Sample records for owl strix occidentalis

  1. Estimation of Food Consumption fr om Pellets Cast by Captive Ural Owls ( Strix uralensis ) Aki Higuchi and Manabu T . Abe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    551 Estimation of Food Consumption fr om Pellets Cast by Captive Ural Owls ( Strix uralensis ) Aki of the Ural Owl ( Strix uralensis) based on pellet analysis. Though it is possible to identify pr ey items- tat and manage for this species. In this study, ingested food and cast pellet mass were quantified

  2. Owl Feather War Bonnet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Owl Feather War Bonnet and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  3. Albinism in the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) and Other Owls Pentti Alaja and Heimo Mikkola1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a recessive gene which inhibits the enzyme tyrosinase. Tyrosine, an amino acid, synthesizes the melanin

  4. Population Assessment of the Northern Spotted Owl in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owl Management Plan. Within our survey areas, Spotted Owl occupancy declined by 49% between 1992.C. Conservation Foundation Carla B. Lenihan, Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management #12;Population Assessment of the Northern Spotted Owl in British Columbia 1992-2001 Page 1 Abstract In 1997, the Spotted Owl Management Plan

  5. Towards improving phenotype representation in OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loebe, Frank; Stumpf, Frank; Hoehndorf, Robert; Herre, Heinrich

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    PROCEEDINGS Open Access Towards improving phenotype representation in OWL Frank Loebe1*, Frank Stumpf1, Robert Hoehndorf2, Heinrich Herre3 From Ontologies in Biomedicine and Life Sciences (OBML 2011) Berlin, Germany. 6-7 October 2011...

  6. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne Robertson3 and Mark Small3 1 Centre for Geospatial Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD geospatial web services, most of which conform to specifications of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC

  7. NEJC: "Engaging Non-Traditional Partners with Woodsy Owl’s Conservative Ethics: A Head Start Success Story"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Description: This workshop will show how the Woodsy Owl’s partnership was established, what we have done to keep up the momentum, the challenges we have faced, and our vision for the future of this...

  8. Relations as patterns: bridging the gap between OBO and OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Oellrich, Anika; Dumontier, Michel; Kelso, Janet; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Herre, Heinrich

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    METHODOLOGY ARTICLE Open Access Relations as patterns: bridging the gap between OBO and OWL Robert Hoehndorf1,5*, Anika Oellrich1, Michel Dumontier4, Janet Kelso3, Dietrich Rebholz-Schuhmann1, Heinrich Herre2 Abstract Background: Most biomedical... . Genome Biol 2005, 6(5). 8. Horridge M, Drummond N, Goodwin J, Rector A, Stevens R, Wang H: The Manchester OWL Syntax. Proc of the 2006 OWL Experiences and Directions Workshop (OWL-ED2006) 2006. 9. Hoehndorf R, Loebe F, Kelso J, Herre H: Representing...

  9. Parallel OWL Reasoning: Merge Classification Kejia Wu and Volker Haarslev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haarslev, Volker

    of concepts. Although some of these huge ontologies fit into one of OWL's three tractable profiles, e proposed and inves- tigated for dealing with monolithic ontologies. Some research results, e.g. ontology

  10. Towards OWL-based Knowledge Representation in Petrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shkotin, Alex; Kudryavtsev, Dmitry

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents our work on development of OWL-driven systems for formal representation and reasoning about terminological knowledge and facts in petrology. The long-term aim of our project is to provide solid foundations for a large-scale integration of various kinds of knowledge, including basic terms, rock classification algorithms, findings and reports. We describe three steps we have taken towards that goal here. First, we develop a semi-automated procedure for transforming a database of igneous rock samples to texts in a controlled natural language (CNL), and then a collection of OWL ontologies. Second, we create an OWL ontology of important petrology terms currently described in natural language thesauri. We describe a prototype of a tool for collecting definitions from domain experts. Third, we present an approach to formalization of current industrial standards for classification of rock samples, which requires linear equations in OWL 2. In conclusion, we discuss a range of opportunities arising ...

  11. Habitat associations of cavity-nesting owls in the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groce, Julie Elizabeth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several species of small, cavity-nesting owls occur in the Sierra Nevada, including in areas impacted by human activities. The owls typically use standing dead trees (snags) for nest sites. Although descriptive studies exist regarding habitats...

  12. Dalhousie Libraries e-Reserves Service Library Readings in OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    will look like this: #12;Dalhousie Libraries can Provide URLs to these Types of Electronic MaterialDalhousie Libraries e-Reserves Service Library Readings in OWL #12;Course Reserves Faculty now have 2 options for Reserve materials: NEW Option: Upload a course reading list and Library staff will

  13. Owls as Biomonitors of Environmental Contamination Steven R. Sheffield1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owls as Biomonitors of Environmental Contamination Steven R. Sheffield1 Abstract.--Much like of environmental contamination. These species provide an "early warning system" for toxic contaminants (Pandion haliaetus) have been widely used as biomonitors of aquatic contamination. However, few higher

  14. Using OWL Ontologies Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Using OWL Ontologies for Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling Arnab Sinha and Paul Couderc INRIA for better recycling of materials. Our motive for using ontologies is for representing and rea- soning, recyclable materials, N-ary relations 1 Introduction Today Pervasive computing is gradually entering people

  15. Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis ``Capsule'': Ground-level ozone causes deleterious effects to cutleaf coneflower and crown-beard in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abstract Incidence and severity of visible foliar ozone injury on cutleaf

  16. FEEDING ECOLOGY OF THE BARN OWL IN CENTRAL CHILE AND SOUTHERN SPAIN: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    FEEDING ECOLOGY OF THE BARN OWL IN CENTRAL CHILE AND SOUTHERN SPAIN: A COMPARATIVE STUDY CARLOSM. HERREV&AND FABIANM. JAKSI·1 EstacidnBioldgicade Dogaria, Sevilla-12, Andalucia, Spain, and Instituto de of the Barn Owl (Tyro alba) in the mediterranean- climate areasof central Chile and southernSpain. In both

  17. And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca Terry, PhD'08 drop their bones on the cave floor or (in the case of owls) ex- pel them in the form of pellets

  18. Effects of Drought-Stress on Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and Host-Plant Resistance to Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella Occidentalis Pergande)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiene, Justin G. 1983-

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Herbivory by Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande) (WFT) and drought-stress due to limited water availability are currently two major factors that can severely impact cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production...

  19. Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany OilInformationPre-TaxShelf LandsOpenCorningOwl

  20. Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls Head, Maine: Energy

  1. Mitochondrial and nuclear assessment of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium Brasilianum) Phylogrography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proudfoot, Glenn Arthur

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequences of the cytochrome b gene and genotypes from 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were used to assess phylogeographic variation in ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) from Arizona, Mexico, and Texas. ...

  2. Mitochondrial and nuclear assessment of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium Brasilianum) Phylogrography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proudfoot, Glenn Arthur

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequences of the cytochrome b gene and genotypes from 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were used to assess phylogeographic variation in ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) from Arizona, Mexico, and Texas. Analysis of mtDNA indicated...

  3. Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B. [NSTec; Greger, Paul D. [NSTec

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

  4. Adaptive map alignment in the superior colliculus of the barn owl: a neuromorphic implementation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huo, Juan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptation is one of the basic phenomena of biology, while adaptability is an important feature for neural network. Young barn owl can well adapt its visual and auditory integration to the environmental change, such as ...

  5. Adaptation of orienting behavior: from the barn owl to a robotic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucci, Michele

    Adaptation of orienting behavior: from the barn owl to a robotic system M. Rucci, J. Wray and G.M. Edelman The Neurosciences Institute San Diego, CA Abstract- Autonomous robotic systems need t o adjust control of t h e orienting behavior of a robotic system in t h e presence of auditory and visual stim

  6. Gestion de la cohrence des rgles mtier dites partir d'ontologies OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Gestion de la cohérence des règles métier éditées à partir d'ontologies OWL Amina Chniti1,2 , Patrick Albert1 , Jean Charlet2,3 1 IBM, CAS France {amina.chniti,albertpa}@fr.ibm.com 2 INSERM UMRS 872 effectué propose une méthode pour la gestion des relations entre les ontologies et les règles métier en

  7. Distribution of the Chuckwalla, Western Burrowing Owl, and Six Bat Species on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Willis

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Surveys were conducted in 1996 to determine the current distribution of several animal species of concern on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). They included the chuckwall (Sauromalus obesus), western burrowing owl (Speotyto cunicularia), and six species of bats. Nineteen chuckwallas and 118 scat locations were found during the chuckwalla field study. Eighteen western burrowing owls were found at 12 sighting locations during the 1996 field study. Of the eleven bat species of concern which might occur on the NTS, five, and possibly six, were captured during this survey. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, takes certain management actions to protect and conserve the chuckwalla, western burrowing owl, and bats on the NTS. These actions are described and include: (1) conducting surveys at sites of proposed land-disturbing activities (2) altering projects whenever possible to avoid or minimize impacts to these species (3) maintaining a geospatial database of known habitat for species of concern (4) sharing sighting and trap location data gathered on the NTS with other local land and resource managers, and (5) conducting periodic field surveys to monitor these species distribution and relative abundance on the NTS.

  8. Incr easing Mist Net Captur es of Migrant Norther n Saw-whet Owls (Aegolius acadicus ) with an Audiolur e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incr easing Mist Net Captur es of Migrant Norther n Saw-whet Owls (Aegolius acadicus associated with courtship activities. Fr om 1971 thr ough 1985, using passive mist netting at Little Suamico eased capture rates over passive mist netting. Audiolur es are now being used by all major Norther n Saw

  9. Optimization of the Orbiting Wide-angle Light Collectors (OWL) Mission for Charged-Particle and Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krizmanic, John F; Streitmatter, Robert E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OWL uses the Earth's atmosphere as a vast calorimeter to fully enable the emerging field of charged-particle astronomy with high-statistics measurements of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) and a search for sources of UHE neutrinos and photons. Confirmation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) suppression above ~4 x 10^19 eV suggests that most UHECR originate in astrophysical objects. Higher energy particles must come from sources within about 100 Mpc and are deflected by ~1 degree by predicted intergalactic/galactic magnetic fields. The Pierre Auger Array, Telescope Array and the future JEM-EUSO ISS mission will open charged-particle astronomy, but much greater exposure will be required to fully identify and measure the spectra of individual sources. OWL uses two large telescopes with 3 m optical apertures and 45 degree FOV in near-equatorial orbits. Simulations of a five-year OWL mission indicate ~10^6 km^2 sr yr of exposure with full aperture at ~6 x 10^19 eV. Observations at different altitudes and sp...

  10. 56 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG by MIchEllE bOWlEs JacKsON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    56 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG by MIchEllE bOWlEs JacKsON stepby #12;june 2012 PM NETWORK 57 by adopting an iterative 58 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG waterfall approach. This introduced the idea

  11. Early Birds, Night Owls,and Tireless/Recurring Itinerants: An Exploratory Analysis of Extreme Transit Behaviors in Beijing, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Ying; Zhou, Jiangping; Chai, Yanwei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper seeks to understand extreme public transit riders in Beijing using both traditional household survey and emerging new data sources such as Smart Card Data (SCD). We focus on four types of extreme transit behaviors: public transit riders who (1) travel significantly earlier than average riders (the 'early birds'); (2) ride in unusual late hours (the 'night owls'); and (3) commute in excessively long distance (the 'tireless itinerants'); (4) travel over frequently in a day (the 'recurring itinerants). SCD are used to identify the spatiotemporal patterns of these three extreme transit behaviors. In addition, household survey data are employed to supplement the socioeconomic background and provide a tentative profiling of extreme travelers. While the research findings are useful to guide urban governance and planning in Beijing, the methods developed in this paper can be applied to understand travel patterns elsewhere.

  12. Isolation of an alkaloid from Cassia occidentalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puleo, Larry Ellis

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    viscous. The concentrated crude extract was diluted w1th water to 10 liters and treated w1th 300 ml of 2N sulfuric acid, The acid solution was filtered, washed with trichloroethylene and. made basic (pH 9) with TABLE I Plant Extraction Scheme I3... roaattuh. J, perm. fm. , Identification of Or anic Com ounds. John 1 ey and Sons Inc. , New York, N. Y. , 1964, 28. Bellamy', L. J. , The infra-red S ectra of' Com lex Molecules. John Wiley and Sons Inc, , New York, N. Y. , 1960. 29. Nakanish1, Ko...

  13. Phylogeography of the supralittoral isopod Ligia occidentalis around the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosberg, Rick

    of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843-2258, USA *Correspondence of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Texas A&M University, College of the nuclear gene sodium­potassium ATPase a-subunit (NaK). We conducted phylogenetic and population

  14. Nickname: Owls Colors: Red and Blue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Mike Jarvis Cheer Heather Coker-Henderson Cross Country Alex Smolka Cross Country Alex Smolka Football marked FAU's first win over a team from a BCS conference. Rusty Smith was named USA Today National Player

  15. The Distribution and Abundance of Bluntnose Flyingfish (Prognichthys occidentalis) Across the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall, Landes Lee

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    larvae based on UP-HRMA (unlabelled probe high resolution melting analysis)as a function of fluorescence over temperature. .......................................................................................... 9 3 Mean density of bluntnose... vials with 70% ethanol before identified to species. Due to similarity in larval characteristic, a genetic protocol using high- resolution melting analysis (HRMA), as outlined in Smith et al. (2009), was used to identify a subset of flyingfish (n=390...

  16. A New Method of Preparing Owl Pellets: Boiling in Naoh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick W. Schueler Journal:  Bird Banding Volume:  43 Issue:  2 (April) Section:  General Notes Year:  1972 Pages:  142

  17. C-OWL: Contextualizing Ontologies1 Paolo Bouquet ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Harmelen, Frank

    Luciano Serafini b Heiner Stuckenschmidt c a DIT - University of Trento, Trento, Italy b ITC-IRST, Trento makes every statement in an ontology satisfiable. As a consequence statements are allowed to hold in one

  18. Ecotoxicological simulation modeling: effects of agricultural chemical exposure on wintering burrowing owls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelman, Catherine Allegra

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    are the OP insecticides chlorpyrifos, dicrotophos, and disulfoton, the oxadiazine insecticide indoxacarb, the herbicide trifluralin, and the defoliants tribufos and paraquat. The results of this model demonstrate the usefulness of simulation modeling... Organochlorine Insecticide OP Organophosphate Insecticide PAN Pesticide Action Network database PIF Partners in Flight PIP Pesticide Information Profiles database SANCO European Commission. Health & Consumer Protection Directorate- General SRD Alberta...

  19. Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) Productivity and Home Range Characteristics in a Shortgrass Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reuse. Ninety-five percent adaptive kernel mean home range size did not differ between ages or sexes and transformed into an urban wildlife refuge through cooperative efforts by the United States Army, Shell Oil and was designated to be an urban wildlife refuge in 1992. The climate is semi-arid, with low humidity, light

  20. Logical Gene Ontology Annotations (GOAL): Exploring gene ontology annotations with OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    with phenotype and disease phenomena, such as linking together proteolysis, insulin secretion, plasma membrane, increased glucose concentration and diabetes, is not yet possible. To answer such a query cor- rectly, some form of reasoning over the ontologies...

  1. Assessment of the Current Status of the California Spotted Owl, with Recommendations for Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Association, National Audubon Society, Nature Conservancy, private timber companies, Sacramento Chamber, observers from the timber industry and the environmental com- munity, and staff. This volume is the CASPO

  2. Patterns of Habitat Use By California Spotted Owls in Logged Forests of the Northern Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and private timber companies. This information. Methods The cutting history within the study area was determined using records and timber sale maps from

  3. Eighteen microsatellite loci developed from western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faircloth, Brant C.; Title, Alexandra; Tan, Kevin; Welty, Justin; Belthoff, James R.; Gowaty, Patricia Adair

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of alleles ranged from two to 11, averaging 5.1. BOOB-BM4-H06 and BOOB-BM4-A01 deviated (P \\ 0.01) from HWE followingdeviation from HWE for BOOB-RM2-H08. We did not detect LD

  4. GEOGRAPHICAL STRUCTURE OF GENETIC VARIATION IN THE MALAGASY SCOPS-OWL INFERRED FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    detected, four of which were shared by more than one individual. Maximum sequence divergence was 0.6% (mean.6% (promedio 5 0.24%). El haplotipo ma´s comu´n fue compartido por diez individuos originarios de localidades

  5. Answering SPARQL Queries over Databases and under OWL 2 QL Entailment Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharyaschev, Michael

    of Computer Science and Information Systems, Birkbeck, University of London, U.K. 2 Faculty of Computer Science, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy 3 IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY have been implemented in both academia and industry; e.g., [26,29,23,3,22,14,11,7,19,21]. Most of them

  6. Massive immigration balances high anthropogenic mortality in a stable eagle owl population: Lessons for conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    networks such as railways, motorways, electric power lines or wind turbines, to mention but a few. Half of the mortality was caused by infrastructure, with electrocution accounting for 24% of all population recovery if dangerous electric pylons are mitigated system- atically. Our study demonstrates

  7. Sexual size dimorphism in relation to breeding behavior in Screech Owls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witmer, M. C

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or whinny (Allen, cited in Bent 1938), ho-ho-ho-ho (Tyler, cited in Bent 1938), tremolo trill (Kelso 1944), and secondary song (Marshall 1967). The most common call associated with courtship was the trill (Fig. 3A), The trill was given by both sexes... by the female (R =. 35), s Non-courtship Behaviors ~Whinn of adults. This call has been termed the wail or whinny (Tyler, cited in Bent 1938), screech (Hough 1960), and primary song (Marshall 1967). The whinny is similar to the trill except that the notes...

  8. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):251256, Fall 2009 Burrowing owl and other migratory bird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for a runway construction project at Edwards AFB aMBeR l. hoehn, JT3/CH2M HILL Natural Resource Department, Edwards AFB, 5 E. Popson Avenue, Edwards AFB, CA 93524, USA amber.hoehn.ctr@us.af.mil MaRk hagan, 95 Air

  9. Seven federally protected Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook TwitterSearch-CommentsSolid-StateComplexesServices

  10. Sea-land transitions in isopods: pattern of symbiont distribution in two species of intertidal isopods Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis in the Eastern Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberl, Renate

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stressors such as heat stress (Montllor et al 2002;Acyrthosiphon pisum under heat stress. Ecol Entomol 27:189–

  11. Fitze, P. S. (2012). Lagartija occidental ibrica Psammodromus occidentalis. En: Enciclopedia Virtual de los Vertebrados Espaoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtual de los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales-Jimena, San-José, San Mauro y Zardoya, 2012 Patrick S. Fitze Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC: Enciclopedia Virtual de los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias

  12. Chapter 2: Genetic Variability in Nuclear Ribosomal and Chloroplast DNA in Utah (Juniperus Osteosperma) and Western (J. Occidentalis) Juniper (Cupressaceae): Evidence for Interspecific Gene Flow1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, Randall G.; Tausch, Robin J.; Nowak, Robert S.

    1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Early studies of evolutionary change in chloroplast DNA indicated limited variability within species. This finding has been attributed to relatively low rates of sequence evolution and has been maintained as justification for the lack of intraspecific sampling in studies examining, relationships at the species level and above. However, documentation of intraspecific variation in cpDNA has become increasingly common and has been attributed in many cases to ''chloroplast capture'' following genetic exchange across species boundaries. Rleseberg and Wendel (1993) list 37 cases of proposed hybridization in plants that include intraspecific variation in cpDNA, 24 (65%) of which they considered to be probable instances of introgression. Rieseberg (1995) suspected that a review of the literature at that time would reveal over 100 cases of intraspecific variation in CPDNA that could be attributed to hybridization and introgression. That intraspecific variation in cpDNA is potentially indicative of hybridization is founded on the expectation that slowly evolving loci or genomes will produce greater molecular variation between than within species. In cases where a species is polymorphic for CPDNA and at least one of the molecular variants is diagnostic for a second species, interspecific hybridization is a plausible explanation. Incongruence between relationships suggested by cpDNA variation and those supported by other types of data (e.g., morphology or molecular data from an additional locus) provides additional support for introgression. One aspect of hybridization in both animals and plants that has become increasingly evident is incongruence in the phylogenetic and geographic distribution of cytoplasmic and nuclear markers. In most cases cytoplasmic introgression appears to be more pervasive than nuclear exchange. This discordance appears attributable to several factors including differences in the mutation rate, number of effective alleles, and modes of inheritance of cytoplasmic and nuclear loci. In addition, unidirectional introgression following an initial hybridization event can result in populations that have the cytoplasmic genome of one parental species and the nuclear genome of the other. In such cases, discordance in the phylogenetic, taxonomic, and geographic distribution of cytoplasmic and nuclear markers can provide insight into the biogeographic and population genetic forces affecting parental and hybrid populations.

  13. East versus West: Organic contaminant differences in brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) eggs from South Carolina, USA and the Gulf of California, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    by organochlorine contaminants, such as DDT. The southeast pop- ulation, P.o. carolinensis, was delisted in 1985, while the west coast population, P.o. californicus, was not delisted until 2009. As fish-eating coastal.o. carolinensis) was delisted in 1985 (Potter and Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, 1985), bu

  14. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 860 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Event reconstruction for the orbiting wide-angle light collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the orbiting wide-angle light collectors (OWL) air-fluorescence detector T. Z. Abu-Zayyad1 and the OWL

  15. Boletn de la Sociedad Entomolgica Aragonesa (S.E.A.), n 46 (2010) : 429435. APHELOCHEIRUS MURCIUS NIESER & MILLN, 1989 Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murcia, Universidad de

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MURCIUS NIESER & MILLÁN, 1989 Y APHELOCHEIRUS OCCIDENTALIS NIESER & MILLÁN, 1989 (HEMIPTERA consideración para una posible inclusión en la lista roja de la UICN. Palabras clave: Hemiptera, Aphelocheiridae occidentalis Nieser & Millán, 1989 (Hemiptera: Aphelo- cheiridae) dos hemípteros acuáticos endémicos de la

  16. ENDEMIC AND INTRODUCED VERTEBRATES IN THE DIET OF THE BARN OWL (TYTO ALBA) ON TWO ISLANDS IN THE GULF OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellín, Rodrigo

    Isla Rasa (0.91), pero la biomasa promedio por regurgitacio´n fue mayor en Isla Rasa (75.8 g) que en

  17. Parental Effort and Blood Parasitism in Tengmalm's Owl: Effects of Natural and Experimental Variation in Food Abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shutler, Dave

    , available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part inip~rtanceor' \\ar\\lng cn\\~r~nmentalcon,I~tisri>;tnJ ph!>~ial ~ , ) n d ~ t i ~ ~ ~ i ,)II ~ I I > C C

  18. Distances de similarit d'images bases sur les arbres quaternaires1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Manouvrier** -- Geneviève Jomier** * Universidad Central de Venezuela, CCPD, Escuela de Computación, Av. Los Ilustres, Apt. 47002, Los Chaguaramos, 1041 Caracas, Venezuela mrukoz@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ** Université

  19. Of owl or ostrich. The U.S. policy of calculated ambiguity to deter the use of chemical and biological weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakamp, M.A.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has adopted a policy of calculated ambiguity regarding the role of nuclear weapons in response to a potential chemical or biological weapons (CBW) attack. Many factors affect decisions about the role nuclear weapons play in US counterproliferation strategy. This thesis describes the policy of calculated ambiguity and offers some observations about its prospects and pitfalls. The thesis presents evidence that suggests nuclear weapons could play a positive role in the US counterproliferation strategy, at least in some circumstances. It also explains how such a role could conflict with the US nonproliferation strategy. Such a role would also violate the nuclear taboo and be seen by a majority of countries as illegal and immoral. The United States has chosen a policy of calculated ambiguity in an attempt to retain the deterrent value of nuclear weapons without paying the political, legal, and moral costs of explicit reliance on nuclear weapons to deter the use of CBW. This may have short-term benefits, but ultimately may damage the national interest.

  20. 11/10/2005 Copyright 2005 by Benjamin Grosof and Mike Dean. All Rights Reserved Overview of SweetRules V2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Compiler XSB (bkw. OLP) Smodels (fwd. OLP) Process Handbook (OO/frame def.-inh) (fwd. SCLP) OWL (-DLP) Jena

  1. Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

  2. Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coto, Ernesto

    Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ecoto@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002, 1041-A ND

  3. Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coto, Ernesto

    Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ecoto@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002, 1041-A

  4. Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coto, Ernesto

    Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias Construcción de Algoritmos Ernesto Coto ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002

  5. ASERsumm.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    setting of SNLNM provides a diverse range of geological, hydrological, climatic, and ecological settings. Sandia National Laboratories 4 Burrowing Owl at SNLNM near TA-IV...

  6. adult mexican smokers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deveined, uncooked Directions 1. Heat oil Liskiewicz, Maciej 9 Mexican Spotted Owl Distribution and Habitat CiteSeer Summary: Because of significant threats to its habitat, the...

  7. Supplement to the Population Assessment of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................... 2 Figure 2. Comparison of the Linear Regression Model..................................................... 9 Figure 3. Comparison of the Linear Multiplicative Model Owls in the study and non-study area

  8. OIKOS 90: 343346. Copenhagen 2000 Survival of dispersing versus philopatric juvenile snowshoe hares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebs, Charles J.

    horned owls (Bubo 6irginianus). Hares were trapped on control areas (two 36-ha control grids and an off-grid

  9. LIST OF PUBLICATIONS G. W. Minshall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :55-58. (R. L. Newell and G. W. Minshall). 21. 1979 Bioenergetics of a stream "collector" organism. 1979 Bioenergetics of lotic filter-feeding insects Simulium spp. (Diptera) and Hydropsyche occidentalis

  10. Using C-OWL for the Alignment and Merging of Medical Ontologies H. Stuckenschmidt a, F. van Harmelen a L. Serafini b P. Bouquet b,c, F. Giunchiglia b,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Harmelen, Frank

    ://www.cs.vu.nl/ai/kr/) bITC-IRST, Trento (http://www.itc.it) cDIT University of Trento (http://www.dit.unitn.it) Abstract satisfiable. As a consequence statements are allowed to hold in one ontology but not in another one1

  11. Year in Review WE'RE ALL ABOUT STUDENTS!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    2012-2013 Year in Review WE'RE ALL ABOUT STUDENTS! #12;"What does it mean to be an Owl University · Division of Student Affairs · Year in Review 2012/2013 #12;Greetings, Owls! It is my privilege University · Division of Student Affairs · Year in Review 2012/2013 page 3 #12;page 4 Florida Atlantic

  12. A LEADERSHIP AMBASSADOR PROGRAM March 20, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    ELITE OWL A LEADERSHIP AMBASSADOR PROGRAM March 20, 2012 Dear Applicant: The FAU Elite OWL is a premiere ambassador leadership program designed to recognize exemplary student leaders at Florida Atlantic University. Only ten student leaders will be selected for this program based on their academics, leadership

  13. Species, Methods and Hwotheses of Findines." , atio ion,Years Sample ~ t s i e d Comments Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for this owl contained five delisting criteria that must be met to remove the owl from the list of threatened.1). The monitoring criterion speci- fied that delisting should occur only if the populations monitored were shown with a power of 90% and a Type I error rate of 5%. The specificity in this delisting criterion represented

  14. From BPEL Processes to YAWL Workflows Antonio Brogi and Razvan Popescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brogi, Antonio

    argue for the use of service contracts [4] consisting of (a) a (WSDL) signature, (b) an (OWL process inputs a set of service contracts to be aggregated and it outputs the contract of the aggregated

  15. Binding and Direct Electrochemistry of OmcA, an Outer-Membrane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expressed by these organisms are of interest in both microbial fuel cells and biofuel cells. We use optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) to show that OmcA, an...

  16. Comparing SNePS with Topbraid/Pellet SNeRG Technical Note 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Stuart C.

    Comparing SNePS with Topbraid/Pellet SNeRG Technical Note 42 Michael Kandefer and Stuart C. Shapiro Editing Tool (Top Quadrant Inc. 2007) using the Pellet OWL DL Reasoner (Clark & Parsia, LLC 2007

  17. in height, 40-50 inches in wingspan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and he'd rather not have to come back. He brushes sweat from his brow and refit his headlamp. Halfway moving again, listening. He calls out four hollow notes, imitating a Mexican spotted owl. The silence

  18. Pterocarpus officinalis Dominated Wetlands and Dependent Fauna 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledo Rodriguez, Frances

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Resident ? Icterus dominicensis Calandria Puerto Rican Oriole Common Resident ? Margarops fuscatus Zorzal Pardo Pearly - eyed Thrasher Common Resident ? ? Megascops nudipes Mucaro Comun / Mucarito Puerto Rican Screech-Owl Endemic...

  19. FEATURE ARTICLES The Condor 108:760769

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutiérrez, R.J.

    ) detected following exposure to Barred Owl calls. We inferred from the crossover experiment´ficos en a´reas donde S. varia era comu´n. Empleamos un disen~o experimental binario cruzado de 2 3 2 para

  20. 11/11/2005 Copyright 2005 by Benjamin Grosof. All Rights Reserved Extending the SweetDeal Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    default inheritance ontologies, as Courteous LP · Relationship to E-Business Messaging Standards Web Automated Knowledge Bases Rules (RuleML) Ontologies (OWL) Databases (SQL, XQuery, RDF) API, standards? ­ Rules in combination with ontologies; probabilistic, decision-/game-theoretic · Business

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposes to issue a License Outgrant to the Owl Creek Water District (OCWD) for their pipeline project on Western owned property in the Town of Thennopolis, Wyoming. The OCWD...

  2. 22 natural history November 2012 By Cheryl Lyn Dybas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Rodney J.

    are a slippery mulch. Briars tangle in my hair as I trip down a narrow, root-lined path. Somewhere of saw-whet owl hoots playing in covered plastic buckets beneath the mist nets. The repetitive tooting

  3. apoquindo central chile: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    examined the food habits of the Barn Owl (Tyro alba) in the mediterranean- climate areasof central Chile and southernSpain. In both Herrera, Carlos M. 3 Modeling of...

  4. Environmental Evaluation for Installation of Solar Arrays at San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this technical memorandum (TM) is to review the options to develop a potential solar array development (Project) within or adjacent to western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) habitat in the buffer lands that surround the San José/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and to determine if there is a ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) configuration that would enable a workable co-existence between the burrowing owl habitat and the PV arrays.

  5. OBML – Ontologies in Biomedicine and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    concept definitions and the reliability of inferences. Further manuscripts presented at the OBML workshop discussed the construction of an ontology for primary immuno-deficiencies [27], a cellular genealogical tree ontology [28], strategies for improving... : Strengths and limitations of formal ontologies in the biomedical domain. RECIIS Rev Electron Comun Inf Inov Saude 2009, 3(1):31-45. 13. Grau B, Horrocks I, Motik B, Parsia B, Patelschneider P, Sattler U: OWL 2: The next step for OWL. Web Semantics: Science...

  6. Environmental, genetic, and ecophysiological variation of western and Utah juniper and their hybrids: A model system for vegetation response to climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, R.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Resource Sciences; Tausch, R.J. [Forest Service, Reno, NV (United States). Rocky Mountain Research Station

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the following two research projects relating to the biological effects of climate change: Hybridization and genetic diversity populations of Utah (Juniperus osteosperma) and western (Juniperus occidentalis) juniper: Evidence from nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA; and Ecophysiological patterns of pinyon and juniper.

  7. Variation in phenology and monoterpene patterns of defoliated and nondefoliated douglas-fir ( pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca'). Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzika, R.M.; Engle, J.; Parks, C.; Wickman, B.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foliage was collected from paired Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) trees characterized as either resistant' or susceptible' to western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) attack. Resistant trees produced more foliage monoterpenes and broke bud 7 to 10 days earlier than susceptible trees.

  8. Ecosystem management aligns different uses of the land with ecological parameters and goals of environmental quality. An important USDA Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -aged timber harvest on old-growth forests and their associated wildlife, such as the California spotted owl" for special needs, will sustain all key resources (soil, water, vegetation, and wildlife) and functions, promoting forest health, allowing sustainable levels of commodity extraction, and supporting recreational

  9. Einsatz von Web Services im Semantic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    Einsatz von Web Services im Semantic Web am Beispiel der RACER Engine und OWL-QL Jan Galinski Aufbau der Arbeit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 Grundlagen 5 2.1 Semantic Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.1 Komponenten des Semantic Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.1.2 Repräsentation

  10. CANDEL: Product Line Based Dynamic Context Management for Pervasive Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaodong

    , it is essential for computing applications to be context-aware. However, one of the major challenges the context as a dynamic product line composed of context primitives (CPs). Frame based software product line techniques are used together with OWL ontology to define CPs and to dynamically generate the current context

  11. TREKiSM Issue 25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiona Feldman. (Trust me! She might seem strange at first but, compared to the rest of the family, she's apple pie normal --as long as she remembers to dream about bats, not owls.) Thus Star Fleet, in its infinite wisdom, assigned Feldman...

  12. Repairing Ontologies for Incomplete Reasoners Giorgos Stoilos, Bernardo Cuenca Grau, Boris Motik, and Ian Horrocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grau, Bernardo Cuenca

    of the art RDF management systems, such as Jena [8], OWLim [6], DLE-Jena [9], and Oracle's Semantic Store [17 in a preprocessing step. In fact, systems such as DLE-Jena [9], #12;PelletDB,1 TrOWL [12], Minerva [7], and DLDB [4

  13. Ontology Design and Development Framework Part I: Enhancing Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demurjian, Steven A.

    terminologies representing a semantic agreement between humans and knowledge systems. Numerous knowledge representational frameworks (e.g. KIF, DAML+OIL, OWL etc.), have been proposed in the research community, with limited adoption in the industry. One possible reason is a lack of a formal and rigorous model

  14. Differential Evolution -A simple and efficient adaptive scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    , Fax: 510-643-7684. E-mail: storn@icsi.berkeley.edu. On leave from Siemens AG, ZFE T SN 2, Otto- Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Muenchen, Germany. Fax: 01149-636-44577, E- mail:rainer.storn@zfe.siemens.de. 2)836 Owl function is designed to transform the optimization problem into a minimization task. To this end, we

  15. Effects of corticosterone pellets on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and corticosteroid-binding-globulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    Effects of corticosterone pellets on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and corticosteroid-degradable corticosterone pellets (implanted under the skin) in elevating plasma corticosterone levels. We monitored to handling in Eurasian kestrel Falco tinnunculus and barn owl Tyto alba nestlings. Corticosterone pellets

  16. Seasonal Variation in the Diet of the Barn Own in Northwestern Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... by season or year at a single location (Otteni et al. 1972, Smith et al. 1972, Marti 1973, 1988, Franzreb and Laudenslayer 1982, Gubanyi et ... Barn Owl diet in at least some western habitats (Jones 1949, Smith et al. 1972, Marti 1973, 1988, Gubanyi et al. 1992, Van Vuren et al. ...

  17. Animal Model and INLA Ingelin Steinsland & Anna Marie Holand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinsland, Ingelin

    for Norwegian House Sparrows Extended model, and study of Swiss Barn Owls. Approximative inference animal model with non-gaussian traits Study of Norwegian House Sparrows What next, opportuneties and (possible as in Quaas (1976) #12;Data, islands We have studied house sparrow populations on five islands off the coast

  18. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    on the World Wide Web 6 (2008) 133­136 Translating the Foundational Model of Anatomy into OWL Natalya F. Noy cases authors are permitted to post their version of the article (e.g. in Word or Tex form's personal copy Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Web Semantics: Science, Services and Agents

  19. Semantic Web 30Artificial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Harmelen, Frank

    312007.11 "" Semantic Web 30Artificial IntelligenceKnowledge Representation Inductive Web datasets ---- Tim Berners-Lee Tim Berners-Lee " "" " Web 2.0---- Web Web 2.0 Frank van Harmelen W3C OWL Web Sesame RDF Aduna 100 Hirsch 35 5 15 ECAI2002 3 ISWC

  20. Journal of Computing, Volume 2, Issue 6, June 2010, ISSN 2151-9617 HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ], and OWL [2] are modelling web languages that have already been developed to represent or express, much research has been conducted into creating a powerful Ontology modelling language. This research://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/ WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 166 The State of the Art: Ontology Web- Based Languages: XML Based Mohammad

  1. Trips in planning: January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    on the night sky in search of the elusive Aurora Borealis. Enjoy a wide variety of activities, visit unique island and examine the luminous amber that washes ashore, remnants of pine forests that covered the land of Arctic fox and snowy owl, and possibly even the Northern Lights brightening the sky. Optional pre

  2. Steffen Staab staab@uni-koblenz.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staab, Steffen

    kalifornischen Kleinstadt Bluewater soll es nach einem Bericht des örtlichen Senders vpk-tv zu einem? Bluewater is a City #12;Steffen Staab staab@uni-koblenz.de Semantic Days 11 WeST Two Types of Provenance permit 43 Bluewater is a City #12;Steffen Staab staab@uni-koblenz.de Semantic Days 12 WeST OWL REASONING

  3. 5/21/2004 Copyright 2004 by Benjamin Grosof. All Rights Reserved Remarks on Rules and Semantic Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Initiative ­ the leading emerging standards body in semantic web rules (http://www.ruleml.org) · Core standards (http://www.swsi.org) ­ Area Editor for Contracts & Negotiation, Language Committee ­ CoML) Ontologies (OWL) Databases (SQL, XQuery, RDF) API's on Web (WSDL, SOAP) #12;5/21/2004 Copyright 2004

  4. 11/26/2004 Copyright 2004 by Benjamin Grosof and Mike Dean. All Rights Reserved Slideset 1 of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Languages and Standards B. Tools -- SweetRules, Jena, cwm, and More (BREAK in middle) C. Applications Web Automated Knowledge Bases Rules (RuleML) Ontologies (OWL) Databases (SQL, XQuery, RDF) API. A. Core -- KR Languages and Standards 1. Intro 2. Overview of Logic Knowledge Representations

  5. 1093. Science case 3.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    1093. Science case 3.1 Introduction When the development of the OWL concept started in 1997, its size was set to the rather overwhelming 100-m diameter in order to be able to reach three main science of earth-like planets around other stars. These science cases were supported by qualitative

  6. PROTON: A Prolog Reasoner for Temporal ONtologies Nikos Papadakis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrakis, Euripides G.M.

    PROTON: A Prolog Reasoner for Temporal ONtologies in OWL Nikos Papadakis1 ,Kostas Stravoskoufos2, University of Crete, dp@csd.uoc.gr Abstract We present PROTON, a reasoner for managing temporal information. PROTON is implemented using this extension. Key words: Ramification problem; Temporal Ontologies

  7. Chemistry 106X -Fall 2010 General Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Chemistry 106X - Fall 2010 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 9 bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. by Kotz, Treichel, and Townsend-0-495-38703-9 Electronic Book - ISBN 978-0-495-68043-7 · OWL pin number for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1

  8. From Ontology to NL: Generation of Multilingual User-Oriented Environmental Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    related in particular to (i) environmental data (e.g., temperature, wind speed, birch pollen, CO2); (ii linguistically-oriented knowledge structures--as, e.g., the Upper Model [1] or the MIAKT ontology [2 as starting point for generation The three layers of our knowledge representation model are implemented in OWL

  9. UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA/VNC DC WRRC Report Number 20 Washington, D.C. 20008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    of Urban Runoff Models" which tests models for several storms on a number of urban water sheds both REPORT 1978 - 1979 D. C. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER #12;TABLE- OF, CONTENT INTRODUCTION FORMS OW-l A of the Office of Water Research and Technology, U.S Department of the Interior in compliance with Section 506

  10. MnM: A Tool for Automatic Support on Semantic Markup Maria Vargas-Vera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    current developments in web-based knowledge representation, such as DAML+OIL (ref- erence description of the DAML+OIL can be found at http://www.daml.org/2001/03/reference.html) and OWL the language proposed information and carrying out complex problem solving on the web is based on the assumption that these agents

  11. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  12. Predicting regeneration establishment with the prognosis model. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, D.E.; Carlson, C.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conifer establishment following regeneration timber harvests is predicted by version 2 of the Regeneration Establishment Model, a submodel of the Prognosis Model. The regeneration model covers 10 species for forests in Montana, central Idaho, and northern Idaho. Most harvest and site preparation methods can be simulated so that alternative treatments can be evaluated. Also included in the model is the influence of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on regeneration success. The model predicts the probability of stocking, seedling density, species composition, and seedling heights 2 to 20 years after harvest. The paper describes the study design, equation development, model formulation, and model behavior for the Regeneration Establishment Model.

  13. Population dynamics of the major north American needle-eating budworms. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes data from six western States provided 1,251 life tables representing western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis. These data provided projection capabilities for defoliation and successive budworm densities, as well as a basis for comparing survival rates among the three principal North American needle-eating budworms (western and eastern spruce budworms, and the jack pine budworm). Several modifications are suggested in current methods for managing budworm susceptible forests, and suggestions are provided for further studies on the budworm life systems.

  14. Variation in, inheritance of, and correlations between a number of growth and form traits in three sycamore populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebgen, Russell James

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comb1nation of these factors (Lee 1972). American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L . ) has si 1 v1 cal characteri st1cs -- rapid growth, abundant seeding, relative intolerance, ease of propagat1on and plant1ng -- which makes it an excellent choice...) . In the past, it has been rel at1 vely free of pests in natural stands although several fungal d1seases (which cause top d1e-back and lethal bole cankers) appear to be ser 1ous in plantations under intensive culture. Improvement of a species through select1...

  15. Differential Evolution A simple and efficient adaptive scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    , Fax: 510­643­7684. E­mail: storn@icsi.berkeley.edu. On leave from Siemens AG, ZFE T SN 2, Otto­ Hahn­Ring 6, D­81739 Muenchen, Germany. Fax: 01149­636­44577, E­ mail:rainer.storn@zfe.siemens.de. 2) 836 Owl function is designed to transform the optimization problem into a minimization task. To this end, we

  16. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  18. A metadata approach for clinical data management in translational genomics studies in breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papatheodorou, Irene; Crichton, Charles; Morris, Lorna; Maccallum, Peter; METABRIC Group, Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium; Davies, Jim; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, Wolfson Building, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QD, UK Email: Irene Papatheodorou* - ivp21@cam.ac.uk; Charles Crichton - Charles.Crichton@comlab.ox.ac.uk; Lorna Morris - ljm59@cam.ac.uk; Peter Maccallum - peter.maccallum@cancer.org.uk; METABRIC Group... Description Framework (RDF) [3,4] and the Web Ontology Language (OWL) [5] are still very much under development, they are already being applied widely in business, government, and scientific contexts [6]. Two Cancer Informatics projects, caBIG [7-10] and Can...

  19. Contingent valuation study of the value of reducing fire hazards to old-growth forests in the Pacific northwest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loomis, J.B.; Gonzalez-Caban, A.; Gregory, R.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contingent valuation methodology was applied to old-growth forests and critical habitat units for the Northern Spotted Owl in Oregon to esimate the economic value to the public in knowing that rare and unique ecosystems will be protected from fire for current and future generations. Generalizing to the whole state, the total annual willingness-to-pay of Oregon residents ranges from $49.6 to $99 million. In terms of old-growth forests protected from fire, the value is $28 per acre.

  20. Proposal for a quantity based data model in the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Thomas; Edward Shaya

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose the beginnings of a data model for the Virtual Observatory (VO) built up from simple ``quantity'' objects. In this paper we present how an object-oriented, domain (or namespace)-scoped simple quantity may be used to describe astronomical data. Our model is designed around the requirements that it be searchable and serve as a transport mechanism for all types of VO data and meta-data. In this paper we describe this model in terms of an OWL ontology and UML diagrams. An XML schema is available online.

  1. The use of the probability distribution function to analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Chau Qui

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    par t of his t ime and labor to assist in the welding of thermocoupl-. junctions to the copper disk. And to all of those directly connected and to many others who helped by givino words of suggestion, there will always remain a debt o.... DEDICATION. AC (QU OWL EDGI"IENT S. TABLE OF CONTENTS. L1ST OF TABLES. LIST OF F IGUR ES. vi vii 1x CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. CHAPTER II MECHANISMS OF NUCLEATE POOL BOILING. . . . . Bubble agitation model. Vapor-liquid exchange model. 3. M...

  2. Quantitative evaluation of bioturbation on the deep sea floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guinasso, Norman Louis

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Bowen (1973) reported measurements of plutonium in six cores taken in 1969 through 1971 in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterran- ean Sea. Measurable amounts of plutonium were found at depths of the order of 10 cm below the surface in five of these cores... between 1 and 10 cd kyr r by invoking the assumption that mixing is proportional to biomass. Plutonium distributions in deep sea sedi- ments (Noshkin and Bowcn, 1973) indicate abyssal mixing rates ranging from 100-400 cmP kyr r . AC KN OWLE DGEMEN TS...

  3. Owsley County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls Head, Maine:

  4. Owyhee County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls Head, Maine:Owyhee

  5. Oxbow, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls Head,

  6. Oxford County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls Head,County, Maine:

  7. Oxford Innovation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls Head,County,

  8. Oxford Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls Head,County,Solar

  9. Oxford, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,Owls

  10. Oxford, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,OwlsMichigan: Energy

  11. Oxford, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,OwlsMichigan:

  12. Oxford, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,OwlsMichigan:Ohio: Energy

  13. Oxford, United Kingdom: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,OwlsMichigan:Ohio:

  14. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,OwlsMichigan:Ohio:Drill

  15. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

  16. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University, Athens; Mark, David [University at Buffalo, NY; Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  17. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  18. Mercury and cause of death in great white herons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, M.G.; Sundlof, S.F. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Djork, R.D.; Powell, G.V.N. (National Audobon Research, Tavernier, FL (United States))

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury contamination is suspected to adversely affect wading birds in southern Florida. To determine the magnitude of contamination associated with cause of death we followed 3 adult and 19 juvenile radio-tagged great white herons (Ardea herodias occidentalis), recovered them soon after death, and determined liver mercury content and cause of death. Birds that died from acute causes had less (P < 0.001) mercury in their livers (geometric [bar x] [GM] = 1.77 ppm wet mass [wm], range 0.6-4.0 ppm, n = 9) than did those that died of chronic, often multiple, diseases (GM = 9.76 ppm, range 2.9-59.4 ppm, n = 13). Juvenile herons that migrated to mainland Florida accumulated more (P = 0.009) mercury in their livers than those that did not migrate. Kidney disease and gout were present in birds that died with >25 ppm wm liver mercury. Although detrimental to the health of wading birds, mercury contamination is presumably more detrimental to their reproductive efforts; therefore, an understanding of its ill effects is important in the management of these birds. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

  20. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

  1. Aster jessicae Jessica's aster Status: State Endangered, USFWS Species of Concern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank Gss; General Description Robust

    creeping rhizomes that tends to grow in large clumps. Plants grow to be 5 feet tall, but average about 3 feet. The herbage, particularly the upper portion, is covered with a dense, uniform, soft pubescence. Leaves are abundant, broadly lance-shaped and entire. Middle stem leaves generally partially clasp the stem and lower leaves tend to dry up and wither as the season progresses. Flowers are generally numerous, lavender in color, 1-1.5 inches in diameter, and form a broad cluster at the top of the plant. Identification Tips: A. jessicae is distinct in its unusually robust nature, dense pubescence, and cordate leaf bases. The only other aster found in the vicinity of Jessica’s aster is A. occidentalis var. intermedius. This species generally inhabits more mesic microhabitats, has smaller flowers, is less robust, possesses few to no hairs, and lacks cordate leaf bases. Phenology: Flowering occurs in late summer and early fall (from late July through mid September). Fruit and seed maturation occurs in September and early October, with seed dispersal likely in mid to late October. Range: Local endemic; southeastern WA (Whitman Co.) and adjacent ID. Occurs in the Columbia Basin physiographic province. Habitat: The species occurs in Palouse grasslands and prairie/ forest transition zones, often in association with small drainages, but above water level on dry ground, 2500-2800 feet in elevation. It occurs primarily in the following habitat types (Daubenmire 1970): ponderosa pine/snowberry, Idaho fescue/snowberry, black hawthorn/snowberry, Idaho fescue/Nootka rosa, and Douglas fir/ ninebark. Other associated species include bluebunch wheatgrass, balsamroot, and yarrow. ©1955 University of Washington Press. Illustration by John H. Rumely. Known distribution of

  2. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

  3. Report by the ESA-ESO Working Group on Extra-Solar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Perryman; O. Hainaut; D. Dravins; A. Leger; A. Quirrenbach; H. Rauer; F. Kerber; R. Fosbury; F. Bouchy; F. Favata; M. Fridlund; R. Gilmozzi; A. -M. Lagrange; T. Mazeh; D. Rouan; S. Udry; J. Wambsganss

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Various techniques are being used to search for extra-solar planetary signatures, including accurate measurement of radial velocity and positional (astrometric) displacements, gravitational microlensing, and photometric transits. Planned space experiments promise a considerable increase in the detections and statistical knowledge arising especially from transit and astrometric measurements over the years 2005-15, with some hundreds of terrestrial-type planets expected from transit measurements, and many thousands of Jupiter-mass planets expected from astrometric measurements. Beyond 2015, very ambitious space (Darwin/TPF) and ground (OWL) experiments are targeting direct detection of nearby Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone and the measurement of their spectral characteristics. Beyond these, `Life Finder' (aiming to produce confirmatory evidence of the presence of life) and `Earth Imager' (some massive interferometric array providing resolved images of a distant Earth) appear as distant visions. This report, to ESA and ESO, summarises the direction of exo-planet research that can be expected over the next 10 years or so, identifies the roles of the major facilities of the two organisations in the field, and concludes with some recommendations which may assist development of the field. The report has been compiled by the Working Group members and experts over the period June-December 2004.

  4. Biological assessment for the transfer of the DP land tract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, D.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer to the County of Los Alamos up to 10-ha (25-ac) of federal land located in Technical Area-21 to be developed for commercial uses. Previous studies for the proposed land transfer area indicate that potential habitat for four threatened, endangered, and sensitive species occurs in or adjacent to the proposed land transfer area. These include the northern goshawk (federal species of concern), Mexican spotted owl (federal threatened), the spotted bat (federal species of concern, state threatened), die peregrine falcon (federal endangered, state endangered), and the. In order to determine the possible influences of the land transfer on these organisms, information from species-specific surveys was collected. These surveys were used to confirm the presence of these species or to infer their absence in or near the project area. It was concluded that none of die above mentioned species occur in the project area. Stretches of the stream channel within Los Alamos Canyon have been identified as palustrine and riverine, temporarily flooded wetlands. The proposed land transfer should not affect these wetlands.

  5. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  6. An evidential path logic for multi-relational networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geldart, Joe [UNIV OF DURHAM

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-relational networks are used extensively to structure knowledge. Perhaps the most popular instance, due to the widespread adoption of the Semantic Web, is the Resource Description Framework (RDF). One of the primary purposes of a knowledge network is to reason; that is, to alter the topology of the network according to an algorithm that uses the existing topological structure as its input. There exist many such reasoning algorithms. With respect to the Semantic Web, the bivalent, axiomatic reasoners of the RDF Schema (RDFS) and the Web Ontology Language (OWL) are the most prevalent. However, nothing prevents other forms of reasoning from existing in the Semantic Web. This article presents a non-bivalent, non-axiomatic, evidential logic and reasoner that is an algebraic ring over a multi-relational network and two binary operations that can be composed to perform various forms of inference. Given its multi-relational grounding, it is possible to use the presented evidential framework as another method for structuring knowledge and reasoning in the Semantic Web. The benefits of this framework are that it works with arbitrary, partial, and contradictory knowledge while, at the same time, supporting a tractable approximate reasoning process.

  7. Metazoan Gene Families from Metazome

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Metazome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst metazoans. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of version 2.0.4, Metazome provides access to twenty-four sequenced and annotated metazoan genomes, clustered at nine evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, Ensembl, and JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. The included organisms (by common name) are: Human, Mouse, Rat, Dog, Opossum, Chicken, Frog, Stickleback, Medaka, Fugu pufferfish; Zebrafish, Seasquirt - savignyi, Seasquirt - intestinalis, Amphioxus, Sea Urchin, Fruitfly, Mosquite, Yellow Fever Mosquito, Silkworm, Red Flour Beetle, Worm, Briggsae Worm, Owl limpet (snail), and Sea anemone. [Copied from Metazome Overview at http://www.metazome.net/Metazome_info.php

  8. Systematic errors in the measurement of neutrino masses due to baryonic feedback processes: Prospects for stage IV lensing surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aravind Natarajan; Andrew R. Zentner; Nicholas Battaglia; Hy Trac

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the importance of baryonic feedback effects on the matter power spectrum on small scales, and the implications for the precise measurement of neutrino masses through gravitational weak lensing. Planned large galaxy surveys such as the Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid are expected to measure the sum of neutrino masses to extremely high precision, sufficient to detect non-zero neutrino masses even in the minimal mass normal hierarchy. We show that weak lensing of galaxies while being a very good probe of neutrino masses, is extremely sensitive to baryonic feedback processes. We use publicly available results from the Overwhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the effects of active galactic nuclei feedback, the nature of the stellar initial mass function, and gas cooling rates, on the measured weak lensing shear power spectrum. Using the Fisher matrix formalism and priors from CMB+BAO data, we show that when one does not account for feedback, the measured neutrino mass may be substantially larger or smaller than the true mass, depending on the dominant feedback mechanism, with the mass error |\\Delta m_nu| often exceeding the mass m_nu itself. We also consider gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and show that it is not sensitive to baryonic feedback on scales l < 2000, although CMB experiments that aim for sensitivities sigma(m_nu) < 0.02 eV will need to include baryonic effects in modeling the CMB lensing potential. A combination of CMB lensing and galaxy lensing can help break the degeneracy between neutrino masses and baryonic feedback processes. We conclude that future large galaxy lensing surveys such as LSST and Euclid can only measure neutrino masses accurately if the matter power spectrum can be measured to similar accuracy.

  9. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  10. Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

  11. SU-E-T-51: Bayesian Network Models for Radiotherapy Error Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalet, A; Phillips, M; Gennari, J [UniversityWashington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a probabilistic model of radiotherapy plans using Bayesian networks that will detect potential errors in radiation delivery. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with medical physicists and other domain experts were employed to generate a set of layered nodes and arcs forming a Bayesian Network (BN) which encapsulates relevant radiotherapy concepts and their associated interdependencies. Concepts in the final network were limited to those whose parameters are represented in the institutional database at a level significant enough to develop mathematical distributions. The concept-relation knowledge base was constructed using the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and translated into Hugin Expert Bayes Network files via the the RHugin package in the R statistical programming language. A subset of de-identified data derived from a Mosaiq relational database representing 1937 unique prescription cases was processed and pre-screened for errors and then used by the Hugin implementation of the Estimation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for machine learning all parameter distributions. Individual networks were generated for each of several commonly treated anatomic regions identified by ICD-9 neoplasm categories including lung, brain, lymphoma, and female breast. Results: The resulting Bayesian networks represent a large part of the probabilistic knowledge inherent in treatment planning. By populating the networks entirely with data captured from a clinical oncology information management system over the course of several years of normal practice, we were able to create accurate probability tables with no additional time spent by experts or clinicians. These probabilistic descriptions of the treatment planning allow one to check if a treatment plan is within the normal scope of practice, given some initial set of clinical evidence and thereby detect for potential outliers to be flagged for further investigation. Conclusion: The networks developed here support the use of probabilistic models into clinical chart checking for improved detection of potential errors in RT plans.

  12. High-resolution stratigraphic correlations and geochemical analyses, Cretaceous Niobrara formation, northwestern Denver-Julesburg Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, T.E.; Pratt, L.M.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The middle Santonian-lower Campanian part of the Smoky Hill Member of the Niobrara Formation represents a fourth-order regressive-transgressive cyclotherm. Studies of this interval have improved our understanding of the influence of depositional environments and structural setting on distributions of organic matter in epicontinental marine strata. Geochemical analyses of fresh quarried sections at Lyons and LaPorte, Colorado, show that, in general, C/sub org/ (organic carbon) levels are highest between mid-regression and mid-transgression. Rhythmic fluctuations of C/sub carb/ (carbonate carbon) and C/sub org/ correspond to limestone-marlstone bedding couplets at a scale of 15-20 cm (6-8 in.). Pronounced lateral variations between Lyons and LaPorte exist in C/sub org/, HI (pyrolytic hydrogen index), sediment accumulation rates, and T/sub max/ (temperature of maximum pyrolytic yield). Comparisons of geochemical averages at Lyons and LaPorte indicate an elevated thermal maturity at Lyons and depositional conditions more favorable for preservation of marine organic matter at LaPorte. In both sections, C/sub org/ and C/sub carb/ show strong negative correlations, possibly reflecting cyclic climatic controls on the development of bedding couplets. High-resolution stratigraphic correlations of 100.000-year or smaller intervals between Boulder and Owl Canyon, Colorado, based on wide-spread bentonites and bedding couplets, reveal a paleostructural high near Lyons. Shallow-water conditions and increased turbulence over this high are reflected in sediment accumulation rates only 60% of those at LaPorte. Increased amounts and hydrogen richness of organic matter at LaPorte may reflect a deeper water, more quiescent depositional setting.

  13. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  14. Design, status and first operations of the spallation neutron source polyphase resonant converter modulator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, W. A. (William A.); Apgar, S. E. (Sean E.); Baca, D. M. (David M.); Doss, James D.; Gonzales, J. (Jacqueline); Gribble, R. F. (Robert F.); Hardek, T. W. (Thomas W.); Lynch, M. T. (Michael T.); Rees, D. E. (Daniel E.); Tallerico, P. J. (Paul J.); Trujillo, P. B. (Pete B.); Anderson, D. E. (David E.); Heidenreich, D. A. (Dale A.); Hicks, J. D. (Jim D.); Leontiev, V. N.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a new 1.4 MW average power beam, 1 GeV accelerator being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator requires 15 converter-modulator stations each providing between 9 and 11 MW pulses with up to a 1 .I MW average power. The converter-modulator can be described as a resonant 20 kHz polyphase boost inverter. Each converter modulator derives its buss voltage from a standard substation cast-core transformer. Each substation is followed by an SCR pre-regulator to accommodate voltage changes from no load to full load, in addition to providing a soft-start function. Energy storage is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. These capacitors do not fail short, but clear any internal anomaly. Three 'H-Bridge' IGBT transistor networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are time-gated to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse width modulation of the individual 20 lcHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with DSP based adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes nanocrystalline alloy that provides low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Capacitors are used on the transformer secondary networks to resonate the leakage inductance. The transformers are wound for a specific leakage inductance, not turns ratio. This design technique generates multiple secondary volts per turn as compared to the primary. With the appropriate tuning conditions, switching losses are minimized. The resonant topology has the added benefit of being deQed in a klystron fault condition, with little energy deposited in the arc. This obviates the need of crowbars or other related networks. A review of these design parameters, operational performance, production status, and OWL installation and performance to date will be presented.