National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for owl strix occidentalis

  1. Seasonal Distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta Douglas M. Collister1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seasonal Distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta Douglas M in the foothills of Alberta from 1986 to 1996. Thirty-six adult owls have been banded: 16 males, 16 females and 4. The Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) breeds in northern and western Alberta south to Waterton Lakes National

  2. Estimation of Food Consumption fr om Pellets Cast by Captive Ural Owls ( Strix uralensis ) Aki Higuchi and Manabu T . Abe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    551 Estimation of Food Consumption fr om Pellets Cast by Captive Ural Owls ( Strix uralensis ) Aki of the Ural Owl ( Strix uralensis) based on pellet analysis. Though it is possible to identify pr ey items- tat and manage for this species. In this study, ingested food and cast pellet mass were quantified

  3. Landscape Featur es and Characteristics of Gr eat Gray Owl ( Strix nebulosa) Nests in Fragmented Landscapes of Central Alberta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landscapes of Central Alberta D.P. Stepnisky1 Abstract.--For est fragmentation thr ough timber harvesting Owls (Strix nebulosa) in the for est fragments of central Alberta. I examined landscape and nest site of Alberta (Oeming 1955); how- ever, the landscape featur es of the nesting ar ea are not well described

  4. Demography of the California Spotted Owl in the Sierra National Forest and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /or deformed live trees, and decaying wood on the forest floor. Pairs in Sierra conifer forests use home ranges than local in scope, such as weather and/or prey populations. Local forest management may compound and timber harvest, weather, and prey availability. California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis

  5. regurgitated owl Owl nesting habi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regurgitated owl pellets. Owl nesting habi- tat, by comparing vegetation compo- sition and struc- cial and personal fuel wood permits. In ponderosa pine dominated canyon bottoms, approxi- mately 240

  6. 2nd Owl Symposium Winter Owl Surveying in Central Alberta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2nd Owl Symposium 518 Winter Owl Surveying in Central Alberta Barbara H. Beck and James A. Beck, Jr. Most of the calling was done during the winter and almost all of it in central Alberta with much fever. 1 Department of Renewable Resour ces, 751 GSB, University of Alberta. Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H1

  7. 2nd Owl Symposium Owls in the Moscow Region: the Results of a 10-year Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2nd Owl Symposium Owls in the Moscow Region: the Results of a 10-year Study O.S. Gr enchenko, S region. 549 #12;2nd Owl Symposium 550 Figure 3.--Distribution of rare owl species in the Moscow region

  8. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne.m.robertson@ed.ac.uk; mark.small@ed.ac.uk} Abstract OWL-S is an ontology for describing web services in a way that includes the semantics (meaning) of the web service, including the semantics of its behaviour and the semantics

  9. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne, United Kingdom {kristin.stock@nottingham.ac.uk} 2 Allworlds Geothinking, Nottingham, United Kingdom 3). This paper describes an approach to the description of OGC web services using OWL-S that takes advantage

  10. OWL Change Management Patterns Rim Djedidi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OWL Change Management Patterns Rim Djedidi1 , and Marie-Aude Aufaure2 1 Computer Science Department, we focus on issues related to change management, particularly consistency maintenance and we present in this paper, an overview of Change Management Patterns (CMP) that we have defined to model the three

  11. Burrowing Owls in the Pacific Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    #12;10/12/2014 7 Conservation Outlook Issues · Lack of data · Conflicting interests · Nest mostly, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA. Breeding Bird Survey data, 1985-1991. Scale represents (NatureServe) Breeding distribution of the burrowing owl in the US & Canada (Breeding Bird Survey) Why

  12. ROWLBAC -Representing Role Based Access Control in OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Jianwei

    two parallel themes in access control re- search in recent years. On the one hand there are efforts show two dif- ferent ways to support the NIST Standard RBAC model in OWL and then discuss how the OWL in infrastructures such as Grid computing, web services and pervasive computing. These systems must exchange

  13. PROVISIONING AND PREY QUALITY IN BROWN PELICANS (PELECANUS OCCIDENTALIS) IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    , SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of Clemson University In Partial Fulfillment occidentalis) nesting at a colony in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina during the 2006 breeding season on the coast of South Carolina. Some of these fish species are likely only available in the seabirds' diet

  14. Habitat associations of cavity-nesting owls in the Sierra Nevada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groce, Julie Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    Several species of small, cavity-nesting owls occur in the Sierra Nevada, including in areas impacted by human activities. The owls typically use standing dead trees (snags) for nest sites. Although descriptive studies exist regarding habitats...

  15. Ecotoxicological simulation modeling: effects of agricultural chemical exposure on wintering burrowing owls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelman, Catherine Allegra

    2008-10-10

    The western burrowing owl, Athene cunicularia hypugaea, is a Federal Species of Concern, whose numbers and range have been drastically reduced from historic levels in Texas. Burrowing owls roost and forage in agricultural ...

  16. Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis ``Capsule'': Ground-level ozone causes deleterious effects to cutleaf coneflower and crown-beard in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abstract Incidence and severity of visible foliar ozone injury on cutleaf

  17. Dalhousie Libraries e-Reserves Service Library Readings in OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    will look like this: #12;Dalhousie Libraries can Provide URLs to these Types of Electronic MaterialDalhousie Libraries e-Reserves Service Library Readings in OWL #12;Course Reserves Faculty now have 2 options for Reserve materials: NEW Option: Upload a course reading list and Library staff will

  18. PR-OWL 2.0 -Bridging the gap to OWL Rommel N. Carvalho, Kathryn B. Laskey, and Paulo C.G. Costa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laskey, Kathryn Blackmond

    PR-OWL 2.0 - Bridging the gap to OWL semantics Rommel N. Carvalho, Kathryn B. Laskey, and Paulo C on the Semantic Web, with new standards being de- veloped and more complex use cases being proposed and explored representa- tion and reasoning on the Semantic Web have emerged [3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14]. For example, PR

  19. The evolution of plumage polymorphism in birds of prey and owls: the apostatic selection hypothesis revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krüger, Oliver

    was related to variables such as sexual plumage dimorphism, population size and range size, as wellThe evolution of plumage polymorphism in birds of prey and owls: the apostatic selection hypothesis selection; birds of prey; comparative analysis; owls; polymorphism; population size. Abstract Co

  20. And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca Terry, PhD'08 drop their bones on the cave floor or (in the case of owls) ex- pel them in the form of pellets

  1. OWL Ontology as Semantic PublicationSemantic Publishing of Knowledge about Amino Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Robert

    this as an ontology writ- ten in OWL and presented as XML/RDF. The classification of amino acids is based on taylor's original description of the amino acid's physicochemical properties are captured with value parti- tionsOWL Ontology as Semantic PublicationSemantic Publishing of Knowledge about Amino Acids #12;[ Robert

  2. Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOver Core StressOwen, Wisconsin:Owls

  3. Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpenOsmosisWesternCorning JumpOwl

  4. Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B. [NSTec; Greger, Paul D. [NSTec

    2014-08-01

    We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

  5. Mitochondrial and nuclear assessment of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium Brasilianum) Phylogrography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proudfoot, Glenn Arthur

    2006-08-16

    Sequences of the cytochrome b gene and genotypes from 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were used to assess phylogeographic variation in ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) from Arizona, Mexico, and Texas. ...

  6. Original Article The slow and fast life histories of early birds and night owls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maestripieri, Dario

    ., 2005), and are sexually dimorphic, as men tend to be overrepresented among evening types (Randler, 2007 & Bausback, 2010; Roenneberg et al., 2004) and, similarly to other sexually dimorphic traits, may be underOriginal Article The slow and fast life histories of early birds and night owls: their future

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF CATTLE GRAZING ON POCKET GOPHERS IN THE CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    THE INFLUENCE OF CATTLE GRAZING ON POCKET GOPHERS IN THE CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS shown to be negatively affected by cattle grazing, but effects of grazing on gophers in the Sierra Gopher, cattle grazing, Great Gray Owl, meadows, Mountain Pocket Gopher, Sierra Nevada Mountains, Strix

  8. Isolation of an alkaloid from Cassia occidentalis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puleo, Larry Ellis

    1966-01-01

    was made from the responses of this molecule in question to three energy probes. The molecule's responses were recorded as spec- tra;- mass, infrared and to a lesser extent, ultraviolet, 13 M that only two other alkaloids from Cassia spe- oies...

  9. Chromatophore Behavior in the Isopod Ligia Occidentalis Dana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    1960-01-01

    was observed by Tait ( 1910 ) . H e dem­ onstrated that the melanophores of Ligia oceanica contained dispersed pigment when the animals were on a dark background. Similar responses for this species have been observed by Smith ( 1 9 3 8 ) ; for Ligia exotica... that a single hormone is present. However, the entire body of data can be better understood if the presence of both a concentrating and a dispersing hormone is postulated. Smith (1938) postulated such a condition in L. oceanica based on the rates...

  10. GROWTH AND ADRENOCORTICAL RESPONSE OF BROWN PELICAN (PELECANUS OCCIDENTALIS) NESTLINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    on the coastal islands of South Carolina and for his guidance and support throughout this project. Dr. Kathleen O, for their support and contributions to this project, and Dr. Herman Senter and Dr. William Bridges, who assisted feedback on this project. I am especially indebted to Lauren Bolte, Cristina Campbell, Felicia Sanders

  11. The Distribution and Abundance of Bluntnose Flyingfish (Prognichthys occidentalis) Across the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall, Landes Lee

    2014-06-03

    , and percent frequency of occurrence ranged from 40% in July 2011 to 100% in June 2010, suggesting that this species is a common and important component of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in this region. Generalized additive models were used to evaluate...

  12. XBRL taxonomies and OWL ontologies for investment funds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castells2 1 Tecnolog´ia, Informaci´on y Finanzas, Madrid, Spain rlara@afi.es 2 Universidad Aut´onoma de

  13. Relations as patterns: bridging the gap between OBO and OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Oellrich, Anika; Dumontier, Michel; Kelso, Janet; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Herre, Heinrich

    2010-08-31

    University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1 S 5B6, Canada. 5Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK. Authors’ contributions RH conceived of the project and drafted the paper. HH and RH developed...

  14. Applications of Description Logics: State of the Art and Research Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Andrzej

    ­4]. They are, how- ever, best known as the basis for ontology languages such as OIL, DAML+OIL and OWL [5 used in, e.g., knowledge manage- ment systems, e-Science, and bio-informatics and medical terminologies expressive power: OWL Lite, OWL DL and OWL Full. Like OWL's predecessor DAML+OIL, OWL Lite and OWL DL

  15. University of Nevada, Reno Relationships among hydrogeomorphic processes and the distribution, age and stand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    occidentalis, Salix exigua, Salix lutea, and Populus tremuloides) with different ecological amplitudes and life

  16. Answering SPARQL Queries over Databases and under OWL 2 QL Entailment Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharyaschev, Michael

    of Computer Science and Information Systems, Birkbeck, University of London, U.K. 2 Faculty of Computer Science, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy 3 IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY have been implemented in both academia and industry; e.g., [26,29,23,3,22,14,11,7,19,21]. Most of them

  17. Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) Productivity and Home Range Characteristics in a Shortgrass Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reuse. Ninety-five percent adaptive kernel mean home range size did not differ between ages or sexes and transformed into an urban wildlife refuge through cooperative efforts by the United States Army, Shell Oil and was designated to be an urban wildlife refuge in 1992. The climate is semi-arid, with low humidity, light

  18. Adaptation of Barn Owl Localization System with Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Leslie S.

    rule Juan Huo, Alan Murray and Zhijun Yang are with the Elec- tronics & Engineering School, Edinburgh.Murray}@ed.ac.uk). Leslie Smith is with the department of computing science and mathematics, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK (phone:(01786)467435; fax:(01786)464551; email:lss@cs.stir.ac.uk). in which the synapse weight

  19. HOME RANGE AND FORAGING HABITAT SELECTION OF SPOTTED OWLS IN THE CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutiérrez, R.J.

    , provided field housing and maintenance services over the course of the study. Rob Walters also provided of mature conifer forest within these home ranges was not disproportionate to availability. I used logistic

  20. APPROVAL SHEET Title of Dissertation: BayesOWL: A Probabilistic Framework for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Yun

    Attended: University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland September 2001 ­ December 2005, Ph.D., December 2005 Major: Computer Science University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland, Computer Science Doctoral Dissertation, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, December 2005. #12;Z

  1. POPULATION BIOLOGY OF THE CALIFORNIA SPOTTED OWL IN THE CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutiérrez, R.J.

    , and friend. Rocky motivated not only my interest in wildlife biology but also in becoming a better scientist Crozier, Guthrie "Gut" Zimmerman, Andrea Chatfield, Monica Bond, Doug Tempel, Cynthia "Simon" Hsu, Vince

  2. Querying Temporal Databases via OWL 2 QL Szymon Klarman and Thomas Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Tommie

    Intelligence Research, CSIR Meraka and University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa {sklarman architecture and differing in the flavour and depth of temporal reasoning they support, aim at addressing

  3. Towards Ontological Context Mediation for Semantic Web Database Integration: Translating COIN Ontologies Into OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    possible by the use of the COIN do- main model that expresses the ontology of the subject matter types, attributes, modifiers, and elevation axioms. Semantic types are vocabulary terms that are used. The semantic types are arranged in a relationship hierarchy using "is-a" links. The "is-a" links define

  4. Seven federally protected Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 Unlimited Release4: "Short-TermSeung-Hoe KuNational

  5. Seven federally protected Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species SensitiveSeth Darling Nanoscientist

  6. Sea-land transitions in isopods: pattern of symbiont distribution in two species of intertidal isopods Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis in the Eastern Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberl, Renate

    2010-01-01

    stressors such as heat stress (Montllor et al 2002;Acyrthosiphon pisum under heat stress. Ecol Entomol 27:189–

  7. Effects of Drought-Stress on Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and Host-Plant Resistance to Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella Occidentalis Pergande) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiene, Justin G. 1983-

    2012-11-05

    and fecundity and fertility, respectively.????????????????.............. 79 Figure 6.3. Positive correlations between A) Jasmonic acid and Jasmonic acid- isoleucine, and B) Salicylic acid and Jasmonic acid-isoleucine in four transgenic cotton isolines... examined simultaneously during each of two trials (n=10-15, per treatment combination, trial). Periodic drought-stress in the absence of prey The goal of this experiment was to investigate the effect of periodic drought- stress of cotton plants (in...

  8. Pieces to a Puzzle: A Lithic Refit Study Evaluating Stratigraphic and Lithic Components of the Owl Ridge Site, Central Alaska 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Judith

    2014-05-23

    . Fedorova, Mikhail I. Voevoda, Michael DeGiorgio, Thomas Sicheritz-Ponten, Soren Brunak, Svetlana Demeshchenko, Toomas Kivisild, Richard Villems, Rasmus Nielsen, Mattias Jakobsson and Eske Willerslev 2014 Upper Palaeolithic Siberian Genome Reveals Dual...

  9. Overview of ISWC-2009 Tutorial: "Semantic Rules on the Web" (Oct. 26 half-day: 14:00-18:00)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    knowledge representation: first order logic and relational DBMS; and (2) basics of XML, RDF, and OWL

  10. SILK: Higher Level Rules with Defaults and Semantic Scalability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Comparison to other semantic rule systems and standardsp y · RIF, BRMS, OWL, DBMS, etc. · Conclusions

  11. J. Field Ornithol. 77(3):280290, 2006 DOI: 10.1111/j.1557-9263.2006.00054.x Comparative demography of Burrowing Owls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conway, Courtney J.

    las causas de la merma poblacional. Se encontr´o una densidad mayor de nidos en ´areas agr´icolas (0.2 vs. 3.1). El reclutamiento poblacional (4% vs. 8%) y el retorno anual de adultos fue menor en ´areas agr´icolas, lo que sugiere que la poblaci´on de buhos en ´areas agr´icolas no es estable, o se est

  12. Inferred summer precipitation for southern Ontario back to AD 610, as reconstructed from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inferred summer precipitation for southern Ontario back to AD 610, as reconstructed from ring-cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.) from the Niagara Escarpment in southern Ontario, Canada. Using principal dendrochronologiques du thuya occidental (Thuja occidentalis L.) provenant de l'escarpement du Niagara dans le sud de l'Ontario

  13. Community Action on the Cherokee Reservation in North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swafford, Tamrala Greer

    2004-03-01

    , assumed all responsibilities for the automotive shop, while Clyde Owle served as its manager. Dewey Owle managed the paint and body shop, and Dan McCoy managed the automatic transmission department. Mike Walkingstick and Raymond Owle facilitated..., the Boys Club regularly honored employees for their dedication and hard work. In February 1968, they honored three Club members who were drafted or enlisted into military service during the Vietnam War. David C. Owle graduated from Cherokee High School...

  14. Version of July 8, 2009 Hyper Logic Programs in SILK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and standards · RIF, BRMS, OWL, DBMS, etc. · Conclusions and Directions · How You can be Involved 2 #12;SILK

  15. LIST OF PUBLICATIONS G. W. Minshall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :55-58. (R. L. Newell and G. W. Minshall). 21. 1979 Bioenergetics of a stream "collector" organism. 1979 Bioenergetics of lotic filter-feeding insects Simulium spp. (Diptera) and Hydropsyche occidentalis

  16. Drifting bumble bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) workers in commercial greenhouses may be social

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drifting bumble bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) workers in commercial greenhouses may be social parasites greenhouses require high densities of managed bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis Greene, 1858 and Bombus examined drifting, a behavioural consequence of introducing closely aggregated colonies into greenhouse

  17. Phytologia (August 2010) 92(2)266 VARIATION IN nrDNA AND cpDNA OF JUNIPERUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    . occidentalis, J. osteosperma, Cupressaceae, nrDNA, petN- psbM, trnD-trnT, trnL-trnF, trnS-trnG, SNPs

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ON SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION OF FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN THE LOWER BRAZOS RIVER, TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LI, RAYMOND Y.

    2003-01-01

    of willow Salix sp., eastern cottonwood Populus deltoides, and sycamore Platanus occidentalis extended along both banks for most of the reach. This river segment was selected because it contained representative habitats of the lower Brazos River...

  19. The effects of nutrient availability on the host plant resistance of gerbera to western flower thrips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiers, James Davis

    2009-05-15

    Nutrition of host plants has been shown to have a direct effect on the productivity of numerous insect pests, including western flower thrips [(WFT) Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande)] – a major pest on both horticulture ...

  20. NAMA Members' Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lacy Michelle

    2011-10-21

    stakeholders (Lusk & Norwood, 2008). There are many conflicting opinions as to whether animal welfare decisions should be made based on either scientific evidence or ethics (Lusk & Norwood, 2008; Thompson, 2010). The spotted owl controversy has also brought... about many ethical questions. In 1986, after heavy logging in the forests of the Pacific Northwest resulted in a decrease in the number of spotted owls, an environmentalist group petitioned to add the owl to the ?endangered species? list (Andre...

  1. Seshat: The Global History Databank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    database, graph-based knowledge models, specified in OWL (the web ontology language) or RDFS (resource description framework schema), facilitate constant evolution

  2. REGULAR PATHS IN SPARQL: QUERYING THE NCI THESAURUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    REGULAR PATHS IN SPARQL: QUERYING THE NCI THESAURUS University of Washington Structural Informatics path enhancements Examples NCI Thesaurus Widely used Exhibits common OWL representational patterns

  3. Page 1 June 7, 2013 Eng. Md. Rashedul Hasan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Ontology development ­ DERA Methodology ­ Facet · Ontology representation ­ RDF ­ OWL · Existing ontology/Thesaurus been developed. · However, it is mainly a thesaurus encoding broader and narrower relations. · It does

  4. May 7, 2014 NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF FORESTRY IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Jerry

    "drivable" streams in the inventories of Forest Reserves Splash dams Railroad logging Different ­ big Fumbled efforts to avert listing of the owl

  5. Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coto, Ernesto

    Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ecoto@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002, 1041-A

  6. Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coto, Ernesto

    Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ecoto@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002, 1041-A ND

  7. T e c h n i c a l M e m o r a n d u m \\\\owl\\masterplan\\2\\6 Master Plan\\Land and Building Use.doc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    the problem of degenerating Greek facilities. The College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences (CAES) has and development of the three major extension campuses. The CAES has developed a Facilities and Land Use Task Force related programs. This report is exemplary of what should be developed for the other CAES campuses

  8. 502 SHORT COMMUNICATIONS (Speotyto cuniculuria) to a moving object when the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    of the owl box, and each was in a sanded acrylic container for diffusion of light. The single bulb cast not cast a conspicuous shadow. We used a single Burrowing Owl for all tests. It was trapped about 5 km and the shadow-casting and nonshadow-casting lighting systems. This box was open on the side that was adjacent

  9. The Next Generation Ian Horrocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Andrzej

    on earlier languages RDF, OIL and DAML+OIL ­ Became a recommendation on 10 Feb 2004 · Supported by toolsCommerce, geography, engineering, defence, ... ­ E.g., OWL tools used to identify and repair errors in a medical

  10. Controlling House Sparrows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2008-04-15

    , so check with local police before using them. Visual. Visual repellents are usually as ineffec- tive as acoustical ones. Decoy owls, rubber snakes, scarecrows or foil strips hung from trees or build- ings may deter sparrows for a short time...

  11. The genetics of circadian rhythms in Neurospora crassa : do multiple oscillators exist? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortum, Karen

    2013-02-22

    for photosynthesizing plants, and cooler night-time, as is important for nocturnal owls. Finally, all circadian rhythms are temperature compensated which means that they mamtain a normal period within their physiological temperature ranges This prevents the rhythm...

  12. Predator Control as a Tool in Wildlife Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Dale

    2004-02-26

    Support control Control foxes, raccoons and skunks To protect duck species in danger of extinction 81% To protect endangered shorebirds 67% To increase songbird populations 55% To improve upland game bird populations 56% Control hawks and owls to improve...

  13. ABACHRYSA EUREKA (BANKS) (NEUROPTERA: CHRYSOPIDAE): EGG, FIRST INSTAR LARVA AND BIOLOGICAL NOTES 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catanach, Therese A.

    2007-08-29

    , Indianapolis, Indiana, December 2006 “Prey items collected from barn owl pellets in Texas.” Poster Presentation, The Wildlife Society Annual Meeting, Anchorage, Alaska, September 2006 “Leafhoppers as an Indicator of Prairie Health” Entomological Society...

  14. Controlling Feral Pigeons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2008-04-15

    crackers are usually ineffective with pigeons. Pigeons in urban areas are accustomed to loud noises and are not easily deterred by them. Other frightening devices such as decoy hawks or owls, balloons, rubber snakes or streamers also have limited use...

  15. Cataloguer makeover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilik, Violeta

    2014-02-28

    Language (OWL) Available tools: Relational data – RDF data SQL query language ? relational data SPARQL query language ? RDF data “SQL does this by accessing tables in relational databases, and SPARQL does this by accessing a web of Linked Data...

  16. A review of "Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief." by Walter Stephens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William E. Engel

    2003-01-01

    particular confession? (7). In the process, Stephens uncovers some important points of origination relating to and associated with the identification of witches, such as screech-owls, black cats, boiling cauldrons, and flying broom-sticks (transvection...

  17. Controlling Mole Damage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    of underground burrows,comingtothesurfaceonlyrarely,and then often by accident. Because of its secluded lifeunderground,themolehasonlyafewnatur- al enemies. Coyotes, dogs, badgers and skunks dig out a few of them, and occasionally a cat, hawk or owl surprises one...

  18. Population structure of Acrotrichis xanthocera (Matthews) (Coleoptera: Ptiliidae) in the Klamath Ecoregion of northwestern California, inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequence variation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caesar, Ryan Matthew

    2004-09-30

    The Klamath-Siskiyou Ecoregion of northern California and southern Oregon has extremely high biodiversity, but conservation centers on the protection of habitat for the northern spotted owl. A network of late successional reserves has been...

  19. An Overview of the Building Energy Retrofit Research Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mixon, W. R.

    1987-01-01

    selected most often. Participants in the project included DOE, OWL, ASE, the State of Wisconsin. Wisconsin Power and Light, Wisconsin Gas, and Madison Gas and Electric. SHORT TERU BUILDING ENERGY MONITORING Monitoring techniques have been developed...

  20. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    falcons and owls as well as a collection of bird bones, droppings, feathers and hunting gear. The program is designed for grades first through seventh grade students and scout...

  1. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | June 2, 2015: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  2. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  3. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 28, 2013: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  4. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 22, 2012: Fermilab...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    falcons and owls as well as a collection of bird bones, droppings, feathers and hunting gear. For additional information, call 630-840-5588 or e-mail edreg@fnal.gov. About...

  5. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 28, 2014: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature,...

  6. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | Fermilab Outdoor Family...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    falcons and owls as well as a collection of bird bones, droppings, feathers and hunting gear. The program is designed for first through seventh grade students. Scout troops are...

  7. Henrikson: Prehistoric Cold Storage on the Snake River Plain: Archaeological Investigations at Bobcat Cave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Dennis L

    1997-01-01

    Cold Storage on the Snake River Plain: Archaeologicaland Owl Cave on the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Reported toresponses to it in the Snake River Plain re- gion. This

  8. Comparing SNePS with Topbraid/Pellet SNeRG Technical Note 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Stuart C.

    Comparing SNePS with Topbraid/Pellet SNeRG Technical Note 42 Michael Kandefer and Stuart C. Shapiro Editing Tool (Top Quadrant Inc. 2007) using the Pellet OWL DL Reasoner (Clark & Parsia, LLC 2007

  9. This article was originally published in a journal published by Elsevier, and the attached copy is provided by Elsevier for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Derek

    , reproduction and distribution, including without limitation commercial reprints, selling or licensing copies that can be communicated between people and machines. RDF and RDFS [14], DAML+OIL and OWL [1

  10. 22 natural history November 2012 By Cheryl Lyn Dybas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Rodney J.

    are a slippery mulch. Briars tangle in my hair as I trip down a narrow, root-lined path. Somewhere of saw-whet owl hoots playing in covered plastic buckets beneath the mist nets. The repetitive tooting

  11. THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AND TOLERANCE O F EMBRYONIC WESTERN GULLS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AND TOLERANCE O F EMBRYONIC WESTERN GULLS1 ALBERT F. BENNETT: WILLIAM R. DAWSON/6/80) The thermal environment and tolerance of eggs and embryos of western gulls (Larus occidentalis wymani) on San tolerance of the embryos in reference to the thermal environment form an adaptive suite of characters

  12. Species List A001 Tiger Salamander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    flavipunctatus A016 Tailed Frog Ascaphus truei A017 Western Spadefoot Scaphiopus hammondii A018 Western Toad Bufo Pond Turtle Clemmys marmorata R002 Western Fence Lizard Sceloporus occidentalis R003 Sagebrush Lizard Ringneck Snake Diadophis punctatus R014 Sharp-tailed Snake Contia tenuis R015 Racer Coluber constrictor R

  13. LONG-TERM REPRODUCTIVE OUTPUT IN WESTERN GULLS: CONSEQUENCES OF ALTERNATE TACTICS IN DIET CHOICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annett, Cynthia A.; Pierotti, Raymond

    1999-01-01

    of Western Gulls, Larus occidentalis. Of 112 pairs for which we have either long-term ($5 yr) or lifetime reproductive output, 44% bred for only a single year, and an additional 25% bred for only 2–3 yr. A few pairs bred successfully for 6–12 yr and showed...

  14. Bird list for Anegada Version 4: 2nd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    podiceps FW Pond UC Pelicans: Pelicanidae Brown Pelican Pelecanus occidentalis All Coastal Areas C End Salt Ponds UC Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias All Salt Ponds C Great Egret Ardea alba All Salt Ponds C Snowy Egret Egretta thula All Salt Ponds UC Tricolored Heron Egretta tricolor All Salt Ponds UC

  15. Bird list for Anegada Version 6: 13th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    podiceps FW Pond UC Pelicans: Pelicanidae Brown Pelican Pelecanus occidentalis All Coastal Areas C End Salt Ponds R Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias All Salt Ponds C Great Egret Ardea alba All Salt Ponds C Snowy Egret Egretta thula All Salt Ponds UC Tricolored Heron Egretta tricolor All Salt Ponds UC

  16. Bird list for Anegada Version 7: 5th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    podiceps FW Pond UC Pelicans: Pelicanidae Brown Pelican Pelecanus occidentalis All Coastal Areas C End Salt Ponds R Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias All Salt Ponds C Great Egret Ardea alba All Salt Ponds C Snowy Egret Egretta thula All Salt Ponds UC Tricolored Heron Egretta tricolor All Salt Ponds UC

  17. Bird list for Anegada Version 5: 6th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    podiceps FW Pond UC Pelicans: Pelicanidae Brown Pelican Pelecanus occidentalis All Coastal Areas C End Salt Ponds R Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias All Salt Ponds C Great Egret Ardea alba All Salt Ponds C Snowy Egret Egretta thula All Salt Ponds UC Tricolored Heron Egretta tricolor All Salt Ponds UC

  18. Bird list for Anegada Version 2: 3rd March 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    podiceps FW Pond UC Pelicans: Pelicanidae Brown Pelican Pelecanus occidentalis All Coastal Areas C End Salt Ponds UC Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias All Salt Ponds C Great Egret Ardea alba All Salt Ponds C Tricolored Heron Egretta tricolor All Salt Ponds UC Little Blue Heron Egretta caerulea All Salt

  19. EOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOMAMERICANAS (e . I.p.A . (I.e.B.p.)/ P.S.G.) VOLUY.EN I , NUMERO 2. 1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Ar dl ey (Lat . 62013'). SYl'1POSIO SOBRE EL NINO 23-31 octubre 1986: Guayaquil, Ecuador Simpos io)~ noticias de nuevas publicaciones, cor.ferencias sabre El Hino , sabre aves marinas del Golfo de California. Algunos aspectos de la nidificaci6n y el crecimiento de pelecanus occidentalis thaqus Molina , 1782 , en

  20. The vertebrate taxonomy ontology: a framework for reasoning across model organism and species phenotypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midford, Peter E.; Dececchi, Thomas Alex; Balhoff, James P.; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Ibrahim, Nizar; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G.; Mabee, Paula M.; Sereno, Paul C.; Westerfield, Monte; Vision, Todd J.; Blackburn, David C.

    2013-11-22

    is distributed among several different resources. We combined information from multiple sources to build the Vertebrate Taxonomy Ontology (VTO; http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/vto.owl). As of October 2013, the VTO contained 106,947 terms annotated with 104...:// purl.obolibrary.org/obo/taxrank.owl). The vocabulary con- solidates the rank terms used by the NCBI taxonomy with those proposed in the Biodiversity Information Standards (TDWG) TaxonRank vocabulary (http://rs.tdwg.org/ontol- ogy...

  1. Miscellaneous Mascots - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    : EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ON WINTERING BURROWING OWLS A Thesis by CATHERINE ALLEGRA ENGELMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2008 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ECOTOXICOLOGICAL SIMULATION MODELING: EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ON WINTERING BURROWING OWLS A Thesis by CATHERINE ALLEGRA...

  2. Heidegger and the Philosophy of Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Wayne D.

    in the remainder of my paper: BT: Martin Heidegger, Being and Time, trans. John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson (New York: Harper & Row, 1962), OTB: On Time and Being, trans. Joan Stambaugh (New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1972), OWL: Martin Heidegger... language. If language everywhere withholds its nature in this sense, then such withholding is in the very nature of language. (OWL, p. 81) HEIDEGGER AND LANGUAGE 55 There remains something about language and about speaking a language that slips...

  3. Small mammal faunal stasis in Natural Trap Cave (Pleistocene-Holocene), Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Daniel Ryan

    2009-01-01

    , the cave fauna covers the last glacial cycle (~100 ka?present). There are no major taphonomic breaks within the fauna, the small mammals were primarily accumulated by owls, diurnal raptors, and mammalian carnivores in the immediate vicinity of the cave..., the cave fauna covers the last glacial cycle (~100 ka?present). There are no major taphonomic breaks within the fauna, the small mammals were primarily accumulated by owls, diurnal raptors, and mammalian carnivores in the immediate vicinity of the cave...

  4. KU Today, January 23, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Spike in snowy owls CONNECT connect.ku.edu CAMPUS LINKS Chancellor's messages Provost e-news KUMC leadership messages KUMC KU Alumni Association Edwards Campus Kansas Public Radio KU Today is produced by the Office of News...) Spike in snowy owls CONNECT connect.ku.edu CAMPUS LINKS Chancellor's messages Provost e-news KUMC leadership messages KUMC KU Alumni Association Edwards Campus Kansas Public Radio KU Today is produced by the Office of News...

  5. Wildlife Photography for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Miles

    2006-04-17

    . Occasionally, photographers would like to pho- tograph owls and hawks nesting. This requires an elevated blind. Archery tripod hunting stands work for this. Or, you could construct two or three sec- tions of scaffolding with a portable photo blind on top... in particular. Most photographers want to stay at the ranch or photography site and have the complete outdoor experience?ranch cooking, night sounds (owls, coyotes, paraques, etc.) and stargazing. They want a comfortable bed, a shower, air conditioning...

  6. Extraction of Contextual Knowledge and Ambiguity Handling for Ontology in Virtual Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Soo

    2011-10-21

    and Lambourn?s reconstruction method using an expert system .............................................................................. 15 Figure 9 A scene graph and the OWL representation in a Java 3D model ............. 26 Figure 10 Metaearth... in artificial intelligence, data mining and communication theory [48-51]. In particular, semantics and ontology play a crucial role in the development of semantic Web and Web 2.0 especially the Web Ontology Languages OWL and Resource Description Framework...

  7. Ecology of Montezuma Quail in Southeast Arizona 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavarria, Pedro Mazier

    2013-04-26

    .19 and ranged from 7?145 days. There were 4 confirmed mortalities: confirmed raptor (n = 2), owl suspected (n = 1), and unknown (n = 1). There were 9 censures: suspected mortality (unknown, n = 1), suspected hunting mortalities (n = 3), and suspected... (Appendix I): confirmed raptor [n = 7; 1 Northern harrier (Circus cyaneus), 1 owl, 1 Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), suspected raptor (n = 8), confirmed mammal (n = 1), suspected mammal (n = 7), frozen on roost (n = 3), mortality suspected (n = 1...

  8. Environmental Evaluation for Installation of Solar Arrays at San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this technical memorandum (TM) is to review the options to develop a potential solar array development (Project) within or adjacent to western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) habitat in the buffer lands that surround the San José/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and to determine if there is a ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) configuration that would enable a workable co-existence between the burrowing owl habitat and the PV arrays.

  9. WIRELESS Eduroam Wireless Network for College Eduroam is a global wireless roaming consortium which gives members of education and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    WIRELESS Eduroam Wireless Network for College Eduroam is a global wireless roaming consortium://cat.eduroam.org (You can visit https://cat.eduroam.org whilst connected to the OWL wireless network without a password://register.it.ox.ac.uk/self/remote_access If you are already in Oxford you can get to this URL via the OWL wireless network 2. Once you have

  10. S ignpos ts to F raud, page 4 ; U . S . 1 Cras h es th e E den G ala, 2 8; ` S izw e B anzi ' at M cCarter, 2 7 ; S uper B owl Ch eat S h eet, 39 .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XPeCteD to Be FinisheD this summer. PRINCETON'S 21ST-CENTURY MANHATTAN PROJECT Images physics project that would eventually lead to a break- through in the computer simulation of materials

  11. Editor's Comment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nails, Debra

    L'DIT'iP's COMMENT tu öeou veutepoi, tiaAaioüs v6uoue Kaötnudaaade Oh you young gods\\ how you have trampled the time-honored tradition I —Aeschylus, Eumenides Philosophers would be in danger were we to take as a dictum that Athena's owl flies... only at the falling of dusk, that it is somehow untimely to wax critical before issues are well-defined and institutions ensconced. Dawning pursues dusk with some measure of regularity; the owl makes its flight not once but many times in its life...

  12. Control of Black Spot of Roses with Sulphur-Copper Dust. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyle, E. W. (Eldon W.)

    1944-01-01

    of the same treatment were replicated in each field. Data were taken from 5 consecutive plants in the middle row of each plot for black-spot counts and from 10 plants for weights. ?Swan Brand (conditioned) sulphur; all other mixtures made with Owl Brand....5 3.4 3.3 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.8 3.2 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.7 2.5 12 BULLETIN NO. 648, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION fungicides during this season. In most cases an unconditioned 325-mesh sulphur (Owl Brand) was found as suitable for the sulphur...

  13. Achieving Energy Goals Through Employee Participation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisenthal, M.

    1981-01-01

    of using just enough erIergy to get a job done. In that way, we could encourage ever'yon", to I oak for energy Vl6ste in thei r OWl work erIvi- ronment. We Vl6nted everyone to know that they C, play an irrportant part in energy conservat ion...". The message is directed to the indivi dual persmally. The gut level feel ing we want -,~troit Diesel errployees to relate to, is that they can individually take charge of thei r OWl work en- viro;1','Cflt and use the energy at their disposal, Tl...

  14. Field Notebook and Specimen Catalog, Numbers 1101-1707 [2468] (1935-1936) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, William B.

    2012-04-09

    , W base Mt. Diaoio, Contra Costa Co*, Caiif. Jan, 13, 1101? Cbrynorhynus 92-45-10-31 Tr. 11 ?oil. By H. Twining 1102? " 101-48-10-32 Tr. 11 " M " " Stool, Aiameda Co., Caiif. Jan. 30. 1103?acu Screech Owl. (C6?21? by Joy Lesure.). Berkeley Hills... Rogerson Twin Fails County, Idaho. May 13, A horned Owl was heard hooting from the cliffs below the dam last night and again tonight* Aldrich brought in a young Marmot today and reported a large colony on the west side of the canyon. Twining brought...

  15. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML): dictionaries and conventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray-Rust, Peter; Townsend, Joe A.; Adams, Sam E.; Phadungsukanan, Weerapong; Thomas, Jens

    2011-10-14

    : ChemAxiom - An Ontological Framework for Chemistry in Science. Nature Precedings 2009. 3. OWL 2 Web Ontology Language. [http://www.w3.org/TR/owl2-overview/], Accessed 2011-05-25. Figure 3 A compchem-compliant document read into the Avogadro [39]browser... ://www.quantum-espresso.org/], Accessed 2011-05-25. 38. CML compchem dictionary. [http://xml-cml.org/dictionary/compchem/], Accessed 2011-05-25. 39. Avogadro software. [http://avogadro.openmolecules.net], Accessed 2011- 05-25. doi:10.1186/1758-2946-3-43 Cite this article as: Murray...

  16. Semantic Web 30Artificial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Harmelen, Frank

    312007.11 "" Semantic Web 30Artificial IntelligenceKnowledge Representation Inductive Web datasets ---- Tim Berners-Lee Tim Berners-Lee " "" " Web 2.0---- Web Web 2.0 Frank van Harmelen W3C OWL Web Sesame RDF Aduna 100 Hirsch 35 5 15 ECAI2002 3 ISWC

  17. 96 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 15, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Adaptation of Orienting Behavior: From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucci, Michele

    96 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 15, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Adaptation of Orienting Behavior: From the Barn Owl to a Robotic System Michele Rucci, Member, IEEE, Gerald M. Edelman, and Jonathan Wray Abstract-- Autonomous robotic systems need to adjust their sensorimotor coordinations so

  18. Proceedingsof the 1997EEE International Conferenceon Robotics and Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucci, Michele

    Proceedingsof the 1997EEE International Conferenceon Robotics and Automation Albuquerque,New Mexico -April 1997 A robotic system emulating the adaptive orienting behavior of the barn owl M. Rucci, J. Wray, G. Tononi and G.M. Edelman The Neurosciences Institute San Diego, CA Abstmct- Autonomous robotic

  19. How Many Legs Do I Have? Non-Simple Roles in Number Restrictions Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sattler, Ulrike

    -roles--in number restrictions. When modeling composite objects, for example in bio-medical ontologies, partially due to their usage as logical underpinning of ontology languages such as OIL, DAML+OIL, and OWL1 less readable such applications of number re- strictions in bio-informatics and medical applications, e

  20. August 2013 ICLP2013, Istanbul, Turkey Pascal Hitzler Recent Advances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitzler, Pascal

    August 2013 ­ ICLP2013, Istanbul, Turkey ­ Pascal Hitzler Recent Advances Concerning OWL and Rules;August 2013 ­ ICLP2013, Istanbul, Turkey ­ Pascal Hitzler 2 Textbook Pascal Hitzler, Markus Krötzsch://www.semantic-web-book.org #12;August 2013 ­ ICLP2013, Istanbul, Turkey ­ Pascal Hitzler 3 Textbook ­ Chinese translation Pascal

  1. Establishing a Birding-Related Business 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David; Callahan, Ashley

    2000-05-04

    Texas specialities?the Ferruginous pygmy owl and the Tropical parula. The tour guide concentrates on helping birders see just these two species in a minimum amount of time. There are no rare birds to attract serious birders to the B-Bar-B, but the own...

  2. INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INFLAMMATORY SIGNALING PATHWAYS AND INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE IN GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Alexander B

    2013-02-04

    Membrane Blotting and Protein Analysis After running the gel, proteins were transfered to a nitrocellulose membrane using an Owl HEP-1 semi-dry transfer apparatus (Thermo Scienti c?), incubated in Pierce? Fast Semi- dry Transfer Bu er at a constant 0.5 m...

  3. Dove Management in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ben; Johnson, Jason; Roberson, Jay; Schwertner, T. Wayne; Silvy, Nova; Linex, Ricky

    2006-05-03

    snakes, great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and hawks such as Cooper?s hawk (Ac- cipiter cooperi). Great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus) are considered to be serious nest predators on white-winged doves in South Texas. Weather and human...

  4. A review of "The Divorce Tracts of John Milton: Texts and Contexts" edited by Sara J. van den Berg and W. Scott Howard 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nardo, Anna K.

    2011-01-01

    sonnets on the publication of his divorce tracts had been included. Such an ar- rangement would illuminate not only Milton?s vituperative ridicule of the ?Owls and Cuckoos, Asses, Apes and Dogs? who dismissed his learned argument (?I did but prompt...

  5. Evaluation of "Dry Year Option" Water Transfers from Agricultural to Urban Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.; Jones, Lonnie L.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1997-01-01

    and welfare trust funds; layoff and vacation replacement benefits; and retraining at the expense of the US Government during a period of protection (Berck and Bentley). In a more recent case involving the Northern Spotted Owl listing as an endangered species...

  6. Survival, reproduction, and habitat use of captive-reared Attwater's prairie chicken 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mitchell Andrew

    1998-01-01

    %. Recruitment on APCNWR was zero, while recruitment on GBPP was unknown in 1997. Future releases should occur during early fall (September-October) at sites away from the refuge edge and owl roost sites. Birds should be released from release pens as soon...

  7. A review of "The Cambridge Companion to Bunyan" edited by Anne Dunan-Page 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufmann, U. Milo

    2011-01-01

    vituperative ridicule of the ?Owls and Cuckoos, Asses, Apes and Dogs? who dismissed his learned argument (?I did but prompt the age to quit their clogs?), but also his invitations in the preface to Tetrachordon to ?those his detractors [to] any fair meeting...

  8. An Approach to Plantwide Optimization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nath, R.; Worsham, B. A.; Libby, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    WATER liP STEAM VENT PLANT UTILITY SYSTEM ... ......... . .... --'.-. ,,1_ .' FIGURE'3: Schemalfc of. Compressed Air Subsystem .?.... r5 oWl (pnfit ..r;in far lIIlt ? - _ of' lltU1t1al SllIJICt to 1lUcUGn~ 5ellanUan~ ~oO.Jot -.a...

  9. Forest Plan A summary of a forum explor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental issue sticks in Americans' minds as well as the northern spotted owl and timber industry and early 1990s. While the debates encompassed economic, social, and political issues, at the heartNorthwest Forest Plan Revisited A summary of a forum explor- ing the science, policy, and politics

  10. Published for the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) byWiley-Blackwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumstein, Daniel T.

    -distributed barn owl A. Roulin and N. Salamin 935 Indirect genetic effects in a sex-limited trait: the case diversification in dragon lizards D. C. Collar, J. A. Schulte II, B. C. O'Meara and J. B. Losos 1050 Wing are located preferentially in regions of low recombination rates in the human genome G. Liu, H. Li and L. Cai

  11. NEW RECORDS OF ACANTHOCEPHALANS FROM BIRDS IN THE PHILIPPINES WITH A DESCRIPTION OF A NEW PORRORCHIS SPECIES AND IDENTIFICATION KEYS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    #12;NEW RECORDS OF ACANTHOCEPHALANS FROM BIRDS IN THE PHILIPPINES WITH A DESCRIPTION OF A NEW), and Porrorchis centropusi and Porrorchis kinsellai n. sp., both from Philippine scops owls (Otus megalotis), are reported from Aurora Province, Luzon Island, Philippines. Porrorchis kinsellai n. sp. can be readily

  12. A practical method for transforming free-text eligibility criteria into computable criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    -interpretable the eligibility criteria which de- fine the target populations of studies. At the design stage, studyA practical method for transforming free-text eligibility criteria into computable criteria Samson criteria Clinical trials Natural-language processing Ontology OWL Relational databases a b s t r a c

  13. July2014 ESIP Summer Meeting 2014 Frisco, CO Pascal Hitzler Smart Data for Smart Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitzler, Pascal

    and metadata formats and on general methodology. In this case: Semantic Web standards RDF and OWL ­ Pascal Hitzler 5 Where's your (meta)data? Data: Wind direction "north" at 10 km/h Depending on usage, you · information about the sensor device · conditions in which measurements were taken · etc. Data Context #12;July

  14. THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO LONDON CANADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO LONDON CANADA DEPARTMENT://owl.uwo.ca). PREREQUISITES: One or more of Ontario Secondary School MCV4U, MHF4U, MDM4U, Mathematics 0110A/B, 1225A/B, 1229A/B, the former Mathematics 017a/b, the former Ontario Secondary School MGA4U, MCB4U. ANTIREQUISITES

  15. Great Basin Birds of Prey June 1-4, 2015, Marc Bechard,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    with emphasis on the Snake River Plain of southern Idaho. Included are field trips to the Snake River Birds, and Environmental Studies. 1 credit/unit Owls of the Snake River Plain June 8-11, 2015, Marc Bechard, Boise State in the western United States with emphasis on the Snake River Plain of southern Idaho. Instruction will be given

  16. Commercial Fertilizers in 1946-47. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1947-01-01

    Milorganite Smith Money Maker All-Weather Four Leaf Mr. 0 Smith Nitro-F'hos Arcadian Fulton's Plantabbs N. J. Soiless-Hydroponics Armstrong's Prescription Goldenrod Nulife Soylaid Arrow Standard Green Acre Old Black Joe Star Best Bet Gro-Crop Owl Siauffer...

  17. Effects of corticosterone pellets on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and corticosteroid-binding-globulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    Effects of corticosterone pellets on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and corticosteroid-degradable corticosterone pellets (implanted under the skin) in elevating plasma corticosterone levels. We monitored to handling in Eurasian kestrel Falco tinnunculus and barn owl Tyto alba nestlings. Corticosterone pellets

  18. CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  19. What's Inside . . . Fire effects database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , particle-size distribution of individual samples, suspended sediment load, measurements of hydraulic) monitoring of radiomarked owls in four study areas. All data sets identified a subset of map units measurements were made during the course of 13 runoff seasons between 1982 and 1997 on a gravel-bed stream near

  20. The Condor 108:721730 # The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emslie, Steve

    FROM NEW MEXICO REBECKA L. BRASSO AND STEVEN D. EMSLIE1 Department of Biology and Marine Biology Pleistocene avifaunas from New Mexico, recovered from Sandia Cave during archaeological excavations by F), and Micrathene whitneyi (Elf Owl) from New Mexico. Two new radiocarbon dates on fossil G. californianus from

  1. Ecosystem management aligns different uses of the land with ecological parameters and goals of environmental quality. An important USDA Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -aged timber harvest on old-growth forests and their associated wildlife, such as the California spotted owl" for special needs, will sustain all key resources (soil, water, vegetation, and wildlife) and functions, promoting forest health, allowing sustainable levels of commodity extraction, and supporting recreational

  2. Alexis Smoluk GEO 565, winter 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    as a pellet. When owl surveyors encounter pellets they are collected and UTMs are recorded. Each pellet is linked to a site location and a list of prey items contained within that pellet. Pellet information and core. The presence of down wood and larger old-growth patch sizes have been strongly related to spotted

  3. MnM: A Tool for Automatic Support on Semantic Markup Maria Vargas-Vera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    current developments in web-based knowledge representation, such as DAML+OIL (ref- erence description of the DAML+OIL can be found at http://www.daml.org/2001/03/reference.html) and OWL the language proposed information and carrying out complex problem solving on the web is based on the assumption that these agents

  4. Regular Paths in SparQL: Querying the NCI Thesaurus Landon T. Detwiler1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Regular Paths in SparQL: Querying the NCI Thesaurus Landon T. Detwiler1 , Dan Suciu, PhD3 , James F can create views of the OWL version of the NCI Thesaurus that match the views generated by the web the matched triples. Some examples of triples from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Thesaurus that would

  5. Evolution for the Sustainability of Internetware Daren Fang, Xiaodong Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaodong

    by implementing evolvable designs. Secondly, rapid adaptations would renew and refresh the software with the up that is not adaptable will become obsolete sooner or later. Internetware is currently one of the prevailing paradigms power management adaptations using Web Ontology Language (OWL) - based user behavioral profiles

  6. From Ontology to NL: Generation of Multilingual User-Oriented Environmental Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    related in particular to (i) environmental data (e.g., temperature, wind speed, birch pollen, CO2); (ii linguistically-oriented knowledge structures--as, e.g., the Upper Model [1] or the MIAKT ontology [2 as starting point for generation The three layers of our knowledge representation model are implemented in OWL

  7. What Happened to Bob? Semantic Data Mining of Context Histories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessel, Michael

    and give some practical guidance. 1 Introduction Social Web applications like Facebook and Twitter allow.0 services like Facebook. To increase the level of abstraction, IYOUIT uses knowledge formalized as OWL DL meeting may be derived based on the people in proximity, their social relations and the actual place

  8. Scholarship in Action through Community Engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    Before · Clean and Renewable Energy · Indoor Environmental Quality · Water Resources Design by Toshiko, it would make an owl weep to fly over it." An 1820 Visitor to Central New York* UNIVERSITY CITY * Peter L Mori After Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental & Energy Systems Brownfield Site #12

  9. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve 1-hexadecanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve 1-hexadecanol production Xueyang Feng) from barn owl (Tyto alba). In order to improve fatty alcohol production, we have manipulated both) was over-expressed, which improved 1-hexadecanol production by 56% (from 45 mg/ L to 71 mg/L). Knocking out

  10. Einsatz von Web Services im Semantic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    Einsatz von Web Services im Semantic Web am Beispiel der RACER Engine und OWL-QL Jan Galinski Aufbau der Arbeit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 Grundlagen 5 2.1 Semantic Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.1 Komponenten des Semantic Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.1.2 Repräsentation

  11. Software Development Internship www.arhs-group.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    to the development of our fast growing R&D branch Project As part of his HR and Bid department, Ars has developed to improve the set of reference data used by the application by leveraging existing open data set will alsoJS, RDF/OWL, linked data. Description As a software development intern, you will: Be involved

  12. Management Controls for Ranches Producing Breeding Cattle. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, L. A. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    weight ----- L I Quality grade shep ';OZ .LM ?PV 1q61a~ 1eni9v r sy~ewau shep UI a6v owl 'POJ~ YU!~ 40 ales ~PEJ~ 14613~ u~ea ~J!S OI~J 146!a~ a6e s,uep .rn ?PV urea I .ou pJeH YEARLING CAlTLE Yearling Weights and Grades Date Sex...

  13. Elastic and Inelastic-Scattering of Alpha-Particles from Ba-138 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, J. H.; Hiebert, John C.

    1972-01-01

    dist 'b ' srl utions for (n, n' Ba. lOIls FyG 5 138Ba(n, n'~ ~ q Ilg OWlIlg .24-Me V average 1798 J. H. BARKER AND J. C. HIEBERT EXPERIMENT THIS WORK THEORY 4.2419 3.9217 (a) (b) 4 2423 2,3,4 4,1668 2,3t4 4.0810 2 39354 2 3&220 (3,4)~800 2...

  14. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John P. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). School of Energy Resources; Pluda, Allison R. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Wyoming High-Precision Isotope Lab.

    2014-03-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  15. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P.; Sims, Kenneth W.W.; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-06-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  16. A method of analysing fox squirrel stomach contents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hanley Kerfoot

    1966-01-01

    . iiex vomi tories, Stone cells, 100 X Ilex vomitoria, liesoca&p, 100 X 93 53. A~er ~ne ndo, Endocarp, 100 X I&car ~ne ndo, Seed coat, 100 X A~I b lixocarp, 60 X 56. ~21 . '" b . -. II. - 6 p, AIIAX 95 57. A~t', b . II. . ; -. M, 0, 100 X Tilia.... ~EX' 2 & El S'M . t, 100 X E 1' ~ ~tt' . ll 11, 100X;1 t, 6330 X 02. ~lhd W ~tlf1 . Wl 2 f &, 100 1 03. ~LSS 0 nx to . ESE, 60x 87 89 89 89 I ist of Fief es (continued) ~Pi re I&&&. platen?s occidentalis. II&i&s of' secfb 6i& 1313 Crate e pl...

  17. Next Generation Models for Storage and Representation of Microbial Biological Annotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quest, Daniel J; Land, Miriam L; Brettin, Thomas S; Cottingham, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional genome annotation systems were developed in a very different computing era, one where the World Wide Web was just emerging. Consequently, these systems are built as centralized black boxes focused on generating high quality annotation submissions to GenBank/EMBL supported by expert manual curation. The exponential growth of sequence data drives a growing need for increasingly higher quality and automatically generated annotation. Typical annotation pipelines utilize traditional database technologies, clustered computing resources, Perl, C, and UNIX file systems to process raw sequence data, identify genes, and predict and categorize gene function. These technologies tightly couple the annotation software system to hardware and third party software (e.g. relational database systems and schemas). This makes annotation systems hard to reproduce, inflexible to modification over time, difficult to assess, difficult to partition across multiple geographic sites, and difficult to understand for those who are not domain experts. These systems are not readily open to scrutiny and therefore not scientifically tractable. The advent of Semantic Web standards such as Resource Description Framework (RDF) and OWL Web Ontology Language (OWL) enables us to construct systems that address these challenges in a new comprehensive way. Results Here, we develop a framework for linking traditional data to OWL-based ontologies in genome annotation. We show how data standards can decouple hardware and third party software tools from annotation pipelines, thereby making annotation pipelines easier to reproduce and assess. An illustrative example shows how TURTLE (Terse RDF Triple Language) can be used as a human readable, but also semantically-aware, equivalent to GenBank/EMBL files. Conclusions The power of this approach lies in its ability to assemble annotation data from multiple databases across multiple locations into a representation that is understandable to researchers. In this way, all researchers, experimental and computational, will more easily understand the informatics processes constructing genome annotation and ultimately be able to help improve the systems that produce them.

  18. APresent State of Ontology Development Tools Kouji Kozaki The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    ://protege.stanford.edu/ Protégé OntoEdit OntoStudio OilEd WebODE SWOOP Stanford Medical Informatics Ontoprise Ontoprise://panda.cs.inf.shizuoka.ac.jp/mmm/doddle/ #12;- 2 - 2.3 2000 Web OWLOIL10DAML OIL11OilEd [Sean 01]OntoEdit [Staab 00] OIL(DAML+OIL) Web RDF(S)OWL Web Web 3. 10 http://www.ontoknowledge.org/oil 11 http://www.daml.org/ 12 http://www.w3

  19. Proposal for a quantity based data model in the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Thomas; Edward Shaya

    2003-12-23

    We propose the beginnings of a data model for the Virtual Observatory (VO) built up from simple ``quantity'' objects. In this paper we present how an object-oriented, domain (or namespace)-scoped simple quantity may be used to describe astronomical data. Our model is designed around the requirements that it be searchable and serve as a transport mechanism for all types of VO data and meta-data. In this paper we describe this model in terms of an OWL ontology and UML diagrams. An XML schema is available online.

  20. Rock Chalk Report, January 2, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-02

    to Start @ 3:30 PM (Central) on Jan. 6 Jayhawks and Owls to play on CBS. UPCOMING EVENTS 1.02 W. Basketball vs Kansas State 7 PM @ Lawrence, KS 01.05 Track Bill Easton Classic 1 PM @ Lawrence, KS 01.06 M. Basketball vs Temple 3... as $50! Earn two Williams Education Fund Priority Points per sport when you buy Baseball and Softball season tickets! Women's Basketball Women's Basketball Tickets On Sale Purchase the Big 12 Pack which includes all nine home...

  1. Evaluation of asbestos fibre content in discharge air from a portable canister vacuum cleaner 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, James Turner

    1975-01-01

    . The isokinetic sampling train was composed of a 37 mm filter, various measuring devices and a vacuum pump. An 0. 8 micron Millipore filter retained the asbestos fibres and counting of the fibres was by phase contrast microscopy. Fibre counts for fibres... greater than 5 microns in length ranged from 6 to 56 fibres per cubic oentimeter, An analysis of variance performed on the fibre count data indicated that fibre concentra- tions are related to filter usage and arrangement, AC KN OWL ED GEMENTS I wish...

  2. Suspended sediment load studies of the Brazos River between Waco and Richmond, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadhwa, Nand P

    1961-01-01

    of the clay- sized fraction in the suspended sediment load, 70 Figure 17m Typical X-Ray diffraction patterns of the clay- sized fraction in the bank sediment. 74 ACKN OWLE D lR iEN TS The writer wishes to extend his appreciation to Mr. S. A. Lynch, Head... or tractive force of the stream exerted on the boundaries of the channels and are moved upward by momentary upward eddy curren+s. The upward movement is coun+eracted by the force of gravity, which tends to settle the particles and by momer'tary downward...

  3. The use of the probability distribution function to analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Chau Qui

    1976-01-01

    par t of his t ime and labor to assist in the welding of thermocoupl-. junctions to the copper disk. And to all of those directly connected and to many others who helped by givino words of suggestion, there will always remain a debt o.... DEDICATION. AC (QU OWL EDGI"IENT S. TABLE OF CONTENTS. L1ST OF TABLES. LIST OF F IGUR ES. vi vii 1x CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. CHAPTER II MECHANISMS OF NUCLEATE POOL BOILING. . . . . Bubble agitation model. Vapor-liquid exchange model. 3. M...

  4. Parental care masks a density-dependent shift from cooperation to competition among burying beetle larvae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrader, Matthew; Jarrett, Benjamin J. M.; Kilner, Rebecca M.

    2015-03-21

    . Kolliker, eds. The evolution of parental care. Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford, U.K. Marti, C. D. 1989. Food sharing by sibling common barn-owls. Wilson Bull. 101:132–134. Mas, F., and M. Ko¨lliker. 2008. Maternal care and offspring begging in social insects... (Tyto alba) nestlings have been documented feeding one another (Marti 1989) and there is evidence that barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) nestlings moder- ate their selfishness when their siblings have been food deprived (Romano et al. 2012). Although...

  5. Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarsi, Livio

    1998-06-15

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10{sup 20} eV arriving on Earth with very low flux ({approx}1 particle/Km{sup 2}-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas, exceeding values of 1000 km{sup 2} sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays ('Auger' with 2x3500 km{sup 2} sr) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space ('AIR WATCH' and OWL,'' with effective area reaching 1 million km{sup 2} sr). In this last case, by using as a target the 10{sup 13} tons of air viewed, also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.

  6. Unmanned systems win unexpected support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneiderman, R.

    1991-09-01

    A review of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is presented in which emphasis is given to recent mission accomplishments and current directions of research. Existing and new military UAV programs are listed with reference to funding, the type of vehicle, and level of development. Several trends are established including the reliance of UVAs on global positioning satellites and advanced electronics and the growth of the UVA industry. UVAs that are in advanced stages of development or have been deployed include short-range UAV such as the Pioneer, the Pointer, the Sky Owl, and the Hunter. Key UAV systems are described such as the Advanced Tactical Airborne Reconnaissance System, the Maritime Vertical Takeoff and Landing, and other VTOL systems. Very small UVAs and Exdrones are also discussed, and a weather reconnaissance system and surveillance systems are mentioned.

  7. Recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation and implications for the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segers, Marijke C; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We use cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the EAGLE and OWLS projects to assess the significance of recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation. The fractional contributions of stellar mass loss to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass densities increase with time, reaching $35 \\%$ and $19 \\%$, respectively, at $z=0$. The importance of recycling increases steeply with galaxy stellar mass for $M_{\\ast} < 10^{10.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, and decreases mildly at higher mass. This trend arises from the mass dependence of feedback associated with star formation and AGN, which preferentially suppresses star formation fuelled by recycling. Recycling is more important for satellites than centrals and its contribution decreases with galactocentric radius. The relative contribution of AGB stars increases with time and towards galaxy centers. This is a consequence of the more gradual release of AGB ejecta compared to that of massive stars, and the preferential removal of the latter by outflow...

  8. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  9. Biotransformation and Incorporation into Proteins along a Simulated Terrestrial Food Chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unrine, J.M., B.P. Jackson and W.A. Hopkins

    2007-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element in vertebrates, but there is a narrow concentration range between dietary requirement and toxicity threshold. Although a great deal is known about the biochemistry of Se from a nutritional perspective, considerably less attention has been focused on the specific biochemistry of Se as an environmental toxicant. Recent advances in hyphenated analytical techniques have provided the capability of quantifying specific chemical forms of Se in biological tissues as well as the distribution of Se among macromolecules. We applied liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to investigate biotransformations of selenomethionine along a simulated terrestrial food chain consisting of selenomethionine exposed crickets (Acheta domesticus) fed to western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis). Evidence was obtained for selenomethionine biotransformation as well as for sex-specific differences in the metabolism of Se compounds and their subsequent incorporation into proteins in the lizard. The results demonstrate the complexities involved in trophic transfer of Se due to the potential for extensive biotransformation and the species- and even sex-specific nature of these biotransformations.

  10. Binding and Direct Electrochemistry of OmcA, an Outer-Membrane Cytochrome from an Iron Reducing Bacterium, with Oxide Electrodes: A Candidate Biofuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggleston, Carrick M.; Voros, Janos; Shi, Liang; Lower, Brian H.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Colberg, Patricia J.

    2008-02-15

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria transfer electrons to solid ferric respiratory electron acceptors. Outer-membrane cytochromes expressed by these organisms are of interest in both microbial fuel cells and biofuel cells. We use optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) to show that OmcA, an 85 kDa decaheme outer-membrane c-type cytochrome from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, adsorbs to isostructural Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in similar amounts. Adsorption is ionic-strength and pH dependent (peak adsorption at pH 6.5–7.0). The thickness of the OmcA layer on Al2O3 at pH 7.0 [5.8 ± 1.1 (2r) nm] from OWLS is similar, within error, to that observed using atomic force microscopy (4.8 ± 2 nm). The highest adsorption density observed was 334 ng cm 2 (2.4 · 1012 molecules cm 2), corresponding to a monolayer or 9.9 nm diameter spheres or submonolayer coverage by smaller molecules. Direct electrochemistry of OmcA on Fe2O3 electrodes was observed using cyclic voltammetry, with cathodic peak potentials of 380 to 320 mV versus Ag/AgCl. Variations in the cathodic peak positions are speculatively attributed to redox-linked conformation change or changes in molecular orientation. OmcA can exchange electrons with ITO electrodes at higher current densities than with Fe2O3. Overall, OmcA can bind to and exchange electrons with several oxides, and thus its utility in fuel cells is not restricted to Fe2O3.

  11. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

  14. MIFS: A Mega Integral Field Spectrograph for the VLT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bacon; G. Adam; S. Cabrit; F. Combes; R. L. Davies; E. Emsellem; P. Ferruit; M. Franx; G. Gilmore; B. Guiderdoni; O. Lefevre; S. Morris; E. Pecontal; E. Prieto; R. Sharples; P. van der Werf; P. T. de Zeeuw

    2001-09-05

    We describe MIFS, a second generation integral-field spectrograph for the VLT, operating in the visible wavelength range. It combines a 1'x1' field of view with the improved spatial resolution provided by multi-conjugate adaptive optics and covers a large simultaneous spectral range (0.6-1.0 microns). A separate mode exploits the highest spatial resolution provided by adaptive optics. With this unique combination of capabilities, MIFS has a wide domain of application and a large discovery potential. The MIFS low-spatial resolution mode (sampled at 0.2") combined with the initial MCAO capabilities planned for the VLT will provide ultra-deep fields with a limiting magnitude for spectroscopy of R~28. MIFS will improve the present day detection limit of Lyman alpha emitters by a factor of 100, and will detect low-mass star-forming galaxies to z~7. The MIFS high-spatial resolution mode (3"x3" field sampled at 0.01") is optimized for the next step in (MC)AO. It will probe, e.g., the relationship between supermassive central black holes and their host galaxy and the physics of winds from accretion disks in young stellar objects at unprecedented spatial resolution. MIFS will extend Europe's lead in integral-field spectroscopy. It capitalizes on new developments in adaptive optics, and is a key step towards instrumentation for OWL.

  15. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  16. Metazoan Gene Families from Metazome

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Metazome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst metazoans. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of version 2.0.4, Metazome provides access to twenty-four sequenced and annotated metazoan genomes, clustered at nine evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, Ensembl, and JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. The included organisms (by common name) are: Human, Mouse, Rat, Dog, Opossum, Chicken, Frog, Stickleback, Medaka, Fugu pufferfish; Zebrafish, Seasquirt - savignyi, Seasquirt - intestinalis, Amphioxus, Sea Urchin, Fruitfly, Mosquite, Yellow Fever Mosquito, Silkworm, Red Flour Beetle, Worm, Briggsae Worm, Owl limpet (snail), and Sea anemone. [Copied from Metazome Overview at http://www.metazome.net/Metazome_info.php

  17. Insights into bilaterian evolution from three spiralian genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simakov, Oleg; Marletaz, Ferdinand; Cho, Sung-Jin; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Havlak, Paul; Hellsten, Uffe; Kuo, Dian-Han; Larsson, Tomas; Lv, Jie; Arendt, Detlev; Savage, Robert; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; de Jong, Pieter; Grimwood, Jane; Chapman, Jarrod A.; Shapiro, Harris; Otillar, Robert P.; Terry, Astrid Y.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lindberg, David R.; Seaver, Elaine C.; Weisblat, David A.; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Aerts, Andrea

    2012-01-07

    Current genomic perspectives on animal diversity neglect two prominent phyla, the molluscs and annelids, that together account for nearly one-third of known marine species and are important both ecologically and as experimental systems in classical embryology1, 2, 3. Here we describe the draft genomes of the owl limpet (Lottia gigantea), a marine polychaete (Capitella teleta) and a freshwater leech (Helobdella robusta), and compare them with other animal genomes to investigate the origin and diversification of bilaterians from a genomic perspective. We find that the genome organization, gene structure and functional content of these species are more similar to those of some invertebrate deuterostome genomes (for example, amphioxus and sea urchin) than those of other protostomes that have been sequenced to date (flies, nematodes and flatworms). The conservation of these genomic features enables us to expand the inventory of genes present in the last common bilaterian ancestor, establish the tripartite diversification of bilaterians using multiple genomic characteristics and identify ancient conserved long- and short-range genetic linkages across metazoans. Superimposed on this broadly conserved pan-bilaterian background we find examples of lineage-specific genome evolution, including varying rates of rearrangement, intron gain and loss, expansions and contractions of gene families, and the evolution of clade-specific genes that produce the unique content of each genome.

  18. SU-E-I-62: Assessing Radiation Dose Reduction and CT Image Optimization Through the Measurement and Analysis of the Detector Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of CT Images Using Different Beam Hardening Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, J; Aldoohan, S; Gill, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reducing patient dose while maintaining (or even improving) image quality is one of the foremost goals in CT imaging. To this end, we consider the feasibility of optimizing CT scan protocols in conjunction with the application of different beam-hardening filtrations and assess this augmentation through noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detector quantum efficiency (DQE) analysis. Methods: American College of Radiology (ACR) and Catphan phantoms (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned with a 64 slice CT scanner when additional filtration of thickness and composition (e.g., copper, nickel, tantalum, titanium, and tungsten) had been applied. A MATLAB-based code was employed to calculate the image of noise NPS. The Catphan Image Owl software suite was then used to compute the modulated transfer function (MTF) responses of the scanner. The DQE for each additional filter, including the inherent filtration, was then computed from these values. Finally, CT dose index (CTDIvol) values were obtained for each applied filtration through the use of a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT dose phantom. Results: NPS, MTF, and DQE values were computed for each applied filtration and compared to the reference case of inherent beam-hardening filtration only. Results showed that the NPS values were reduced between 5 and 12% compared to inherent filtration case. Additionally, CTDIvol values were reduced between 15 and 27% depending on the composition of filtration applied. However, no noticeable changes in image contrast-to-noise ratios were noted. Conclusion: The reduction in the quanta noise section of the NPS profile found in this phantom-based study is encouraging. The reduction in both noise and dose through the application of beam-hardening filters is reflected in our phantom image quality. However, further investigation is needed to ascertain the applicability of this approach to reducing patient dose while maintaining diagnostically acceptable image qualities in a clinical setting.

  19. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  20. SU-E-T-51: Bayesian Network Models for Radiotherapy Error Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalet, A; Phillips, M; Gennari, J [UniversityWashington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a probabilistic model of radiotherapy plans using Bayesian networks that will detect potential errors in radiation delivery. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with medical physicists and other domain experts were employed to generate a set of layered nodes and arcs forming a Bayesian Network (BN) which encapsulates relevant radiotherapy concepts and their associated interdependencies. Concepts in the final network were limited to those whose parameters are represented in the institutional database at a level significant enough to develop mathematical distributions. The concept-relation knowledge base was constructed using the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and translated into Hugin Expert Bayes Network files via the the RHugin package in the R statistical programming language. A subset of de-identified data derived from a Mosaiq relational database representing 1937 unique prescription cases was processed and pre-screened for errors and then used by the Hugin implementation of the Estimation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for machine learning all parameter distributions. Individual networks were generated for each of several commonly treated anatomic regions identified by ICD-9 neoplasm categories including lung, brain, lymphoma, and female breast. Results: The resulting Bayesian networks represent a large part of the probabilistic knowledge inherent in treatment planning. By populating the networks entirely with data captured from a clinical oncology information management system over the course of several years of normal practice, we were able to create accurate probability tables with no additional time spent by experts or clinicians. These probabilistic descriptions of the treatment planning allow one to check if a treatment plan is within the normal scope of practice, given some initial set of clinical evidence and thereby detect for potential outliers to be flagged for further investigation. Conclusion: The networks developed here support the use of probabilistic models into clinical chart checking for improved detection of potential errors in RT plans.

  1. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  2. Acceptances for space-based and ground-based fluorescence detectors, and inference of the neutrino-nucleon cross-section above 10{sup 19} eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Irimia, Andrei; Weiler, Thomas J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235-1807 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Detection of ultrahigh energy neutrinos will be useful for unraveling the dynamics of the most violent sources in the cosmos and for revealing the neutrino cross-section at extreme energy. If there exists a Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) suppression of cosmic-ray events above E{sub GZK}{approx}5x10{sup 19} eV, as predicted by theory, then the only messengers of energies beyond E{sub GZK} are neutrinos. Cosmic neutrino fluxes can initiate air-showers through interaction in the atmosphere, or in the Earth. Neutrino trajectories will be downgoing to nearly horizontal in the former case, and 'Earth-skimming' in the latter case. Thus it is important to know the acceptances (event rate/flux) of proposed air-shower experiments for detecting both types of neutrino-initiated events. We calculate these acceptances for fluorescence detectors, both space-based as with the EUSO and OWL proposals, and ground-based, as with Auger, HiRes and Telescope Array. The neutrino cross-section {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sub N}{sup CC} is unknown at energies above 5.2x10{sup 13} eV. Although the popular QCD extrapolation of lower-energy physics offers the cross-section value of 0.54x10{sup -31}(E{sub {nu}}/10{sup 20} eV){sup 0.36} cm{sup 2}, new physics could raise or lower this value. Therefore, we present the acceptances of horizontal (HAS) and upgoing (UAS) air-showers as a function of {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sub N}{sup CC} over the range 10{sup -34} to 10{sup -30} cm{sup 2}. The dependences of acceptances on neutrino energy, shower-threshold energy, shower length, and shower column density are also studied. We introduce a cloud layer, and study its effect on rates as viewed from space and from the ground. For UAS, we present acceptances for events over land (rock), and over the ocean (water). Acceptances over water are larger by about an order of magnitude, thus favoring space-based detectors. We revisit the idea of Kusenko and Weiler [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 161101 (2002)] to infer {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sub N}{sup CC} at E{sub {nu}} > or approx. 10{sup 20} from the ratio of HAS-to-UAS events, and obtain favorable results. Included in our UAS calculations are realistic energy-losses for taus, and Earth-curvature effects. Most of our calculation is analytic, allowing insight into the various subprocesses that collectively turn an incident neutrino into an observable shower.