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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Landscape Patterns Around Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) Nest Sites in Oregon's Central Coast Ranges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owls appeared to be influenced by the amount of old- conifer forest around nest sites and the patch size of old-conifer stands where nests were located. Owl nest sites had more old-conifer forest than but apparently less than old-conifer forest. The remaining five cover-types were either used in proportion

2

Reproductive success of Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) in relation to common environmental noise ? biotic, non-military aircraft, and weather-related  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From 2000 to 2005 noise in Mexican spotted owl habitat in the Gila National Forest NM was monitored using an array of Larson-Davis (LD) sound level meters (SLMs). Thirty-nine SLMs were deployed across a 20 km x 24 km area collecting 2-s time interval data mid-April to July resulting in over 350 000 hr of data. Time-history profiles could be used to attribute many events to sources reliably when SNR exceeded the background by 5-10 dB. The events were categorized as biotic (insects and chorusing birds) thunder regional commercial jet aircraft and local air traffic (recreational and firefighting). Measured by the proportion of 2-s samples with LAeq > 60 dB biotic sources and thunder were the most important. Regional commercial jet traffic was the most significant anthropogenic source accounting for 2% of the total. Based on cumulative sound exposure thunder was the greatest contributor. Regression techniques were used to relate owl reproductive success to noise metrics by source. Biotic noise was the only significant correlate highly and positively related to owl reproductive success. The most reasonable interpretation was a strong relationship between biotic noise and owl prey base [Work supported by U.S. Air Force ACC/CEVP.

Ann E. Bowles; Samuel L. Denes; Chris Hobbs; Kenneth J. Plotkin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Barred Owl (Strix varia) Nest Site Characteristics in the Boreal Forest of Saskatchewan, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barred Owl (Strix varia) Nest Site Characteristics in the Boreal Forest of Saskatchewan, Canada active Barred Owl (Strix varia) nests in the boreal forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada. Eighty records exist. Our objective was to describe Barred Owl nests within the boreal forest of Saskatchewan

4

A Method for Locating Barr ed Owl ( Strix varia ) Nests in the Souther n Boreal For est of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Saskatchewan Shanna D. Frith, Kurt M. Mazur , and Paul C. James 1 Abstract.--Barr ed Owl (Strix varia) nests forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada. During the nesting period, we located pairs of Barr ed Owls eal forest of Saskatchewan, Canada, are the largest reported for this species to date (Mazur 1997

5

2nd Owl Symposium Great Gray Owl ( Strix nebulosa ) Breeding Habitat Use W ithin Alter ed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hole Mountain Range 40 km west of the valley. Wher eas most of the known Great Gray Owl nests habitat in montane for ests in the foothills of the moun- tains that surr ound T eton Valley. This rural of the Island Park cauldera appr oxi- mately 60-80 km north of T eton Valley, and in the foothills of the Big

6

Owls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owls Owls Nature Bulletin No. 267-A April 29, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OWLS The owls, of all our native birds, are least understood. Most kinds remain hidden, motionless and silent during the day and hunt only at night or in the dim twilight of morning and evening. Only a few, like our common Short-eared Owl and those big owls of the far north -- the Snowy Owl, the Great Gray Owl and the Hawk Owl -- habitually hunt in daytime. Because an owl' s feathers are peculiarly soft and fluffy, it flies as silently as a passing shadow, swoops upon its prey unheard, and its Indian name was "hush-wing". Since ancient times there have been many superstitions and legends about these birds. They have been regarded as the companions of sorcerers, witches, ghosts, hobgoblins and Satan himself. Their weird nocturnal hootings, gobblings and screams were and are believed to predict death, illness or disaster. Even today, in our southern states, the plaintive quavering cry of the Little Screech Owl -- which they call the "Shivering" Owl -- will cause some people to get out of bed and turn over their left shoe; others to throw a nail or other iron object into the fire. To the Greeks and Romans, the owl was a symbol of wisdom and was the companion of their goddess of wisdom.

7

Barred Owl Hooting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Barred Owl Hooting Barred Owl Hooting Name: ray Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: have barred owls ever been known to hoot during the daylight hours? Replies: I spent two years researching barred and horned owls when I was a graduate student and these owls are often found to call during daylight hours. I found both species fairly active at about 3pm and sometimes as late as 10am. The fledglings may be active anytime day and night. Parents are most vocal in the spring when trying to locate young and in the pre-nesting season during January-March. However, the barred owl is most active during the night and many times the calling is dependent upon the time of year [breeding season of November through April is more active for adults in particular]. Yearlings can make calls, noise anytime during the day.

8

Owl Feather War Bonnet  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Owl Feather War Bonnet and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

9

The Screech Owl  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Screech Owl Screech Owl Nature Bulletin No. 100 January 25, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE SCREECH OWL At the foot of a dead oak where we hoped to find some winter mushrooms beneath the grass and fallen leaves, we spied several pellets about the size and shape of the end of your thumb. They were clean and odorless, each containing the skull and bones of a mouse tightly wrapped in a layer of the animal's fur. Owls and hawks swallow their prey whole or in large pieces and later spit out the indigestible matter in the form of pellets. Up in this tree was a woodpecker hole from which the round unwinking yellow eyes of a screech owl glared at us. A screech owl, about the size of a robin but much chunkier, is our only small owl with ear tufts like "horns". They prey on mice, chipmunks and ground squirrels, fish, crayfish, amphibians, small snakes, angleworms, and large insects. When other food is scarce, and their fuzzy white young -- usually four in number -- require much food, they frequently kill birds but apparently not enough to seriously affect the bird population. No owl, of any species, should be killed.

10

Nesting Habits of Owls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nesting Habits of Owls Nesting Habits of Owls Nature Bulletin No. 624 January 14, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist NESTING HABITS OF OWLS From all of the information available it appears to us that, amongst the owls, there is greater variation in where and how they nest than in any other group of birds. Two nesting characteristics, however, are common to all owls. The eggs are nearly spherical and white, or off-white, without any markings. Also, a nesting female does not lay one egg per day, as most birds do, but at intervals of two or more days -- sometimes several. In extreme cases there may be a fresh egg, others incubating, and a newly hatched fledgling -- all in the same nest.

11

Owl Feather War Bonnet  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Owl Feather War Bonnet, LLC c/o DISGEN 200 Union Blvd, Suite 304 Lakewood CO 80228 Owl Feather War Bonnet, LLC c/o DISGEN 200 Union Blvd, Suite 304 Lakewood CO 80228 Owl Feather War Bonnet Project Description Owl Feather War Bonnet LLC (OFWB) proposes to develop, construct and operate a 30 MW wind facility to be located on Rosebud Sioux Tribal Trust Land on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. OFWB is solely owned by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen) in Colorado. The US Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is the lead Trust Authority for this project and both the Tribe and BIA have authorized the 35 year Rights of Use easement for a wind energy project. * An existing 115kV Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) transmission line crosses the project area along with an existing substation serving the local cooperative. The

12

OWLeS White Paper 7/30/09 Ontario Winter Lake-effect Systems (OWLeS) Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the morphology of mesoscale precipitation; and how does the interplay between dynamics and mixed-phase cloudOWLeS White Paper 7/30/09 Ontario Winter Lake-effect Systems (OWLeS) Project Science Overview dual- polarization hydrometeor type classification of lake-effect snowfall. The proposed experimental

Geerts, Bart

13

Igniting the OWL 1.1 Touch Paper: The OWL API  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Igniting the OWL 1.1 Touch Paper: The OWL API Matthew Horridge1 , Sean Bechhofer1 , and Olaf and implementation of an OWL 1.1 API, herein referred to as the OWL API . The API is designed to facilitate. The API is based on the OWL 1.1 specification and influenced by the experience of designing and using

Biundo, Susanne

14

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY NEW STUDENT & OWL FAMILY PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and implementation of the program. a. Multiple new programs were enhanced and added to make New Student OrientationEXECUTIVE SUMMARY NEW STUDENT & OWL FAMILY PROGRAMS 2012-2013 Overview The Office of New Student and Owl Family Programs plays an integral role within the University by offering a supportive, innovative

Fernandez, Eduardo

15

An OWL2 Land Use Ontology: LBCS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the “Land Based Classification Standards” (LBCS) OWL2 ontology used as a basic structure for the “City Information Modelling” (CIM) model developed within a larger research project ... Land u...

Nuno Montenegro; Jorge Gomes; Paulo Urbano…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

NEJC: "Engaging Non-Traditional Partners with Woodsy Owl’s Conservative Ethics: A Head Start Success Story"  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Description: This workshop will show how the Woodsy Owl’s partnership was established, what we have done to keep up the momentum, the challenges we have faced, and our vision for the future of this...

17

The logical diversity of explanations in OWL ontologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the high expressivity of the Web Ontology Language OWL 2, there is a potential for great diversity in the logical content of OWL ontologies. The fact that many naturally occurring entailments of such ontologies have multiple justifications indicates ... Keywords: bioinformatics, debugging, explanation, ontologies, owl, semantic web

Samantha Bail; Bijan Parsia; Ulrike Sattler

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A dendroecological reconstruction of western spruce budworm outbreaks (Choristoneura occidentalis) in the Front Range, Colorado, from 1720 to 1986  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radial increment cores from Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and blue spruce (Picea pungens), defoliated by western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis), were analyzed by means of dendrochronological me...

Urs M. Weber; Fritz H. Schweingruber

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

LONG-EARED OWLS NESTING IN BADLANDS NATIONAL PARK by Deborah D. Paulson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LONG-EARED OWLS NESTING IN BADLANDS NATIONAL PARK by Deborah D. Paulson and Carolyn Hull Sieg USDA Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Rapid City 57701 Long-eared Owls nest at high River, few nesting records have been reported. This paper reports the occurrence of Long-eared Owls

20

Using OWL Ontologies Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using OWL Ontologies for Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling Arnab Sinha and Paul Couderc INRIA for better recycling of materials. Our motive for using ontologies is for representing and rea- soning, recyclable materials, N-ary relations 1 Introduction Today Pervasive computing is gradually entering people

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

XBRL taxonomies and OWL ontologies for investment funds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XBRL taxonomies and OWL ontologies for investment funds Rub´en Lara1 , Iv´an Cantador2 and Pablo Madrid, Spain. {ivan.cantador,pablo.castells}@uam.es Abstract. The analysis of investment funds models. In this paper, we present our work on building explicit information models for investment funds

Cantador, Iván

22

ROO: Involving Domain Experts in Authoring OWL Ronald Denaux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Authoring, Controlled Natural Language Interfaces, Evaluation of Ontology Building Tools, Geographical process and improve the quality of the resultant ontologies. Recently, controlled language (CL) interfaces domain experts' definition of ontologies in OWL by allowing them to author the ontology in a controlled

Dimitrova, Vania

23

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.082303°, -69.0572612° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.082303,"lon":-69.0572612,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

FACTORS AFFECTING THE PRESENCE OF NESTING BURROWING OWLS IN AN AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-conveyance systems within an intensive agricultural area in Imperial Valley, southeastern California. We conducted for Burrowing Owls in the Imperial Valley of California. KEY WORDS: Burrowing Owl; Athene cunicularia; agriculture; California; Imperial Valley; nesting habitat; nest-site selection; Salton Sea. FACTORES QUE

Conway, Courtney J.

25

HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):251256, Fall 2009 Burrowing owl and other migratory bird  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), including the burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hazard, burrowing owl, Edwards Air Force Base, human­wildlife conflicts, Migratory Bird Treaty Act (Dolbeer 2006). Most are federally protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) of 1918, which

26

Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.3439,"lon":-114.4631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

Hall, Derek B. [NSTec; Greger, Paul D. [NSTec

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 2nd Quarter FY 1999  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 1999 June 1999 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For Second Quarter FY 1999 June 1, 1999; Issue No. 19 continued on page 6 NEPA and Habitat Management Plan: Environmental Synergy By: Elizabeth Withers, NEPA Compliance Officer, Los Alamos Area Office, with John Stetson, Pacific Western Technologies, Ltd. On the day DOE issued the Draft EIS for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), LANL biologists discovered a nesting pair of Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) – which had only recently been listed as threatened – in the canyons directly below the proposed site. Today, this nest site, at the edge

29

Observations of W intering Snowy Owls ( Nyctea scandiaca ) at Logan Airport, East Boston, Massachusetts fr om 1981-1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Airport, Boston, MA. 591 #12;2nd Owl Symposium under snow with the noise at Logan Airport. DataObservations of W intering Snowy Owls ( Nyctea scandiaca ) at Logan Airport, East Boston in East Boston, MA, latitude 42°22N and longitude 071°01W . The 13th busiest in the world, the airport

30

Much published information exists on food habits of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicu-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collected from the Imperial Valley of California, where little is known about the ecology and food habits of the Burrowing Owl (Coulombe 1971). Recent studies have sug- gested that the Imperial Valley is unique and poor repro- ductive performance in the Imperial Valley, we explored variation in diet and food

Rosenberg, Daniel K.

31

December 2004 509Notes TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF DDE IN BURROWING OWL EGGS FROM THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2004 509Notes TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF DDE IN BURROWING OWL EGGS FROM THE IMPERIAL VALLEY the Imperial Valley of California in 2002 to levels detected in eggs collected at the same site in 1996. Levels huevos del bu´ho machuelo excavador (Athene cunicularia) provenientes del Imperial Valley de California

Gervais, Jennifer

32

Breeding Dispersal and Nesting Behavior of Burrowing Owls Following Experimental Nest1 D. H. CATLIN1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breeding Dispersal and Nesting Behavior of Burrowing Owls Following Experimental Nest1 Predation2 3 97331, dan.rosenberg@oregonstate.edu7 ABSTRACT8 Nest predation is considered a primary factor affecting the hypothesis that nest predation would10 increase dispersal probability, dispersal distance and the frequency

Rosenberg, Daniel K.

33

Breeding Dispersal and Nesting Behavior of Burrowing Owls Following Experimental Nest Predation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breeding Dispersal and Nesting Behavior of Burrowing Owls Following Experimental Nest Predation D, Corvallis 97331 ABSTRACT.--Nest predation is considered a primary factor affecting the life-history characteristics and particularly dispersal of many avian species. We tested the hypothesis that nest predation

Rosenberg, Daniel K.

34

NEST OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-EARED OWL (Asio otus) IN BENTON COUNTY, OREGON, WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEST OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-EARED OWL (Asio otus) IN BENTON COUNTY, OREGON, WITH NOTES ON THEIR FOOD HABITS RICHARD T. REYNOLDS INTRODUCTION A nesting pair of long-earedowls was found 10 miles north, when the young left the nest. This is the third record of nesting Asio otus west of the Oregon Cascades

35

Distribution of the Chuckwalla, Western Burrowing Owl, and Six Bat Species on the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field Surveys were conducted in 1996 to determine the current distribution of several animal species of concern on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). They included the chuckwall (Sauromalus obesus), western burrowing owl (Speotyto cunicularia), and six species of bats. Nineteen chuckwallas and 118 scat locations were found during the chuckwalla field study. Eighteen western burrowing owls were found at 12 sighting locations during the 1996 field study. Of the eleven bat species of concern which might occur on the NTS, five, and possibly six, were captured during this survey. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, takes certain management actions to protect and conserve the chuckwalla, western burrowing owl, and bats on the NTS. These actions are described and include: (1) conducting surveys at sites of proposed land-disturbing activities (2) altering projects whenever possible to avoid or minimize impacts to these species (3) maintaining a geospatial database of known habitat for species of concern (4) sharing sighting and trap location data gathered on the NTS with other local land and resource managers, and (5) conducting periodic field surveys to monitor these species distribution and relative abundance on the NTS.

Cathy A. Willis

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Grand Observatories and multiple-OWL for high energy neutrino astrophysics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A possible “Space Factory” on the International Space Station (ISS) for “Grand Observatories” would permit a large astrophysical observatory in space. Grand-Observatories could revolutionize the great observatories that were hitherto pre-assembled and deployed by the Space Transportation System (STS). The concept of the ISS-Space-Factory envisages a plan of orbital construction fine-tuning and deployment of large-scale astrophysical instruments into the desired free-flying orbit. It incorporates physical aids of the robotics arms and Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) of astronauts. This concept study also examines the necessary infrastructure on ISS for manufacturing a large spaceship for future deployment to the Moon Mars and other interplanetary destinations. We envision a step-by-step advancement of the “Space Factory” with the most frontier astrophysical programs. Less demanding experiments could precede the construction of the most demanding optical telescopes. Multiple-OWL (Orbiting-array of Wide-angle Light collector) has very forgiving optical resolution (?0.1 degrees) and would be suitable for the first generation payload to be built on and deployed from the ISS. This system is an earth’s night-sky-watcher for observing the highest energy cosmic rays and other atmospheric phenomena and is currently in the SEU Explorer Concept. Using the Space Factory this collector can drastically advance its capacity to cover a 120° Field-of-View (FOV) in which the entire horizon of the earth (?6000 km diameter) can be viewed from a low-earth orbit (?1000 km). We have already developed a revolutionary wide-angle Fresnel-lens optic in the OWL program and the Multiple-OWL can use several units of them. As one of the Grand Observatories the proposed Multiple-OWL satellite can open a new window for observational universe in terms of high energy neutrino astrophysics. The OWL may also be used for monitoring earth-threatening meteorites if flipped on orbit at daytime for deep space observation.

Yoshiyuki Takahashi; John O. Dimmock; Lloyd W. Hillman; James B. Hadaway; David J. Lamb; Mamoru Mohri; Toshikazu Ebisuzaki

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ecotoxicological simulation modeling: effects of agricultural chemical exposure on wintering burrowing owls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, (2) chemical applications to crops, (3) chemical transfer and fate in the crop soil and prey items, and (4) chemical exposure in the burrowing owl. This model was used to evaluate (1) which components of the model most affect the endpoints, (2... Cotton/Sorghum/Onions crop scenario HD5 Hazardous Dose resulting in mortality of 5% of the population LD50 Lethal Dose resulting in mortality of 50% of the population LEL Lowest Effects Level vii LOEL Lowest Observed Effects Level NASS USDA...

Engelman, Catherine Allegra

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

Owl Broadcast Surveys in the Foothills Model Forest, Alberta, Canada D. Lisa Takats and Geoffrey L. Holroyd1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:59). During precipitation and strong wind, fewer owls called spontaneously or responded to the playback calls. ____________________________ To effectively manage wildlife, knowledge of distribution, relative abundance and, if pos- sible, density of the wildlife population is important (Mosher and Fuller 1996). In the past few decades raptors have become

39

Unravelling a biogeographical knot: origin of the ‘leapfrog’ distribution pattern of Australo–Papuan sooty owls (Strigiformes) and logrunners (Passeriformes)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wildlife Collection (ANWC). Specimen details (museum, sam- ple code, locality) are: T. t. arfaki (SAM, B22, Waro, Southern...The following internal sequencing primers were also used: NS2 and NS3a (Norman et al. 1998) for ND2 of sooty owls; amyND2int...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Owl play  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the next meal while mum and dad are away catching it. Very wise, says John Whitfield. Everyone knows that you should only thump your little sister when your parents ...

John Whitfield

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Spotted Owl Nesting in Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Samuel W. Gadd Journal:  Condor Volume:  44 Issue:  1 (January-February) Section:  From Field and Study Year:  1942 Pages:  35

42

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Proposed Issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 12-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has assigned a continuing role to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in carrying out NNSAs national security mission. To enable LANL to continue this enduring responsibility requires that NNSA maintain the capabilities and capacities required in support of its national mission assignments at LANL. To carry out its Congressionally assigned mission requirements, NNSA must maintain a safe and reliable infrastructure at LANL. Upgrades to the various utility services at LANL have been ongoing together with routine maintenance activities over the years. However, the replacement of a certain portion of natural gas service transmission pipeline is now necessary as this delivery system element has been operating well beyond its original design life for the past 20 to 30 years and components of the line are suffering from normal stresses, strains, and general failures. The Proposed Action is to grant an easement to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) to construct, operate, and maintain approximately 15,000 feet (4,500 meters) of 12-inch (in.) (30-centimeter [cm]) coated steel natural gas transmission mainline on NNSA-administered land within LANL along Los Alamos Canyon. The new gas line would begin at the existing valve setting located at the bottom of Los Alamos Canyon near the Los Alamos County water well pump house and adjacent to the existing 12-in. (30-cm) PNM gas transmission mainline. The new gas line (owned by PNM) would then cross the streambed and continue east in a new easement obtained by PNM from the NNSA, paralleling the existing electrical power line along the bottom of the canyon. The gas line would then turn northeast near State Road (SR) 4 and be connected to the existing 12-in. (30-cm) coated steel gas transmission mainline, located within the right-of-way (ROW) of SR 502. The Proposed Action would also involve crossing a streambed twice. PNM would bore under the streambed for pipe installation. PNM would also construct and maintain a service road along the pipeline easement. In addition, when construction is complete, the easement would be reseeded. Portions of the Proposed Action are located within potential roosting and nesting habitat for the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida), a Federally protected threatened species. Surveys over the last seven years have identified no owls within this area. The Proposed Action would be conducted according to the provisions of the LANL Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan. Effects would not be adverse to either individuals or potential critical habitat for protected species. Cultural resources within the vicinity of the proposed easement would be avoided with the exception of an historic trail. However, the original trail has been affected by previous activities and no longer has sufficient historical value to be eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Minimal undisturbed areas would be involved in the Proposed Action. Most of the proposed easement follows an established ROW for the existing electrical power line. There are several potentially contaminated areas within Los Alamos Canyon; however, these areas would be avoided, where possible, or, if avoidance isn't possible or practicable under the Proposed Action, the contaminated areas would be sampled and remediated in accordance with New Mexico Environment Department requirements before construction.

N /A

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - ants pogonomyrmex occidentalis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Animal Biology & Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 13 Tschinkel WR. 2004. The nest architecture of the...

44

An ETL process for OLAP using RDF/OWL ontologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an advanced method for on-demand construction of OLAP cubes for ROLAP systems. The method contains the steps from cube design to ETL but focuses on ETL. Actual data analysis can then be done using the tools and methods of the ... Keywords: ETL, OLAP, ontology

Marko Niinimäki; Tapio Niemi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Burrowing Owl Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The monitoring during 2012 focused on documenting the status of known burrows. Newly identified burrows were documented while examining historical locations, during ecological resource reviews, or discovered during other monitoring efforts. The timing of the monitoring effort allowed staff to perform the surveys without disrupting any breeding or hatching, while also allowing for easy discernment of adults from juveniles, which helped in determining burrow-use type.

Wilde, Justin W.; Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

PEREGRINES AND POWERFUL OWLS IN NAMADGI AND TIDBINBILLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive to environmental pollutants which drastically reduced their numbers elsewhere in the world is an indicator species that give us important information on environmental quality. Peregrines are highly was on a building and has since been abandoned, two were in quarries and four were in Namadgi (Olsen 1992, Olsen

Canberra, University of

47

Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK d Resource Management and Science Division, 1314 Cherokee Orchard Road, Great and 2001: Clingmans Dome, Cherokee Orchard Road and Purchase Knob. Cutleaf coneflower exhibited a greater adjacent to the Cherokee Orchard Road Loop. Ozone injury was greatest on the lower leaves for both species

Neufeld, Howard S.

48

Taqman real-time quantitative PCR for identification of western flower thrip (Frankliniella occidentalis) for plant quarantine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thrips. Annu. Rev. Entomol. 51, 67-89. (doi:10.1146/annurev.ento.51.110104.151044) Pappu, H. R. , R. A. Jones, and R. K. Jain 2009 Global status of tospovirus epidemics in diverse cropping systems: Successes achieved...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owl Predators Owl Predators Name: Mia Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: MN Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: What are the predators of a owl? Replies: Mia: Our largest adult owls have few predators. Smaller owls may be prey of other owls, long-eared owls are sometimes eaten by great horned owls, for example. Ground nesting owls, like short-eared owls, and especially nestlings, may be hunted by many predators, coyotes and other hawks and owls most likely. Nestlings of all birds, including owls may be hunted by other birds, raccoons, snakes and other animals that can climb trees. J. Elliott Hi Mia Predators of owls include: Opossums Racoons Hawks, Eagles and other raptors Other owls House cats Snakes that raid nests Accidents such as falling out of a nest, colliding with a tree, and electric power lines also contribute to owl mortality.

50

Ebola Virus in West Africa: Waiting for the Owl of Minerva  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The evolving Ebola epidemic in West Africa is unprecedented in its size and scope, requiring the rapid mobilization of resources. It is too early to determine all of the ethical challenges associated with the ...

Ross E. G. Upshur

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Wing Loading in 15 Species of North American Owls David H. Johnson 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Eastern Scr eech- ( Otus asio), Western Scr eech- ( O. kennicottii), Flammulated (O. flammeolus), Norther have r elatively large, rounded, and slotted wings. Savile (1957) characterized the Easter n Scr eech

52

Habitat associations of cavity-nesting owls in the Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for statistical analysis, with a detection probability of 0.25. I detected saw-whets in a wide range of conditions and it appeared that few factors influenced their distribution in the basin. Areas dominated by white fir, however, were correlated with the absence...

Groce, Julie Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Old Man Owl: Myth and Gambling Medicine in Klamath Basin Rock Art  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Klamath and Modoc visited the Upper Sprague River...1897:101; Ray 1963:198; Spier 1930...:146). When the hunting and gathering concluded in the late fall, the Klamath joined a gathering of various other groups

Robert J. David; Melissa L. Morgan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Structural Characteristics of Forest Stands Within Home Ranges of Mexican Spotted Owls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, J. Iniguez, S. Jojola, E. Kenney, D. Kitterman, J. Kitterman, W. Kunkle, H. Lineiro, K. Maddock, G. Stoddard, J.Todd, V. Ray, and especially A.J. Helgenberg. J.F. Cully, Jr., A.B. Franklin, M.H. Reiser,W, and W. Shepperd and J.K. Dwyer assisted with debugging the habitat data files. R.A. Wilson and B

55

Mexican Spotted Owl Home Range and Habitat Use in Pine-Oak Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Current address: Nongame Birds Program Manager, Arizona Game and Fish Department, 2222 W. Greenway Road. Cossette. For habitat sampling, we thank D. Brown, M. Gaud, B. Gill, M. Hemecke, E. Kenney, D. Kitterman, J. Kitterman, W. Kunkle, P. May, J. McNamara, M. Nelson, C. Newell, V. Pagliarinl. J. Protiva, and D. Ryan. J

56

Management and Conservation Article Habitat Use and Selection by California Spotted Owls in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years after fire. Three nests were located in mixed-conifer forests, 2 in areas of moderate decade (U.S. Forest Service [USFS] 2001, 2004, 2005). Sierran mixed-conifer forests are a particularly are positively associated with forest charac- teristics, including the amount of older conifer-dominated forest

DeSante, David F.

57

Intra-and Interspecific Calling in a T ropical Owl Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

county, Her edia province, Costa Rica (10°26'N 83°59'W). The station adjoins Braulio Carrillo National

58

Mitochondrial and nuclear assessment of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium Brasilianum) Phylogrography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 093Tabasco* 018Tabasco (n = 10), Tamaulipas (n = 4), Veracruz (n = 11), and Yucatan (n = 1), Mexico. Accession numbers for samples...

Proudfoot, Glenn Arthur

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fitze, P. S. (2012). Western Sand Racer Psammodromus occidentalis. En: Enciclopedia Virtual de los Vertebrados Espaoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales de los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

Alvarez, Nadir

60

Fitze, P. S. (2012). Lagartija occidental ibrica Psammodromus occidentalis. En: Enciclopedia Virtual de los Vertebrados Espaoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual de los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales-Jimena, San-José, San Mauro y Zardoya, 2012 Patrick S. Fitze Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC: Enciclopedia Virtual de los Vertebrados Españoles. Salvador, A., Marco, A. (Eds.). Museo Nacional de Ciencias

Alvarez, Nadir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effects of half-sib family selection on the root regeneration potential and initial landscape establishment of container-grown sycamore, Platanus occidentalis (L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and my life. Also for showing his knowledge by asking questions which lead me to the answers myself. I wish to thank Dr. William Lowe, Professor of Forestry, Texas ARM University, for providing the seeds &om the Texas Urban Tree Improvement Program... mother trees TFS-09 and TFS-24 and for providing the seed &om native Brszos County mother-trees, Brazos-C and Brazos-D, used in my research, as well as serving on my graduate committee. I would like to thank Dr. Randall J. Rousseau, research geneticist...

Shoemake, Larry J

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - abstract service results Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 2 OWL-S Ontology Framework Extension for Dynamic Web Service Composition Computer Science Department Summary: mapping in the future. Web...

63

OWL opto-mechanics, phase A. E. Brunetto, M. Dimmler, F.Koch, M Quattri (European Southern Observatory).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will perform and how much it will cost. The two diagrams below summarize the trend of these two key parameters maintenance and handling, localized air conditioning, thermal insulation, cable wraps and paint (50 tons). 0 STATUS The telescope design is based on existing technologies and materials. · Telescope trusses

Liske, Jochen

64

The flight of the barn owl Marion was crying because of the lightning. I went over and jiggled the cardboard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the forest, saved her...' but I broke off when I noticed how Marion clutched at the girl's dress, and made us and headed on out to the hills. There was a great commotion. Some men would have stormed

Johnson, Samuel

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult beech trees Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

resinosa Pine Pinaceae 6 White Pine Pinus strobus Pine Pinaceae Conifers - Trees with scale-like leaves... White Cedar Thuja occidentalis Cypress Cupressaceae Broad Leaf -...

66

56 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG by MIchEllE bOWlEs JacKsON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The iterative approach to waterfall can eliminate bottlenecks and deliver value quickly--if project managers, encouraging project managers to consider approaches beyond established techniques. The traditional waterfall member in the division of management at Oregon Health & Science University. "You learn a little, you plan

Chapman, Michael S.

67

New challenges for adaptive optics: the OWL 100m telescope N. Hubin, M. Le Louarn, M. Sarazin, A. Tokovinin, E. Viard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Tokovinin, E. Viard European Southern Observatory Karl Schwarzschild str., 2 D-85748 Garching bei M deformable mirrors it is realistic to obtain a FOV diameter of 30 00 {60 00 in the visible, or 3 0 {6 0 mirror of current ground based optical telescopes is between 8 and 10 m. Proposals have arisen

Liske, Jochen

68

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Long-eared Owl Status Long-eared Owl Status Name: Joll Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Is the long-eared owl endangered? I have mixed information. Replies: No, long-eared owls are not on the US endangered species list, either as endangered or threatened. The only owls on the list are both northern and Mexican spotted owls. The US list is on line at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html A species may be listed as endangered as a population within a state even if it is not on the US list. You could search for information for your state to see the status. If your location as noted below is California, long-eared owls are not endangered in California. J. Elliott Joll It's endangered. br> http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?q=326032

69

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ecoto@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002, 1041-A ND

Coto, Ernesto

70

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve ecoto@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002, 1041-A

Coto, Ernesto

71

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universidad Central de Venezuela Facultad de Ciencias Escuela de Computación Lecturas en Ciencias Construcción de Algoritmos Ernesto Coto ecoto@strix.ciens.ucv.ve Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Ciencias. Escuela de Computación. Laboratorio de Computación Gráfica (LCG) Venezuela. Caracas Apdo. 47002

Coto, Ernesto

72

Saw What? Saw Whet! | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Saw What? Saw Whet! Saw What? Saw Whet! Saw What? Saw Whet! January 8, 2013 - 2:52pm Addthis A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November. A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November. A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the

73

Saw What? Saw Whet! | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Saw What? Saw Whet! Saw What? Saw Whet! Saw What? Saw Whet! January 8, 2013 - 2:52pm Addthis A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November. A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November. A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the

74

Intervention of Phytohormone Pathways by Pathogen Effectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...achieved mechanistically. For example, Colorado potato beetle larvae (Leptinotarsa decemlineata...antagonizes the JA pathway, allowing enhanced Colorado potato beetle larval growth, although...virus (TSWV), which is vectored by western flower thrips (WFT) Frankliniella occidentalis...

Kemal Kazan; Rebecca Lyons

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

75

WESTERN GREAT PLAINS BIG RIVER FLOODPLAIN extent exaggerated for display  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WESTERN GREAT PLAINS BIG RIVER FLOODPLAIN G.Kittel extent exaggerated for display CAREX/GRAVEL SHORE SPARSELY VEGETATED ALLIANCE Riverine Gravel Flats Great Plains Sparse Vegetation POPULUS DELTOIDES Southern Plains Herbaceous Vegetation SYMPHORICARPOS OCCIDENTALIS TEMPORARILY FLOODED SHRUBLAND ALLIANCE

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - acacia auriculiformis seedlings Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

occidentalis L,, Liquidamhar styraciflua L., and Robinia pseudo-acacia L... acid rain (pH 5-6, 40, 30 and 2 0) were observed for seedlings of four deciduous tree species...

77

Nutrient element accumulation and distribution in an intensively cultured American sycamore plantation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) plantations were intensively cultured on floodplain and terrace sites near the Ohio River in western Kentucky. Biomass and nutrient uptake under various spacing and fe...

Bruce W. Wood; Robert F. Wittwer; Stanley B. Carpenter

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

HNF-56531  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Wildlife (WDFW) Candidate Species. Burrowing Owls are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act; this status provides protection to eggs, nests and birds. Conway and...

79

HNF-54294  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Wildlife Candidate Species. Burrowing owls are also protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). Conway et al. (2006) suggested that the reason for the population...

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - artemether-lumefantrine treatment policy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the limitations of OWL; however a full treatment of RNA structure requires first Source: Shapiro, Stuart C. - Department of Computer Science and Engineering, State University of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptation ocular Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

columns in the superfi- cial layers of V1 of owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus Source: Roe, Anna Wang - Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University Collection: Biology and...

82

T e c h n i c a l M e m o r a n d u m \\\\owl\\masterplan\\2\\6 Master Plan\\Land and Building Use.doc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baltimore, MD 21202 410/347-8500 Fax 410/347-8519 Architecture and Engineering Heery International 999 Engineering LRE Engineering 1475 Peachtree Street, Suite 220 Atlanta, GA 30309 404/888-8800 Fax 404 and services. In the course of the Plan development, five issues pertaining to land use have clearly

Arnold, Jonathan

83

ASSOCIATION OF SEX, FLEDGING DATE, AND SIBLING RELATIONSHIPS WITH POST-FLEDGING MOVEMENTS OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF BURROWING OWLS IN A NONMIGRATORY POPULATION IN THE IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA DANIEL H. CATLIN1 Department cunicularia) between June 2002 and April 2003, in a nonmigratory population in the Imperial Valley, California Owl; Athene cunicularia; California; Imperial Valley; natal dispersal; post-fledging move- ments

Rosenberg, Daniel K.

84

A non-monotonic expressiveness extension on the semantic web rule language  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SWRL (Semantic Web Rule Language) extends OWL syntax and semantics by enabling the description of Horn-like rules. However, the current SWRL specification lacks support for, among others, negative expressions, missing values and priority relationships ... Keywords: non-monotonicity, ontology web language (OWL), rule-based inference process, semantic web rule language (SWRL)

Jose M. Alcaraz Calero; Andres Munoz Ortega; Gregorio Martinez Perez; Juan A. Botia Blaya; Antonio F. Gomez Skarmeta

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ontological Configuration Management for Wireless Mesh Routers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the CIM model and OWL ontology language and implementing XSLT transformations from the originalOntological Configuration Management for Wireless Mesh Routers Iv´an D´iaz , Cristian Popi configuration format to CIM/OWL and back. We thus represent it in a higher level of abstraction, an on

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Anu Vedantham Director, Weigle Information Commons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to create a web-based exhibit of Cherokee storytelling based on indigenous Cherokee knowledge systems. She will interview Freeman Owle, a Cherokee elder in Cherokee, North Carolina, and will use video-editing and web

Sharp, Kim

87

Emphasis of spatial cues in the temporal fine structure during the rising segments of amplitude-modulated sounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...modulation cycle is crucial in complex listening environments: in realistic sound fields...the barn owl contributing to spatial listening in reverberant conditions...were recorded with a whole-head MEG device (Vectorview; Elekta Neuromag) consisting...

Mathias Dietz; Torsten Marquardt; Nelli H. Salminen; David McAlpine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Translation of Common Information Model to Web Ontology Language  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a brief overview of the work on translation of Common Information Model (CIM) to Web Ontology Language (OWL) standard. The main motivation ... also comparison of existing approaches to convers...

Marta Majewska; Bartosz Kryza; Jacek Kitowski

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A Flexible API and Editor for SKOS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a programmatic interface (SKOS API) and editor for working with the Simple Knowledge Organisation System SKOS. The SKOS API has been designed to work with SKOS ... Protege 4 framework using the OWL and...

Simon Jupp; Sean Bechhofer; Robert Stevens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

502 SHORT COMMUNICATIONS (Speotyto cuniculuria) to a moving object when the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the window. A red, 7-watt incandescent bulb inside the box provided illumina- tion for viewing the owl conditions were provided by one and four `I-watt incandescent bulbs, respectively. The single bulb

Minnesota, University of

91

E-Print Network 3.0 - approximation ii pygmy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Journal of the Linnean Society, 2007, 90, 467477 467 Summary: in a given area. An analysis of the pygmy-owls of the genus Glaucidium indicates that spe- cies displaying......

92

An e-government knowledge model: 'e-customs' case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In e-government domain, an efficient semantic interoperability of services is a big challenge. Thus, for modelling semantically the public services, we have adopted semantic web services (SWS) technology. However, this technology allows only semantic description of services without giving a cognitive semantic representation of them. It allows modelling the relationships between services with their different situations through conceptual structures (CSs). In this paper, we develop an approach for modelling efficiently the public services based on SWS and CSs technologies. For this purpose, we extend OWL-S ontology with an e-government knowledge represented through a set of ontologies. Besides OWL-S ontology, we use the conceptual graphs theory as implemented in AminePlatform for structuring and organising the cognitive knowledge about services. Thus, for our application domain, that is, 'e-customs', we extend this platform to support simultaneous use of multiple domain-specific ontologies. Our approach enables as well enhancing service discovery and composition.

Hind Lamharhar; Adil Kabbaj; Dalila Chiadmi; Laila Benhlima

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Environmental Evaluation for Installation of Solar Arrays at San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this technical memorandum (TM) is to review the options to develop a potential solar array development (Project) within or adjacent to western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) habitat in the buffer lands that surround the San José/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and to determine if there is a ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) configuration that would enable a workable co-existence between the burrowing owl habitat and the PV arrays.

94

Frequent Cross-Species Transmission of Parvoviruses among Diverse Carnivore Hosts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...09 CPV-like Canis lupus occidentalis Camas Idaho 2009 JX475243 CPV-2b/Puma/CO...here were all collected from wild hosts in North America, and CPV antibodies in dogs were present in dogs in Europe (but not in North America, Australia, or Japan) up to...

Andrew B. Allison; Dennis J. Kohler; Karen A. Fox; Justin D. Brown; Richard W. Gerhold; Valerie I. Shearn-Bochsler; Edward J. Dubovi; Colin R. Parrish; Edward C. Holmes

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

The development of resistance to organophosphorus compounds by Tetranychus (T.) urticae Koch and laboratory and field toxicological responses of Tetranychus (T.) Cinnabarinus (Boisduval) to some current acaricides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the name T. cinnabarinusg the green one as T. ~~'~~riu . He also divided T. bimaculatus into T. bimaculatus bimaculatus Harvey and T. bimaculatus occidentalis Dillon. He stated that T. multisetis McG. f T. mar landicus Dillon, T. australis...

Contreras Galvez, Saul Edgardo

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to issue a License Outgrant to the Owl Creek Water District (OCWD) for their pipeline project on Western owned property in the Town of Thennopolis, Wyoming. The OCWD is constructing an 8-mile potable water pipeline, a small portion of which crosses land owned by Western. The work on Western's property is along an existing road on the edge of Western's Thermopolis Service Station and Substation within the town limits. The License Outgrant would give the OCWD permission to construct a segment of the 8-inch diameter waterline, buried 10 feet deep, on Western's prope1iy

97

A Flexible API and Editor for SKOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This poster presents a programmatic interface (SKOS API) and plugin for Protégé 4 for editing and working with the Simple Knowledge Organisation System (SKOS). The SKOS API has been designed to work with SKOS models at a high level of abstraction to aid developers of applications that use SKOS. We discuss SKOSEd, a tool for authoring and editing SKOS artefacts. A key aspect to the design of the API and editor is how SKOS relates to OWL and what existing OWL infrastructure can be exploited to work with SKOS. 1.

unknown authors

98

Supplement 23, Part 4, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Nematoda and Acanthocephala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., G., 1966, Bull. Mus. National Hist. Nat., 2. s., v. 38 (5), 683-686 Mabuia comorensis (estomac): Mozambique, Afrique Abbreviata occidentalis, sp. nov., illus. Jones, ?. I., 1978, Austral. J. Zool., v. 26 (4), 789-807 key Pseudechis australis... Slovenia, Yugoslavia Acuaria skrjabini Ozerska, 1926 Mason, P. C.; Hodgkinson, N. L.; and McAllum, H. J. F., 1978, N. Zealand Vet. J., v. 26 (5), 131-132 mebendazole Uraeginthus bengalus (gizzard, beneath horny lining of gizzard, intestine): aviary...

Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Annual variation in seedfall, postdispersal predation, and recruitment of a neotropical tree  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the dynamics of seed production and seedling recruitment of individual tree species is crucial for a complete understanding of tropical forest dynamics, yet multiyear studies on the seed and young seedling stages of tropical trees are virtually nonexistent. In a 4-yr study of the understory tree Faramea occidentalis on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, the author quantified natural levels of viable seedfall, seedling emergence, and seedling establishment, and experimentally estimated postdispersal seed predation. The levels of viable seedfall, seed predation, seedling emergence, early seedling survival, and seedling recruitment all differed significantly among years. The proportion of fallen seeds destroyed by predators before germination was not related to the quantity of F. occidentalis seedfall. Within a year, however, F. occidentalis seed predation appeared to be influenced by community-wide seedfall, with high predation rates during times of low seed abundance and very low predation during the late dry season peak in seedfall by the community. Most of the annual variation in recruitment can be explained by the combination of seedfall and seed predation; in 3 of the 4 yr seedling emergence could be predicted from a knowledge of viable seedfall and the probability of a seed surviving until the peak of germination. The 4th yr, however, demonstrated that environmental conditions provide a sporadic, though important, limitation to recruitment. In comparison to many tree species, early seedling survival was relatively high, as was the ratio of seedlings recruited per seed falling. The highly successful recruitment of F. occidentalis is associated with a high population density of both saplings and adults in the study area.

Schupp, E.W. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

CORRELATION OF THE TRIASSIC FORMATIONS OF NORTH AMERICA EXCLUSIVE OF CANADA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contain a larger proportion of car- bonate rocks and are presumably...assigned to the China Mountain and Panther Canyon formations. Accompanying...77 Owl Rock 28, 29, 30, 38 Panther Canyon 21 Pekin 75 Perkasie...S., 1876,Description of Car- boniferous and Triassic fossils...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An ontology approach to support FMEA studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) is a method to analyze potential reliability problems in the development cycle of the project, making it easier to take actions to overcome such issues, thus enhancing the reliability through design. FMEA is ... Keywords: FMEA, OWL, Protégé, RDF, XML

V. Ebrahimipour; K. Rezaie; S. Shokravi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hitzler & Vrandecic PPSWR05 Dagstuhl, Germany September 2005 AIFBKnowledgeWeb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hitzler & Vrandecic PPSWR05 Dagstuhl, Germany September 2005 Slide 1 AIFBKnowledgeWeb Faster OWL Using Split Programs Pascal Hitzler Denny Vrandecic AIFB, University of Karlsruhe, Germany SCREECH #12;Hitzler & Vrandecic PPSWR05 Dagstuhl, Germany September 2005 Slide 2 AIFBKnowledgeWeb Problem

Hitzler, Pascal

103

AKTiveSA: A Technical Demonstrator System For Enhanced Situation Awareness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......which a force is operating. Institutional...large numbers of personnel, equipment, logistics...introduces a potential training overhead for the...language, and the selection of OWL properties...that influence the selection of relevant information...regularities in a training corpus in order......

Paul R. Smart; Alistair Russell; Nigel R. Shadbolt; m. c. schraefel; Leslie A. Carr

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

CellML metadata standards, associated tools and repositories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...abstracts/G19.pdf ) by extending...as physical processes, and variables...OWL. 4. Simulation metadata The...of CellML simulation software...files and run simulations ( www.cellml...Fortran, Matlab, etc...systems. In Chemical biophysics...of cellular processes, pp. 128-161...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

96 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 15, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Adaptation of Orienting Behavior: From  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

96 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 15, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Adaptation of Orienting Behavior: From the Barn Owl to a Robotic System Michele Rucci, Member, IEEE, Gerald M. Edelman, and Jonathan Wray Abstract-- Autonomous robotic systems need to adjust their sensorimotor coordinations so

Rucci, Michele

106

Surfacing scientific and financial data with the Xcel2RDF plug-in  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the astounding amount of data stored in spreadsheets and relational databases, a critical requirement for the evolution of the Semantic Web (SW) is the ability to convert data to SW compatible formats, such as RDF and OWL. The process by which ... Keywords: Excel, RDF, linked open data, spreadsheet

Marcia Lucas Pesce, Karin K. Breitman, Marco Antonio Casanova

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ontology-Based Network Management: Study Cases and Lessons Learned  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ontology based network management has recently evolved from a theoretical proposal to a more mature technology. As such, it is now being applied in many research projects in a number of different network management and security scenarios. This application ... Keywords: Autonomic management, Lessons learned, Network monitoring, Network security, OWL, Ontology-based network management, SWRL, Study case

Jorge E. López De Vergara; Antonio Guerrero; Víctor A. Villagrá; Julio Berrocal

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Rule modeling and markup  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we address several issues of rule modeling on the basis of UML. We discuss the relationship between UML class models and OWL vocabularies. We show how certain rules can be specified in a class diagram with the help of OCL. We also show ...

Gerd Wagner

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Constructing a Global Ontology by Concept Mapping Using Wikipedia Thesaurus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the importance of semantics on the WWW is widely recognized and a lot of semantic information (RDF, OWL etc.) is being built/published on the WWW. However, the lack of ontology mappings becomes a serious problem for the Semantic Web since it ... Keywords: ontology construction, ontology mapping, Wikipeida

Minghua Pei; Kotaro Nakayama; Takahiro Hara; Shojiro Nishio

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

An API for ontology alignment Jrme Euzenat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 An API for ontology alignment Jérôme Euzenat INRIA Rhône-Alpes, Montbonnot, France, Jerome an implementation of this format as an Alignment API, which can be seen as an extension of the OWL API and shares some design goals with it. We show how this API can be used for effectively aligning ontologies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

111

Chemistry 106X -Fall 2010 General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 106X - Fall 2010 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 9 bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. by Kotz, Treichel, and Townsend-0-495-38703-9 Electronic Book - ISBN 978-0-495-68043-7 · OWL pin number for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1

Wagner, Diane

112

Contributed Paper Potential Effects of the United States-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Church, Suite 4292, Tucson, AZ 85701, U.S.A. §U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, 1611 North Second Avenue, Ajo, AZ 85321, U.S.A. Abstract: Security infrastructure along behaviors of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owls (Glaucidium brasilianum), and satellite telemetry, gene-flow estimates

Montana, University of

113

The subtlety of simple eyes: the tuning of visual fields to perceptual challenges in birds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stereopsis with which binocular vision in birds does not appear to be associated. Thus, in...binocularity would seem to lie in what each eye does independently (i.e. diplopically...Family Caprimulgidae (nightjars). In Handbook of the birds of the world, vol. 5. Barn-owls...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Semen collection, evaluation and freezing in the captive Canadian timber wolf (Canis lupus canadensis)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Alfred Robb, and Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Beebe of the Olympic Game Farm. The author is also grateful to Drs. John P. Smith, Norman C. Ronald, and Ms. Leona Dowling of the Department of parasitology for ass1stance 1n solving parasite problems of the wolf.... Analysis of semen collected from two three year old wolves (Canis ~lu us occidentalis) in 1973. (Seager et. al. , 1975) MATERIALS AND METHODS One hand raised 4 year old male timber wolf (Canis ~lu us) was acquired from the Olympic Game Farm, Sequim...

Mitsuzuka, Munehiro

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Wind Development on the Rosebud  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rosebud Sioux Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation Wind Development on the Rosebud Akicita Cikala 750 Kw turbine Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm, 30Mw North Antelope Highlands Wind Farm, 190Mw Met towers installed in 2003 Met tower installed in 2001 Met tower installed in 1999 Met towers installed in 2009 Akicita Cikala Turbine Neg Micon 750kw Commissioned March 2003 Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm 2003 Dept. of Energy Grant DOE Funding $448,551.00 DISGEN Cost share/in-kind $78,750.00 RST/TUC Cost share/in-kind $27,272.00 Participants in Development RST Resource Development Office, Ken Haukaas, Coordinator RST Tribal Utilities Commission, Tony Rogers, Director RST Natural Resource Office, Stephanie Middlebrooks, Wildlife Biologist Distribute Generation Inc., Dale Osborn, President, Belvin Pete, Project

116

Cataloguer makeover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framework (RDF) standard for data encoding ? Web Ontology Language (OWL) Available tools: Relational data – RDF data SQL query language ? relational data SPARQL query language ? RDF data “SQL does this by accessing tables in relational databases... Examples: Local ontology ? Person unique identifiers ? Organization unique identifiers Examples – person file Examples: Karma – person file modeling Examples: Karma – N-Triples Person file Examples – positions file Examples: Karma – position file...

Ilik, Violeta

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

Next Generation Models for Storage and Representation of Microbial Biological Annotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background Traditional genome annotation systems were developed in a very different computing era, one where the World Wide Web was just emerging. Consequently, these systems are built as centralized black boxes focused on generating high quality annotation submissions to GenBank/EMBL supported by expert manual curation. The exponential growth of sequence data drives a growing need for increasingly higher quality and automatically generated annotation. Typical annotation pipelines utilize traditional database technologies, clustered computing resources, Perl, C, and UNIX file systems to process raw sequence data, identify genes, and predict and categorize gene function. These technologies tightly couple the annotation software system to hardware and third party software (e.g. relational database systems and schemas). This makes annotation systems hard to reproduce, inflexible to modification over time, difficult to assess, difficult to partition across multiple geographic sites, and difficult to understand for those who are not domain experts. These systems are not readily open to scrutiny and therefore not scientifically tractable. The advent of Semantic Web standards such as Resource Description Framework (RDF) and OWL Web Ontology Language (OWL) enables us to construct systems that address these challenges in a new comprehensive way. Results Here, we develop a framework for linking traditional data to OWL-based ontologies in genome annotation. We show how data standards can decouple hardware and third party software tools from annotation pipelines, thereby making annotation pipelines easier to reproduce and assess. An illustrative example shows how TURTLE (Terse RDF Triple Language) can be used as a human readable, but also semantically-aware, equivalent to GenBank/EMBL files. Conclusions The power of this approach lies in its ability to assemble annotation data from multiple databases across multiple locations into a representation that is understandable to researchers. In this way, all researchers, experimental and computational, will more easily understand the informatics processes constructing genome annotation and ultimately be able to help improve the systems that produce them.

Quest, Daniel J [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Schwanniomyces: a potential superyeast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1977, when our quest to determine the industrial potential of the genus Schwanniomyces began, little was known about this microbe. The genus was first described by Kloecker in 1909, after the isolation in the Antilles of Schwanniomyces occidentalis. A number of biological descriptions (see Ferreira and Phaff) and other species were also described. In addition, it was known that close to 100 yeasts were able to assimilate at least part of the starch molecule. Then, Augustin et al. and Costamagna et al. reported the ability of Schwanniomyces spp. to produce extracellular alpha-amylase and utilize starch. Later discoveries would indicate that both alpha-amylase and glucoamylase were present, and from then on, research with the yeast Schwanniomyces would become very competitive - especially in Canada and Europe. (Refs. 53).

Ingledew, W.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Studies on the product formed by the interaction of benzilic and formic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s ry' ", ~ay 19y5 AC F. 'OWL ED 0~' T The author wishes tc express his ~npreciet1cr tc Dr. Robert D ~ Thc, :zpson for his g xi1=nce . 0 cr1t1ct sos during this work. Appreciaticn is also exte~ded tc &r. DE P. Van Tuyl for his assistance cr the ir... the amount of liberated carbon dioxide gas. Almost all of the results reported for the Kovache reaction have been reductions of the triaryl-type of carbinols ~ In stud; . . . th . ;vache, reacti. n, ~ t ~ a. de- sired to learn whether or not the reduction...

Cox, Thomas Elvan

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Transit accessibility as a determinant of automobile ownership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRAN IT ACCESSIBILITY AS A DETER'AINANT OF AUTOMOBILE CNKEESHIP A Thesis by Robert Tc~'nsend Dunphy Submi'ted to th= Graduate College of Texas A&M Oniversity in partial fulfillment cf the reguirement for rhe degree o. . HASTEN OF SCIENCE... point in time, thon ii. may be ?s-ibis to c;ange thc numlser of automobiles owned in a region by i', a! =' g major changes in transit accessibility. ACKN OWL EDGE 1'ZEN TS I am deeply indebted to the Metropolitan washington Council of Governments...

Dunphy, Robert Townsend

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wanna Share Issue 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

motel (deja vu, anybody?). It is late. A car drives up, two guests alight and make for the front door. Clouds obscure the ghostly moon. An owl's menacing hoot breaks the oppressive silence. Cliche is piled upon cliche'. will evil triumph? Can.... "Thanks." He hesitated, then began: "I had this one a while ago. Veird, but I still remember it. It was "^J??*? *W? under your car for two days. Vhen I found you, alive..." He swallowed. I felt like I'd been reprieved from hell or somethin'." "I know...

Multiple Contributors

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The vertebrate taxonomy ontology: a framework for reasoning across model organism and species phenotypes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL SEMANTICS Midford et al. Journal of Biomedical Semantics 2013, 4:34 http://www.jbiomedsem.com/content/4/1/34nyms, and identifiers from different and often conflictingof Sciences, San Francisco, California, USA Full list of author... is distributed among several different resources. We combined information from multiple sources to build the Vertebrate Taxonomy Ontology (VTO; http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/vto.owl). As of October 2013, the VTO contained 106,947 terms annotated with 104...

Midford, Peter E.; Dececchi, Thomas Alex; Balhoff, James P.; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Ibrahim, Nizar; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G.; Mabee, Paula M.; Sereno, Paul C.; Westerfield, Monte; Vision, Todd J.; Blackburn, David C.

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

123

Model for suturing of Superior and Churchill plates: An example of double indentation tectonics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resu l t ing in d e v e l o p m e n t of s inis t ra l m o t i o n a l o n g t he K a p...thea s t e r l y d i rec t ion a n d s inis t ra l shea r s t r e n d i n g in a no...a s t - t r e n d i n g 5 lines a r e s inis t ral (e.g., the Owl River fau l t...

124

Quantitative evaluation of bioturbation on the deep sea floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between 1 and 10 cd kyr r by invoking the assumption that mixing is proportional to biomass. Plutonium distributions in deep sea sedi- ments (Noshkin and Bowcn, 1973) indicate abyssal mixing rates ranging from 100-400 cmP kyr r . AC KN OWLE DGEMEN TS... vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE l. Microtektite Distributions. Estimation of Mixing Rates by Dimensional Analysis of Sediment Working Rates 30 Mixing Rates inferred from the plutonium data of Noshkin and Bowen (1973). 33 4. Mixing Parameters from...

Guinasso, Norman Louis

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Proposal for a quantity based data model in the Virtual Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose the beginnings of a data model for the Virtual Observatory (VO) built up from simple ``quantity'' objects. In this paper we present how an object-oriented, domain (or namespace)-scoped simple quantity may be used to describe astronomical data. Our model is designed around the requirements that it be searchable and serve as a transport mechanism for all types of VO data and meta-data. In this paper we describe this model in terms of an OWL ontology and UML diagrams. An XML schema is available online.

Brian Thomas; Edward Shaya

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

Field Notebook and Specimen Catalog, Numbers 1101-1707 [2468] (1935-1936)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? 1102? Pine Canyon, W base Mt. Diaolo, C?ontra Costa Co., Caj.if. Jan, 13, Corynorhynus 92-45-10-31 Tr. 11 ?oil. By H. " 101-48-10-32 Tr. 11 " M W Twiningf! LIBRARY BINDING COMPANY P.O. BOX 7217 WACO, TEXAS 76710 Name o f L ibrary ?W* Fred....B. Davis l935 Pine Canyon, W base Mt. Diaoio, Contra Costa Co*, Caiif. Jan, 13, 1101? Cbrynorhynus 92-45-10-31 Tr. 11 ?oil. By H. Twining 1102? " 101-48-10-32 Tr. 11 " M " " Stool, Aiameda Co., Caiif. Jan. 30. 1103?acu Screech Owl. (C6?21? by Joy...

Davis, William B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

127

Flying Squirrels and Houses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flying Squirrels and Houses Flying Squirrels and Houses Name: Kathy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do you get rid of flying squirrels in the attic of a Cape style home that has limited access to the attic? There is blown in insulation so we cannot see to the end of the house where we hear them, nor can a person crawl in to see anything. We have used d-con bars, mouse traps and have-a-heart traps in the crawl spaces we can reach, but have caught nothing. Replies: Place a statue of an owl near the entrance the squirrels are using. Owls are their motal enemies and this technique works for birds as well. Steve Sample You will not be able to solve this problem until you find the way they go in and out. Usually the easiest way is to look for light coming in from outside while in the dark attic, but if you can't see it that way do a thorough search of the outside. A flying squirrel does not need a very big hole, maybe 2" or less diameter. They go out at night so once you find the hole close it up at night while they are out. Good luck.

128

Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 11, 2013 April 11, 2013 C-SR-10 Uintah Mine, Colorado, LM Uranium Lease Tracts Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is seeking stakeholder input on an abandoned uranium mines report to Congress. January 9, 2013 LM Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) continues to work with the Navajo Nation to perform long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) at four Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I sites located on the Navajo Nation January 8, 2013 A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November Saw What? Saw Whet!

129

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sanyo Electric Co. 1 Case Number: 20 10-CE- 12 10 Sanyo Electric Co. 1 Case Number: 20 10-CE- 12 10 (Refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and ) freezers) 1 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: September 8,201 0 Number of alleged violations: 58 Maximum possible assessment: $3,501,400 Proposed civil penalty: $3 16,333 The Office of the General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) alleges that Sanyo Electric Co. violated certain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. $6201 etseq., 10 C.F.R. Part 430, or both. Specifically, DOE alleges: I. Sanyo Electric Co. manufactures or privately labels a variety of refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers, including the following models: FF-1152SS FF-4 1 ES FF-43ES FF-7 1 ARD 1 04AB 1 OWL ARD204AB"

130

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 25, 2012 July 25, 2012 CX-008787: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midway Substation 230 Kilovolt Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 3, 2012 CX-008779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3

131

Big Weasels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Big Weasels Big Weasels Nature Bulletin No. 512-A January 12, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BIG WEASELS The Weasel Family includes the mink, skunks, otters, badger, martens and wolverine as well as the bloodthirsty little weasel -- all carnivorous fur-bearers having a pair of anal glands containing musky fluid which, except in the otters, badger and fisher, has a vile penetrating odor. The Pine Marten or American Sable, a little smaller than a house cat, is the tree-living member of the family. It dens and does much of its hunting in trees where it is a deadly enemy of squirrels and birds. On the ground it preys on marmots, chipmunks, hares, mice, grouse and reptiles. Honey, nuts and berries are eaten also. Aside from the lynx, eagles, owls and the fisher, a marten's chief enemy is man.

132

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 30, 2012 July 30, 2012 CX-009090: Categorical Exclusion Determination Line Switch Replacements at Guernsey Rural, Worland, Refinery, Box Butte, and Morrill Taps CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Wyoming, Nebraska Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008496: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate Electrification Improvement CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

133

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Rapid City, South Dakota | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rapid City, South Dakota Rapid City, South Dakota FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Rapid City, South Dakota October 7, 2013 - 2:48pm Addthis Image of the FUPWG logo which displays an illustration of Mount Rushmore. The logo reads Achieving Energy Efficiency on a Monumental Scale; FUPWG October 20-21, 2010; Rapid City, South Dakota. Wednesday, October, 2010 8:30 am Welcome Dennis Haider, MDU Mark Howard, Ellsworth AF Base 8:40 am Introductions & Washington, D.C., Update National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) BioEnergy Atlas David McAndrew, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) 9:00 am Special Presentation Owl Feather War Bonnet Ken Haukaas, Rosebud Sioux Tribe 9:30 am Electric Vehicle Update Amanda Sahl, FEMP 10:15 am Networking Break 10:45 am O&M/Commissioning Panel Moderator - Ab Ream, FEMP

134

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

91 - 20000 of 28,905 results. 91 - 20000 of 28,905 results. Download EM SSAB Conference Calls- May 10, 2007 Minutes and highlights of the Environmental Management (EM) Site Specific Advisory Board's (SSAB) Bi-Monthly conference call including Participants, DOE-HQ Representatives, Opening Remarks, Program... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/em-ssab-conference-calls-may-10-2007 Download CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008784-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EIS-0385-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Final

135

Property:Equivalent URI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equivalent URI Equivalent URI Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI is a special property in Semantic MediaWiki with a built-in meaning: it marks a page in the wiki as having a well-known meaning beyond this wiki, in an external URI. For example an extension to the Semantic MediaWiki extension might introduce its own property, and all wikis should use the same equivalent URI for it. In RDF Export the "Equivalent URI" special property exports as owl:sameAs. Pages using the property "Equivalent URI" This property is a special property in this wiki. Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition + http://cleanenergysolutions.org/content/2010-carbon-sequestration-atlas-united-states-and-canada-third-edition +

136

Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10 20 ?eV arriving on Earth with very low flux (?1 particle/Km2-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas exceeding values of 1000 km2?sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays (“Auger” with 2×3500? km 2 ?sr ) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space (“AIR WATCH” and OWL ” with effective area reaching 1 million km2?sr). In this last case by using as a target the 10 13 tons of air viewed also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.

Livio Scarsi

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Unmanned systems win unexpected support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is presented in which emphasis is given to recent mission accomplishments and current directions of research. Existing and new military UAV programs are listed with reference to funding, the type of vehicle, and level of development. Several trends are established including the reliance of UVAs on global positioning satellites and advanced electronics and the growth of the UVA industry. UVAs that are in advanced stages of development or have been deployed include short-range UAV such as the Pioneer, the Pointer, the Sky Owl, and the Hunter. Key UAV systems are described such as the Advanced Tactical Airborne Reconnaissance System, the Maritime Vertical Takeoff and Landing, and other VTOL systems. Very small UVAs and Exdrones are also discussed, and a weather reconnaissance system and surveillance systems are mentioned.

Schneiderman, R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Systematic errors in the measurement of neutrino masses due to baryonic feedback processes: Prospects for stage IV lensing surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the importance of baryonic feedback effects on the matter power spectrum on small scales, and the implications for the precise measurement of neutrino masses through gravitational weak lensing. Planned large galaxy surveys such as the Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid are expected to measure the sum of neutrino masses to extremely high precision, sufficient to detect non-zero neutrino masses even in the minimal mass normal hierarchy. We show that weak lensing of galaxies while being a very good probe of neutrino masses, is extremely sensitive to baryonic feedback processes. We use publicly available results from the Overwhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the effects of active galactic nuclei feedback, the nature of the stellar initial mass function, and gas cooling rates, on the measured weak lensing shear power spectrum. Using the Fisher matrix formalism and priors from CMB+BAO data, we show that when one does not account for feedback, the measured neutrino mas...

Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas; Trac, Hy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Figwort Family  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Figwort Family Figwort Family Nature Bulletin No. 564-A April 26, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIGWORT FAMILY The Figwort Family, also known as the Foxglove Family, includes many plants with such strikingly different flowers or such different habits of growth that they scarcely seem to be relatives. The weirdly shaped blossoms of several kinds suggest, if you are fanciful, the faces of animals: some with fearsome open jaws, others with gaping flabby lips or bulging throats. Hence, among them, there are plants with such colorful names as Snapdragon, Turtlehead, Monkey Flower, Little Elephants, Owl's Clover and Pelican Flower. The Figwort, from which the family gets not only a common name but also its scientific name, is a woodland plant with inconspicuous flowers that was once supposed to possess a cure for scrofula. Most members of this family have bitter juice; and several do have medicinal, narcotic or poisonous properties.

140

A group housing society ontology in Swoop 2.3 Beta 4 and Protege 3.4.4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ontology creation using various editors like Protégé and SWOOP plays a significant role in Semantic Web. In this paper, we illustrate the creation of a housing society ontology viz, 'Jawaharlal CGHS ontology' using Swoop and Protégé, the most commonly used ontology editors. We are using Swoop 2.3 Beta 4 editor where super class and sub class hierarchy and instances have been presented with the query retrieval process using 'Fly the MotherShip' option in advanced tab and show the 'general concept inclusion axiom', 'class expression table' for relations in classes and subclasses. Then, the same ontology is created using Protégé 3.4.4 and finally illustrates using the OWL code to obtain ontology class hierarchy (subject/object relationship) in Protege by executing a SPARQL query.

Sanjay Kumar Malik; S.A.M. Rizvi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University, Athens; Mark, David [University at Buffalo, NY; Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

SRS Environmental Reports for 2003  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

environmental reports 2003 Savannah River Site home srs environmental report - 2003 srs environmental data - 2003 soil & groundwater closure projects solid waste & infrastructure savannah river ecology laboratory high-level waste disposition site decommissioning & demolition USDA forest service - savannah river srs maps - 2003 savannah river site part of blue river space environmental reports 2003 Savannah River Site home srs environmental report - 2003 srs environmental data - 2003 soil & groundwater closure projects solid waste & infrastructure savannah river ecology laboratory high-level waste disposition site decommissioning & demolition USDA forest service - savannah river srs maps - 2003 savannah river site part of blue river space The Sycamore Tree The leaves and fruit of a fallen sycamore tree (Platanus occidentalis) dangle over the Savannah River as it flows along the southwestern border of the Savannah River Site. The sycamore can live for 500 to 600 years and reach a diameter greater than that of any other North American hardwood species. It grows in all states east of the Great Plains except Minnesota. Commonly found along streams and bottomlands, it frequently is planted as a shade tree because of its rapid growth; its distinctive, white, exfoliating bark; and its broad, dense crown. The fruit breaks apart during winter, producing an average of 200,000 seeds per pound.

143

Case history of population change in a `bacillus thuringiensis`-treated versus an untreated outbreak of the western spruce budworm. Forest Service research note  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Larval densities of the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) were monitored for 12 years (1984-95) on permanent sample plots in northeastern Oregon. The time series spanned a period of general budworm infestations when populations increased rapidly from low densities, plateaued for a time at high-outbreak densities, and then declind suddenly. Midway through the period (1988), an area with half of the sample plots was sprayed with the microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) in an operational suppression project. The other sample plots were part of an untreated area. In the treated area, B.t. spray reduced numbers of larvae by more than 90 percent; however, populations returned to an outbreak density within 3 years. In the untreated area, populations remained at outbreak densities and continued to fluctuate due to natural feedback processes. Natural decline of the population (1992-95) in the monitored area was largely unexplained and coincided with an overall collapse of the budworm outbreak in the Blue Mountains.

Mason, R.R.; Paul, H.G.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Erythroneura lawsoni abundance and feeding injury levels are influenced by foliar nutrient status in intensively managed American sycamore.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract 1 Abundance and feeding injury of the leafhopper Erythroneura lawsoni Robinson was measured in an intensively-managed American sycamore Platanus occidentalis L. plantation. Trees were planted in spring 2000 in a randomized complete block design, and received one of three annual treatments: (i) fertilization (120 kg N/ha/year); (ii) irrigation (3.0 cm/week); (iii) fertilization + irrigation; or (iv) control (no treatment). 2 Foliar nutrient concentrations were significantly influenced by the treatments because only sulphur and manganese levels were not statistically greater in trees receiving fertilization. 3 Over 116 000 E. lawsoni were captured on sticky traps during the study. Leafhopper abundance was highest on nonfertilized trees for the majority of the season, and was positively correlated with foliar nutrient concentrations. Significant temporal variation in E. lawsoni abundance occurred, suggesting five discrete generations in South Carolina. 4 Significant temporal variation occurred in E. lawsoni foliar injury levels, with the highest injury ratings occurring in late June and August. Foliar injury was negatively correlated with foliar nutrient content, and higher levels of injury occurred more frequently on nonfertilized trees. 5 The results obtained in the present study indicated that increased E. lawsoni abundance occurred on trees that did not receive fertilization. Nonfertilized trees experienced greater foliar injury, suggesting that lower foliar nutrient status may have led to increased levels of compensatory feeding.

Coyle, David, Robert: Aubrey, Doug, Patric; Bentz, Jo-Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Linnaeus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Linnaeus Linnaeus Nature Bulletin No. 383-A May 23, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LINNAEUS Linne Woods, the forest preserve along the North Branch of the Chicago, River north of Dempster St. in Morton Grove, is named in honor of Carl Linne, born on May 23, 1707, in Rashault, a village in the southernmost part of Sweden. He became a scientist so great that he is called the Father of Systematic Botany" and his Latin name, Linnaeus, is known and used by all botanists and zoologists. The 200th anniversary of his birth was observed throughout the world as a red- letter day in the history of human culture. In 1753, he published his monumental work. Species Planetarium, which named, described and classified all the plant species then known to exist and by a system universally used today. In this system, each plant and each animal is assigned a name consisting of two words, Latin or Latin in form: the first being the name of the genus or related kinds; the second being the name of the species, which produces offspring having the same distinctive characteristics. This climinates the confusion created by the use of different common names in various localities for certain species, or the same common name for species that arc different. The tree most commonly known as the hackberry, is called sugarberry in six states, nettle tree in three, and is variously known as hoop ash, juniper tree, and bastard elm in other states, but it has only one scientific name: Celtis occidentalis.

148

Environmental and plant effects of sewage sludge application to forests and pastures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digested sewage sludge was applied to pastures and tree plantations at 19 to 44 Mg/ha (dry weight) as part of a municipal sludge disposal program. The sludge had low concentrations of heavy metals and traces of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co. Monitoring of soils, soil solutions, and runoff indicated that N, P, heavy metals, and radionuclides were largely retained in the upper 15cm of the soil. Soil solutions had elevated NO/sub 3//sup /minus// concentrations often >100 mg/L, but no significant increases in groundwater NO/sub 3//sup /minus// were found during the first year. Runoff from active sites had elevated concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup /minus// (20--30 mg/L), soluble P (1 mg/L), BOD/sub 5/ (5--30 mg/L), and fecal coliform (up to 14,000 colonies per 100 ml), not unlike runoff from pastures with cattle. Enrichment of organic N (2 times), available (inorganic) N (5 to 10 times), and Bray-P in the upper soils persisted for several years following sludge application. Sludge increased vegetation N concentrations from 1.5% to 2.3% and P concentrations from 0.16% to 0.31%. With the exception of Zn, heavy metals did not accumulate substantially in the vegetation. The sludge addition increased the survival and growth of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.). For a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation future growth improvements are expected based on elevated foliar N concentrations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Van Miegroet, H.; Boston, H.L.; Johnson, D.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

TITLE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J J a s 1. Besl President Force Control Industries 3664 Dixla H i 9 h p ~ Falrfleld, Ohio 45014 Dear Hr. Besl: With your consent,. the U.S. Dcpartwnt o f Energy (WE) conducted a r a d i o l q l l c a l survey a t the Former Associate A i r c r a f t Tool and Manufrcturlng Conpany s l t e i n Fairfield, Ohio. OOE has received the-auwey report frm i t s survey. contractor, Oak Rldge national Laboratory (OWL). Two copies o f the report are enclosed f o r your information and use. 71.5 report C 0 n ~ l ~ d e S that uranium i s present I n the f a c i l l t y I n excess of the ME guidelines f ~ r restdual r a d l o i c t i v e matertal. This conclusion i s based on d i r e c t radiation r a s u r a r n t s (shorn graphically on Flgures 8 , 9, 14, and Table 5 on pages 8, 9, 22, and 29, respectively) and om analysls o f s o i l samples, dust sllples, m

150

Sleeping Birds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sleeping Birds Sleeping Birds Nature Bulletin No. 445-A February 19, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SLEEPING BIRDS Each winter, a few years ago, several thousand crows, roosted in the big woods near our house. In daytime they spread out over the countryside to find food but each evening, about sundown, they came streaming back in a continuous parade that took almost an hour to pass. In flocks of dozens or hundreds with scattered birds between, they flew the same route every day. In downstate Illinois, similar flocks roost in overgrown hedgerows of osage orange, isolated groves of timber, or on willow grown islands in large rivers. A much smaller flock still roosts the year-round in our woods. Ordinarily they slip in a little before dusk and settle down quietly but occasionally there is a hullabaloo as if they were squabbling over a favorite perch occupied by some newcomers. Just before dawn, one old bird we call "the bugler" caws three times. A minute or two later he repeats it. Then, one by one, drowsy voices of other crows are heard -- much like human sleepyheads in the morning. Sometimes an alarm call is heard during the night followed by a general clamor as if the flock had been disturbed by a marauding owl, weasel or raccoon. Crows are very wary and, like most birds, light sleepers.

151

The Toad  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toad Toad Nature Bulletin No. 158 June 5, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation THE TOAD The toad, distinguished by its wide heavy body, dry warty skin and a large kidney-shaped gland on each shoulder, is a most interesting and valuable animal. There are many superstitions about this gentle harmless amphibian so loathed by many people. It is not evil or venomous; it does not "rain down" from the sky; it cannot exist for centuries sealed in the heart of a tree or solid rock; it does not cause warts. From those two big glands and from the "warts", which are also glands, a toad can secrete a milky fluid which is harmless to man but which makes it distasteful to most animals. However, they are eaten by most large snakes and by many hawks, owls, herons and bitterns. Because its food is chiefly insects and their larvae, of which it consumes great quantities, the toad is a valuable friend to the farmer and gardener even though it also eats spiders and earthworms.

152

Do Animals Talk?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Do Animals Talk? Do Animals Talk? Nature Bulletin No. 635 April 1, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DO ANIMALS TALK ? Amateur bird fans are not all bird watchers. Some of us are bird listeners. In the forest preserves and rural regions, the big black noisy crow is a continual challenge. At the first light of dawn an evenly spaced "caw, caw, caw" seems to say "Hello! Is anybody awake?" Soon it is answered by sleepy crow voices. They have food calls, assembly calls, alarm calls, courtship calls and a lot of squabbling over roosting spots as they settle down for the night. The adults are very quiet near the nest but the fledglings make loud gargling sounds as they are fed. The discovery of an owl or cat sets off a sort of mob hysteria. By hiding a microphone among a flock of crows it has been found that they also talk in whispers.

153

Bees  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bees Bees Nature Bulletin No. 13 May 5, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation BEES Last week, in a big hollow tree that had been blown down, we found a squirrel's den, a screech owl's nest, and the comb of a hive of honey- bees. There are many such bee-trees in the forest preserves. They may be located by following the flight of the bees because once it has taken on its load of pollen and honey, a bee returns to the hive in a straight "bee-line. "Dr. David H. Thompson tells of a big elm in Indiana that yielded 350 pounds of honey. Honey-bees are the original communists. Like the bumblebee, the wasp and the ant, they live in large colonies (sometimes 50,000 individuals), and are called social insects. They live in a commune where the citizens govern, where the many kings (drones) are powerless, and where the one queen works as hard as any of her subjects and longer. They have an elaborate caste system, with specific tasks for certain classes of workers.

154

Biological assessment for the transfer of the DP land tract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer to the County of Los Alamos up to 10-ha (25-ac) of federal land located in Technical Area-21 to be developed for commercial uses. Previous studies for the proposed land transfer area indicate that potential habitat for four threatened, endangered, and sensitive species occurs in or adjacent to the proposed land transfer area. These include the northern goshawk (federal species of concern), Mexican spotted owl (federal threatened), the spotted bat (federal species of concern, state threatened), die peregrine falcon (federal endangered, state endangered), and the. In order to determine the possible influences of the land transfer on these organisms, information from species-specific surveys was collected. These surveys were used to confirm the presence of these species or to infer their absence in or near the project area. It was concluded that none of die above mentioned species occur in the project area. Stretches of the stream channel within Los Alamos Canyon have been identified as palustrine and riverine, temporarily flooded wetlands. The proposed land transfer should not affect these wetlands.

Keller, D.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Evaluation of night capable sensors for the detection of oil on water. Final report, May 1993-March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During May, 1993, the USCG participated in a field exercise conducted at the Canadian Forces Base, Petawawa, Canada. Environment Canada set up a test facility that consisted of a lined pool separated into twelve individual tanks. Four types of petroleum products were added to nine of the tanks while three tanks were left clean as control tanks. The field exercise provided an opportunity to evaluate several night-capable sensors for detection of oil slicks on water. The USCG evaluated the day and night imaging capabilities of long wave infrared (LWIR) sensors (FLIR 2000, WF-360TL, and RS- 18C) installed on three Coast Guard aircraft. Three commercially-available hand-held medium wave infrared (MWIR) sensors (AGEMA Thermovision 210, FSI PRISM, and IRC-160ST) were also evaluated. Surface truth data were collected at the test site and through the use of visible-spectrum imagers (S-VHS camcorder and WF-360TL TV camera - day and Dark Invader Owl NVG camcorder night). Sensor imagery was recorded to S-VHS tape format for post exercise review and processing Analysis of the images confirmed several aspects of expected phenomenology. Both IR and visible spectrum sensors were readily able to detect the oil slicks during daytime sorties. Infrared, Infrared images, Long wave infrared, Medium wave infrared, Night vision goggles, Oil slick detection, visible spectrum, Remote sensing of oil slicks.

Hover, G.L.; Plourde, J.V.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Systematic errors in the measurement of neutrino masses due to baryonic feedback processes: Prospects for stage IV lensing surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the importance of baryonic feedback effects on the matter power spectrum on small scales, and the implications for the precise measurement of neutrino masses through gravitational weak lensing. Planned large galaxy surveys such as the Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid are expected to measure the sum of neutrino masses to extremely high precision, sufficient to detect non-zero neutrino masses even in the minimal mass normal hierarchy. We show that weak lensing of galaxies while being a very good probe of neutrino masses, is extremely sensitive to baryonic feedback processes. We use publicly available results from the Overwhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the effects of active galactic nuclei feedback, the nature of the stellar initial mass function, and gas cooling rates, on the measured weak lensing shear power spectrum. Using the Fisher matrix formalism and priors from CMB+BAO data, we show that when one does not account for feedback, the measured neutrino mass may be substantially larger or smaller than the true mass, depending on the dominant feedback mechanism, with the mass error |\\Delta m_nu| often exceeding the mass m_nu itself. We also consider gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and show that it is not sensitive to baryonic feedback on scales l power spectrum can be measured to similar accuracy.

Aravind Natarajan; Andrew R. Zentner; Nicholas Battaglia; Hy Trac

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Insights into bilaterian evolution from three spiralian genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current genomic perspectives on animal diversity neglect two prominent phyla, the molluscs and annelids, that together account for nearly one-third of known marine species and are important both ecologically and as experimental systems in classical embryology1, 2, 3. Here we describe the draft genomes of the owl limpet (Lottia gigantea), a marine polychaete (Capitella teleta) and a freshwater leech (Helobdella robusta), and compare them with other animal genomes to investigate the origin and diversification of bilaterians from a genomic perspective. We find that the genome organization, gene structure and functional content of these species are more similar to those of some invertebrate deuterostome genomes (for example, amphioxus and sea urchin) than those of other protostomes that have been sequenced to date (flies, nematodes and flatworms). The conservation of these genomic features enables us to expand the inventory of genes present in the last common bilaterian ancestor, establish the tripartite diversification of bilaterians using multiple genomic characteristics and identify ancient conserved long- and short-range genetic linkages across metazoans. Superimposed on this broadly conserved pan-bilaterian background we find examples of lineage-specific genome evolution, including varying rates of rearrangement, intron gain and loss, expansions and contractions of gene families, and the evolution of clade-specific genes that produce the unique content of each genome.

Simakov, Oleg; Marletaz, Ferdinand; Cho, Sung-Jin; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Havlak, Paul; Hellsten, Uffe; Kuo, Dian-Han; Larsson, Tomas; Lv, Jie; Arendt, Detlev; Savage, Robert; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; de Jong, Pieter; Grimwood, Jane; Chapman, Jarrod A.; Shapiro, Harris; Otillar, Robert P.; Terry, Astrid Y.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lindberg, David R.; Seaver, Elaine C.; Weisblat, David A.; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Aerts, Andrea

2012-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ultra-high energy cosmic rays from Quark Novae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore acceleration of ions in the Quark Nova (QN) scenario, where a neutron star experiences an explosive phase transition into a quark star (born in the propeller regime). In this picture, two cosmic ray components are isolated: one related to the randomized pulsar wind and the other to the propelled wind, both boosted by the ultra-relativistic Quark Nova shock. The latter component acquires energies $10^{15} {\\rm eV}wind, achieves ultra-high energies $E> 10^{18.6}$ eV. The composition is dominated by ions present in the pulsar wind in the energy range above $10^{18.6}$ eV, while at energies below $10^{18}$ eV the propelled ejecta, consisting of the fall-back neutron star crust material from the explosion, is the dominant one. Added to these two components, the propeller injects relativistic particles with Lorentz factors $\\Gamma_{\\rm prop.} \\sim 1-1000$, later to be accelerated by galactic supernova shocks. The QN model appears to be able to account for the extragalactic cosmic rays above the ankle and to contribute a few percent of the galactic cosmic rays below the ankle. We predict few hundred ultra-high energy cosmic ray events above $10^{19}$ eV for the Pierre Auger detector per distant QN, while some thousands are predicted for the proposed EUSO and OWL detectors.

R. Ouyed; P. Keränen; J. Maalampi

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Evaluation of methods, instrumentation and materials pertinent to quality assurance filter penetration testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Every high efficiency aerosol filter used in the Unites States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is quality assurance (QA) tested at one of the DOE filter test facilities prior to installation. This testing presently includes measurement of filter penetration at rated airflow using a hot DOP aerosol generator, an Owl aerosol size analyzer, and a scattered-light photometer aerosol concentration monitor. Alternative penetration measurement methods for testing size 5 high efficiency aerosol filters which have rated airflow capacities of 1000 cubic feet/min (cfm, approx. 28 m/sup 3//min) are being studied at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These methods are intended to take advantage of commercially available aerosol instrumentation. A penetration test using a polydisperse aerosol produced with a modified Laskin nozzle aerosol generator was found to have promise as an alternative to the present test method. Such a test eliminates the difficulty in producing a monodisperse challenge aerosol, and takes advantage of state-of-the-art aerosol sizing instruments. Aerosol sizing and concentration measuring capabilities of a laser aerosol spectrometer (LAS) were evaluated with respect to the needs of QA filter penetration testing. An aerosol diluter was selected and evaluated for use with the LAS in making filter penetration measurements. Potential alternative test materials were scrutinized with respect to certain toxicological and physical criteria. Certain of these alternative materials were selected for further evaluation. Results of this evaluation and findings cited in the literature indicate that the selected materials could be easily adapted for use with the modified Laskin aerosol generator.

Scripsick, R.C.; Soderholm, S.C.; Tillery, M.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z