady state pH 7 conditions support the mechanism of Scheme 1SM. -- Abstract: A study of the monophenolase activity of tyrosinase by measuring the steady state rate with a group of p-substituted monophenols provides the following kinetic information: k{sub cat}{sup m} and the Michaelis constant, K{sub M}{sup m}. Analysis of these data taking into account chemical shifts of the carbon atom supporting the hydroxyl group ({delta}) and {sigma}{sub p}{sup +}, enables a mechanism to be proposed for the transformation of monophenols into o-diphenols, in which the first step is a nucleophilic attack on the copper atom on the form E{sub ox} (attack of the oxygen of the hydroxyl group of C-1 on the copper atom) followed by an electrophilic attack (attack of the hydroperoxide group on the ortho position with respect to the hydroxyl group of the benzene ring, electrophilic aromatic substitution with a reaction constant {rho} of -1.75). These steps show the same dependency on the electronic effect of the substituent groups in C-4. Furthermore, a study of a solvent deuterium isotope effect on the oxidation of monophenols by tyrosinase points to an appreciable isotopic effect. In a proton inventory study with a series of p-substituted phenols, the representation of k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}}/k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} against n (atom fractions of deuterium), where k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}} is the catalytic constant for a molar fraction of deuterium (n) and k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} is the corresponding kinetic parameter in a water solution, was linear for all substrates. These results indicate that

  20. The Superconductors That Magnets Really Want: What Stands in the Way? (Superconductors for Accelerator Use: What Next and How Close is the Ideal Conductor?)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Larbalestier, David [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory] [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, United States

    2010-01-08

    There are over 5000 superconducting materials but only about 5 have ever been useful for applications in magnets, while HEP, which has been so vital for the development of superconducting magnet technology has made virtually every magnet out of just one, the simple bcc alloy Nb-Ti with Tc of 9 K and upper critical field ~ 14T (at 2K). Significant demonstrations of the capability of the brittle intermetallic Nb3Sn have shown that fields of more than 15 T can be generated in dipole form. But Nb-Ti and Nb3Sn are staid, conventional superconductors, far from the cutting edge of superconducting science research where cuprates like YBa2Cu3O7-x and Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox remain at the scientific forefront and in 2008 were joined by the recently discovered Fe-As pnictide superconductors. What could it mean to have materials for magnets with 10 times the Tc of Nb-Ti (90-120 K) and 3 or more times the critical field (100-240 T)? One enormous barrier is that higher Tc so far always means more complexity and a more localized superconducting interaction which is sensitive to local loss of superconductivity. The issue that has made the cuprate high temperature superconductors so hard to apply is that grain boundaries which form a 3D network in any practical wire form, easily acquire degraded superconducting properties. But conductors can now be made with extreme texture so that grain boundaries are minimized. Moreover almost practical conductors of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox and YBa2Cu3O7-x are now are in production and in late 2008 we were, at the Magnet Lab, able to make small solenoids operating at high current density in fields of 32 and almost 34 T respectively. Within the HEP community, there is enthusiasm to embrace HTS conductors for new very high field machines that could, like the Muon Collider, use fields of 30-50 T. In my talk I would like to explore the underlying science controlling such potential applications.

  1. Piano-stool lutetium amido and imido compounds supported by a constrained bis(oxazoline)cyclopentadienyl ligand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampland, Nicole L.; Zhu, Jing; Hovey, Megan; Jana, Barun; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-06-25

    {BoMCptet}Lu(CH2Ph)2 (1; BoMCptet = MeC(OxMe2 2C5Me4; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline) was prepared in 95% yield from the reaction of BoMCptetH and Lu(CH2Ph)3THF3. Compound 1 reacts with 1 or 2 equiv of H2NCH2R (R = C6H5, 1-C10H7) to give the corresponding imido complexes [{BoMCptet}LuNCH2R]2 (R = C6H5 (2a), 1-C10H7 (2b)) or amido complexes {BoMCptet}Lu(NHCH2R)2 (R = C6H5 (3a), 1-C10H7 (3b)). When isolated, the imido species are insoluble in nonprotic organic solvents. Crystallographic characterization reveals dimeric [{BoMCptet}LuNCH2(1-C10H7)]2 in the solid state. The reaction of 1 and NH3B(C6F5)3 affords crystallographically characterized {BoMCptet}Lu{NHB(C6F5)2}C6F5. This species is proposed to form via a transient lutetium imido, which undergoes C6F5 migration to the lutetium center.

  2. Atmospheric changes caused by galactic cosmic rays over the period 1960–2010

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Fleming, Eric L.

    2016-05-13

    The Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM) and the Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (GSFC 2-D) models are used to investigate the effect of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) on the atmosphere over the 1960–2010 time period. The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) computation of the GCR-caused ionization rates are used in these simulations. GCR-caused maximum NOx increases of 4–15 % are computed in the Southern polar troposphere with associated ozone increases of 1–2 %. NOx increases of ~1–6 % are calculated for the lower stratosphere with associated ozone decreases of 0.2–1more » %. The primary impact of GCRs on ozone was due to their production of NOx. The impact of GCRs varies with the atmospheric chlorine loading, sulfate aerosol loading, and solar cycle variation. Because of the interference between the NOx and ClOx ozone loss cycles (e.g., the ClO + NO2+ M → ClONO2+ M reaction) and the change in the importance of ClOx in the ozone budget, GCRs cause larger atmospheric impacts with less chlorine loading. GCRs also cause larger atmospheric impacts with less sulfate aerosol loading and for years closer to solar minimum. GCR-caused decreases of annual average global total ozone (AAGTO) were computed to be 0.2 % or less with GCR-caused column ozone increases between 1000 and 100 hPa of 0.08 % or less and GCR-caused column ozone decreases between 100 and 1 hPa of 0.23 % or less. Although these computed ozone impacts are small, GCRs provide a natural influence on ozone and need to be quantified over long time periods. This result serves as a lower limit because of the use of the ionization model NAIRAS/HZETRN which underestimates the ion production by neglecting electromagnetic and muon branches of the cosmic ray induced cascade. Furthermore, this will be corrected in future works.« less

  3. Broad Temperature Pinning Study of 15 mol.% Zr-Added (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O MOCVD Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, AX; Khatri, N; Liu, YH; Majkic, G; Galstyan, E; Selvamanickam, V; Chen, YM; Lei, CH; Abraimov, D; Hu, XB; Jaroszynski, J; Larbalestier, D

    2015-06-01

    BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumns have long been shown to be very effective for raising the pinning force F-p of REBa2Cu3Ox (REBCO, where RE = rare earth) films at high temperatures and recently at low temperatures too. We have successfully incorporated a high density of BZO nanorods into metal organic chemical vapor deposited (MOCVD) REBCO coated conductors via Zr addition. We found that, compared to the 7.5% Zr-added coated conductor, dense BZO nanorod arrays in the 15% Zr-added conductor are effective over the whole temperature range from 77 K down to 4.2 K. We attribute the substantially enhanced J(c) at 30 K to the weak uncorrelated pinning as well as the strong correlated pinning. Meanwhile, by tripling the REBCO layer thickness to similar to 2.8 mu m, the engineering critical current density J(e) at 30 K exceeds J(e) of optimized Nb-Ti wires at 4.2 K.

  4. Electronic properties of quasi one-dimensional quantum wire models under equal coupling strength superpositions of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papp, E.; Micu, C.; Racolta, D.

    2013-11-13

    In this paper one deals with the theoretical derivation of energy bands and of related wavefunctions characterizing quasi 1D semiconductor heterostructures, such as InAs quantum wire models. Such models get characterized this time by equal coupling strength superpositions of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of dimensionless magnitude a under the influence of in-plane magnetic fields of magnitude B. We found that the orientations of the field can be selected by virtue of symmetry requirements. For this purpose one resorts to spin conservations, but alternative conditions providing sensible simplifications of the energy-band formula can be reasonably accounted for. Besides the wavenumber k relying on the 1D electron, one deals with the spin-like s=±1 factors in the front of the square root term of the energy. Having obtained the spinorial wavefunction, opens the way to the derivation of spin precession effects. For this purpose one resorts to the projections of the wavenumber operator on complementary spin states. Such projections are responsible for related displacements proceeding along the Ox-axis. This results in a 2D rotation matrix providing both the precession angle as well as the precession axis.

  5. Comparison of growth texture in round Bi2212 and flat Bi2223 wires and its relation to high critical current density development

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kametani, F.; Jiang, J.; Matras, M.; Abraimov, D.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2015-02-10

    Why Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂Ox (Bi2212) allows high critical current density Jc in round wires rather than only in the anisotropic tape form demanded by all other high temperature superconductors is important for future magnet applications. Here we compare the local texture of state-of-the-art Bi2212 and Bi2223 ((Bi,Pb)₂Sr₂Ca₂Cu₃O₁₀), finding that round wire Bi2212 generates a dominant a-axis growth texture that also enforces a local biaxial texture (FWHM <15°) while simultaneously allowing the c-axes of its polycrystals to rotate azimuthally along and about the filament axis so as to generate macroscopically isotropic behavior. By contrast Bi2223 shows only a uniaxial (FWHM <15°) c-axis texturemore » perpendicular to the tape plane without any in-plane texture. Consistent with these observations, a marked, field-increasing, field-decreasing Jc(H) hysteresis characteristic of weak-linked systems appears in Bi2223 but is absent in Bi2212 round wire. Growth-induced texture on cooling from the melt step of the Bi2212 Jc optimization process appears to be the key step in generating this highly desirable microstructure.« less

  6. The effect of Fe-Rh alloying on CO hydrogenation to C2+ oxygenates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palomino, Robert; Magee, Joseph W.; Llorca, Jordi; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; White, Michael G.

    2015-05-20

    A combination of reactivity and structural studies using X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair distribution function (PDF), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to identify the active phases of Fe-modified Rh/TiO2 catalysts for the synthesis of ethanol and other C2+ oxygenates from CO hydrogenation. XRD and TEM confirm the existence of Fe–Rh alloys for catalyst with 1–7 wt% Fe and ~2 wt% Rh. Rietveld refinements show that FeRh alloy content increases with Fe loading up to ~4 wt%, beyond which segregation to metallic Fe becomes favored over alloy formation. Catalysts that contain Fe metal after reduction exhibit some carburization as evidencedmore »by the formation of small amounts of Fe3C during CO hydrogenation. Analysis of the total Fe content of the catalysts also suggests the presence of FeOx also increased under reaction conditions. Reactivity studies show that enhancement of ethanol selectivity with Fe loading is accompanied by a significant drop in CO conversion. Comparison of the XRD phase analyses with selectivity suggests that higher ethanol selectivity is correlated with the presence of Fe–Rh alloy phases. As a result, the interface between Fe and Rh serves to enhance the selectivity of ethanol, but suppresses the activity of the catalyst which is attributed to the blocking or modifying of Rh active sites.« less

  7. Acid Strength and Bifunctional Catalytic Behavior of Alloys Comprised of Noble Metals and Oxophilic Metal Promoters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbitts, David D.; Tan, Qiaohua; Neurock, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The promotion of metal catalysts with partially oxidized oxophilic MOx species, such as ReOx-promoted Rh, has been demonstrated to produce Brnsted acid sites that can promote hydrogenolysis of oxygenate intermediates such as those found in biomass-derived species. A wide variety of alloy compositions and structures are examined in this work to investigate strongly acidic promoters by using DFT-calculated deprotonation energies (DPE) as a measure of acid strength. Sites with the highest acid strength had DPE less than 1100 kJ mol-1, similar to DPE values of heteropolyacids or acid-containing zeolites, and were found on alloys composed of an oxophilic metal (such as Re or W) with a noble metal (such as Rh or Pt). NH3 adsorbs more strongly to sites with increasing acid strength and the activation barriers for acid-catalyzed ring opening of a furan ring decrease with increasing acid strength, which was also shown to be stronger for OH acid sites bound to multiple oxophilic metal atoms in a three-fold configuration rather than OH sites adsorbed in an atop configuration on one oxophilic metal, indicating that small MOx clusters may yield sites with the highest acid strength.

  8. The effect of Fe-Rh alloying on CO hydrogenation to C2+ oxygenates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palomino, Robert; Magee, Joseph W.; Llorca, Jordi; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; White, Michael G.

    2015-05-20

    A combination of reactivity and structural studies using X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair distribution function (PDF), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to identify the active phases of Fe-modified Rh/TiO2 catalysts for the synthesis of ethanol and other C2+ oxygenates from CO hydrogenation. XRD and TEM confirm the existence of Fe–Rh alloys for catalyst with 1–7 wt% Fe and ~2 wt% Rh. Rietveld refinements show that FeRh alloy content increases with Fe loading up to ~4 wt%, beyond which segregation to metallic Fe becomes favored over alloy formation. Catalysts that contain Fe metal after reduction exhibit some carburization as evidencedmore » by the formation of small amounts of Fe3C during CO hydrogenation. Analysis of the total Fe content of the catalysts also suggests the presence of FeOx also increased under reaction conditions. Reactivity studies show that enhancement of ethanol selectivity with Fe loading is accompanied by a significant drop in CO conversion. Comparison of the XRD phase analyses with selectivity suggests that higher ethanol selectivity is correlated with the presence of Fe–Rh alloy phases. As a result, the interface between Fe and Rh serves to enhance the selectivity of ethanol, but suppresses the activity of the catalyst which is attributed to the blocking or modifying of Rh active sites.« less

  9. Polyacrylamide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madabhushi, Ramakrishna S.; Gammon, Stuart A.

    2003-11-11

    A polyacryalmide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules. The polyacryalmide medium comprises high molecular weight polyacrylamides (PAAm) having a viscosity average molecular weight (M.sub.v) of about 675-725 kDa were synthesized by conventional red-ox polymerization technique. Using this separation medium, capillary electrophoresis of BigDye DNA sequencing standard was performed. A single base resolution of .about.725 bases was achieved in .about.60 minute in a non-covalently coated capillary of 50 .mu.m i.d., 40 cm effective length, and a filed of 160 V/cm at 40.degree. C. The resolution achieved with this formulation to separate DNA under identical conditions is much superior (725 bases vs. 625 bases) and faster (60 min. vs. 75 min.) to the commercially available PAAm, such as supplied by Amersham. The formulation method employed here to synthesize PAAm is straight-forward, simple and does not require cumbersome methods such as emulsion polymerizaiton in order to achieve very high molecular weights. Also, the formulation here does not require separation of PAAm from the reaction mixture prior to reconstituting the polymer to a final concentration. Furthermore, the formulation here is prepared from a single average mol. wt. PAAm as opposed to the mixture of two different average mo. wt. PAAm previously required to achieve high resolution.

  10. (Invited) Comprehensive Assessment of Oxide Memristors As Post-CMOS Memory and Logic Devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, X.; Mamaluy, D.; Cyr, E. C.; Marinella, M. J.

    2016-05-10

    As CMOS technology approaches the end of its scaling, oxide-based memristors have become one of the leading candidates for post-CMOS memory and logic devices. In orderTo facilitate the understanding of physical switching mechanisms and accelerate experimental development of memristors, we have developed a three-dimensional fully-coupled electrical and thermal transport model, which captures all the important processes that drive memristive switching and is applicable for simulating a wide range of memristors. Moreover, the model is applied to simulate the RESET and SET switching in a 3D filamentary TaOx memristor. Extensive simulations show that the switching dynamics of the bipolar device ismore » determined by thermally-activated field-dominant processes: with Joule heating, the raised temperature enables the movement of oxygen vacancies, and the field drift dominates the overall motion of vacancies. Simulated current-voltage hysteresis and device resistance profiles as a function of time and voltage during RESET and SET switching show good agreement with experimental measurement.« less

  11. Strain control of oxygen vacancies in epitaxial strontium cobaltite films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeen, Hyoung Jeen; Choi, Woo Seok; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Freeland, John W.; Eres, Gyula; Lee, Ho Nyung; Petrie, Jonathan R.; Mitra, Chandrima; Meyer, Tricia L.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, the ability to manipulate oxygen anion defects rather than metal cations in complex oxides can facilitate creating new functionalities critical for emerging energy and device technologies. However, the difficulty in activating oxygen at reduced temperatures hinders the deliberate control of important defects, oxygen vacancies. Here, strontium cobaltite (SrCoOx) is used to demonstrate that epitaxial strain is a powerful tool for manipulating the oxygen vacancy concentration even under highly oxidizing environments and at annealing temperatures as low as 300 °C. By applying a small biaxial tensile strain (2%), the oxygen activation energy barrier decreases by ≈30%, resulting inmore » a tunable oxygen deficient steady-state under conditions that would normally fully oxidize unstrained cobaltite. These strain-induced changes in oxygen stoichiometry drive the cobaltite from a ferromagnetic metal towards an antiferromagnetic insulator. The ability to decouple the oxygen vacancy concentration from its typical dependence on the operational environment is useful for effectively designing oxides materials with a specific oxygen stoichiometry.« less

  12. Atomistic Insights Into the Oriented Attachment of Tunnel-Based Oxide Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Yifei; Wood, Stephen M; He, Kun; Yao, Wentao; Tompsett, David; Lu, Jun; Nie, Anmin; Islam, M. Saiful; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Controlled synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the grand challenges facing materials scientists. In particular, how tunnel-based nanomaterials aggregate during synthesis while maintaining their well-aligned tunneled structure is not fully understood. Here, we describe the atomistic mechanism of oriented attachment (OA) during solution synthesis of tunneled α-MnO2 nanowires based on a combination of in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), aberration-corrected scanning TEM with subangstrom spatial resolution, and first-principles calculations. It is found that primary tunnels (1 × 1 and 2 × 2) attach along their common {110} lateral surfaces to form interfaces corresponding to 2 × 3 tunnels that facilitate their short-range ordering. The OA growth of α-MnO2 nanowires is driven by the stability gained from elimination of {110} surfaces and saturation of Mn atoms at {110}-edges. During this process, extra [MnOx] radicals in solution link the two adjacent {110} surfaces and bond with the unsaturated Mn atoms from both surface edges to produce stable nanowire interfaces. Our results provide insights into the controlled synthesis and design of nanomaterials in which tunneled structures can be tailored for use in catalysis, ion exchange, and energy storage applications.

  13. Enhancing perovskite electrocatalysis through strain tuning of oxygen deficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barron, Sara C.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Petrie, Jonathan R.; Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Meyer, Tricia L.

    2016-05-27

    Oxygen vacancies in transition-metal oxides facilitate catalysis critical for energy storage and generation. However, promoting vacancies at the lower temperatures required for operation in devices such as metal–air batteries and portable fuel cells has proven elusive. Here we used thin films of perovskite-based strontium cobaltite (SrCoOx) to show that epitaxial strain is a powerful tool for manipulating the oxygen content under conditions consistent with the oxygen evolution reaction, yielding increasingly oxygen-deficient states in an environment where the cobaltite would normally be fully oxidized. The additional oxygen vacancies created through tensile strain enhance the cobaltite’s catalytic activity toward this important reactionmore » by over an order of magnitude, equaling that of precious-metal catalysts, including IrO2. Lastly, our findings demonstrate that strain in these oxides can dictate the oxygen stoichiometry independent of ambient conditions, allowing unprecedented control over oxygen vacancies essential in catalysis near room temperature.« less

  14. Measurements of Eh and pH in Compacted MX-80 Bentonite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsson, Torbjoern; Muurinen, Arto

    2007-07-01

    The low-content free water and high swelling pressure in compacted bentonite, planned to be used as a buffer in nuclear waste repositories, create adverse conditions for direct measurements of the chemical conditions. This paper presents laboratory results from online measurements with Eh and pH electrodes in water-saturated compacted MX-80 bentonite. The Eh was measured with Au and Pt wires as electrodes, while the pH was determined with IrOx electrodes. The latter were prepared in accordance with the method by Yao et al. [1]. The measurements were carried out in two types of cells: 'squeezing cells' and 'diffusion cells'. The squeezing cell excludes almost completely all chemical interactions between the sample and the surrounding environment outside the cell. The diffusion cell, on the other hand, contains a sample that stays in contact with an external solution and therefore allows following of the physico-chemical interaction between the sample and the external solution. The measuring electrodes were positioned inside the cell in the compacted bentonite, while the reference electrode was positioned outside the cell. (authors)

  15. Ultrafast nanolaser device for detecting cancer in a single live cell.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourley, Paul Lee; McDonald, Anthony Eugene

    2007-11-01

    Emerging BioMicroNanotechnologies have the potential to provide accurate, realtime, high throughput screening of live tumor cells without invasive chemical reagents when coupled with ultrafast laser methods. These optically based methods are critical to advancing early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. The first year goals of this project are to develop a laser-based imaging system integrated with an in- vitro, live-cell, micro-culture to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions. In the second year, the system will be used to elucidate the morphology and distribution of mitochondria in the normal cell respiration state and in the disease state for normal and disease states of the cell. In this work we designed and built an in-vitro, live-cell culture microsystem to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions of pH, temp, CO2, Ox, humidity, on engineered material surfaces. We demonstrated viability of cell culture in the microsystem by showing that cells retain healthy growth rates, exhibit normal morphology, and grow to confluence without blebbing or other adverse influences of the material surfaces. We also demonstrated the feasibility of integrating the culture microsystem with laser-imaging and performed nanolaser flow spectrocytometry to carry out analysis of the cells isolated mitochondria.

  16. Pseudo-capacitor device for aqueous electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prakash, J.; Thackeray, M.M.; Dees, D.W.; Vissers, D.R.; Myles, K.M.

    1998-11-24

    A pseudo-capacitor having a high energy storage capacity develops a double layer capacitance as well as a Faradaic or battery-like redox reaction, also referred to as pseudo-capacitance. The Faradaic reaction gives rise to a capacitance much greater than that of the typical ruthenate oxide ultracapacitor which develops only charge separation-based double layer capacitance. The capacitor employs a lead and/or bismuth/ruthenate and/or iridium system having the formula A{sub 2}[B{sub 2{minus}x}Pb{sub x}]O{sub 7{minus}y}, where A=Pb, Bi, and B=Ru, Ir, and O{<=}1 and O

  17. A series of Cd(II) complexes with {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiuli; Zhang Jinxia; Liu Guocheng; Lin Hongyan

    2011-02-15

    Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP){sub 2}(dnba){sub 2}] (1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)].H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H{sub 2}O)].4H{sub 2}O (3), [Cd(3-PIP){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O (4), [Cd{sub 2}(3-PIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O (5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H{sub 2}O)].H{sub 2}O (6), [Cd{sub 2}(TIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O (7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H{sub 2}ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended {pi}-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1-7 are also investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Seven new supramolecular architectures have been successfully isolated under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of different phen derivatives and Cd(II) salts together with organic carboxylate anions auxiliary ligands. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Complexes 1-7 are 0D or 1D polymeric structure, the {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions extend the complexes into 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, systematic study on {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions in cadmium(II) complexes are still limited. {yields} The structural

  18. SECA Coal-Based Systems - LGFCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goettler, Richard

    2013-08-01

    than 95% of the mean flow for all bundles. The prior design required unique bundle components and pressure drops specifications to achieve overall strip fuel flow uniformity. 2. Slow crack growth measurements in simulated fuel environments of the MgO-MgAl2O4 substrate by ORNL reveal favorable tolerance against slow crack growth. Evidence as well of a high stress intensity threshold below which crack growth would be avoided. These findings can have very positive implications on long-term structural reliability. More testing is required, including under actual reformate fuels, to gain a deeper understanding of such time dependent reliability mechanisms. 3. A next generation (Gen2) substrate from the LGFCS supplier has been qualified. The substrate incorporates cost reductions and quality improvements. Cell Developments: 1. Subscale testing of the epsilon technology under system relevant conditions surpassed 16,000 hours with a power degradation rate of <1%/1000 hours. Key degradation mechanisms have been identified: (1) MnOx accumulation near the cathode-electrolyte interface and cathode densification (2) metals migration across the anode-ACC bilayer and general microstructure coarsening at high temperatures and peak fuel utilizations and (3) metal migration into primary interconnect (lesser mechanism) 5 2. Alternate LSM cathodes show slightly lower ASR and lesser free MnOx and chromium contamination. Long-term durability screening of three alternate cathodes is being performed. 3. Single layer anodes show very significant improvement in microstructure stability after 5000 hours testing at aggressive conditions of 925C and bundle outlet, high utilization fuel. 4. New primary interconnect designs are being tested that achieve lower ASR. Modeling performed to further balance ASR and cost through optimized designs.

  19. Effects of support on bifunctional methanol oxidation pathways catalyzed by polyoxometallate keggin clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2003-12-26

    H5PV2Mo10O40 polyoxometallate Keggin clusters supported on ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 are effective catalysts for CH3OH oxidation reactions to form HCHO, methyl formate (MF), and dimethoxymethane (DMM). Rates and selectivities and the structure of supported clusters depend on the surface properties of the oxide supports. Raman spectroscopy showed that Keggin structures remained essentially intact on ZrO2, TiO2, and SiO2 after treatment in air at 553 K, but decomposed to MoOx and VOx oligomers on Al2O3. Accessible protons per Keggin unit (KU) were measured during CH3OH oxidation by titration with 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine. For similar KU surface densities (0.28 0.37 KU/nm2), the number of accessible protons was larger on SiO2 than on ZrO2 and TiO2 and much smaller on Al2O3 supports, even though residual dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis rates after titrant saturation indicated that the fractional dispersion of KU was similar on the first three supports. These effects of support on structure and on H+ accessibility reflect varying extents of interaction between polyoxometallate clusters and supports. Rates of CH3OH oxidative dehydrogenation per KU were higher on ZrO2 and TiO2 than on SiO2 at similar KU surface densities (0.28 0.37 KU/nm2) and dispersion, indicating that redox properties of Keggin clusters depend on the identity of the support used to disperse them. ZrO2 and TiO2 supports appear to enhance the reducibility of anchored polyoxometallate clusters. Rates were much lower on Al2O3, because structural degradation led to less reactive MoOx and VOx domains. CH3OH reactions involve primary oxidation to form HCHO and subsequent secondary reactions to form DMM and MF. These reactions involve HCHO CH3OH acetalization steps leading to methoxymethanol (CH3OCH2OH) or hemiacetal intermediates, which condense with CH3OH on acid sites to form DMM or dehydrogenate to form MF. COx formation rates are much lower than those of other reactions, and DME forms in parallel

  20. Correlation Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition Of Sputter-deposited Germanium Cxide (GeOx) Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Neil R.; Grant, J. T.; Sun, L.; Jones, J. G.; Jakubiak, R.; Shutthanandan, V.; Ramana, Chintalapalle V.

    2014-03-18

    Germanium oxide (GeOx) films were grown on (1 0 0) Si substrates by reactive Direct-Current (DC) magnetron sputter-deposition using an elemental Ge target. The effects of oxygen gas fraction, Г = O2/(Ar + O2), on the deposition rate, structure, chemical composition and optical properties of GeOx films have been investigated. The chemistry of the films exhibits an evolution from pure Ge to mixed Ge + GeO + GeO2 and then finally to GeO2 upon increasing Г from 0.00 to 1.00. Grazing incidence X-ray analysis indicates that the GeOx films grown were amorphous. The optical properties probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry indicate that the effect of Г is significant on the optical constants of the GeOx films. The measured index of refraction (n) at a wavelength (λ) of 550 nm is 4.67 for films grown without any oxygen, indicating behavior characteristic of semiconducting Ge. The transition from germanium to mixed Ge + GeO + GeO2 composition is associated with a characteristic decrease in n (λ = 550 nm) to 2.62 and occurs at Г = 0.25. Finally n drops to 1.60 for Г = 0.50–1.00, where the films become GeO2. A detailed correlation between Г, n, k and stoichiometry in DC sputtered GeOx films is presented and discussed.

  1. Geothermal Target Areas in Colorado as Identified by Remote Sensing Techniques

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Target Areas Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as targets of potential geothermal activity. The Criteria used to identify the target areas include: hot/warm surface exposures modeled from ASTER/Landsat satellite imagery and geological characteristics, alteration mineral commonly associated with hot springs (clays, Si, and FeOx) modeled from ASTER and Landsat data, Coloradodo Geological Survey (CGS) known thermal hot springs/wells and heat-flow data points, Colorado deep-seated fault zones, weakened basement identified from isostatic gravity data, and Colorado sedimentary and topographic characteristics Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546251.530446 m Left: 151398.567298 m Right: 502919.587395 m Bottom: 4095100.068903 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  2. Dissecting the steps of CO2 reduction: 2. The interaction of CO and CO2 with Pd/?-Al2O3: an in situ FTIR study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2014-08-07

    Alumina supported Pd catalysts with metal loadings of 0.5, 2.5 and 10 wt% were investigated by in situ FTIR spectroscopy in order to understand the nature of adsorbed species formed during their exposure to CO2 and CO. Exposing the annealed samples to CO2 at 295 K resulted in the formation of alumina support-bound surface species only: linear adsorbed CO2, bidentate carbonates and bicarbonates. Room temperature exposure of all three samples to CO produced IR features characteristic of both ionic and metallic Pd, as well as bands we observed upon CO2 adsorption (alumina support-bound species). Low temperature (100 K) adsorption of CO on the three samples provided information about the state of Pd after oxidation and reduction. Oxidized samples contained exclusively ionic Pd, while mostly metallic Pd was present in the reduced samples. Subsequent annealing of the CO-saturated samples revealed the facile (low temperature) reduction of PdOx species by adsorbed CO. This process was evidenced by the variations in IR bands characteristic of ionic and metallic Pd-bound CO, as well as by the appearance of IR bands associated with CO2 adsorption as a function of annealing temperature. Samples containing oxidized Pd species (oxidized, annealed or reduced) always produced CO2 upon their exposure to CO, while CO2-related surface entities were observed on samples having only fully reduced (metallic) Pd. Acknowledgements: The catalyst preparation was supported by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. JHK also acknowledges the support of this work by the 2013 Research Fund of UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, Korea).

  3. Understanding the origin of high-rate intercalation pseudocapacitance in Nb2O5 crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kent, P. R. C.; Sumpter, Bobby G; Lubimtsev, Andrew A

    2013-01-01

    Pseudocapacitors aim to maintain the high power density of supercapacitors while increasing the energy density towards those of energy dense storage systems such as lithium ion batteries. Recently discovered intercalation pseudocapacitors (e.g. Nb2O5) are particularly interesting because their performance is seemingly not limited by surface reactions or structures, but instead determined by the bulk crystalline structure of the material. We study ordered polymorphs of Nb2O5 and detail the mechanism for the intrinsic high rates and energy density observed for this class of materials. We find that the intercalating atom (lithium) forms a solid solution adsorbing at specific sites in a network of quasi-2D NbOx faces with x {1.3, 1.67, or 2}, donating electrons locally to its neighboring atoms, reducing niobium. Open channels in the structure have low diffusion barriers for ions to migrate between these sites (Eb 0.28 0.44 eV) comparable to high-performance solid electrolytes. Using a combination of complementary theoretical methods we rationalize this effect in LixNb2O5 for a wide range of compositions (x) and at finite temperatures. Multiple adsorption sites per unit-cell with similar adsorption energies and local charge transfer result in high capacity and energy density, while the interconnected open channels lead to low cost diffusion pathways between these sites, resulting in high power density. The nano-porous structure exhibiting local chemistry in a crystalline framework is the origin of high-rate pseudocapacitance in this new class of intercalation pseudocapacitor materials. This new insight provides guidance for improving the performance of this family of materials.

  4. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; et al

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reductionmore » by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.« less

  5. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu-SAPO-34 Catalysts for Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction. 1. Aqueous Solution Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-09-06

    SAPO-34 molecular sieves are synthesized using various structure directing agents (SDAs). Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are prepared via aqueous solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. During solution ion exchange, different SAPO-34 samples undergo different extent of structural damage via irreversible hydrolysis. Si content within the samples (i.e., Al-O-Si bond density) and framework stress are key factors that affect irreversible hydrolysis. Even using very dilute Cu acetate solutions, it is not possible to generate Cu-SAPO-34 samples with only isolated Cu2+ ions. Small amounts of CuOx species always coexist with isolated Cu2+ ions. Highly active and selective Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts for NH3-SCR are readily generated using this synthesis protocol, even for SAPO-34 samples that degrade substantially during solution ion exchange. High-temperature aging is found to improve the catalytic performance. This is likely due to reduction of intracrystalline mass-transfer limitations via formation of additional porosity in the highly defective SAPO-34 particles formed after ion exchange. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  6. In-situ DRIFTS measurements for the mechanistic study of NO oxidation over a commercial Cu-CHA catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Nova, Isabella; Tronconi, Enrico; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2014-11-03

    We report a mechanistic DRIFTS in-situ study of NO2, NO + O2 and NO adsorption on a commercial Cu-CHA catalyst for NH3-SCR of NOx. Both pre-reduced and pre-oxidized catalyst samples were investigated with the aim of clarifying mechanistic aspects of the NO oxidation to NO2 as a preliminary step towards the study of the Standard SCR reaction mechanism at low temperatures. Nitrosonium cations (NO+, N formal oxidation state = +3) were identified as key surface intermediates in the process of NO (+2) oxidation to NO2 (+4) and nitrates (+5). While NO+ and nitrates were formed simultaneously upon catalyst exposure tomore » NO2, nitrates evolved consecutively to NO+ when the catalyst was exposed to NO + O2, suggesting that nitrite-like species, and not NO2, are formed as the primary products of the NO oxidative activation over Cu-CHA. Upon catalyst exposure to NO only, i.e. in the absence of gaseous O2, NO+ and then nitrates were formed on a pre-oxidized sample but not on a pre-reduced one, which demonstrates the red-ox nature of the NO oxidation mechanism. The negative effect of H2O on NO+ and nitrates formation was also clearly established. Assuming Cu dimers as the active sites for NO oxidation to NO2, we propose a mechanism which reconciles all the experimental observations. Specifically, we show that such a mechanism also explains the observed kinetic effects of H2O, O2 and NO2 on the NO oxidation activity of the investigated Cu zeolite catalyst.« less

  7. Structure Stabilization by Mixed Anions in Oxyfluoride Cathodes for High-Energy Lithium Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Pereira, Nathalie; Chernova, Natasha A.; Omenya, Fredrick; Gao, Peng; Whittingham, M. Stanley; Amatucci, Glenn G.; Su, Dong; Wang, Feng

    2015-08-24

    Mixed-anion oxyfluorides (i.e., FeOxF2-x) are an appealing alternative to pure fluorides as high-capacity cathodes in lithium batteries, with enhanced cyclability via oxygen substitution. Yet, it is still unclear how the mixed anions impact the local phase transformation and structural stability of oxyfluorides during cycling due to the complexity of electrochemical reactions, involving both lithium intercalation and conversion. Herein, we investigated the local chemical and structural ordering in FeO0.7F1.3 at length scales spanning from single particles to the bulk electrode, via a combination of electron spectrum-imaging, magnetization, electrochemistry, and synchrotron X-ray measurements. The FeO0.7F1.3 nanoparticles retain a FeF2-like rutile structuremore » but chemically heterogeneous, with an F-rich core covered by thin O-rich shell. Upon lithiation the O-rich rutile phase is transformed into Li—Fe—O(—F) rocksalt that has high lattice coherency with converted metallic Fe, a feature that may facilitate the local electron and ion transport. The O-rich rocksalt is highly stable over lithiation/delithiation and thus advantageous to maintain the integrity of the particle, and due to its predominant distribution on the surface, it is expected to prevent the catalytic interaction of Fe with electrolyte. Our findings of the structural origin of cycling stability in oxyfluorides may provide insights into developing viable high-energy electrodes for lithium batteries.« less

  8. A HEURISTIC PREDICTION OF THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE CO-LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Heywood, I.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Rawlings, S.

    2009-09-10

    We predict the emission line luminosity functions (LFs) of the first 10 rotational transitions of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O in galaxies at redshift z = 0 to z = 10. This prediction relies on a recently presented simulation of the molecular cold gas content in {approx}3 x 10{sup 7} evolving galaxies based on the Millennium Simulation. We combine this simulation with a model for the conversion between molecular mass and CO-line intensities, which incorporates the following mechanisms: (1) molecular gas is heated by the cosmic microwave background (CMB), starbursts (SBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGNs); (2) molecular clouds in dense or inclined galaxies can overlap; (3) compact gas can attain a smooth distribution in the densest part of disks; (4) CO luminosities scale with metallicity changes between galaxies; and (5) CO luminosities are always detected against the CMB. We analyze the relative importance of these effects and predict the cosmic evolution of the CO-LFs. The most notable conclusion is that the detection of regular galaxies (i.e., no AGN, no massive SB) at high z {approx}> 7 in CO emission will be dramatically hindered by the weak contrast against the CMB, in contradiction to earlier claims that CMB heating will ease the detection of high-redshift CO. The full simulation of extragalactic CO lines and the predicted CO-LFs at any redshift can be accessed online (http://s-cubed.physics.ox.ac.uk/, go to {sup S3}-SAX) and they should be useful for the modeling of CO-line surveys with future telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array or the Square Kilometre Array.

  9. Apocynin suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inactivation of macrophages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Ishii, Norio; Fukuda, Kazuki; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Taketa, Kayo; Kawasaki, Shuji; Hanatani, Satoko; Takeya, Motohiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined the anti-athrogenic effect of apocynin in atherosclerotic model mice. ► Apocynin prevented atherosclerotic lesion formation. ► Apocynin suppressed ROS production in aorta and in macrophages. ► Apocynin suppressed cytokine expression and cell proliferation in macrophages. ► Apocynin may be beneficial compound for the prevention of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other proinflammatory substances by macrophages plays an important role in atherogenesis. Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone), which is well known as a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory effects including suppression of the generation of ROS. However, the suppressive effects of apocynin on the progression of atherosclerosis are not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of apocynin using apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup –/–}) mice in vivo and in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In atherosclerosis-prone apoE{sup –/–} mice, apocynin suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis, decreased 4-hydroxynonenal-positive area in atherosclerotic lesions, and mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in aorta. In mouse peritoneal macrophages, apocynin suppressed the Ox-LDL-induced ROS generation, mRNA expression of MCP-1, IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and cell proliferation. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies revealed that apocynin decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE{sup –/–} mice. These results suggested that apocynin suppressed the formation of atherosclerotic lesions, at least in part, by inactivation of macrophages. Therefore, apocynin may be a potential therapeutic material to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  10. Chemical stability of highly (0001) textured Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films with a thin Ta capping layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Haibao; Wang Hao; Liu Xiaoqi; Wang Jianping; Zhang Tao

    2011-04-01

    With the highest magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (Ku) among practical magnetic materials, SmCo{sub 5} could be a very attractive candidate for future high areal density magnetic recording. However, its corrosion resistance is always a concern in recording media applications. In this paper, the chemical stability and microstructures of highly (0001) textured Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films with and without a 3 nm Ta capping layer were reported. For Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films without a capping layer, the coercivity decreases significantly (from 8kOe to 1kOe) within one month. Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films capped with a thin Ta layer (3 nm) behave differently. Even exposed to a laboratory environment (25 deg. C) over 3 years, the Ta-capped Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films are stable in terms of structural and magnetic properties, i.e., there were no changes in X-ray diffraction peaks and vibrating sample magnetometer hysteresis loops. Microstructure of Ta-capped Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films showed that Sm(CoCu){sub 5} formed a domelike particle assembly structure on a smooth Ru underlayer and were well covered by partially oxidized Ta capping layer, as shown by TEM cross-section micrographs. Accelerated corrosion treatment (130 deg. C, 95% relative humidity, 6 h) was performed on Ta-capped Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that no Co was detected on the sample surface before the corrosion treatment, but strong XPS signals of CoOx and Co(OH)x were observed after treatment. Therefore, none of our Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films can pass the accelerated corrosion test. Hcp-phased CoPt-alloys are proposed as better capping materials for Sm(CoCu){sub 5} thin films in future high-density magnetic recording applications.

  11. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  12. Syntheses, crystal structures and properties of series of 4d–4f ln(III)–Ag(I) heterometallic coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ran, Xing-Rui; Wang, Ning; Xie, Wei-Ping; Xiong, Yan-Ju; Cheng, Qian; Long, Yi; Yue, Shan-Tang; Liu, Ying-Liang

    2015-05-15

    By control of the experimental parameters such as ligands, pH value and reacting temperature, series of three-dimensional (3D) 4d–4f Ln(III)–Ag(I) porous coordination polymers (PCPs) with interesting chain-layer construction, namely, ([Ln{sup III}Ag{sup I}(na)(ina)(ox)]·2(H{sub 2}O)){sub n} [Ln=Sm(1), Eu(2), Gd(3), Tb(4), Dy(5), Ho(6), Y(7), Yb(8)], have been successfully synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and structurally characterized. All the complexes are characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). Furthermore, the luminescence properties of compounds 2 and 4 and the magsnetic properties of complexes 3 and 5 were also investigated in detail. - Graphical abstract: Series of three-dimensional (3D) 4d–4f Ln(III)–Ag(I) porous coordination polymers (PCPs) with interesting chain-layer construction which are featured by tetranuclear Ln{sub 2}Ag{sub 2} and ‘non-linear’ N–Ag–N linkages. - Highlights: • Complexes 1–8 are first built by three kinds of organic ligands based on nicotinic acid and isonicotinic acid. • PCPs 1–8 are featured by tetranuclear Ln{sub 2}Ag{sub 2} and ‘non-linear’ N–Ag–N linkages. • The total solvent-accessible volume of PCP 2 comprises 11.6% of the crystal volume after dislodging the free water molecules. • Complexes 2 and 4 exhibit characteristic lanthanide-centered luminescence, while compounds 3 and 5 show antiferromagnetic behaviors.

  13. The influence of surface preparation on low temperature HfO{sub 2} ALD on InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, Tyler; Edmonds, Mary; Kummel, Andrew C.; Tang, Kechao; Negara, Muhammad Adi; McIntyre, Paul; Chobpattana, Varistha; Mitchell, William; Sahu, Bhagawan; Galatage, Rohit; Droopad, Ravi

    2015-10-28

    Current logic devices rely on 3D architectures, such as the tri-gate field effect transistor (finFET), which utilize the (001) and (110) crystal faces simultaneously thus requiring passivation methods for the (110) face in order to ensure a pristine 3D surface prior to further processing. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and correlated electrical measurement on MOSCAPs were utilized to compare the effects of a previously developed in situ pre-atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface clean on the InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces. Ex situ wet cleans are very effective on the (001) surface but not the (110) surface. Capacitance voltage indicated the (001) surface with no buffered oxide etch had a higher C{sub max} hypothesized to be a result of poor nucleation of HfO{sub 2} on the native oxide. An in situ pre-ALD surface clean employing both atomic H and trimethylaluminum (TMA) pre-pulsing, developed by Chobpattana et al. and Carter et al. for the (001) surface, was demonstrated to be effective on the (110) surface for producing low D{sub it} high C{sub ox} MOSCAPs. Including TMA in the pre-ALD surface clean resulted in reduction of the magnitude of the interface state capacitance. The XPS studies show the role of atomic H pre-pulsing is to remove both carbon and oxygen while STM shows the role of TMA pre-pulsing is to eliminate H induced etching. Devices fabricated at 120 °C and 300 °C were compared.

  14. Active phase distribution changes within a catalyst particle during Fischer–Tropsch synthesis as revealed by multi-scale microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cats, K. H.; Andrews, J. C.; Stephan, O.; March, K.; Karunakaran, C.; Meirer, F.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2016-02-16

    In this study, the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reaction is one of the most promising processes to convert alternative energy sources, such as natural gas, coal or biomass, into liquid fuels and other high-value products. Despite its commercial implementation, we still lack fundamental insights into the various deactivation processes taking place during FTS. In this work, a combination of three methods for studying single catalyst particles at different length scales has been developed and applied to study the deactivation of Co/TiO2 Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts. By combining transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy-electronmore » energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) we visualized changes in the structure, aggregate size and distribution of supported Co nanoparticles that occur during FTS. At the microscale, Co nanoparticle aggregates are transported over several μm leading to a more homogeneous Co distribution, while at the nanoscale Co forms a thin layer of ~1-2 nm around the TiO2 support. The formation of the Co layer is the opposite case to the “classical” strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in which TiO2 surrounds the Co, and is possibly related to the surface oxidation of Co metal nanoparticles in combination with coke formation. In other words, the observed migration and formation of a thin CoOx layer are similar to a previously discussed reaction-induced spreading of metal oxides across a TiO2 surface.« less

  15. Assessment of contaminant levels and trophic relations at a World Heritage Site by measurements in a characteristic shorebird species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwemmer, Philipp; Covaci, Adrian; Das, Krishna; Lepoint, Gilles; Adler, Sven; Garthe, Stefan

    2015-01-15

    The River Elbe is responsible for influxes of contaminants into the Wadden Sea World Heritage Site. We investigated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), oxychlordane (OxC), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (α-, β-, γ-HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in blood and feathers from Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus; n=28) at the Elbe and compared it with a non-riverine site about 90 km further north. (1) Mean levels of all contaminants in feathers and serum were significantly higher at the river (∑PCBs: 27.6 ng/g feather, 37.0 ng/ml serum; ∑DDTs: 5.3 ng/g feather, 4.4 ng/ml serum) compared with the non-riverine site (∑PCBs: 6.5 ng/g feather, 1.2 ng/ml serum; ∑DDTs: 1.4 ng/g feather, 0.5 ng/ml serum). Mean ∑HCH and HCB levels were <1.8 ng/g in feather and <1.8 ng/ml in serum at both sites. (2) Levels of most detectable compounds in serum and feathers were significantly related, but levels were not consistently higher in either tissue. (3) There was no significant relationship between trophic level in individual oystercatchers (expressed as δ15N) or the degree of terrestrial feeding (expressed as δ13C) and contaminant loads. (4) PBDEs were not detected in significant amounts at either site. The results of this study indicate that the outflow from one of Europe′s largest river systems is associated with significant historical contamination, reflected by the accumulation of contaminants in body tissues in a coastal benthivore predator. - Highlights: • Contaminants in Oystercatchers from the Elbe river and a non-riverine site were measured. • Mean levels of contaminants were higher at the river than at the non-riverine site. • Levels of most contaminants in serum and feathers were significantly related. • No relationship between trophic level (δ15N) and contaminant level was found. • One of Europe′s largest river systems is associated

  16. Mixed metallic Ba(Co,Mn)X{sub 0.2-x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (X=F, Cl) hexagonal perovskites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iorgulescu, Mihaela; Roussel, Pascal; Tancret, Nathalie; Renaut, Nicolas; Tiercelin, Nicolas; Mentre, Olivier

    2013-02-15

    We show here that the incorporation of Mn in Ba-Co-oxohalide, BaCoX{sub 0.2-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, hexagonal perovskite stabilizes the 6H-form (stacking sequence (chhhch Prime ); c, h=[BaO{sub 3}] and h Prime =[BaOX] layers), with tetramers of face-sharing octahedra) rather than the trimeric 10H-form. On the contrary to previous results on the Fe incorporation in similar system leading to more reduced 10H-compounds, the Mn effect is to increase the mean (Co/Mn) valence better suited to the 6H form. We experienced a poor Mn/Co miscibility during our syntheses leading to great difficulties to isolate mixed Co/Mn single phase materials and/or weak reproducibility. Powder neutron diffraction data shows a mixed Mn/Co octahedral occupancy, while the tetrahedra are filled by Co{sup 3+} cations. Anionic vacancies were refined in the h Prime -[BaO{sub 1-z}X{sub 1-x}] layer and the next c-[BaO{sub 3-z}] layers, while the h-[BaO{sub 3}] layers are not oxygen deficient. Magnetic properties suggest that a part of Mn cations remain paramagnetic until low temperature, while isolated spin clusters (probably driven by AFM Co tetrahedral dimers) behave as low-dimensional AFM systems. Transport measurements reveal a transition from high-temperature metallic to low-temperature semi-conducting states that could occur from defect shallow donor upon the Mn for Co substitution. - Graphical abstract: The incorporation of Mn in Ba-Co-oxohalide, BaCoX{sub 0.2-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, hexagonal perovskite stabilizes the 6H-form with tetrameric (Co,Mn){sub 4}O{sub 15} face sharing linear chains. This results from a oxidizing Mn effect and particular Mn/Co distribution. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The incorporation of Mn in BaCoX{sub 0.2-x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (X=F,Cl) hexagonal perovskites stabilizes the 6H-form. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It contains tetrameric (Co,Mn){sub 4}O{sub 15} face sharing linear chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The preference for such chains better than

  17. In-situ DRIFTS measurements for the mechanistic study of NO oxidation over a commercial Cu-CHA catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Nova, Isabella; Tronconi, Enrico; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2014-11-03

    We report a mechanistic DRIFTS in-situ study of NO2, NO + O2 and NO adsorption on a commercial Cu-CHA catalyst for NH3-SCR of NOx. Both pre-reduced and pre-oxidized catalyst samples were investigated with the aim of clarifying mechanistic aspects of the NO oxidation to NO2 as a preliminary step towards the study of the Standard SCR reaction mechanism at low temperatures. Nitrosonium cations (NO+, N formal oxidation state = +3) were identified as key surface intermediates in the process of NO (+2) oxidation to NO2 (+4) and nitrates (+5). While NO+ and nitrates were formed simultaneously upon catalyst exposure to NO2, nitrates evolved consecutively to NO+ when the catalyst was exposed to NO + O2, suggesting that nitrite-like species, and not NO2, are formed as the primary products of the NO oxidative activation over Cu-CHA. Upon catalyst exposure to NO only, i.e. in the absence of gaseous O2, NO+ and then nitrates were formed on a pre-oxidized sample but not on a pre-reduced one, which demonstrates the red-ox nature of the NO oxidation mechanism. The negative effect of H2O on NO+ and nitrates formation was also clearly established. Assuming Cu dimers as the active sites for NO oxidation to NO2, we propose a mechanism which reconciles all the experimental observations. Specifically, we show that such a mechanism also explains the observed kinetic effects of H2O, O2 and NO2 on the NO oxidation activity of the investigated Cu zeolite catalyst.

  18. Ethane oxidative dehydrogenation pathways on vanadium oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyle, Morris; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-12-10

    Kinetic and isotopic tracer and exchange measurements were used to determine the identity and reversibility of elementary steps involved in ethane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) on VOx/Al2O3 and VOx/ZrO2. C2H6-C2D6-O2 and C2H6-D2O-O2 react to form alkenes and COx without concurrent formation of C2H6-xDx orC2H4-xDx isotopomers, suggesting that C-H bond cleavage in ethane and ethene is an irreversible and kinetically relevant step in ODH and combustion reactions. Primary ethane ODH reactions show normal kinetic isotopic effects (kC-H/kC-D) 2.4; similar values were measured for ethane and ethene combustion(1.9 and 2.8, respectively). 16O2-18O2-C2H6 reactions on supported V16Ox domains led to the initial appearance of 16O from the lattice in H2O, CO, and CO2, consistent with the involvement of lattice oxygen in C-H bond activation steps. Isotopic contents are similar in H2O, CO, and CO2, suggesting that ODH and combustion reactions use similar lattice oxygen sites. No 16O-18O isotopomer s were detected during reactions of 16O2-18O2-C2H6 mixtures, as expected if dissociative O2 chemisorption steps were irreversible. The alkyl species formed in these steps desorb irreversibly as ethene and the resulting O-H groups recombine to form H2O and reduced V centers in reversible desorption steps. These reduced V centers reoxidize by irreversible dissociative chemisorption of O2. A pseudo-steady state analysis of these elementary steps together with these reversibility assumptions led to a rate expression that accurately describes the observed inhibition of ODH rates by water and the measured kinetic dependence of ODH rates on C2H6 and O2 pressures. This kinetic analysis suggests that surface oxygen, OH groups, and oxygen vacancies are the most abundant reactive intermediates during ethane ODH on active VOx domains.

  19. Ethane oxidative dehydrogenation pathways on vanadium oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyle, Morris; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-12-10

    Kinetic and isotopic tracer and exchange measurements were used to determine the identity and reversibility of elementary steps involved in ethane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) on VOx/Al2O3 and VOx/ZrO2. C2H6-C2D6-O2 and C2H6-D2O-O2 react to form alkenes and COx without concurrent formation of C2H6-xDx orC2H4-xDx isotopomers, suggesting that C-H bond cleavage in ethane and ethene is an irreversible and kinetically relevant step in ODH and combustion reactions. Primary ethane ODH reactions show normal kinetic isotopic effects (kC-H/kC-D 2.4); similar values were measured for ethane and ethene combustion(1.9 and 2.8, respectively). 16O2-18O2-C2H6 reactions on supported V16Ox domains led to the initial appearance of 16O from the lattice in H2O, CO, and CO2, consistent with the involvement of lattice oxygen in C-H bond activation steps. Isotopic contents are similar in H2O, CO, and CO2, suggesting that ODH and combustion reactions use similar lattice oxygen sites. No 16O-18O isotopomer s were detected during reactions of 16O2-18O2-C2H6 mixtures, as expected if dissociative O2 chemisorption steps were irreversible. The alkyl species formed in these steps desorb irreversibly as ethene and the resulting O-H groups recombine to form H2O and reduced V centers in reversible desorption steps. These reduced V centers reoxidize by irreversible dissociative chemisorption of O2. A pseudo-steady state analysis of these elementary steps together with these reversibility assumptions led to a rate expression that accurately describes the observed inhibition of ODH rates by water and the measured kinetic dependence of ODH rates on C2H6 and O2 pressures. This kinetic analysis suggests that surface oxygen, OH groups, and oxygen vacancies are the most abundant reactive intermediates during ethane ODH on active VOx domains.

  20. Recovery Act: Novel Oxygen Carriers for Coal-fueled Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping; Cao, Yan

    2012-11-30

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) could totally negate the necessity of pure oxygen by using oxygen carriers for purification of CO{sub 2} stream during combustion. It splits the single fuel combustion reaction into two linked reactions using oxygen carriers. The two linked reactions are the oxidation of oxygen carriers in the air reactor using air, and the reduction of oxygen carriers in the fuel reactor using fuels (i.e. coal). Generally metal/metal oxides are used as oxygen carriers and operated in a cyclic mode. Chemical looping combustion significantly improves the energy conversion efficiency, in terms of the electricity generation, because it improves the reversibility of the fuel combustion process through two linked parallel processes, compared to the conventional combustion process, which is operated far away from its thermo-equilibrium. Under the current carbon-constraint environment, it has been a promising carbon capture technology in terms of fuel combustion for power generation. Its disadvantage is that it is less mature in terms of technological commercialization. In this DOE-funded project, accomplishment is made by developing a series of advanced copper-based oxygen carriers, with properties of the higher oxygen-transfer capability, a favorable thermodynamics to generate high purity of CO{sub 2}, the higher reactivity, the attrition-resistance, the thermal stability in red-ox cycles and the achievement of the auto-thermal heat balance. This will be achieved into three phases in three consecutive years. The selected oxygen carriers with final-determined formula were tested in a scaled-up 10kW coal-fueled chemical looping combustion facility. This scaled-up evaluation tests (2-day, 8-hour per day) indicated that, there was no tendency of agglomeration of copper-based oxygen carriers. Only trace-amount of coke or carbon deposits on the copper-based oxygen carriers in the fuel reactor. There was also no evidence to show the sulphidization of oxygen

  1. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woody, Matthew C.; Baker, Kirk R.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Koo, Bonyoung; Pye, Havala O. T.

    2016-03-29

    Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations utilizing the traditional organic aerosol (OA) treatment (CMAQ-AE6) and a volatility basis set (VBS) treatment for OA (CMAQ-VBS) were evaluated against measurements collected at routine monitoring networks (Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE)) and those collected during the 2010 California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaign to examine important sources of OA in southern California. Traditionally, CMAQ treats primary organic aerosol (POA) as nonvolatile and uses a two-product framework to represent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. CMAQ-VBS instead treats POA asmore » semivolatile and lumps OA using volatility bins spaced an order of magnitude apart. The CMAQ-VBS approach underpredicted organic carbon (OC) at IMPROVE and CSN sites to a greater degree than CMAQ-AE6 due to the semivolatile POA treatment. However, comparisons to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements collected at Pasadena, CA, indicated that CMAQ-VBS better represented the diurnal profile and primary/secondary split of OA. CMAQ-VBS SOA underpredicted the average measured AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, a surrogate for SOA) concentration by a factor of 5.2, representing a considerable improvement to CMAQ-AE6 SOA predictions (factor of 24 lower than AMS). We use two new methods, one based on species ratios (SOA/ΔCO and SOA/Ox) and another on a simplified SOA parameterization, to apportion the SOA underprediction for CMAQ-VBS to slow photochemical oxidation (estimated as 1.5 ×  lower than observed at Pasadena using −log(NOx : NOy)), low intrinsic SOA formation efficiency (low by 1.6 to 2 ×  for Pasadena), and low emissions or excessive dispersion for the Pasadena site (estimated to be 1.6 to 2.3 ×  too low/excessive). The first and third factors are common to CMAQ-AE6, while the intrinsic SOA formation

  2. LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL AFTERGLOWS: BIASES IN THE SWIFT SAMPLE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Thoene, C. C.; Jakobsson, P.; Bjoernsson, G.; De Cia, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Nardini, M.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Christensen, L.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a sample of 77 optical afterglows (OAs) of Swift detected gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which spectroscopic follow-up observations have been secured. Our first objective is to measure the redshifts of the bursts. For the majority (90%) of the afterglows, the redshifts have been determined from the spectra. We provide line lists and equivalent widths (EWs) for all detected lines redward of Ly{alpha} covered by the spectra. In addition to the GRB absorption systems, these lists include line strengths for a total of 33 intervening absorption systems. We discuss to what extent the current sample of Swift bursts with OA spectroscopy is a biased subsample of all Swift detected GRBs. For that purpose we define an X-ray-selected statistical sample of Swift bursts with optimal conditions for ground-based follow-up from the period 2005 March to 2008 September; 146 bursts fulfill our sample criteria. We derive the redshift distribution for the statistical (X-ray selected) sample and conclude that less than 18% of Swift bursts can be at z > 7. We compare the high-energy properties (e.g., {gamma}-ray (15-350 keV) fluence and duration, X-ray flux, and excess absorption) for three subsamples of bursts in the statistical sample: (1) bursts with redshifts measured from OA spectroscopy; (2) bursts with detected optical and/or near-IR afterglow, but no afterglow-based redshift; and (3) bursts with no detection of the OA. The bursts in group (1) have slightly higher {gamma}-ray fluences and higher X-ray fluxes and significantly less excess X-ray absorption than bursts in the other two groups. In addition, the fractions of dark bursts, defined as bursts with an optical to X-ray slope {beta}{sub OX} < 0.5, is 14% in group (1), 38% in group (2), and >39% in group (3). For the full sample, the dark burst fraction is constrained to be in the range 25%-42%. From this we conclude that the sample of GRBs with OA spectroscopy is not representative for all Swift bursts, most likely due

  3. HOx radical chemistry in oxidation flow reactors with low-pressure mercury lamps systematically examined by modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Stark, H.; Li, R.; Palm, B. B.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-04-20

    analysis shows that most of the uncertainty is contributed by photolysis rates of O3, O2, and H2O and reactions of OH and HO2 with themselves or with some abundant species, i.e., O3 and H2O2. Using HOx-recycling vs. destructive external OH reactivity only leads to small changes in OHexp under most conditions. Changing the identity (rate constant) of external OH reactants can result in substantial changes in OHexp due to different reductions in OH suppression as the reactant is consumed. We also report two equations for estimating OH exposure in OFR254. We find that the equation estimating OHexp from measured O3 consumption performs better than an alternative equation that does not use it, and thus recommend measuring both input and output O3 concentrations in OFR254 experiments. This study contributes to establishing a firm and systematic understanding of the gas-phase HOx and Ox chemistry in these reactors, and enables better experiment planning and interpretation as well as improved design of future reactors.« less

  4. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woody, Matthew C.; Baker, Kirk R.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Koo, Bonyoung; Pye, Havala O. T.

    2016-03-29

    In this paper, Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations utilizing the traditional organic aerosol (OA) treatment (CMAQ-AE6) and a volatility basis set (VBS) treatment for OA (CMAQ-VBS) were evaluated against measurements collected at routine monitoring networks (Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE)) and those collected during the 2010 California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaign to examine important sources of OA in southern California. Traditionally, CMAQ treats primary organic aerosol (POA) as nonvolatile and uses a two-product framework to represent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. CMAQ-VBS insteadmore » treats POA as semivolatile and lumps OA using volatility bins spaced an order of magnitude apart. The CMAQ-VBS approach underpredicted organic carbon (OC) at IMPROVE and CSN sites to a greater degree than CMAQ-AE6 due to the semivolatile POA treatment. However, comparisons to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements collected at Pasadena, CA, indicated that CMAQ-VBS better represented the diurnal profile and primary/secondary split of OA. CMAQ-VBS SOA underpredicted the average measured AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, a surrogate for SOA) concentration by a factor of 5.2, representing a considerable improvement to CMAQ-AE6 SOA predictions (factor of 24 lower than AMS). We use two new methods, one based on species ratios (SOA/ΔCO and SOA/Ox) and another on a simplified SOA parameterization, to apportion the SOA underprediction for CMAQ-VBS to slow photochemical oxidation (estimated as 1.5 × lower than observed at Pasadena using -log(NOx:NOy)), low intrinsic SOA formation efficiency (low by 1.6 to 2 × for Pasadena), and low emissions or excessive dispersion for the Pasadena site (estimated to be 1.6 to 2.3 × too low/excessive). The first and third factors are common to CMAQ-AE6, while the intrinsic SOA formation

  5. Real-time measurements of secondary organic aerosol formation and aging from ambient air in an oxidation flow reactor in the Los Angeles area

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ortega, Amber M.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Peng, Zhe; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Day, Douglas A.; Li, Rui; Cubison, Michael J.; Brune, William H.; Graus, Martin; et al

    2016-06-15

    Field studies in polluted areas over the last decade have observed large formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that is often poorly captured by models. The study of SOA formation using ambient data is often confounded by the effects of advection, vertical mixing, emissions, and variable degrees of photochemical aging. An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) was deployed to study SOA formation in real-time during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign in Pasadena, CA, in 2010. A high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) alternated sampling ambient andmore » reactor-aged air. The reactor produced OH concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than in ambient air. OH radical concentration was continuously stepped, achieving equivalent atmospheric aging of 0.8 days–6.4 weeks in 3 min of processing every 2 h. Enhancement of organic aerosol (OA) from aging showed a maximum net SOA production between 0.8–6 days of aging with net OA mass loss beyond 2 weeks. Reactor SOA mass peaked at night, in the absence of ambient photochemistry and correlated with trimethylbenzene concentrations. Reactor SOA formation was inversely correlated with ambient SOA and Ox, which along with the short-lived volatile organic compound correlation, indicates the importance of very reactive (τOH ~ 0.3 day) SOA precursors (most likely semivolatile and intermediate volatility species, S/IVOCs) in the Greater Los Angeles Area. Evolution of the elemental composition in the reactor was similar to trends observed in the atmosphere (O : C vs. H : C slope ~ –0.65). Oxidation state of carbon (OSc) in reactor SOA increased steeply with age and remained elevated (OSC ~ 2) at the highest photochemical ages probed. The ratio of OA in the reactor output to excess CO (ΔCO, ambient CO above regional background) vs. photochemical age is similar to previous studies at low to moderate ages and

  6. HOx radical chemistry in oxidation flow reactors with low-pressure mercury lamps systematically examined by modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Stark, H.; Li, R.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Palm, B. B.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-11-20

    -sections in the model are within ±25 % for OH exposure and within ±60 % for other parameters. These uncertainties are small relative to the dynamic range of outputs. Uncertainty analysis shows that most of the uncertainty is contributed by photolysis rates of O3, O2, and H2O and reactions of OH and HO2 with themselves or with some abundant species, i.e., O3 and H2O2. OHexp calculated from direct integration and estimated from SO2 decay in the model with laminar and measured residence time distributions (RTDs) are generally within a factor of 2 from the plug-flow OHexp. However, in the models with RTDs, OHexp estimated from SO2 is systematically lower than directly integrated OHexp in the case of significant SO2 consumption. We thus recommended using OHexp estimated from the decay of the species under study when possible, to obtain the most appropriate information on photochemical aging in the OFR. Using HOx-recycling vs. destructive external OH reactivity only leads to small changes in OHexp under most conditions. Changing the identity (rate constant) of external OH reactants can result in substantial changes in OHexp due to different reductions in OH suppression as the reactant is consumed. We also report two equations for estimating OH exposure in OFR254. We find that the equation estimating OHexp from measured O3 consumption performs better than an alternative equation that does not use it, and thus recommend measuring both input and output O3 concentrations in OFR254 experiments. This study contributes to establishing a firm and systematic understanding of the gas-phase HOx and Ox chemistry in these reactors, and enables better experiment planning and interpretation as well as improved design of future reactors.« less

  7. GENOME ENABLED MODIFICATION OF POPLAR ROOT DEVELOPMENT FOR INCREASED CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    designated as a bioenergy crop by the U.S. Department of Energy, as a result of research following the oil embargo. Populus species also serve as model trees for plant molecular biology research. In this article, we will review recent progress in the genetic improvement of Populus, considering both classical breeding and genetic engineering for bioenergy, as well as in using transgenics to elucidate gene functionality. A perspective for future improvement of Populus via functional genomics will also be presented. The role of gibberellins (GAs) in regulation of lateral root development is poorly understood. We show that GA-deficient (35S:PcGA2ox1) and GA-insensitive (35S:rgl1) transgenic Populus exhibited increased lateral root proliferation and elongation under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, and these effects were reversed by exogenous GA treatment. In addition, RNA interference suppression of two poplar GA 2-oxidases predominantly expressed in roots also decreased lateral root formation. GAs negatively affected lateral root formation by inhibiting lateral root primordium initiation. A whole-genome microarray analysis of root development in GA-modified transgenic plants revealed 2069 genes with significantly altered expression. The expression of 1178 genes, including genes that promote cell proliferation, growth, and cell wall loosening, corresponded to the phenotypic severity of the root traits when transgenic events with differential phenotypic expression were compared. The array data and direct hormone measurements suggested crosstalk of GA signaling with other hormone pathways, including auxin and abscisic acid. Transgenic modification of a differentially expressed gene encoding an auxin efflux carrier suggests that GA modulation of lateral root development is at least partly imparted by polar auxin transport modification. These results suggest a mechanism for GA-regulated modulation of lateral root proliferation associated with regulation of plant allometry during