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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Barred Owl (Strix varia) Nest Site Characteristics in the Boreal Forest of Saskatchewan, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barred Owl (Strix varia) Nest Site Characteristics in the Boreal Forest of Saskatchewan, Canada active Barred Owl (Strix varia) nests in the boreal forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada. Eighty records exist. Our objective was to describe Barred Owl nests within the boreal forest of Saskatchewan

2

A Method for Locating Barr ed Owl ( Strix varia ) Nests in the Souther n Boreal For est of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Saskatchewan Shanna D. Frith, Kurt M. Mazur , and Paul C. James 1 Abstract.--Barr ed Owl (Strix varia) nests forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada. During the nesting period, we located pairs of Barr ed Owls eal forest of Saskatchewan, Canada, are the largest reported for this species to date (Mazur 1997

3

Estimation of Food Consumption fr om Pellets Cast by Captive Ural Owls ( Strix uralensis ) Aki Higuchi and Manabu T . Abe1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

551 Estimation of Food Consumption fr om Pellets Cast by Captive Ural Owls ( Strix uralensis ) Aki of the Ural Owl ( Strix uralensis) based on pellet analysis. Though it is possible to identify pr ey items- tat and manage for this species. In this study, ingested food and cast pellet mass were quantified

4

Albinism in the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) and Other Owls Pentti Alaja and Heimo Mikkola1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a recessive gene which inhibits the enzyme tyrosinase. Tyrosine, an amino acid, synthesizes the melanin

5

Owl Feather War Bonnet  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Owl Feather War Bonnet and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

6

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY NEW STUDENT & OWL FAMILY PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and implementation of the program. a. Multiple new programs were enhanced and added to make New Student OrientationEXECUTIVE SUMMARY NEW STUDENT & OWL FAMILY PROGRAMS 2012-2013 Overview The Office of New Student and Owl Family Programs plays an integral role within the University by offering a supportive, innovative

Fernandez, Eduardo

7

Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne Robertson3 and Mark Small3 1 Centre for Geospatial Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD geospatial web services, most of which conform to specifications of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC

Stock, Kristin

8

NEJC: "Engaging Non-Traditional Partners with Woodsy Owl’s Conservative Ethics: A Head Start Success Story"  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Description: This workshop will show how the Woodsy Owl’s partnership was established, what we have done to keep up the momentum, the challenges we have faced, and our vision for the future of this...

9

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/general/gl_outlin.html Developing an Outline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/general/gl_outlin.html Developing an Outline Brought outline, see the OWL document Sample Outline at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl process at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_plan2.html. Developing an Outline An outline

Yanai, Ruth D.

10

LONG-EARED OWLS NESTING IN BADLANDS NATIONAL PARK by Deborah D. Paulson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LONG-EARED OWLS NESTING IN BADLANDS NATIONAL PARK by Deborah D. Paulson and Carolyn Hull Sieg USDA Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Rapid City 57701 Long-eared Owls nest at high River, few nesting records have been reported. This paper reports the occurrence of Long-eared Owls

11

ROO: Involving Domain Experts in Authoring OWL Ronald Denaux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Authoring, Controlled Natural Language Interfaces, Evaluation of Ontology Building Tools, Geographical process and improve the quality of the resultant ontologies. Recently, controlled language (CL) interfaces domain experts' definition of ontologies in OWL by allowing them to author the ontology in a controlled

Dimitrova, Vania

12

Using OWL Ontologies Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using OWL Ontologies for Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling Arnab Sinha and Paul Couderc INRIA for better recycling of materials. Our motive for using ontologies is for representing and rea- soning, recyclable materials, N-ary relations 1 Introduction Today Pervasive computing is gradually entering people

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwls Head, Maine:

14

FEEDING ECOLOGY OF THE BARN OWL IN CENTRAL CHILE AND SOUTHERN SPAIN: A COMPARATIVE STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEEDING ECOLOGY OF THE BARN OWL IN CENTRAL CHILE AND SOUTHERN SPAIN: A COMPARATIVE STUDY CARLOSM. HERREV&AND FABIANM. JAKSI·1 EstacidnBioldgicade Dogaria, Sevilla-12, Andalucia, Spain, and Instituto de of the Barn Owl (Tyro alba) in the mediterranean- climate areasof central Chile and southernSpain. In both

Herrera, Carlos M.

15

And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca Terry, PhD'08 drop their bones on the cave floor or (in the case of owls) ex- pel them in the form of pellets

Collar, Juan I.

16

HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):251256, Fall 2009 Burrowing owl and other migratory bird  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), including the burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hazard, burrowing owl, Edwards Air Force Base, human­wildlife conflicts, Migratory Bird Treaty Act (Dolbeer 2006). Most are federally protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) of 1918, which

17

Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesa IOvonic Battery CompanyOwl Creek

18

Effects of Drought-Stress on Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and Host-Plant Resistance to Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella Occidentalis Pergande)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Herbivory by Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande) (WFT) and drought-stress due to limited water availability are currently two major factors that can severely impact cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production...

Fiene, Justin G. 1983-

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

Hall, Derek B. [NSTec; Greger, Paul D. [NSTec

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Adaptive map alignment in the superior colliculus of the barn owl: a neuromorphic implementation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptation is one of the basic phenomena of biology, while adaptability is an important feature for neural network. Young barn owl can well adapt its visual and auditory integration to the environmental change, such as ...

Huo, Juan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Observations of W intering Snowy Owls ( Nyctea scandiaca ) at Logan Airport, East Boston, Massachusetts fr om 1981-1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Airport, Boston, MA. 591 #12;2nd Owl Symposium under snow with the noise at Logan Airport. DataObservations of W intering Snowy Owls ( Nyctea scandiaca ) at Logan Airport, East Boston in East Boston, MA, latitude 42°22N and longitude 071°01W . The 13th busiest in the world, the airport

22

Logical Gene Ontology Annotations (GOAL): Exploring gene ontology annotations with OWL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for each annotation): Class: MGI_2685072 oboInOwl: hasDefinition ”trace amine–associated receptor 4”, rdfs: label ”Taar4” SubClassOf: Annotations: oboInOwl: evidenceCode ”IEA” ro: located_in some GO: GO_0016021, (integral to membrane) Annotations: obo... N, Rustici G, Tikhonov A, Travillian RS, Williams E, Zorin A, Parkinson H, Brazma A: Gene Expression Atlas update - a value-added database of microarray and sequencing- based functional genomics experiments. Nucleic Acids Research 2011. 19. Jupp S...

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

Exploration of OWL Ontologies Volker Haarslev and Ying Lu and Nematollah Shiri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OntoXpl Exploration of OWL Ontologies Volker Haarslev and Ying Lu and Nematollah Shiri Computer Science Department Concordia University, Montreal, Canada haarslev@cs.concordia.ca ying lu subset [17] (with the additional restriction of approximated reasoning OntoXpl's download page: http://www.cs.concordia.ca/ying

Haarslev, Volker

24

Intelligent Exploration of OWL Ontologies Volker Haarslev and Ying Lu and Nematollah Shiri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ONTOXPL ­ Intelligent Exploration of OWL Ontologies Volker Haarslev and Ying Lu and Nematollah Shiri Computer Science Department, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada {haarslev, ying lu, shiri ´EG ´E can be ONTOXPL's URL: http://www.cs.concordia.ca/ying lu/ configured to use RACER [3

Haarslev, Volker

25

Metapopulation Dynamics of a Burr owing Owl ( Speotyto cunicularia ) Population in Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over time at the 6,900-ha Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (RMANWR), Colorado fr om 1990. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study Ar ea We studied Burr owing Owls on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National W yucca ( Yucca spp.), sand sagebrush (Artemisia filifolia), and rubber rabbitbrush ( Chrysothamnus

26

Gestion de la cohrence des rgles mtier dites partir d'ontologies OWL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gestion de la cohérence des règles métier éditées à partir d'ontologies OWL Amina Chniti1,2 , Patrick Albert1 , Jean Charlet2,3 1 IBM, CAS France {amina.chniti,albertpa}@fr.ibm.com 2 INSERM UMRS 872 effectué propose une méthode pour la gestion des relations entre les ontologies et les règles métier en

Boyer, Edmond

27

Adaptation of orienting behavior: from the barn owl to a robotic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptation of orienting behavior: from the barn owl to a robotic system M. Rucci, J. Wray and G.M. Edelman The Neurosciences Institute San Diego, CA Abstract- Autonomous robotic systems need t o adjust control of t h e orienting behavior of a robotic system in t h e presence of auditory and visual stim

Rucci, Michele

28

Breeding Dispersal and Nesting Behavior of Burrowing Owls Following Experimental Nest1 D. H. CATLIN1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breeding Dispersal and Nesting Behavior of Burrowing Owls Following Experimental Nest1 Predation2 3 97331, dan.rosenberg@oregonstate.edu7 ABSTRACT8 Nest predation is considered a primary factor affecting the hypothesis that nest predation would10 increase dispersal probability, dispersal distance and the frequency

Rosenberg, Daniel K.

29

Breeding Dispersal and Nesting Behavior of Burrowing Owls Following Experimental Nest Predation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breeding Dispersal and Nesting Behavior of Burrowing Owls Following Experimental Nest Predation D, Corvallis 97331 ABSTRACT.--Nest predation is considered a primary factor affecting the life-history characteristics and particularly dispersal of many avian species. We tested the hypothesis that nest predation

Rosenberg, Daniel K.

30

NEST OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-EARED OWL (Asio otus) IN BENTON COUNTY, OREGON, WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEST OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-EARED OWL (Asio otus) IN BENTON COUNTY, OREGON, WITH NOTES ON THEIR FOOD HABITS RICHARD T. REYNOLDS INTRODUCTION A nesting pair of long-earedowls was found 10 miles north, when the young left the nest. This is the third record of nesting Asio otus west of the Oregon Cascades

31

Distribution of the Chuckwalla, Western Burrowing Owl, and Six Bat Species on the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field Surveys were conducted in 1996 to determine the current distribution of several animal species of concern on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). They included the chuckwall (Sauromalus obesus), western burrowing owl (Speotyto cunicularia), and six species of bats. Nineteen chuckwallas and 118 scat locations were found during the chuckwalla field study. Eighteen western burrowing owls were found at 12 sighting locations during the 1996 field study. Of the eleven bat species of concern which might occur on the NTS, five, and possibly six, were captured during this survey. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, takes certain management actions to protect and conserve the chuckwalla, western burrowing owl, and bats on the NTS. These actions are described and include: (1) conducting surveys at sites of proposed land-disturbing activities (2) altering projects whenever possible to avoid or minimize impacts to these species (3) maintaining a geospatial database of known habitat for species of concern (4) sharing sighting and trap location data gathered on the NTS with other local land and resource managers, and (5) conducting periodic field surveys to monitor these species distribution and relative abundance on the NTS.

Cathy A. Willis

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ecotoxicological simulation modeling: effects of agricultural chemical exposure on wintering burrowing owls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, (2) chemical applications to crops, (3) chemical transfer and fate in the crop soil and prey items, and (4) chemical exposure in the burrowing owl. This model was used to evaluate (1) which components of the model most affect the endpoints, (2... Cotton/Sorghum/Onions crop scenario HD5 Hazardous Dose resulting in mortality of 5% of the population LD50 Lethal Dose resulting in mortality of 50% of the population LEL Lowest Effects Level vii LOEL Lowest Observed Effects Level NASS USDA...

Engelman, Catherine Allegra

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

33

Incr easing Mist Net Captur es of Migrant Norther n Saw-whet Owls (Aegolius acadicus ) with an Audiolur e  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incr easing Mist Net Captur es of Migrant Norther n Saw-whet Owls (Aegolius acadicus associated with courtship activities. Fr om 1971 thr ough 1985, using passive mist netting at Little Suamico eased capture rates over passive mist netting. Audiolur es are now being used by all major Norther n Saw

34

Optimization of the Orbiting Wide-angle Light Collectors (OWL) Mission for Charged-Particle and Neutrino Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OWL uses the Earth's atmosphere as a vast calorimeter to fully enable the emerging field of charged-particle astronomy with high-statistics measurements of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) and a search for sources of UHE neutrinos and photons. Confirmation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) suppression above ~4 x 10^19 eV suggests that most UHECR originate in astrophysical objects. Higher energy particles must come from sources within about 100 Mpc and are deflected by ~1 degree by predicted intergalactic/galactic magnetic fields. The Pierre Auger Array, Telescope Array and the future JEM-EUSO ISS mission will open charged-particle astronomy, but much greater exposure will be required to fully identify and measure the spectra of individual sources. OWL uses two large telescopes with 3 m optical apertures and 45 degree FOV in near-equatorial orbits. Simulations of a five-year OWL mission indicate ~10^6 km^2 sr yr of exposure with full aperture at ~6 x 10^19 eV. Observations at different altitudes and sp...

Krizmanic, John F; Streitmatter, Robert E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

56 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG by MIchEllE bOWlEs JacKsON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

56 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG by MIchEllE bOWlEs JacKsON stepby #12;june 2012 PM NETWORK 57 by adopting an iterative 58 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG waterfall approach. This introduced the idea

Chapman, Michael S.

36

Early Birds, Night Owls,and Tireless/Recurring Itinerants: An Exploratory Analysis of Extreme Transit Behaviors in Beijing, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper seeks to understand extreme public transit riders in Beijing using both traditional household survey and emerging new data sources such as Smart Card Data (SCD). We focus on four types of extreme transit behaviors: public transit riders who (1) travel significantly earlier than average riders (the 'early birds'); (2) ride in unusual late hours (the 'night owls'); and (3) commute in excessively long distance (the 'tireless itinerants'); (4) travel over frequently in a day (the 'recurring itinerants). SCD are used to identify the spatiotemporal patterns of these three extreme transit behaviors. In addition, household survey data are employed to supplement the socioeconomic background and provide a tentative profiling of extreme travelers. While the research findings are useful to guide urban governance and planning in Beijing, the methods developed in this paper can be applied to understand travel patterns elsewhere.

Long, Ying; Zhou, Jiangping; Chai, Yanwei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Spotted Owl Nesting in Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Samuel W. Gadd Journal:  Condor Volume:  44 Issue:  1 (January-February) Section:  From Field and Study Year:  1942 Pages:  35

38

A New Method of Preparing Owl Pellets: Boiling in Naoh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frederick W. Schueler Journal:  Bird Banding Volume:  43 Issue:  2 (April) Section:  General Notes Year:  1972 Pages:  142

39

PEREGRINES AND POWERFUL OWLS IN NAMADGI AND TIDBINBILLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive to environmental pollutants which drastically reduced their numbers elsewhere in the world is an indicator species that give us important information on environmental quality. Peregrines are highly was on a building and has since been abandoned, two were in quarries and four were in Namadgi (Olsen 1992, Olsen

Canberra, University of

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - ants pogonomyrmex occidentalis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Animal Biology & Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 13 Tschinkel WR. 2004. The nest architecture of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK d Resource Management and Science Division, 1314 Cherokee Orchard Road, Great and 2001: Clingmans Dome, Cherokee Orchard Road and Purchase Knob. Cutleaf coneflower exhibited a greater adjacent to the Cherokee Orchard Road Loop. Ozone injury was greatest on the lower leaves for both species

Neufeld, Howard S.

42

Structural Characteristics of Forest Stands Within Home Ranges of Mexican Spotted Owls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, J. Iniguez, S. Jojola, E. Kenney, D. Kitterman, J. Kitterman, W. Kunkle, H. Lineiro, K. Maddock, G. Stoddard, J.Todd, V. Ray, and especially A.J. Helgenberg. J.F. Cully, Jr., A.B. Franklin, M.H. Reiser,W, and W. Shepperd and J.K. Dwyer assisted with debugging the habitat data files. R.A. Wilson and B

43

Mexican Spotted Owl Home Range and Habitat Use in Pine-Oak Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Current address: Nongame Birds Program Manager, Arizona Game and Fish Department, 2222 W. Greenway Road. Cossette. For habitat sampling, we thank D. Brown, M. Gaud, B. Gill, M. Hemecke, E. Kenney, D. Kitterman, J. Kitterman, W. Kunkle, P. May, J. McNamara, M. Nelson, C. Newell, V. Pagliarinl. J. Protiva, and D. Ryan. J

44

Sexual size dimorphism in relation to breeding behavior in Screech Owls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or whinny (Allen, cited in Bent 1938), ho-ho-ho-ho (Tyler, cited in Bent 1938), tremolo trill (Kelso 1944), and secondary song (Marshall 1967). The most common call associated with courtship was the trill (Fig. 3A), The trill was given by both sexes... by the female (R =. 35), s Non-courtship Behaviors ~Whinn of adults. This call has been termed the wail or whinny (Tyler, cited in Bent 1938), screech (Hough 1960), and primary song (Marshall 1967). The whinny is similar to the trill except that the notes...

Witmer, M. C

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Assessment of the Current Status of the California Spotted Owl, with Recommendations for Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Association, National Audubon Society, Nature Conservancy, private timber companies, Sacramento Chamber, observers from the timber industry and the environmental com- munity, and staff. This volume is the CASPO

Standiford, Richard B.

46

Patterns of Habitat Use By California Spotted Owls in Logged Forests of the Northern Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and private timber companies. This information. Methods The cutting history within the study area was determined using records and timber sale maps from

Standiford, Richard B.

47

Habitat associations of cavity-nesting owls in the Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for statistical analysis, with a detection probability of 0.25. I detected saw-whets in a wide range of conditions and it appeared that few factors influenced their distribution in the basin. Areas dominated by white fir, however, were correlated with the absence...

Groce, Julie Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mitochondrial and nuclear assessment of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium Brasilianum) Phylogrography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 093Tabasco* 018Tabasco (n = 10), Tamaulipas (n = 4), Veracruz (n = 11), and Yucatan (n = 1), Mexico. Accession numbers for samples...

Proudfoot, Glenn Arthur

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Fitze, P. S. (2012). Lagartija occidental ibrica Psammodromus occidentalis. En: Enciclopedia Virtual de los Vertebrados Espaoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual de los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales-Jimena, San-José, San Mauro y Zardoya, 2012 Patrick S. Fitze Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC: Enciclopedia Virtual de los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias

Alvarez, Nadir

50

Fitze, P. S. (2012). Western Sand Racer Psammodromus occidentalis. En: Enciclopedia Virtual de los Vertebrados Espaoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales de los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

Alvarez, Nadir

51

East versus West: Organic contaminant differences in brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) eggs from South Carolina, USA and the Gulf of California, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by organochlorine contaminants, such as DDT. The southeast pop- ulation, P.o. carolinensis, was delisted in 1985, while the west coast population, P.o. californicus, was not delisted until 2009. As fish-eating coastal.o. carolinensis) was delisted in 1985 (Potter and Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, 1985), bu

Jodice, Patrick

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox alopex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owl ( Nyctea scandiaca ) Repr oduction in Relation to Lemming Summary: . Competition for food between snowy owls , Nyctea scandiaca, and arctic foxes, Alopex lagopus. Zoological...

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic foxes alopex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owl ( Nyctea scandiaca ) Repr oduction in Relation to Lemming Summary: . Competition for food between snowy owls , Nyctea scandiaca, and arctic foxes, Alopex lagopus. Zoological...

54

Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 860 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Event reconstruction for the orbiting wide-angle light collectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the orbiting wide-angle light collectors (OWL) air-fluorescence detector T. Z. Abu-Zayyad1 and the OWL

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - abstract service results Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 2 OWL-S Ontology Framework Extension for Dynamic Web Service Composition Computer Science Department Summary: mapping in the future. Web...

56

ENDEMIC AND INTRODUCED VERTEBRATES IN THE DIET OF THE BARN OWL (TYTO ALBA) ON TWO ISLANDS IN THE GULF OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isla Rasa (0.91), pero la biomasa promedio por regurgitacio´n fue mayor en Isla Rasa (75.8 g) que en

Medellín, Rodrigo

57

The flight of the barn owl Marion was crying because of the lightning. I went over and jiggled the cardboard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the forest, saved her...' but I broke off when I noticed how Marion clutched at the girl's dress, and made us and headed on out to the hills. There was a great commotion. Some men would have stormed

Johnson, Samuel

58

Distances de similarit d'images bases sur les arbres quaternaires1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manouvrier** -- Geneviève Jomier** * Universidad Central de Venezuela, CCPD, Escuela de Computación, Av. Los Ilustres, Apt. 47002, Los Chaguaramos, 1041 Caracas, Venezuela mrukoz@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ** Université

Boyer, Edmond

59

11/10/2005 Copyright 2005 by Benjamin Grosof and Mike Dean. All Rights Reserved Overview of SweetRules V2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compiler XSB (bkw. OLP) Smodels (fwd. OLP) Process Handbook (OO/frame def.-inh) (fwd. SCLP) OWL (-DLP) Jena

Polz, Martin

60

Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ecoto@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002, 1041-A ND

Coto, Ernesto

62

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ecoto@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002, 1041-A

Coto, Ernesto

63

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias Construcción de Algoritmos Ernesto Coto ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002

Coto, Ernesto

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - agency endangered bird Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

endangered bird Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Study Guide to The Natural History and Conservation of Burrowing Owls, Summary: and seasonal changes, plus other links. http:...

65

Protecting Wildlife  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bees as Indicators of Radionuclide Contamination (pdf) Great Horned Owls at the Los Alamos Environmental Research Park: Population Survey, Nesting Biology, and Management...

66

T e c h n i c a l M e m o r a n d u m \\\\owl\\masterplan\\2\\6 Master Plan\\Land and Building Use.doc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baltimore, MD 21202 410/347-8500 Fax 410/347-8519 Architecture and Engineering Heery International 999 Engineering LRE Engineering 1475 Peachtree Street, Suite 220 Atlanta, GA 30309 404/888-8800 Fax 404 and services. In the course of the Plan development, five issues pertaining to land use have clearly

Arnold, Jonathan

67

T e c h n i c a l M e m o r a n d u m \\\\owl\\masterplan\\1\\5 Prelim MP\\Alternative Concepts.doc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the desired objectives for the designs remained constant. Each scheme was based on the interconnectivity

Arnold, Jonathan

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - acacia auriculiformis seedlings Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

occidentalis L,, Liquidamhar styraciflua L., and Robinia pseudo-acacia L... acid rain (pH 5-6, 40, 30 and 2 0) were observed for seedlings of four deciduous tree species...

69

Species, Methods and Hwotheses of Findines." , atio ion,Years Sample ~ t s i e d Comments Reference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this owl contained five delisting criteria that must be met to remove the owl from the list of threatened.1). The monitoring criterion speci- fied that delisting should occur only if the populations monitored were shown with a power of 90% and a Type I error rate of 5%. The specificity in this delisting criterion represented

70

Anu Vedantham Director, Weigle Information Commons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to create a web-based exhibit of Cherokee storytelling based on indigenous Cherokee knowledge systems. She will interview Freeman Owle, a Cherokee elder in Cherokee, North Carolina, and will use video-editing and web

Sharp, Kim

71

Effects of Habitat Quality and Landscape Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 8, 2005 ... predictive power of a metapopulation model. Key words: .... extinction from a state with practically all habitat oc- cupied. The M. ... 1990, Weiss et al. 1993, Hanski et al. ...... A dynamic analysis of northern spotted owl viability.

72

in height, 40-50 inches in wingspan,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and he'd rather not have to come back. He brushes sweat from his brow and refit his headlamp. Halfway moving again, listening. He calls out four hollow notes, imitating a Mexican spotted owl. The silence

73

502 SHORT COMMUNICATIONS (Speotyto cuniculuria) to a moving object when the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the window. A red, 7-watt incandescent bulb inside the box provided illumina- tion for viewing the owl conditions were provided by one and four `I-watt incandescent bulbs, respectively. The single bulb

Minnesota, University of

74

From BPEL Processes to YAWL Workflows Antonio Brogi and Razvan Popescu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

argue for the use of service contracts [4] consisting of (a) a (WSDL) signature, (b) an (OWL process inputs a set of service contracts to be aggregated and it outputs the contract of the aggregated

Brogi, Antonio

75

Binding and Direct Electrochemistry of OmcA, an Outer-Membrane...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

expressed by these organisms are of interest in both microbial fuel cells and biofuel cells. We use optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) to show that OmcA, an...

76

An examination of biological variation in Lower Pecos and Central Texas human populations: the odontometric evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and one turtle (Terrapene ornata). A few of the nearly five hundred bird species present are the brown jay (Cyanocorax tnorio), painted bunting (Passerina ciris), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura), golden eagle (Aquila chysaetos), and burrowing owl...

Mailloux, Jennifer Lynn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - approximation ii pygmy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Journal of the Linnean Society, 2007, 90, 467477 467 Summary: in a given area. An analysis of the pygmy-owls of the genus Glaucidium indicates that spe- cies displaying......

78

Environmental Evaluation for Installation of Solar Arrays at San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this technical memorandum (TM) is to review the options to develop a potential solar array development (Project) within or adjacent to western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) habitat in the buffer lands that surround the San José/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and to determine if there is a ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) configuration that would enable a workable co-existence between the burrowing owl habitat and the PV arrays.

79

Environmental, genetic, and ecophysiological variation of western and Utah juniper and their hybrids: A model system for vegetation response to climate change. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on the following two research projects relating to the biological effects of climate change: Hybridization and genetic diversity populations of Utah (Juniperus osteosperma) and western (Juniperus occidentalis) juniper: Evidence from nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA; and Ecophysiological patterns of pinyon and juniper.

Nowak, R.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Resource Sciences; Tausch, R.J. [Forest Service, Reno, NV (United States). Rocky Mountain Research Station

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The development of resistance to organophosphorus compounds by Tetranychus (T.) urticae Koch and laboratory and field toxicological responses of Tetranychus (T.) Cinnabarinus (Boisduval) to some current acaricides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the name T. cinnabarinusg the green one as T. ~~'~~riu . He also divided T. bimaculatus into T. bimaculatus bimaculatus Harvey and T. bimaculatus occidentalis Dillon. He stated that T. multisetis McG. f T. mar landicus Dillon, T. australis...

Contreras Galvez, Saul Edgardo

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

1093. Science case 3.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1093. Science case 3.1 Introduction When the development of the OWL concept started in 1997, its size was set to the rather overwhelming 100-m diameter in order to be able to reach three main science of earth-like planets around other stars. These science cases were supported by qualitative

Liske, Jochen

82

Hitzler & Vrandecic PPSWR05 Dagstuhl, Germany September 2005 AIFBKnowledgeWeb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hitzler & Vrandecic PPSWR05 Dagstuhl, Germany September 2005 Slide 1 AIFBKnowledgeWeb Faster OWL Using Split Programs Pascal Hitzler Denny Vrandecic AIFB, University of Karlsruhe, Germany SCREECH #12;Hitzler & Vrandecic PPSWR05 Dagstuhl, Germany September 2005 Slide 2 AIFBKnowledgeWeb Problem

Hitzler, Pascal

83

Semantic Web 30Artificial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

312007.11 "" Semantic Web 30Artificial IntelligenceKnowledge Representation Inductive Web datasets ---- Tim Berners-Lee Tim Berners-Lee " "" " Web 2.0---- Web Web 2.0 Frank van Harmelen W3C OWL Web Sesame RDF Aduna 100 Hirsch 35 5 15 ECAI2002 3 ISWC

van Harmelen, Frank

84

96 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 15, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Adaptation of Orienting Behavior: From  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

96 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 15, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Adaptation of Orienting Behavior: From the Barn Owl to a Robotic System Michele Rucci, Member, IEEE, Gerald M. Edelman, and Jonathan Wray Abstract-- Autonomous robotic systems need to adjust their sensorimotor coordinations so

Rucci, Michele

85

Repairing Ontologies for Incomplete Reasoners Giorgos Stoilos, Bernardo Cuenca Grau, Boris Motik, and Ian Horrocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the art RDF management systems, such as Jena [8], OWLim [6], DLE-Jena [9], and Oracle's Semantic Store [17 in a preprocessing step. In fact, systems such as DLE-Jena [9], #12;PelletDB,1 TrOWL [12], Minerva [7], and DLDB [4

Grau, Bernardo Cuenca

86

Ontology Design and Development Framework Part I: Enhancing Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terminologies representing a semantic agreement between humans and knowledge systems. Numerous knowledge representational frameworks (e.g. KIF, DAML+OIL, OWL etc.), have been proposed in the research community, with limited adoption in the industry. One possible reason is a lack of a formal and rigorous model

Demurjian, Steven A.

87

Differential Evolution -A simple and efficient adaptive scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Fax: 510-643-7684. E-mail: storn@icsi.berkeley.edu. On leave from Siemens AG, ZFE T SN 2, Otto- Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Muenchen, Germany. Fax: 01149-636-44577, E- mail:rainer.storn@zfe.siemens.de. 2)836 Owl function is designed to transform the optimization problem into a minimization task. To this end, we

Neumaier, Arnold

88

Effects of corticosterone pellets on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and corticosteroid-binding-globulin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of corticosterone pellets on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and corticosteroid-degradable corticosterone pellets (implanted under the skin) in elevating plasma corticosterone levels. We monitored to handling in Eurasian kestrel Falco tinnunculus and barn owl Tyto alba nestlings. Corticosterone pellets

Alvarez, Nadir

89

Seasonal Variation in the Diet of the Barn Own in Northwestern Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... by season or year at a single location (Otteni et al. 1972, Smith et al. 1972, Marti 1973, 1988, Franzreb and Laudenslayer 1982, Gubanyi et ... Barn Owl diet in at least some western habitats (Jones 1949, Smith et al. 1972, Marti 1973, 1988, Gubanyi et al. 1992, Van Vuren et al. ...

90

UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA/VNC DC WRRC Report Number 20 Washington, D.C. 20008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Urban Runoff Models" which tests models for several storms on a number of urban water sheds both REPORT 1978 - 1979 D. C. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER #12;TABLE- OF, CONTENT INTRODUCTION FORMS OW-l A of the Office of Water Research and Technology, U.S Department of the Interior in compliance with Section 506

District of Columbia, University of the

91

Einsatz von Web Services im Semantic Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Einsatz von Web Services im Semantic Web am Beispiel der RACER Engine und OWL-QL Jan Galinski Aufbau der Arbeit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 Grundlagen 5 2.1 Semantic Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.1 Komponenten des Semantic Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.1.2 Repräsentation

Moeller, Ralf

92

Chemistry 106X -Fall 2010 General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 106X - Fall 2010 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 9 bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. by Kotz, Treichel, and Townsend-0-495-38703-9 Electronic Book - ISBN 978-0-495-68043-7 · OWL pin number for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1

Wagner, Diane

93

Contributed Paper Potential Effects of the United States-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Church, Suite 4292, Tucson, AZ 85701, U.S.A. §U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, 1611 North Second Avenue, Ajo, AZ 85321, U.S.A. Abstract: Security infrastructure along behaviors of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owls (Glaucidium brasilianum), and satellite telemetry, gene-flow estimates

Montana, University of

94

CANDEL: Product Line Based Dynamic Context Management for Pervasive Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it is essential for computing applications to be context-aware. However, one of the major challenges the context as a dynamic product line composed of context primitives (CPs). Frame based software product line techniques are used together with OWL ontology to define CPs and to dynamically generate the current context

Liu, Xiaodong

95

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Differential Evolution A simple and efficient adaptive scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Fax: 510­643­7684. E­mail: storn@icsi.berkeley.edu. On leave from Siemens AG, ZFE T SN 2, Otto­ Hahn­Ring 6, D­81739 Muenchen, Germany. Fax: 01149­636­44577, E­ mail:rainer.storn@zfe.siemens.de. 2) 836 Owl function is designed to transform the optimization problem into a minimization task. To this end, we

Neumaier, Arnold

97

Owsley County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwls Head,

98

Owyhee County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwls Head,Owyhee

99

Oxford County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwls

100

Oxford Innovation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwlsInnovation Place:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Oxford Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwlsInnovation

102

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

Wills, C.A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Alternative Perspectives on the Battle of Wolf Creek of 1938  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all relative 3 4 Mary Jane Warde newcomers to the region and had yet to establish firm claims and boundaries. The Comanches arrived first, by the early 1700s, according to contemporary French reports. Mounted on horses acquired from the Spanish... know about this time and what followed has come to us through George Bent, the son of trader William Bent and Owl Woman, the Indigenous Nations Studies Journal, Vol. 2, No. 2, Fall 2001 5 daughter of White Thunder, Keeper of the Medicine Arrows.3...

Warde, Mary Jane

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Wanna Share Issue 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

motel (deja vu, anybody?). It is late. A car drives up, two guests alight and make for the front door. Clouds obscure the ghostly moon. An owl's menacing hoot breaks the oppressive silence. Cliche is piled upon cliche'. will evil triumph? Can.... "Thanks." He hesitated, then began: "I had this one a while ago. Veird, but I still remember it. It was "^J??*? *W? under your car for two days. Vhen I found you, alive..." He swallowed. I felt like I'd been reprieved from hell or somethin'." "I know...

Multiple Contributors

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Transit accessibility as a determinant of automobile ownership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRAN IT ACCESSIBILITY AS A DETER'AINANT OF AUTOMOBILE CNKEESHIP A Thesis by Robert Tc~'nsend Dunphy Submi'ted to th= Graduate College of Texas A&M Oniversity in partial fulfillment cf the reguirement for rhe degree o. . HASTEN OF SCIENCE... point in time, thon ii. may be ?s-ibis to c;ange thc numlser of automobiles owned in a region by i', a! =' g major changes in transit accessibility. ACKN OWL EDGE 1'ZEN TS I am deeply indebted to the Metropolitan washington Council of Governments...

Dunphy, Robert Townsend

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The vertebrate taxonomy ontology: a framework for reasoning across model organism and species phenotypes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL SEMANTICS Midford et al. Journal of Biomedical Semantics 2013, 4:34 http://www.jbiomedsem.com/content/4/1/34nyms, and identifiers from different and often conflictingof Sciences, San Francisco, California, USA Full list of author... is distributed among several different resources. We combined information from multiple sources to build the Vertebrate Taxonomy Ontology (VTO; http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/vto.owl). As of October 2013, the VTO contained 106,947 terms annotated with 104...

Midford, Peter E.; Dececchi, Thomas Alex; Balhoff, James P.; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Ibrahim, Nizar; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G.; Mabee, Paula M.; Sereno, Paul C.; Westerfield, Monte; Vision, Todd J.; Blackburn, David C.

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

107

Quantitative evaluation of bioturbation on the deep sea floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between 1 and 10 cd kyr r by invoking the assumption that mixing is proportional to biomass. Plutonium distributions in deep sea sedi- ments (Noshkin and Bowcn, 1973) indicate abyssal mixing rates ranging from 100-400 cmP kyr r . AC KN OWLE DGEMEN TS... vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE l. Microtektite Distributions. Estimation of Mixing Rates by Dimensional Analysis of Sediment Working Rates 30 Mixing Rates inferred from the plutonium data of Noshkin and Bowen (1973). 33 4. Mixing Parameters from...

Guinasso, Norman Louis

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Proposal for a quantity based data model in the Virtual Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose the beginnings of a data model for the Virtual Observatory (VO) built up from simple ``quantity'' objects. In this paper we present how an object-oriented, domain (or namespace)-scoped simple quantity may be used to describe astronomical data. Our model is designed around the requirements that it be searchable and serve as a transport mechanism for all types of VO data and meta-data. In this paper we describe this model in terms of an OWL ontology and UML diagrams. An XML schema is available online.

Brian Thomas; Edward Shaya

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Field Notebook and Specimen Catalog, Numbers 1101-1707 [2468] (1935-1936)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? 1102? Pine Canyon, W base Mt. Diaolo, C?ontra Costa Co., Caj.if. Jan, 13, Corynorhynus 92-45-10-31 Tr. 11 ?oil. By H. " 101-48-10-32 Tr. 11 " M W Twiningf! LIBRARY BINDING COMPANY P.O. BOX 7217 WACO, TEXAS 76710 Name o f L ibrary ?W* Fred....B. Davis l935 Pine Canyon, W base Mt. Diaoio, Contra Costa Co*, Caiif. Jan, 13, 1101? Cbrynorhynus 92-45-10-31 Tr. 11 ?oil. By H. Twining 1102? " 101-48-10-32 Tr. 11 " M " " Stool, Aiameda Co., Caiif. Jan. 30. 1103?acu Screech Owl. (C6?21? by Joy...

Davis, William B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

A metadata approach for clinical data management in translational genomics studies in breast cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, Wolfson Building, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QD, UK Email: Irene Papatheodorou* - ivp21@cam.ac.uk; Charles Crichton - Charles.Crichton@comlab.ox.ac.uk; Lorna Morris - ljm59@cam.ac.uk; Peter Maccallum - peter.maccallum@cancer.org.uk; METABRIC Group... Description Framework (RDF) [3,4] and the Web Ontology Language (OWL) [5] are still very much under development, they are already being applied widely in business, government, and scientific contexts [6]. Two Cancer Informatics projects, caBIG [7-10] and Can...

Papatheodorou, Irene; Crichton, Charles; Morris, Lorna; Maccallum, Peter; METABRIC Group, Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium; Davies, Jim; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Studies on the product formed by the interaction of benzilic and formic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s ry' ", ~ay 19y5 AC F. 'OWL ED 0~' T The author wishes tc express his ~npreciet1cr tc Dr. Robert D ~ Thc, :zpson for his g xi1=nce . 0 cr1t1ct sos during this work. Appreciaticn is also exte~ded tc &r. DE P. Van Tuyl for his assistance cr the ir... the amount of liberated carbon dioxide gas. Almost all of the results reported for the Kovache reaction have been reductions of the triaryl-type of carbinols ~ In stud; . . . th . ;vache, reacti. n, ~ t ~ a. de- sired to learn whether or not the reduction...

Cox, Thomas Elvan

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Oxara Energy Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesa IOvonic Battery CompanyOwl

113

Oxford Catalysts Group plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesa IOvonic Battery CompanyOwlOxford

114

Oxford Institute for Energy Studies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesa IOvonic Battery CompanyOwlOxford

115

Oxbow, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwls Head,OwyheeOxbow,

116

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Unmanned systems win unexpected support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is presented in which emphasis is given to recent mission accomplishments and current directions of research. Existing and new military UAV programs are listed with reference to funding, the type of vehicle, and level of development. Several trends are established including the reliance of UVAs on global positioning satellites and advanced electronics and the growth of the UVA industry. UVAs that are in advanced stages of development or have been deployed include short-range UAV such as the Pioneer, the Pointer, the Sky Owl, and the Hunter. Key UAV systems are described such as the Advanced Tactical Airborne Reconnaissance System, the Maritime Vertical Takeoff and Landing, and other VTOL systems. Very small UVAs and Exdrones are also discussed, and a weather reconnaissance system and surveillance systems are mentioned.

Schneiderman, R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effective Energy Management Through Better Operator Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Checl sh~m haps. 3. Check ins~'I'ltm.n~s. esp, Ttflu'A.,distlllQ.~ o:nd ftt~ flows. '" ~up ,"he cOrldensn c1e~n . 5, Check. itlSulo.Hon, 6 .Check. pum~s : ~o.cki118, belt sliPP~ imptllm, beati"&s. Ktep' spnri' dOWl1 un Ius l't~uired. 7, Heo.t in...) 8. In$t1ul1'leT\\td~ioYl 'J Pump Operahort J. e~c. Fi9.4: ~urndce Operations.! Common instruction media such as audio-visual cassettes, slides and technical manuals can be !used and i need no elaboration. Participants should also re...

Shah, G. C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University, Athens; Mark, David [University at Buffalo, NY; Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Erythroneura lawsoni abundance and feeding injury levels are influenced by foliar nutrient status in intensively managed American sycamore.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract 1 Abundance and feeding injury of the leafhopper Erythroneura lawsoni Robinson was measured in an intensively-managed American sycamore Platanus occidentalis L. plantation. Trees were planted in spring 2000 in a randomized complete block design, and received one of three annual treatments: (i) fertilization (120 kg N/ha/year); (ii) irrigation (3.0 cm/week); (iii) fertilization + irrigation; or (iv) control (no treatment). 2 Foliar nutrient concentrations were significantly influenced by the treatments because only sulphur and manganese levels were not statistically greater in trees receiving fertilization. 3 Over 116 000 E. lawsoni were captured on sticky traps during the study. Leafhopper abundance was highest on nonfertilized trees for the majority of the season, and was positively correlated with foliar nutrient concentrations. Significant temporal variation in E. lawsoni abundance occurred, suggesting five discrete generations in South Carolina. 4 Significant temporal variation occurred in E. lawsoni foliar injury levels, with the highest injury ratings occurring in late June and August. Foliar injury was negatively correlated with foliar nutrient content, and higher levels of injury occurred more frequently on nonfertilized trees. 5 The results obtained in the present study indicated that increased E. lawsoni abundance occurred on trees that did not receive fertilization. Nonfertilized trees experienced greater foliar injury, suggesting that lower foliar nutrient status may have led to increased levels of compensatory feeding.

Coyle, David, Robert: Aubrey, Doug, Patric; Bentz, Jo-Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Mercury and cause of death in great white herons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury contamination is suspected to adversely affect wading birds in southern Florida. To determine the magnitude of contamination associated with cause of death we followed 3 adult and 19 juvenile radio-tagged great white herons (Ardea herodias occidentalis), recovered them soon after death, and determined liver mercury content and cause of death. Birds that died from acute causes had less (P < 0.001) mercury in their livers (geometric [bar x] [GM] = 1.77 ppm wet mass [wm], range 0.6-4.0 ppm, n = 9) than did those that died of chronic, often multiple, diseases (GM = 9.76 ppm, range 2.9-59.4 ppm, n = 13). Juvenile herons that migrated to mainland Florida accumulated more (P = 0.009) mercury in their livers than those that did not migrate. Kidney disease and gout were present in birds that died with >25 ppm wm liver mercury. Although detrimental to the health of wading birds, mercury contamination is presumably more detrimental to their reproductive efforts; therefore, an understanding of its ill effects is important in the management of these birds. 29 refs., 1 fig.

Spalding, M.G.; Sundlof, S.F. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Djork, R.D.; Powell, G.V.N. (National Audobon Research, Tavernier, FL (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Environmental and plant effects of sewage sludge application to forests and pastures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digested sewage sludge was applied to pastures and tree plantations at 19 to 44 Mg/ha (dry weight) as part of a municipal sludge disposal program. The sludge had low concentrations of heavy metals and traces of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co. Monitoring of soils, soil solutions, and runoff indicated that N, P, heavy metals, and radionuclides were largely retained in the upper 15cm of the soil. Soil solutions had elevated NO/sub 3//sup /minus// concentrations often >100 mg/L, but no significant increases in groundwater NO/sub 3//sup /minus// were found during the first year. Runoff from active sites had elevated concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup /minus// (20--30 mg/L), soluble P (1 mg/L), BOD/sub 5/ (5--30 mg/L), and fecal coliform (up to 14,000 colonies per 100 ml), not unlike runoff from pastures with cattle. Enrichment of organic N (2 times), available (inorganic) N (5 to 10 times), and Bray-P in the upper soils persisted for several years following sludge application. Sludge increased vegetation N concentrations from 1.5% to 2.3% and P concentrations from 0.16% to 0.31%. With the exception of Zn, heavy metals did not accumulate substantially in the vegetation. The sludge addition increased the survival and growth of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.). For a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation future growth improvements are expected based on elevated foliar N concentrations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Van Miegroet, H.; Boston, H.L.; Johnson, D.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

127

Aster jessicae Jessica's aster Status: State Endangered, USFWS Species of Concern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

creeping rhizomes that tends to grow in large clumps. Plants grow to be 5 feet tall, but average about 3 feet. The herbage, particularly the upper portion, is covered with a dense, uniform, soft pubescence. Leaves are abundant, broadly lance-shaped and entire. Middle stem leaves generally partially clasp the stem and lower leaves tend to dry up and wither as the season progresses. Flowers are generally numerous, lavender in color, 1-1.5 inches in diameter, and form a broad cluster at the top of the plant. Identification Tips: A. jessicae is distinct in its unusually robust nature, dense pubescence, and cordate leaf bases. The only other aster found in the vicinity of Jessica’s aster is A. occidentalis var. intermedius. This species generally inhabits more mesic microhabitats, has smaller flowers, is less robust, possesses few to no hairs, and lacks cordate leaf bases. Phenology: Flowering occurs in late summer and early fall (from late July through mid September). Fruit and seed maturation occurs in September and early October, with seed dispersal likely in mid to late October. Range: Local endemic; southeastern WA (Whitman Co.) and adjacent ID. Occurs in the Columbia Basin physiographic province. Habitat: The species occurs in Palouse grasslands and prairie/ forest transition zones, often in association with small drainages, but above water level on dry ground, 2500-2800 feet in elevation. It occurs primarily in the following habitat types (Daubenmire 1970): ponderosa pine/snowberry, Idaho fescue/snowberry, black hawthorn/snowberry, Idaho fescue/Nootka rosa, and Douglas fir/ ninebark. Other associated species include bluebunch wheatgrass, balsamroot, and yarrow. ©1955 University of Washington Press. Illustration by John H. Rumely. Known distribution of

Rank Gss; General Description Robust

128

Metazoan Gene Families from Metazome  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Metazome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst metazoans. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of version 2.0.4, Metazome provides access to twenty-four sequenced and annotated metazoan genomes, clustered at nine evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, Ensembl, and JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. The included organisms (by common name) are: Human, Mouse, Rat, Dog, Opossum, Chicken, Frog, Stickleback, Medaka, Fugu pufferfish; Zebrafish, Seasquirt - savignyi, Seasquirt - intestinalis, Amphioxus, Sea Urchin, Fruitfly, Mosquite, Yellow Fever Mosquito, Silkworm, Red Flour Beetle, Worm, Briggsae Worm, Owl limpet (snail), and Sea anemone. [Copied from Metazome Overview at http://www.metazome.net/Metazome_info.php

129

Biological assessment for the transfer of the DP land tract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer to the County of Los Alamos up to 10-ha (25-ac) of federal land located in Technical Area-21 to be developed for commercial uses. Previous studies for the proposed land transfer area indicate that potential habitat for four threatened, endangered, and sensitive species occurs in or adjacent to the proposed land transfer area. These include the northern goshawk (federal species of concern), Mexican spotted owl (federal threatened), the spotted bat (federal species of concern, state threatened), die peregrine falcon (federal endangered, state endangered), and the. In order to determine the possible influences of the land transfer on these organisms, information from species-specific surveys was collected. These surveys were used to confirm the presence of these species or to infer their absence in or near the project area. It was concluded that none of die above mentioned species occur in the project area. Stretches of the stream channel within Los Alamos Canyon have been identified as palustrine and riverine, temporarily flooded wetlands. The proposed land transfer should not affect these wetlands.

Keller, D.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of night capable sensors for the detection of oil on water. Final report, May 1993-March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During May, 1993, the USCG participated in a field exercise conducted at the Canadian Forces Base, Petawawa, Canada. Environment Canada set up a test facility that consisted of a lined pool separated into twelve individual tanks. Four types of petroleum products were added to nine of the tanks while three tanks were left clean as control tanks. The field exercise provided an opportunity to evaluate several night-capable sensors for detection of oil slicks on water. The USCG evaluated the day and night imaging capabilities of long wave infrared (LWIR) sensors (FLIR 2000, WF-360TL, and RS- 18C) installed on three Coast Guard aircraft. Three commercially-available hand-held medium wave infrared (MWIR) sensors (AGEMA Thermovision 210, FSI PRISM, and IRC-160ST) were also evaluated. Surface truth data were collected at the test site and through the use of visible-spectrum imagers (S-VHS camcorder and WF-360TL TV camera - day and Dark Invader Owl NVG camcorder night). Sensor imagery was recorded to S-VHS tape format for post exercise review and processing Analysis of the images confirmed several aspects of expected phenomenology. Both IR and visible spectrum sensors were readily able to detect the oil slicks during daytime sorties. Infrared, Infrared images, Long wave infrared, Medium wave infrared, Night vision goggles, Oil slick detection, visible spectrum, Remote sensing of oil slicks.

Hover, G.L.; Plourde, J.V.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Insights into bilaterian evolution from three spiralian genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current genomic perspectives on animal diversity neglect two prominent phyla, the molluscs and annelids, that together account for nearly one-third of known marine species and are important both ecologically and as experimental systems in classical embryology1, 2, 3. Here we describe the draft genomes of the owl limpet (Lottia gigantea), a marine polychaete (Capitella teleta) and a freshwater leech (Helobdella robusta), and compare them with other animal genomes to investigate the origin and diversification of bilaterians from a genomic perspective. We find that the genome organization, gene structure and functional content of these species are more similar to those of some invertebrate deuterostome genomes (for example, amphioxus and sea urchin) than those of other protostomes that have been sequenced to date (flies, nematodes and flatworms). The conservation of these genomic features enables us to expand the inventory of genes present in the last common bilaterian ancestor, establish the tripartite diversification of bilaterians using multiple genomic characteristics and identify ancient conserved long- and short-range genetic linkages across metazoans. Superimposed on this broadly conserved pan-bilaterian background we find examples of lineage-specific genome evolution, including varying rates of rearrangement, intron gain and loss, expansions and contractions of gene families, and the evolution of clade-specific genes that produce the unique content of each genome.

Simakov, Oleg; Marletaz, Ferdinand; Cho, Sung-Jin; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Havlak, Paul; Hellsten, Uffe; Kuo, Dian-Han; Larsson, Tomas; Lv, Jie; Arendt, Detlev; Savage, Robert; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; de Jong, Pieter; Grimwood, Jane; Chapman, Jarrod A.; Shapiro, Harris; Otillar, Robert P.; Terry, Astrid Y.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lindberg, David R.; Seaver, Elaine C.; Weisblat, David A.; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Aerts, Andrea

2012-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

133

An evidential path logic for multi-relational networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-relational networks are used extensively to structure knowledge. Perhaps the most popular instance, due to the widespread adoption of the Semantic Web, is the Resource Description Framework (RDF). One of the primary purposes of a knowledge network is to reason; that is, to alter the topology of the network according to an algorithm that uses the existing topological structure as its input. There exist many such reasoning algorithms. With respect to the Semantic Web, the bivalent, axiomatic reasoners of the RDF Schema (RDFS) and the Web Ontology Language (OWL) are the most prevalent. However, nothing prevents other forms of reasoning from existing in the Semantic Web. This article presents a non-bivalent, non-axiomatic, evidential logic and reasoner that is an algebraic ring over a multi-relational network and two binary operations that can be composed to perform various forms of inference. Given its multi-relational grounding, it is possible to use the presented evidential framework as another method for structuring knowledge and reasoning in the Semantic Web. The benefits of this framework are that it works with arbitrary, partial, and contradictory knowledge while, at the same time, supporting a tractable approximate reasoning process.

Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geldart, Joe [UNIV OF DURHAM

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline. The geochemistry of the thermal waters of three active hot springs, Big Spring, White Sulfur Spring, and Teepee Fountain, is similar in composition; the geochemistry is characteristic of carbonate or carbonate-bearing siliciclastic aquifers. Previous studies of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system postulate that the thermal waters are a mixture of waters from Paleozoic formations. Major element geochemical analyses available for waters from these formations is not of sufficient quality to determine whether the thermal waters are a mixture of the Paleozoic aquifers. In the time frame of this study (1 year), the geochemistry of all three springs was constant through all four seasons, spanning spring snowmelt and recharge as well as late summer and fall dryness. This relationship is consistent with a deep source not influenced by shallow, local hydrogeology. Anomalies are evident in the historic dataset for the geochemistry of Big Spring. We speculate that anomalies occurring between 1906 and 1926 suggest mixing of source waters of Big Spring with waters from a siliciclastic formation, and that anomalies occurring between 1926 and 1933 suggest mixing with waters from a formation containing gypsum or anhydrite. Decreased concentrations measured in our study, relative to concentrations measured between 1933 and 1976, may reflect mixing of thermal waters with more dilute waters. Current data is not sufficient to rigorously test these suggestions, and events of sufficient scale taking place in these timeframes have not been identified.

Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

136

Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evaluation of methods, instrumentation and materials pertinent to quality assurance filter penetration testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Every high efficiency aerosol filter used in the Unites States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is quality assurance (QA) tested at one of the DOE filter test facilities prior to installation. This testing presently includes measurement of filter penetration at rated airflow using a hot DOP aerosol generator, an Owl aerosol size analyzer, and a scattered-light photometer aerosol concentration monitor. Alternative penetration measurement methods for testing size 5 high efficiency aerosol filters which have rated airflow capacities of 1000 cubic feet/min (cfm, approx. 28 m/sup 3//min) are being studied at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These methods are intended to take advantage of commercially available aerosol instrumentation. A penetration test using a polydisperse aerosol produced with a modified Laskin nozzle aerosol generator was found to have promise as an alternative to the present test method. Such a test eliminates the difficulty in producing a monodisperse challenge aerosol, and takes advantage of state-of-the-art aerosol sizing instruments. Aerosol sizing and concentration measuring capabilities of a laser aerosol spectrometer (LAS) were evaluated with respect to the needs of QA filter penetration testing. An aerosol diluter was selected and evaluated for use with the LAS in making filter penetration measurements. Potential alternative test materials were scrutinized with respect to certain toxicological and physical criteria. Certain of these alternative materials were selected for further evaluation. Results of this evaluation and findings cited in the literature indicate that the selected materials could be easily adapted for use with the modified Laskin aerosol generator.

Scripsick, R.C.; Soderholm, S.C.; Tillery, M.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Systematic errors in the measurement of neutrino masses due to baryonic feedback processes: Prospects for stage IV lensing surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the importance of baryonic feedback effects on the matter power spectrum on small scales, and the implications for the precise measurement of neutrino masses through gravitational weak lensing. Planned large galaxy surveys such as the Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid are expected to measure the sum of neutrino masses to extremely high precision, sufficient to detect non-zero neutrino masses even in the minimal mass normal hierarchy. We show that weak lensing of galaxies while being a very good probe of neutrino masses, is extremely sensitive to baryonic feedback processes. We use publicly available results from the Overwhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the effects of active galactic nuclei feedback, the nature of the stellar initial mass function, and gas cooling rates, on the measured weak lensing shear power spectrum. Using the Fisher matrix formalism and priors from CMB+BAO data, we show that when one does not account for feedback, the measured neutrino mass may be substantially larger or smaller than the true mass, depending on the dominant feedback mechanism, with the mass error |\\Delta m_nu| often exceeding the mass m_nu itself. We also consider gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and show that it is not sensitive to baryonic feedback on scales l < 2000, although CMB experiments that aim for sensitivities sigma(m_nu) < 0.02 eV will need to include baryonic effects in modeling the CMB lensing potential. A combination of CMB lensing and galaxy lensing can help break the degeneracy between neutrino masses and baryonic feedback processes. We conclude that future large galaxy lensing surveys such as LSST and Euclid can only measure neutrino masses accurately if the matter power spectrum can be measured to similar accuracy.

Aravind Natarajan; Andrew R. Zentner; Nicholas Battaglia; Hy Trac

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z