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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Owls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Owls Owls Nature Bulletin No. 267-A April 29, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OWLS The owls, of all our native birds, are least understood. Most kinds remain hidden, motionless and silent during the day and hunt only at night or in the dim twilight of morning and evening. Only a few, like our common Short-eared Owl and those big owls of the far north -- the Snowy Owl, the Great Gray Owl and the Hawk Owl -- habitually hunt in daytime. Because an owl' s feathers are peculiarly soft and fluffy, it flies as silently as a passing shadow, swoops upon its prey unheard, and its Indian name was "hush-wing". Since ancient times there have been many superstitions and legends about these birds. They have been regarded as the companions of sorcerers, witches, ghosts, hobgoblins and Satan himself. Their weird nocturnal hootings, gobblings and screams were and are believed to predict death, illness or disaster. Even today, in our southern states, the plaintive quavering cry of the Little Screech Owl -- which they call the "Shivering" Owl -- will cause some people to get out of bed and turn over their left shoe; others to throw a nail or other iron object into the fire. To the Greeks and Romans, the owl was a symbol of wisdom and was the companion of their goddess of wisdom.

2

Large Owls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"ear" tufts. The nest is usually a remodeled hawk or owl's nest, but they even drive eagles from their eyries and take over. The food is extremely varied; mostly mice, rabbits...

3

Barred Owl Hooting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barred Owl Hooting Barred Owl Hooting Name: ray Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: have barred owls ever been known to hoot during the daylight hours? Replies: I spent two years researching barred and horned owls when I was a graduate student and these owls are often found to call during daylight hours. I found both species fairly active at about 3pm and sometimes as late as 10am. The fledglings may be active anytime day and night. Parents are most vocal in the spring when trying to locate young and in the pre-nesting season during January-March. However, the barred owl is most active during the night and many times the calling is dependent upon the time of year [breeding season of November through April is more active for adults in particular]. Yearlings can make calls, noise anytime during the day.

4

The Screech Owl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Screech Owl Screech Owl Nature Bulletin No. 100 January 25, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE SCREECH OWL At the foot of a dead oak where we hoped to find some winter mushrooms beneath the grass and fallen leaves, we spied several pellets about the size and shape of the end of your thumb. They were clean and odorless, each containing the skull and bones of a mouse tightly wrapped in a layer of the animal's fur. Owls and hawks swallow their prey whole or in large pieces and later spit out the indigestible matter in the form of pellets. Up in this tree was a woodpecker hole from which the round unwinking yellow eyes of a screech owl glared at us. A screech owl, about the size of a robin but much chunkier, is our only small owl with ear tufts like "horns". They prey on mice, chipmunks and ground squirrels, fish, crayfish, amphibians, small snakes, angleworms, and large insects. When other food is scarce, and their fuzzy white young -- usually four in number -- require much food, they frequently kill birds but apparently not enough to seriously affect the bird population. No owl, of any species, should be killed.

5

Nesting Habits of Owls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nesting Habits of Owls Nesting Habits of Owls Nature Bulletin No. 624 January 14, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist NESTING HABITS OF OWLS From all of the information available it appears to us that, amongst the owls, there is greater variation in where and how they nest than in any other group of birds. Two nesting characteristics, however, are common to all owls. The eggs are nearly spherical and white, or off-white, without any markings. Also, a nesting female does not lay one egg per day, as most birds do, but at intervals of two or more days -- sometimes several. In extreme cases there may be a fresh egg, others incubating, and a newly hatched fledgling -- all in the same nest.

6

Owl Feather War Bonnet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Owl Feather War Bonnet, LLC c/o DISGEN 200 Union Blvd, Suite 304 Lakewood CO 80228 Owl Feather War Bonnet, LLC c/o DISGEN 200 Union Blvd, Suite 304 Lakewood CO 80228 Owl Feather War Bonnet Project Description Owl Feather War Bonnet LLC (OFWB) proposes to develop, construct and operate a 30 MW wind facility to be located on Rosebud Sioux Tribal Trust Land on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. OFWB is solely owned by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen) in Colorado. The US Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is the lead Trust Authority for this project and both the Tribe and BIA have authorized the 35 year Rights of Use easement for a wind energy project. * An existing 115kV Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) transmission line crosses the project area along with an existing substation serving the local cooperative. The

7

OWL-Eu: Adding customised datatypes into OWL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although OWL is rather expressive, it has a very serious limitation on datatypes; i.e., it does not support customised datatypes. It has been pointed out that many potential users will not adopt OWL unless this limitation is overcome, and the W3C Semantic ... Keywords: Customised Datatypes, Description Logics, Ontologies, Semantic Web, Unary datatype groups

Jeff Z. Pan; Ian Horrocks

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Using MMS with the OWL Grade Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using MMS with the OWL Grade Book #12;Notes Overview While MMS provides you with an easy way to maintain and manage your students'grades, the OWL Grade Book offers a simple and secure method into the OWL Grade Book, as well as export grades from the OWL Grade Book into MMS. Page 2 Transfer Grades from

Lennard, William N.

9

V.: GLOO: A Graphical Query Language for OWL Ontologies. OWLED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The database usability experience has shown that visual query languages tend to be superior to textual languages in many aspects. By applying this principle in the context of ontologies, we present GLOO, a graphical query language for OWL-DL ontologies. GLOO maps diagrammatic queries to DL based query languages such as nRQL, which is offered by the OWL-DL reasoner Racer. GLOO hides the complexity of a DL query language from users and allows them to query OWL ontologies with less difficulty. 1

Amineh Fadhil; Volker Haarslev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Justification oriented proofs in OWL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Justifications -- that is, minimal entailing subsets of an ontology -- are currently the dominant form of explanation provided by ontology engineering environments, especially those focused on the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Despite this, there are ...

Matthew Horridge; Bijan Parsia; Ulrike Sattler

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

JustBench: a framework for OWL benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysing the performance of OWL reasoners on expressive OWL ontologies is an ongoing challenge. In this paper, we present a new approach to performance analysis based on justifications for entailments of OWL ontologies. Justifications are minimal subsets ...

Samantha Bail; Bijan Parsia; Ulrike Sattler

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Finding all justifications of OWL DL entailments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finding the justifications of an entailment (that is, all the minimal set of axioms sufficient to produce an entailment) has emerged as a key inference service for the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Justifications are essential for debugging unsatisfiable ... Keywords: OWL ontology explanation, debugging, justifications

Aditya Kalyanpur; Bijan Parsia; Matthew Horridge; Evren Sirin

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced Use of the OWL Grade Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Use of the OWL Grade Book #12;Notes Overview The Grade Book has many features to help you organize, release, and compile grades. This manualette will discuss the following advanced Grade Book the Grade Book, creating columns or adding and releasing grades, please see the Basic Use of the OWL Grade

Lennard, William N.

14

OWL: Capturing Semantic Information using a Standardized Web Ontology Language  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) was launched in the US and it launched DAML-ONT #12;History Cont.. DAML project joined efforts with OIL Ontology Language History of OWL Characteristics of OWL Applications of OWL #12;SEMANTIC WEB Extension in a distributed environment #12;History of OWL Ontologies existed outside the computer science community

McLeod, Dennis

15

The “Owl Horn” Radar Signature in Developing Southern Plains Supercells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During spring 2001 in the Southern Plains, a recurring, hitherto undocumented reflectivity signature that the authors have called the “Owl Horn” signature (because the radar reflectivity pattern resembles the profile of the Great Horned Owl) was ...

Matthew R. Kramar; Howard B. Bluestein; Andrew L. Pazmany; John D. Tuttle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Scalable OWL 2 reasoning for linked data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Scalable OWL 2 Reasoning for Linked Data lecture is twofold: first, to introduce scalable reasoning and querying techniques to SemanticWeb researchers as powerful tools to make use of Linked Data and large-scale ontologies, and second, ...

Aidan Hogan; Jeff Z. Pan; Axel Polleres; Yuan Ren

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Basic Use of the OWL Grade Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic Use of the OWL Grade Book #12;Notes Overview The Grade Book tool provides an easy and convenient way for instructors to manage grades and distribute them to students. Using the Grade Book. This handout will show you how to: · Access the Grade Book · Create a column in the Grade Book · Add

Lennard, William N.

18

Expressing OWL axioms by English sentences: dubious in theory, feasible in practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With OWL (Web Ontology Language) established as a standard for encoding ontologies on the Semantic Web, interest has begun to focus on the task of verbalising OWL code in controlled English (or other natural language). Current approaches to this task ...

Richard Power; Allan Third

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

LUBM: A benchmark for OWL knowledge base systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe our method for benchmarking Semantic Web knowledge base systems with respect to use in large OWL applications. We present the Lehigh University Benchmark (LUBM) as an example of how to design such benchmarks. The LUBM features an ontology ... Keywords: Evaluation, Knowledge base system, Lehigh University Benchmark, Semantic Web

Yuanbo Guo; Zhengxiang Pan; Jeff Heflin

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.082303°, -69.0572612° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.082303,"lon":-69.0572612,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.3439,"lon":-114.4631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 2nd Quarter FY 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 1999 June 1999 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For Second Quarter FY 1999 June 1, 1999; Issue No. 19 continued on page 6 NEPA and Habitat Management Plan: Environmental Synergy By: Elizabeth Withers, NEPA Compliance Officer, Los Alamos Area Office, with John Stetson, Pacific Western Technologies, Ltd. On the day DOE issued the Draft EIS for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), LANL biologists discovered a nesting pair of Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) – which had only recently been listed as threatened – in the canyons directly below the proposed site. Today, this nest site, at the edge

23

OWLS: a ten-year history in optical wireless links for intra-satellite communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of Optical Wireless Links to intra-Spacecraft communications (OWLS) is presented here. This work summarizes ten years of developments, ranging from basic optoelectronic parts and front-end electronics, to different in-orbit demonstrations. ... Keywords: optical communication, optoelectronic devices, space technology, space vehicle communication, space vehicle electronics, wireless LAN

I. Arruego; H. Guerrero; S. Rodríguez; J. Martínez-Oter; J. J. Jiménez; J. A. Domínguez; A. Martín-Ortega; J. R. De Mingo; J. Rivas; V. Apéstigue; J. Sánchez; J. Iglesias; M. T. Álvarez; P. Gallego; J. Azcue; C. Ruiz De Galarreta; B. Martín; A. Álvarez-Herrero; M. Díaz-Michelena; I. Martín; F. R. Tamayo; M. Reina; M. J. Gutierrez; L. Sabau; J. Torres

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A.: Defining a benchmark suite for evaluating the import of OWL lite ontologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Semantic Web tools should be able to correctly interchange ontologies and, therefore, to interoperate. This interchange is not always a straightforward task if tools have different underlying knowledge representation paradigms. This paper describes the process followed to define a benchmark suite for evaluating the OWL import capabilities of ontology development tools in a benchmarking activity in progress in the Knowledge Web 1 European Network of Excellence. 1

Stefano David; Raúl García-castro; Asunción Gómez-pérez

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Exploring variations in the fundamental constants with ELTs: The CODEX spectrograph on OWL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmological variations in the fine structure constant, alpha, can be probed through precise velocity measurements of metallic absorption lines from intervening gas clouds seen in spectra of distant quasars. Data from the Keck/HIRES instrument support a variation in alpha of 6 parts per million. Such a variation would have profound implications, possibly providing a window into the extra spatial dimensions required by unified theories such as string/M-theory. However, recent results from VLT/UVES suggest no variation in alpha. The COsmic Dynamics EXperiment (CODEX) spectrograph currently being designed for the ESO OWL telescope (Pasquini et al 2005) with a resolution high enough to properly resolve even the narrowest of metallic absorption lines, R>150,000, will achieve a 2-to-3 order-of-magnitude precision increase in Delta\\alpha/alpha. This will rival the precision available from the Oklo natural fission reactor and upcoming satellite-borne atomic clock experiments. Given the vital constraints on fundamental physics possible, the ELT community must consider such a high-resolution optical spectrograph like CODEX.

Paolo Molaro; Michael T. Murphy; Sergei Levshakov

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effects of Drought-Stress on Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and Host-Plant Resistance to Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella Occidentalis Pergande)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Herbivory by Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande) (WFT) and drought-stress due to limited water availability are currently two major factors that can severely impact cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production. This dissertation examines the effects of drought-stress on cotton and host-plant resistance (HPR) to WFT in laboratory conditions, and seeks to identify the physiological and morphological mechanisms that underlie drought-tolerance and HPR. A life-history systems-approach was developed that provides a new level of detail for understanding how environmental variation impacts adult female WFT. The approach was illustrated by investigating the combined effects of cotton genotype, periodic drought-stress, and prey availability on the adult female omnivorous thrips using a factorial design. Three treatment conditions were significantly different, none of which were predicted based on prevailing ecological-hypotheses. At the same time, the approach produced three novel insights about WFT life-history and reproductive strategy. The roles of negative photo-taxis and leaf biomechanical properties were investigated as potential mechanisms that influence WFT foraging-decisions on individual cotyledons. Results showed that WFT foraging-decisions could be considered adaptive, but there was limited support for either of the mechanisms investigated. The physiological responses to drought stress and drought recovery were investigated for three transgenic cotton cultivars and an untransformed wild-type (WT). At peak drought, ABA levels, stomatal area, and stomatal apertures in the transgenic isolone, AtRAV1-1 were 48% lower, 27.7%, and 16.3% smaller than WT. These results suggest that AtRAV1-1 was the most drought-tolerant and support the hypothesis that changes in stomatal morphology may have functionally contributed to drought-tolerance. Lastly, I investigated whether changes in phytohormone concentrations associated with periodic-drought stress in four cotton cultivars (three transgenic and WT) were correlated with WFT feeding, fitness and state-dependent reproductive responses (i.e., the relationship between initial weight and reproduction). Results showed that JA-Ile and JA were positively correlated with state-dependent egg viability and fecundity, respectively, and negatively correlated with total egg viability and fecundity, respectively, supporting the hypothesis that JA and JA-Ile underlie the negative effects on WFT reproduction and the associated shift to state-dependent reproduction.

Fiene, Justin 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Transforming XML Schema to OWL Using Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the promises of the Semantic Web is to support applications that easily and seamlessly deal with heterogeneous data. Most data on the Web, however, is in the Extensible Markup Language (XML) format, but using XML requires applications to understand ... Keywords: XML Schema, Ontology, transformation patterns, ontology design, automatic ontology generation

Ivan Bedini; Christopher Matheus; Peter F. Patel-Schneider; Aidan Boran; Benjamin Nguyen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Towards improving phenotype representation in OWL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of external dependence, see [[33], esp. sect. 6.2.7]. The more common approach to name those auxiliary relations would have been the use of names counting arguments, like argument1 and argument2. With the latter, an extension to n-ary relations...

Loebe, Frank; Stumpf, Frank; Hoehndorf, Robert; Herre, Heinrich

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

2nd Owl Symposium The Role and Management Implications of Modeling Owl Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Habitat Assessment Modeling (WHAM) and is designed to integrate habitat suitability index models (HSI habitat types. Curr ently, WHAM is unable to per form these sorts of analyses; however, these capabilities

30

Burrowing Owl Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

The monitoring during 2012 focused on documenting the status of known burrows. Newly identified burrows were documented while examining historical locations, during ecological resource reviews, or discovered during other monitoring efforts. The timing of the monitoring effort allowed staff to perform the surveys without disrupting any breeding or hatching, while also allowing for easy discernment of adults from juveniles, which helped in determining burrow-use type.

Wilde, Justin W.; Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

31

Biology and Conservation of Owls of the Northern Hemisphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standard salt­chloroform extraction procedures (Sambrook et al. 1989) or a 5% Chelex extraction method. All PCR products were evaluated on a 1.5% agarose gel and purified by standard isopropanol

32

Leveraging OWL for GIS interoperability: rewards and pitfalls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information systems often require combining datasets available in different formats, and geographical information systems are no exception. While semantic technologies have been used before to enable interoperability between relational databases, little ... Keywords: geographic information systems, interoperability, semantic web

Serge Boucher; Esteban Zimányi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Owl Predators Owl Predators Name: Mia Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: MN Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: What are the predators of a owl? Replies: Mia: Our largest adult owls have few predators. Smaller owls may be prey of other owls, long-eared owls are sometimes eaten by great horned owls, for example. Ground nesting owls, like short-eared owls, and especially nestlings, may be hunted by many predators, coyotes and other hawks and owls most likely. Nestlings of all birds, including owls may be hunted by other birds, raccoons, snakes and other animals that can climb trees. J. Elliott Hi Mia Predators of owls include: Opossums Racoons Hawks, Eagles and other raptors Other owls House cats Snakes that raid nests Accidents such as falling out of a nest, colliding with a tree, and electric power lines also contribute to owl mortality.

34

OWL: cooperative thread array aware scheduling techniques for improving GPGPU performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging GPGPU architectures, along with programming models like CUDA and OpenCL, offer a cost-effective platform for many applications by providing high thread level parallelism at lower energy budgets. Unfortunately, for many general-purpose applications, ... Keywords: GPGPUs, latency tolerance, prefetching, scheduling

Adwait Jog; Onur Kayiran; Nachiappan Chidambaram Nachiappan; Asit K. Mishra; Mahmut T. Kandemir; Onur Mutlu; Ravishankar Iyer; Chita R. Das

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Logical Gene Ontology Annotations (GOAL): Exploring gene ontology annotations with OWL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Shneiderman B: Visualization and analysis of microarray and gene ontology data with treemaps. BMC Bioinformatics 2004, 5:84. 8. Subramanian A, Tamayo P, Mootha VK, Mukherjee S, Ebert BL, Gillette MA, Paulovich A, Pomeroy SL, Golub TR, Lander ES, Mesirov JP...

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

36

EFFECTS OF HUMAN LAND USE ON WESTERN BURROWING OWL FORAGING AND ACTIVITY BUDGETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 U.S.A. JAMES D. RAY BWXT Pantex LLC, Pantex

McIntyre, Nancy E.

37

Great science observatories in the space station era and OWL efforts in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept of “Space Factory” on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) is described. By following the four great observatories that purposefully took advantage of the Space Transportation System (STS)

Yoshiyuki Takahashi

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ontology-driven relational query formulation using the semantic and assertional capabilities of OWL-DL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work investigates the extent to which domain knowledge, expressed in a domain ontology, can assist end-users in formulating relational queries that can be executed over a complex relational database. In this regard, an ontology-driven query formulation ... Keywords: Data retrieval, Domain knowledge, Information systems, Ontology, Query formulation

K. Munir; M. Odeh; R. Mcclatchey

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Use of a ground-based scanning lidar for estimation of biophysical properties of western larch (Larix occidentalis)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based laser scanners represent a relatively new technology that promises to enhance the ability to remotely sense biophysical properties of vegetation. In this study, we utilized a commercially available discrete-return ground-based laser scanning ...

R. Clawges; L. Vierling; M. Calhoon; M. Toomey

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Aditya Kalyanpur, Jennifer Golbeck, Jay Banerjee, James Hendler Presented by Yazhou Zhou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information across interrelated systems · Solutions Web Ontology Language(OWL) #12;History of OWL · Mid 1990's: Ontologies aimed specifically at the Web · 1996: SHOE ( Simple HTML Ontology Extension) · 2000: OIL (Ontology Language). #12;History of OWL · February 2004: OWL (Web Ontology Language). #12;Characteristics of OWL

McLeod, Dennis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Proceeedings of the Workshop on NLP and XML (NLPXML-2004): RDF/RDFS and OWL in Language Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth in the NLPXML series of workshops on natural language processing and XML. The first two workshops (NLPXML-2001 in Tokyo and NLPXML-2002 in Taipei) were primarily concerned with XML-based NLP tools and the use of XML in a wide range ...

Nancy Ide; Laurent Romary

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Appendix List for Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Appendix A. WNHP. 2003.Known High Quality or Rare Plant Communities and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information: Red-winged Blackbird Appendix D. USDA, Farm Service Agency. Conservation Reserve Program: Monthly-and-thread Betula occidentalis / Cornus sericea shrubland Water birch / red-osier dogwood Betula occidentalis cover

43

Occurrence of Sustained Droughts in the Interior Pacific Northwest (A.D. 1733–1980) Inferred from Tree-Ring Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The occurrence of moderate and severe sustained droughts in the interior Pacific Northwest (PNW) from 1733 to 1980 was mapped using 18 western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis var. occidentalis Hook.) tree-ring chronologies. The frequency and ...

Paul A. Knapp; Peter T. Soulé; Henri D. Grissino-Mayer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

maritima Rottboellia exaltata Schizachyrium scoparium Scirpus olneyi Setaria faberi Sorghum bicolor Sorghum helpense Spartina patens Sporobolus kentrophyllus Stipa occidentalis...

45

Framework for an automated comparison of description logic reasoners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OWL is an ontology language developed by the W3C, and although initially developed for the Semantic Web, OWL has rapidly become a de facto standard for ontology development in general. The design of OWL was heavily influenced by research in description ...

Tom Gardiner; Dmitry Tsarkov; Ian Horrocks

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-eared Owl Status Long-eared Owl Status Name: Joll Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Is the long-eared owl endangered? I have mixed information. Replies: No, long-eared owls are not on the US endangered species list, either as endangered or threatened. The only owls on the list are both northern and Mexican spotted owls. The US list is on line at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html A species may be listed as endangered as a population within a state even if it is not on the US list. You could search for information for your state to see the status. If your location as noted below is California, long-eared owls are not endangered in California. J. Elliott Joll It's endangered. br> http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?q=326032

47

C S I R O P U B L I S H I N G Invertebrate Taxonomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (Cosmopolitan), Eurycardiochiles, gen. nov. (type species: C. occidentalis Dangerfield & Austin) (Australasian Mao) (Nearctic and Palaearctic), Schoenlandella Cameron (Cosmopolitan) and Toxoneuron Say

Whitfield, James B.

48

Saw What? Saw Whet! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saw What? Saw Whet! Saw What? Saw Whet! Saw What? Saw Whet! January 8, 2013 - 2:52pm Addthis A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November. A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November. A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the

49

Saw What? Saw Whet! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saw What? Saw Whet! Saw What? Saw Whet! Saw What? Saw Whet! January 8, 2013 - 2:52pm Addthis A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November. A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November. A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November A band is attached to the leg of a Northern Saw-Whet Owl during the

50

NEWTON's Zoology Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Robins Nest Duck Behavior Desert Hair Migrating Robins and Breast Color Fish Nostrils Insect Gas Exchange Shrew Physiology Fish Respiration Rates Long-eared Owl...

51

From RESTful Services to RDF: Connecting the Web and the Semantic Web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RDF data from Web resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents 1 Introduction 2 Related Work 2.1 Semantic WebOWL-S: Semantic Markup for Web Services. Member Submission,

Alarcon, Rosa; Wilde, Erik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Whale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Polish) University of Idaho, USA Did the snow owls orleszek@uidaho.edu> Chemistry Professor, University of Idaho.Moscow, Idaho, USA.

Czuchajowski, Leszek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A semantic-based mobile registry for dynamic RFID-based logistics support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose an extended version of the open source jUDDI implementation by the Apache Software Foundation, adapted to pervasive RFID contexts. The registry adopts an OWL-S 1.1 Profile instance annotation of mobile services and resources. ... Keywords: RFID, matchmaking, semantic web, ubiquitous computing

Michele Ruta; Tommaso Di Noia; Eugenio Di Sciascio; Giacomo Piscitelli; Floriano Scioscia

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Research and application on ontology-based layered cloud simulation service description framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud simulation system improves the ability of current network-based M&S in on-demand simulation and massive-user service. The share of multi-granularity resources and dynamic establishment of simulation services in Cloud Simulation raise new challenges ... Keywords: cloud simulation, layered, ontology, owl-s, simulation service description framework

Tan Li, Xudong Chai, Baocun Hou, Bohu Li

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Process-level composition of executable web services: ”on-the-fly” versus ”once-for-all” composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most of the work on automated composition of web services has focused so far on the problem of composition at the functional level, i.e., composition of atomic services that can be executed in a single request-response step. In this paper, we address the problem of automated composition at the process level, i.e., a composition that takes into account that executing a web service requires interactions that may involve different sequential, conditional, and iterative steps. We define two kinds of process-level composition problems: on-the-fly compositions that satisfy one-shot user requests specified as composition goals, and a more general form, called once-for-all compositions, whose goal is to build a general composed web service that is able to interact directly with the users, receive requests from them, and propose suitable answers. We propose a solution to these two kinds of process-level compositions, and apply the solution to the case of web services described in OWL-S. As a result, we automatically generate process-level compositions as executable OWL-S process models. We show that, while executable on-the-fly compositions can be described as standard OWL-S process models, once-for-all compositions need OWL-S process models to be extended with receive and reply constructs.

Marco Pistore; Pierluigi Roberti; Paolo Traverso

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

INTRODUCTION Globally averaged surface temperatures have risen sharply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NLE) (McElwain and Chaloner, 1995, 1996; McEl- wain, 1998; McElwain et al., 1999). NLE's are defined compared to its NLE's, P. occidentalis and P. orientalis (and their hybrid P. Ã? acerfolia), using

Royer, Dana

57

A Formal Ontology Reasoning with Individual Optimization: A Realization of the Semantic Web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Answering a query over a group of RDF data pages is a trivial process. However, in the Semantic Web, there is a need for ontology technology. Consequently, OWL, a family of web ontology languages based on description logic, has been proposed for the Semantic Web. Answering a query over the SemanticWeb is thus not trivial, but a deductive process. However, the reasoning on OWL with data has an efficiency problem. Thus, we introduce optimization techniques for the inference algorithm. This work demonstrates the techniques for instance checking and instance retrieval problems with respect to ALC description logic which covers certain parts of OWL. 1

Pakornpong Pothipruk; Guido Governatori

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Prairie newspaper article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

family-oriented theme park featuring Hootsie the Owl and his prairie friends. Dino-matic Oil Refinery A fossil fuel finishing factory focusing on fine fuel for factories....

59

Halloween  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is not as gloomy and fearsome as in times past. In addition to black cut-outs of angry cats, staring owls and witches riding twig brooms, we decorate our homes and schoolrooms...

60

Bird Beaks and Feet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a bird gives a good clue to its feeding habits. Carnivorous birds like hawks, owls and eagles have strong hooked beaks for tearing flesh. Herons, egrets and kingfishers, with their...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Chemical knowledge representation with description graphs and logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OWL 2 is commonly used to represent objects with complex structure, such as complex assemblies in engineering applications, human anatomy or the structure of chemical molecules [2]. Towards that direction, the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) ...

Despoina Magka; Boris Motik; Ian Horrocks

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modelling structured domains using description graphs and logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although OWL 2 is widely used to describe complex objects such as chemical molecules, it cannot represent ‘structural' features of chemical entities (e.g., having a ring). A combination of rules and description graphs (DGs) has been proposed ...

Despoina Magka; Boris Motik; Ian Horrocks

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to issue a License Outgrant to the Owl Creek Water District (OCWD) for their pipeline project on Western owned property in the Town of Thennopolis, Wyoming. The OCWD is constructing an 8-mile potable water pipeline, a small portion of which crosses land owned by Western. The work on Western's property is along an existing road on the edge of Western's Thermopolis Service Station and Substation within the town limits. The License Outgrant would give the OCWD permission to construct a segment of the 8-inch diameter waterline, buried 10 feet deep, on Western's prope1iy

64

The Fish and Wildlife Agencies and Tribes of The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

migrants that breed in the subbasin and winter in Mexico or Central America. Flammulated owls are the most sparrows winter in the southern United States, south into Central America (Vickery 1996). The olive-sided flycatcher is migratory and winters in Central and South America (Csuti et al. 1997). Environmental toxins

65

Semantic Web approach to smart link generation for Web navigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid development of the Internet has led to diverse applications of accessing various Web resources, such as Web pages, XML documents, pictures and video and audio files. Intelligently discovering how these Web resources are related in order to ... Keywords: OWL, RuleML, Web navigation, XLink, semantic Web

Shang-Juh Kao; I-Ching Hsu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Any correspondence concerning this service should be sent to the repository administrator: staff-oatao@inp-toulouse.fr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming XML Schema to OWL Using Patterns Ivan Bedini, Christopher Matheus, Peter F. Patel Handbook: Theory, Implementation, Applications. Cambridge University Press, 2003. [3] Bedini, I. Deriving of Versailles, France. January, 2010. Retrieved April 15, 2011 http://bivan.free.fr/Janus/Docs/PhD_Report_IvanBedini

Mailhes, Corinne

67

An Empirical Analysis of Semantic Techniques Applied to a Network Management Classification Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semantic technologies are increasingly being employed to integrate, relate and classify heterogeneous data from various problem domains. To date, however, little empirical analysis has been carried out to help identify the benefits and limitations of ... Keywords: OWL, SWRL, SPARQL, axioms, rules, queries, network performance management

Aidan Boran; Ivan Bedini; Christopher J. Matheus; Peter F. Patel-Schneider; Stefan Bischof

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Approaches to Relating and Integrating Semantic Data from Heterogeneous Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrating and relating heterogeneous data using inference is one of the cornerstones of semantic technologies and there are a variety of ways in which this may be achieved. Cross source relationships can be automatically translated or inferred using ... Keywords: inference, semantic integration, OWL/RDF, rules, query

John Keeney; Aidan Boran; Ivan Bedini; Christopher J. Matheus; Peter F. Patel-Schneider

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

AquaticMammalsVolume33,Number4,2007 Aquatic Mammals, Volume 33, Number 4, 2007 ISSN 0167-5427  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of distributed generation ­ be it solar PV, wind turbines, or natural gas micro-turbines ­ and require investor marker, on November 19 2007. None made it through the selection phase. The third and fourth, respectively). In contrast, owls and Coyotes were generalists, with no single prey category comprising more

70

An ontology-driven semantic mashup of gene and biological pathway information: Application to the domain of nicotine dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: This paper illustrates how Semantic Web technologies (especially RDF, OWL, and SPARQL) can support information integration and make it easy to create semantic mashups (semantically integrated resources). In the context of understanding the ... Keywords: Information integration, Nicotine dependence, Ontologies, Semantic mashup, Semantic web

Satya S. Sahoo; Olivier Bodenreider; Joni L. Rutter; Karen J. Skinner; Amit P. Sheth

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

An ontological representation of public services: models, technologies and use cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents our effort to "ontologize" a conceptual public service model in order to express in a formal way domain specific semantics and create a reusable service ontology for eGovernment applications. The conceptual model we have used comes ... Keywords: OWL, eGovernment, ontology, public administration service provision, semantic discovery, semantic web applications

Vassilios Peristeras; Sotirios K. Goudos; Nikolaos Loutas; Konstantinos Tarabanis

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

SWIDE: semantic web integrated development environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ontology is a specification of conceptualization. This paper introduces an environment to develop semantic web applications. This environment integrates a lot of tools such as an editing capability, logic reasoner and semantic search engine. Design and ... Keywords: Jena, OWL, RDF, SPARQL, XML, ontology editor, semantic web

Islam Hany Harb; Abdurrahman A. Nasr; Salah Abdel-Magid; Hany Harb

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Virtual doctor system (VDS): medical decision reasoning based on physical and mental ontologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human computer Interaction based on emotional modelling and physical views, collectively; has been investigated and reported in this paper. Two types of ontology have been presented to formalize a patient state: mental ontology reflecting the patient ... Keywords: OWL, cognitive model, human interaction, knowledge based reasoning, medical diagnosis, semantic web

Hamido Fujita; Jun Hakura; Masaki Kurematsu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

1093. Science case 3.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1093. Science case 3.1 Introduction When the development of the OWL concept started in 1997, its size was set to the rather overwhelming 100-m diameter in order to be able to reach three main science of earth-like planets around other stars. These science cases were supported by qualitative

Liske, Jochen

75

Functional Ecology 2009, 23, 756767 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2009.01567.x 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation 2009 British Ecological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and desiccation stress in limiting the local-scale distribution of the owl limpet, Lottia gigantea Luke P. Miller1 was to quantify the thermal and desiccation tolerance of this species and to predict the frequency of stressful, heat shock protein 70, body temperature, shore height, solar irradiance, lethal temperature, wave

Denny, Mark

76

Discussions on applied mathematics in decision-making modeling with decision support systems and knowledge based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper tries to discuss some findings in mathematical decision-making modeling models with applications in business processes. We start by presenting some technological implications and implementations of decision-making models. After this we discuss ... Keywords: DSS, KBS, OWL, decision-making, inference engine, ontology

Sabina-Cristiana Necula

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Application of Ontology-Based Information Integration on BI System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, due to the demand of heterogeneous data sources integration issue in Business Intelligent system, an ontology-based information integration middleware is designed, in which uses semantic description as a tool to map heterogeneous data ... Keywords: ontology, information integration, business intelligence, OWL

Gang Tong; Yaohua Sun; Jun Tang; Kesheng Qin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Employing description logics in Ambient Intelligence for modeling and reasoning about complex situations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient Intelligence systems need to represent information about their environment and recognize relevant situations to perform appropriate actions proactively and autonomously. The context information gathered by these systems comes with imperfections ... Keywords: OWL DL, Situation-awareness, description logics, modeling context information, reasoning services

Thomas Springer; Anni-Yasmin Turhan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Early Childhood Distance Partnership Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1970s when he served as the Dean of Academic Affairs of Blackfeet Community College. His passion been Blackfeet, yet I know that as years have come and gone, many more tribal groups are being served of the Blackfeet Nation Director, Blackfeet Higher Education Program VINA LITTLE OWL: In June 2006, Vina began

Lawrence, Rick L.

80

Do You Need Help from a Librarian?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 3. Select a database to begin searching. 4. Enter search terms. Subject Specific Indexes to the FAU Library Home page: www.fau.edu/library. 2. Select Off Campus Connect (EZproxy). 3. Enter the 14-digit number on the front or back of your FAU Owl Card. 4. Enter your verification (your birthday month

Fernandez, Eduardo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Intelligence distribution for data processing in smart grids: A semantic approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The smart grid vision demands both syntactic interoperability in order to physically be able to interchange data and semantic interoperability to properly understand and interpret its meaning. The IEC and the EPRI have backed to this end the harmonization ... Keywords: OWL-ontologies, Real-time processing, Semantic interoperability, Smart grid

Juan Carlos Nieves, Angelina Espinoza, Yoseba K. Penya, Mariano Ortega De Mues, Aitor PeñA

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The landscape of multimedia ontologies in the last decade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many efforts have been made in the area of multimedia to bridge the so-called "semantic-gap" with the implementation of ontologies from 2001 to the present. In this paper, we provide a comparative study of the most well-known ontologies related ... Keywords: Comparative Framework, Multimedia, OWL, Ontology, RDF(S)

Mari Carmen Suárez-Figueroa; Ghislain Auguste Atemezing; Oscar Corcho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Proposal of ontology for environmental impact assessment: An application with knowledge mobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) analyses the effects of human activity, ecosystem integrity and the quality of the environmental services that can be provided by them. This analysis must be done prior to project execution in order to have a preventive ... Keywords: EIA, Environmental impact, Knowledge mobilization, OWL, Ontology

Julián Garrido; Ignacio Requena

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Ontology-Based Network Management: Study Cases and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ontology based network management has recently evolved from a theoretical proposal to a more mature technology. As such, it is now being applied in many research projects in a number of different network management and security scenarios. This application ... Keywords: Autonomic management, Lessons learned, Network monitoring, Network security, OWL, Ontology-based network management, SWRL, Study case

Jorge E. López De Vergara; Antonio Guerrero; Víctor A. Villagrá; Julio Berrocal

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Wind Development on the Rosebud  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rosebud Sioux Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation Wind Development on the Rosebud Akicita Cikala 750 Kw turbine Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm, 30Mw North Antelope Highlands Wind Farm, 190Mw Met towers installed in 2003 Met tower installed in 2001 Met tower installed in 1999 Met towers installed in 2009 Akicita Cikala Turbine Neg Micon 750kw Commissioned March 2003 Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm 2003 Dept. of Energy Grant DOE Funding $448,551.00 DISGEN Cost share/in-kind $78,750.00 RST/TUC Cost share/in-kind $27,272.00 Participants in Development RST Resource Development Office, Ken Haukaas, Coordinator RST Tribal Utilities Commission, Tony Rogers, Director RST Natural Resource Office, Stephanie Middlebrooks, Wildlife Biologist Distribute Generation Inc., Dale Osborn, President, Belvin Pete, Project

87

Semi-Automatic Distribution Pattern Modeling of Web Service Compositions using Semantics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enterprise systems are frequently built by combining a number of discrete Web services together, a process termed composition. There are a number of architectural configurations or distribution patterns, which express how a composed system is to be deployed. Previously, we presented a Model Driven Architecture using UML 2.0, which took existing service interfaces as its input and generated an executable Web service composition, guided by a distribution pattern model. In this paper, we propose using Web service semantic descriptions in addition to Web service interfaces, to assist in the semi-automatic generation of the distribution pattern model. Web services described using semantic languages, such as OWL-S, can be automatically assessed for compatibility and their input and output messages can be mapped to each other. 1.

Ronan Barrett

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

University of Aberdeen School of Medicine: Digital Libraries and Evidence in the Developing World Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collaboration Bridge the network divide Machine linkable evidence for computer-based models Low Cost/Easy Maintenance Requirements All evidence is represented by a citation Papers, data, analyses, etc. Evidence-base is therefore shared ontologies (OWL)? Domain... Level Access Control Support for evidence desensitizing Signoff workflows? Support for quality assessment Quality checklist Quality workflows Sounds Like DSpace? Low Entry – Open Source Multiple asset format (docs, data, analyses) Manage ownership issues...

Ferguson, Jon

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Supporting clinical processes with semantic web technologies: a case in breast cancer treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breast cancer surgery is carried out almost entirely manually and there is an obvious risk of human error due to temporary or occasional lack of staff experience (substitutions, sick leaves and other reasons). Another aspect is that the successful ... Keywords: OWL, SOA, automated decision making, breast cancer, cancer treatment, e-healthcare, electronic healthcare, electronic healthcare records, electronic medical records, monitoring, ontologies, ontology web language, patient safety, prognostic factors, semantic web, service-oriented architecture

Ainhoa Serna Nocedal; Jon Kepa Gerrikagoitia; Iker Huerga

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

Wills, C.A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

1 Workshop: Scripting For the Semantic Web (SFSW) Organizers of this workshop are Chris Binzer, Gunnar Aastrand Grimnes and Sören Auer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sketchy notes from the European Semantic Web Conference 2009 plus two workshops. 45 papers plus 8 in-use track plus 24 on the demo track and 8 in the phd symposium in the main conference track. A good conference. Some of the issues I found interesing was “Controlled natural language English ” used in wikis for making semantic information, SCOVO for dataset, the report about SPARQL not being good enough for scientific databases, where ordinary SQL has worked, the combination of tagging and ontologies. The Finnishs have large cultural ontologies. The conference generally sees the “Semantic Web ” as RDF, triples and OWL. Linked data was much mentioned.

Finn ?arup Nielsen; Christopher Lange Krextor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Proposal for a quantity based data model in the Virtual Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the beginnings of a data model for the Virtual Observatory (VO) built up from simple ``quantity'' objects. In this paper we present how an object-oriented, domain (or namespace)-scoped simple quantity may be used to describe astronomical data. Our model is designed around the requirements that it be searchable and serve as a transport mechanism for all types of VO data and meta-data. In this paper we describe this model in terms of an OWL ontology and UML diagrams. An XML schema is available online.

Brian Thomas; Edward Shaya

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

93

The semantic architecture of the World-Wide Molecular Matrix (WWMM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DB and a small number of reaction identifiers in KEGG, con- fined to biological transformations. The CrystalEye col- lection does not have an identifier system yet although the Crystallography Open Database (COD)[48] does. There is no Open system for small... ://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembldb/], Accessed 2011-06- 14. 48. Crystallography Open Databas. COD [http://www.crystallography.net/], Accessed 2011-06-14. 49. Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centr. CCDC [http://www.ccdc.cam.ac. uk/], Accessed 2011-06-14. 50. OWL2 Web Ontology Language. [http...

Murray-Rust, Peter; Adams, Sam E; Downing, Jim; Townsend, Joe A; Zhang, Yong

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Flying Squirrels and Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying Squirrels and Houses Flying Squirrels and Houses Name: Kathy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do you get rid of flying squirrels in the attic of a Cape style home that has limited access to the attic? There is blown in insulation so we cannot see to the end of the house where we hear them, nor can a person crawl in to see anything. We have used d-con bars, mouse traps and have-a-heart traps in the crawl spaces we can reach, but have caught nothing. Replies: Place a statue of an owl near the entrance the squirrels are using. Owls are their motal enemies and this technique works for birds as well. Steve Sample You will not be able to solve this problem until you find the way they go in and out. Usually the easiest way is to look for light coming in from outside while in the dark attic, but if you can't see it that way do a thorough search of the outside. A flying squirrel does not need a very big hole, maybe 2" or less diameter. They go out at night so once you find the hole close it up at night while they are out. Good luck.

95

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report (Part Two of Two)  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Rapid City, South Dakota | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rapid City, South Dakota Rapid City, South Dakota FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Rapid City, South Dakota October 7, 2013 - 2:48pm Addthis Image of the FUPWG logo which displays an illustration of Mount Rushmore. The logo reads Achieving Energy Efficiency on a Monumental Scale; FUPWG October 20-21, 2010; Rapid City, South Dakota. Wednesday, October, 2010 8:30 am Welcome Dennis Haider, MDU Mark Howard, Ellsworth AF Base 8:40 am Introductions & Washington, D.C., Update National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) BioEnergy Atlas David McAndrew, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) 9:00 am Special Presentation Owl Feather War Bonnet Ken Haukaas, Rosebud Sioux Tribe 9:30 am Electric Vehicle Update Amanda Sahl, FEMP 10:15 am Networking Break 10:45 am O&M/Commissioning Panel Moderator - Ab Ream, FEMP

97

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 20000 of 28,905 results. 91 - 20000 of 28,905 results. Download EM SSAB Conference Calls- May 10, 2007 Minutes and highlights of the Environmental Management (EM) Site Specific Advisory Board's (SSAB) Bi-Monthly conference call including Participants, DOE-HQ Representatives, Opening Remarks, Program... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/em-ssab-conference-calls-may-10-2007 Download CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008784-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EIS-0385-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Final

98

Property:Equivalent URI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equivalent URI Equivalent URI Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI is a special property in Semantic MediaWiki with a built-in meaning: it marks a page in the wiki as having a well-known meaning beyond this wiki, in an external URI. For example an extension to the Semantic MediaWiki extension might introduce its own property, and all wikis should use the same equivalent URI for it. In RDF Export the "Equivalent URI" special property exports as owl:sameAs. Pages using the property "Equivalent URI" This property is a special property in this wiki. Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition + http://cleanenergysolutions.org/content/2010-carbon-sequestration-atlas-united-states-and-canada-third-edition +

99

Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 11, 2013 April 11, 2013 C-SR-10 Uintah Mine, Colorado, LM Uranium Lease Tracts Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is seeking stakeholder input on an abandoned uranium mines report to Congress. January 9, 2013 LM Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) continues to work with the Navajo Nation to perform long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) at four Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I sites located on the Navajo Nation January 8, 2013 A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November Saw What? Saw Whet!

100

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sanyo Electric Co. 1 Case Number: 20 10-CE- 12 10 Sanyo Electric Co. 1 Case Number: 20 10-CE- 12 10 (Refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and ) freezers) 1 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: September 8,201 0 Number of alleged violations: 58 Maximum possible assessment: $3,501,400 Proposed civil penalty: $3 16,333 The Office of the General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) alleges that Sanyo Electric Co. violated certain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. $6201 etseq., 10 C.F.R. Part 430, or both. Specifically, DOE alleges: I. Sanyo Electric Co. manufactures or privately labels a variety of refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers, including the following models: FF-1152SS FF-4 1 ES FF-43ES FF-7 1 ARD 1 04AB 1 OWL ARD204AB"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 25, 2012 July 25, 2012 CX-008787: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midway Substation 230 Kilovolt Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 3, 2012 CX-008779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance Gunnison, Chaffee, Fremont, Pueblo, and El Paso Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3

102

Big Weasels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Big Weasels Big Weasels Nature Bulletin No. 512-A January 12, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BIG WEASELS The Weasel Family includes the mink, skunks, otters, badger, martens and wolverine as well as the bloodthirsty little weasel -- all carnivorous fur-bearers having a pair of anal glands containing musky fluid which, except in the otters, badger and fisher, has a vile penetrating odor. The Pine Marten or American Sable, a little smaller than a house cat, is the tree-living member of the family. It dens and does much of its hunting in trees where it is a deadly enemy of squirrels and birds. On the ground it preys on marmots, chipmunks, hares, mice, grouse and reptiles. Honey, nuts and berries are eaten also. Aside from the lynx, eagles, owls and the fisher, a marten's chief enemy is man.

103

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2012 July 30, 2012 CX-009090: Categorical Exclusion Determination Line Switch Replacements at Guernsey Rural, Worland, Refinery, Box Butte, and Morrill Taps CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Wyoming, Nebraska Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008496: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate Electrification Improvement CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

104

Environmental, energy and natural resources status report for the 101st Congress. Special report  

SciTech Connect

Contents: environmental, energy and natural resources status report for the 101st Congress; abandoned-mine fees passed in budget bill; cleanup effort and NRC fees boosted; other measures stall; Strategic Petroleum Reserve to grow to 1 billion barrels; circle of poison provisions cut in farm bill conference; congress clears landmark oil spill liability legislation; motor fuels tax tops massive debt reduction measure; Bush plans to sign massive clean air bill; global climate change bill passes at session end; lots of conservation provisions in farm bill; tongass bill moves; loggers and owls remain stalemated; major reform bills on parks, land fund and blm wither; coastal zone, great lakes, barrier bills beat deadline; modified tuna bill clears congress; Arizona, Alaska, Nevada wilderness bills approved; bills passed on asbestos, transport, waste reduction; bills passed on alternative power, low-income energy aid; numerous money bills clear Congress at the last minute; EPA-to-cabinet bill dies; DOD to fund environment research.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Figwort Family  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figwort Family Figwort Family Nature Bulletin No. 564-A April 26, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIGWORT FAMILY The Figwort Family, also known as the Foxglove Family, includes many plants with such strikingly different flowers or such different habits of growth that they scarcely seem to be relatives. The weirdly shaped blossoms of several kinds suggest, if you are fanciful, the faces of animals: some with fearsome open jaws, others with gaping flabby lips or bulging throats. Hence, among them, there are plants with such colorful names as Snapdragon, Turtlehead, Monkey Flower, Little Elephants, Owl's Clover and Pelican Flower. The Figwort, from which the family gets not only a common name but also its scientific name, is a woodland plant with inconspicuous flowers that was once supposed to possess a cure for scrofula. Most members of this family have bitter juice; and several do have medicinal, narcotic or poisonous properties.

106

Binding and Direct Electrochemistry of OmcA, an Outer-Membrane Cytochrome from an Iron Reducing Bacterium, with Oxide Electrodes: A Candidate Biofuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect

Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria transfer electrons to solid ferric respiratory electron acceptors. Outer-membrane cytochromes expressed by these organisms are of interest in both microbial fuel cells and biofuel cells. We use optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) to show that OmcA, an 85 kDa decaheme outer-membrane c-type cytochrome from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, adsorbs to isostructural Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in similar amounts. Adsorption is ionic-strength and pH dependent (peak adsorption at pH 6.5–7.0). The thickness of the OmcA layer on Al2O3 at pH 7.0 [5.8 ± 1.1 (2r) nm] from OWLS is similar, within error, to that observed using atomic force microscopy (4.8 ± 2 nm). The highest adsorption density observed was 334 ng cm 2 (2.4 · 1012 molecules cm 2), corresponding to a monolayer or 9.9 nm diameter spheres or submonolayer coverage by smaller molecules. Direct electrochemistry of OmcA on Fe2O3 electrodes was observed using cyclic voltammetry, with cathodic peak potentials of 380 to 320 mV versus Ag/AgCl. Variations in the cathodic peak positions are speculatively attributed to redox-linked conformation change or changes in molecular orientation. OmcA can exchange electrons with ITO electrodes at higher current densities than with Fe2O3. Overall, OmcA can bind to and exchange electrons with several oxides, and thus its utility in fuel cells is not restricted to Fe2O3.

Eggleston, Carrick M.; Voros, Janos; Shi, Liang; Lower, Brian H.; Droubay, Timothy; Colberg, Patricia J.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

SRS Environmental Reports for 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental reports 2003 Savannah River Site home srs environmental report - 2003 srs environmental data - 2003 soil & groundwater closure projects solid waste & infrastructure savannah river ecology laboratory high-level waste disposition site decommissioning & demolition USDA forest service - savannah river srs maps - 2003 savannah river site part of blue river space environmental reports 2003 Savannah River Site home srs environmental report - 2003 srs environmental data - 2003 soil & groundwater closure projects solid waste & infrastructure savannah river ecology laboratory high-level waste disposition site decommissioning & demolition USDA forest service - savannah river srs maps - 2003 savannah river site part of blue river space The Sycamore Tree The leaves and fruit of a fallen sycamore tree (Platanus occidentalis) dangle over the Savannah River as it flows along the southwestern border of the Savannah River Site. The sycamore can live for 500 to 600 years and reach a diameter greater than that of any other North American hardwood species. It grows in all states east of the Great Plains except Minnesota. Commonly found along streams and bottomlands, it frequently is planted as a shade tree because of its rapid growth; its distinctive, white, exfoliating bark; and its broad, dense crown. The fruit breaks apart during winter, producing an average of 200,000 seeds per pound.

108

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The diversity, distribution and feeding behavior of solifuges (arachnida; solifugae) in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little is known of the diversity of solifuges in East Africa or their habitat preferences and feeding biologies. A survey was undertaken to improve our understanding of the diversity and distribution of solifuges in Kenya and these data were supplemented by the solifuge holdings of the National Museums of Kenya (NMK), which were identified as part of this study. Historical records of each species found during this survey were verified through assessment of the primary literature and distributions were mapped for all Kenyan spp. A feeding study was conducted to determine preference between hard and toxic prey, and owl pellets from Tucson, Arizona were dissected to determine the importance of solifuges as prey. Finally, various outreach activities that were led and organized during this study were discussed, detailing the importance of science outreach as the bridge between research and the general public. All solifuges used in the feeding study ate the termites that were used as a behavioral control, but only three individuals of one species of solifuge, Z. fordi, were able to eat both hard and toxic prey items repeatedly. Solifuges were more willing or able to eat toxic prey than hard. Burrowing owl pellets from Tucson, Arizona were examined for invertebrate parts and preference was assessed for the five most commonly eaten arthropods. Solifuges were the third most frequently encountered arthropod in the pellets, after caterpillars and beetles, and were also the third most abundant. Solifuges were sampled over a period of six months and collected from 28.V.2006-8.VI.2006 and 11.II.2007- 13.V.2007 from eight different localities in Kenya. During this survey two genera were newly recorded for Kenya, Tarabulida and Solpugyla. In addition, the Tarabulida specimen is the first male ever recorded for the genus. Three new species records for Kenya were added: Z. sericea, Z. lobatula and Z. meruensis, and six undescribed species were recorded from Kenya as a result of this survey, including five unidentified rhagodids and species of Tarabulida. The southernmost locality record for the Galeodidae and Galeodes arabs arabs was uncovered in the NMK holdings.

Reddick, Kristie Lynn

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Bees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bees Bees Nature Bulletin No. 13 May 5, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation BEES Last week, in a big hollow tree that had been blown down, we found a squirrel's den, a screech owl's nest, and the comb of a hive of honey- bees. There are many such bee-trees in the forest preserves. They may be located by following the flight of the bees because once it has taken on its load of pollen and honey, a bee returns to the hive in a straight "bee-line. "Dr. David H. Thompson tells of a big elm in Indiana that yielded 350 pounds of honey. Honey-bees are the original communists. Like the bumblebee, the wasp and the ant, they live in large colonies (sometimes 50,000 individuals), and are called social insects. They live in a commune where the citizens govern, where the many kings (drones) are powerless, and where the one queen works as hard as any of her subjects and longer. They have an elaborate caste system, with specific tasks for certain classes of workers.

112

TITLE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J J a s 1. Besl President Force Control Industries 3664 Dixla H i 9 h p ~ Falrfleld, Ohio 45014 Dear Hr. Besl: With your consent,. the U.S. Dcpartwnt o f Energy (WE) conducted a r a d i o l q l l c a l survey a t the Former Associate A i r c r a f t Tool and Manufrcturlng Conpany s l t e i n Fairfield, Ohio. OOE has received the-auwey report frm i t s survey. contractor, Oak Rldge national Laboratory (OWL). Two copies o f the report are enclosed f o r your information and use. 71.5 report C 0 n ~ l ~ d e S that uranium i s present I n the f a c i l l t y I n excess of the ME guidelines f ~ r restdual r a d l o i c t i v e matertal. This conclusion i s based on d i r e c t radiation r a s u r a r n t s (shorn graphically on Flgures 8 , 9, 14, and Table 5 on pages 8, 9, 22, and 29, respectively) and om analysls o f s o i l samples, dust sllples, m

113

Sleeping Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleeping Birds Sleeping Birds Nature Bulletin No. 445-A February 19, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SLEEPING BIRDS Each winter, a few years ago, several thousand crows, roosted in the big woods near our house. In daytime they spread out over the countryside to find food but each evening, about sundown, they came streaming back in a continuous parade that took almost an hour to pass. In flocks of dozens or hundreds with scattered birds between, they flew the same route every day. In downstate Illinois, similar flocks roost in overgrown hedgerows of osage orange, isolated groves of timber, or on willow grown islands in large rivers. A much smaller flock still roosts the year-round in our woods. Ordinarily they slip in a little before dusk and settle down quietly but occasionally there is a hullabaloo as if they were squabbling over a favorite perch occupied by some newcomers. Just before dawn, one old bird we call "the bugler" caws three times. A minute or two later he repeats it. Then, one by one, drowsy voices of other crows are heard -- much like human sleepyheads in the morning. Sometimes an alarm call is heard during the night followed by a general clamor as if the flock had been disturbed by a marauding owl, weasel or raccoon. Crows are very wary and, like most birds, light sleepers.

114

The Toad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toad Toad Nature Bulletin No. 158 June 5, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation THE TOAD The toad, distinguished by its wide heavy body, dry warty skin and a large kidney-shaped gland on each shoulder, is a most interesting and valuable animal. There are many superstitions about this gentle harmless amphibian so loathed by many people. It is not evil or venomous; it does not "rain down" from the sky; it cannot exist for centuries sealed in the heart of a tree or solid rock; it does not cause warts. From those two big glands and from the "warts", which are also glands, a toad can secrete a milky fluid which is harmless to man but which makes it distasteful to most animals. However, they are eaten by most large snakes and by many hawks, owls, herons and bitterns. Because its food is chiefly insects and their larvae, of which it consumes great quantities, the toad is a valuable friend to the farmer and gardener even though it also eats spiders and earthworms.

115

Do Animals Talk?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do Animals Talk? Do Animals Talk? Nature Bulletin No. 635 April 1, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DO ANIMALS TALK ? Amateur bird fans are not all bird watchers. Some of us are bird listeners. In the forest preserves and rural regions, the big black noisy crow is a continual challenge. At the first light of dawn an evenly spaced "caw, caw, caw" seems to say "Hello! Is anybody awake?" Soon it is answered by sleepy crow voices. They have food calls, assembly calls, alarm calls, courtship calls and a lot of squabbling over roosting spots as they settle down for the night. The adults are very quiet near the nest but the fledglings make loud gargling sounds as they are fed. The discovery of an owl or cat sets off a sort of mob hysteria. By hiding a microphone among a flock of crows it has been found that they also talk in whispers.

116

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Metazoan Gene Families from Metazome  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Metazome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst metazoans. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of version 2.0.4, Metazome provides access to twenty-four sequenced and annotated metazoan genomes, clustered at nine evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, Ensembl, and JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. The included organisms (by common name) are: Human, Mouse, Rat, Dog, Opossum, Chicken, Frog, Stickleback, Medaka, Fugu pufferfish; Zebrafish, Seasquirt - savignyi, Seasquirt - intestinalis, Amphioxus, Sea Urchin, Fruitfly, Mosquite, Yellow Fever Mosquito, Silkworm, Red Flour Beetle, Worm, Briggsae Worm, Owl limpet (snail), and Sea anemone. [Copied from Metazome Overview at http://www.metazome.net/Metazome_info.php

118

Linnaeus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linnaeus Linnaeus Nature Bulletin No. 383-A May 23, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LINNAEUS Linne Woods, the forest preserve along the North Branch of the Chicago, River north of Dempster St. in Morton Grove, is named in honor of Carl Linne, born on May 23, 1707, in Rashault, a village in the southernmost part of Sweden. He became a scientist so great that he is called the Father of Systematic Botany" and his Latin name, Linnaeus, is known and used by all botanists and zoologists. The 200th anniversary of his birth was observed throughout the world as a red- letter day in the history of human culture. In 1753, he published his monumental work. Species Planetarium, which named, described and classified all the plant species then known to exist and by a system universally used today. In this system, each plant and each animal is assigned a name consisting of two words, Latin or Latin in form: the first being the name of the genus or related kinds; the second being the name of the species, which produces offspring having the same distinctive characteristics. This climinates the confusion created by the use of different common names in various localities for certain species, or the same common name for species that arc different. The tree most commonly known as the hackberry, is called sugarberry in six states, nettle tree in three, and is variously known as hoop ash, juniper tree, and bastard elm in other states, but it has only one scientific name: Celtis occidentalis.

119

Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.  

SciTech Connect

Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

120

Environmental and plant effects of sewage sludge application to forests and pastures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Digested sewage sludge was applied to pastures and tree plantations at 19 to 44 Mg/ha (dry weight) as part of a municipal sludge disposal program. The sludge had low concentrations of heavy metals and traces of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co. Monitoring of soils, soil solutions, and runoff indicated that N, P, heavy metals, and radionuclides were largely retained in the upper 15cm of the soil. Soil solutions had elevated NO/sub 3//sup /minus// concentrations often >100 mg/L, but no significant increases in groundwater NO/sub 3//sup /minus// were found during the first year. Runoff from active sites had elevated concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup /minus// (20--30 mg/L), soluble P (1 mg/L), BOD/sub 5/ (5--30 mg/L), and fecal coliform (up to 14,000 colonies per 100 ml), not unlike runoff from pastures with cattle. Enrichment of organic N (2 times), available (inorganic) N (5 to 10 times), and Bray-P in the upper soils persisted for several years following sludge application. Sludge increased vegetation N concentrations from 1.5% to 2.3% and P concentrations from 0.16% to 0.31%. With the exception of Zn, heavy metals did not accumulate substantially in the vegetation. The sludge addition increased the survival and growth of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.). For a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation future growth improvements are expected based on elevated foliar N concentrations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Van Miegroet, H.; Boston, H.L.; Johnson, D.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "owl strix occidentalis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A pilot golden eagle population study in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orloff and Flannery (1992) estimated that several hundred reports are annually killed by turbine collisions, wire strikes, and electrocutions at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (WRA). The most common fatalities were those of red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), American kestrels (Falco sparvatius), and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), with lesser numbers of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), common ravens (Corvus corax), bam owls (Tyto alba), and others. Among the species of raptors killed at Altamont Pass, the one whose local population is most likely to be impacted is the golden eagle. Besides its being less abundant than the others, the breeding and recruitment rates of golden eagles are naturally slow, increasing their susceptibility to decline as a result of mortality influences. The golden eagle is a species afforded special federal protection because of its inclusion within the Bald Eagle Protection Act as amended in 1963. There are no provisions within the Act which would allow the killing ``taking`` of golden eagles by WRA structures. This report details the results of field studies conducted during 19941. The primary purpose of the investigation is to lay the groundwork for determining whether or not turbine strikes and other hazards related to energy at Altamont Pass may be expected to affect golden eagles on a population basis. We also seek an understanding of the physical and biotic circumstances which attract golden eagles to the WRA within the context of the surrounding landscape and the conditions under which they are killed by wind turbines. Such knowledge may suggest turbine-related or habitat modifications that would result in a lower incidence of eagle mortality.

Hunt, G. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Predatory Bird Research Group

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Detroit Big Cliff Dam and Reservoir Project, North Santiam River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Detroit/Big Cliff Dam and Reservoir Project (Detroit Project) on the North Santiam River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1939, 1956, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each time period were determined. Ten wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Detroit Project extensively altered or affected 6324 acres of land and river in the North Santiam River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 1,608 acres of conifer forest and 620 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Detroit Project included the loss of winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, pileated woodpecker, spotted owl, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Detroit Project. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

Noyes, J.H.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Design, status and first operations of the spallation neutron source polyphase resonant converter modulator system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a new 1.4 MW average power beam, 1 GeV accelerator being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator requires 15 converter-modulator stations each providing between 9 and 11 MW pulses with up to a 1 .I MW average power. The converter-modulator can be described as a resonant 20 kHz polyphase boost inverter. Each converter modulator derives its buss voltage from a standard substation cast-core transformer. Each substation is followed by an SCR pre-regulator to accommodate voltage changes from no load to full load, in addition to providing a soft-start function. Energy storage is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. These capacitors do not fail short, but clear any internal anomaly. Three 'H-Bridge' IGBT transistor networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are time-gated to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse width modulation of the individual 20 lcHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with DSP based adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes nanocrystalline alloy that provides low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Capacitors are used on the transformer secondary networks to resonate the leakage inductance. The transformers are wound for a specific leakage inductance, not turns ratio. This design technique generates multiple secondary volts per turn as compared to the primary. With the appropriate tuning conditions, switching losses are minimized. The resonant topology has the added benefit of being deQed in a klystron fault condition, with little energy deposited in the arc. This obviates the need of crowbars or other related networks. A review of these design parameters, operational performance, production status, and OWL installation and performance to date will be presented.

Reass, W. A. (William A.); Apgar, S. E. (Sean E.); Baca, D. M. (David M.); Doss, James D.; Gonzales, J. (Jacqueline); Gribble, R. F. (Robert F.); Hardek, T. W. (Thomas W.); Lynch, M. T. (Michael T.); Rees, D. E. (Daniel E.); Tallerico, P. J. (Paul J.); Trujillo, P. B. (Pete B.); Anderson, D. E. (David E.); Heidenreich, D. A. (Dale A.); Hicks, J. D. (Jim D.); Leontiev, V. N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An Ontology For Agent-Based Modeling And Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontologies are a formal methodology for establishing a common vocabulary, for defining the concepts and relationships between those concepts of a particular domain, and for reasoning about the objects, behaviors, and knowledge that comprises the domain. In this paper, we present an ontology for agent-based modeling and simulation. Agent-based modeling and simulation has become an important and popular paradigm for the computational social and natural sciences; however, the application of this paradigm tends to be performed in an ad-hoc fashion leading to questions about underlying assumptions in an agent-based model, verification of the software implementation as a representation of that model, and validation of hypothesized conclusions inferred from data produced by computer simulation experiments. An ontology provides a formal, logical knowledge representation that supports automated reasoning. Such reasoning capability provides for consistency checking of the concepts and relationships in an agent-based model, can infer the assumptions inherent in a model, can infer the assumptions and the parameters inherent in a simulation or software representation of a model, and can enforce adherence to formal methods or best practices for verification and validation testing. These reasoning tasks direct, or at least inform, the modeler about relevant techniques and methods in the agent-based paradigm. The reasoning capability also provides a framework for automated generation of software code, automated design and execution of simulation experiments as well as automated generation and execution of validation tests for those experiments. Using the standard Ontology Web Language (OWL), we provide a complete, detailed ontology of agent-based modeling and simulation, and we show ho...

Scott Christley Xiaorong; Xiaorong Xiang; Greg Madey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Acceptances for Space-Based and Ground-Based Fluorescence Detectors, and Inference of the Neutrino-Nucleon Cross-Section above 10^19 eV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos will be useful for unraveling the dynamics of the most violent sources in the cosmos and for revealing the neutrino cross-section at extreme energy. Above ~ 10^20 eV, neutrinos may well be the only cosmic primariies. Thus, it is important to know the acceptances (event rate/flux) of proposed air-shower experiments for detecting ``horizontal'' neutrino events initiated in our atmosphere, and ``Earth-skimming'' events initiated in the Earth's surface rock or ocean. We calculate these acceptances for fluorescence detectors, both space-based as with the EUSO and OWL proposals, and ground-based, as with Auger, HiRes and Telescope Array. The neutrino cross-section sigma_nuN is not measured at energies above 5.2 x 10^13 eV. Although QCD extrapolations offer motivated guesses for sigma_nuN, new physics could intervene to provide a surprise. Therefore, we present the acceptances of horizontal (HAS) and upgoing (UAS) air showers as a function of sigma_nuN over the interesting range 10^(-34) to 10^(-30) cm^2. The dependences of acceptances on neutrino energy, shower-threshold energy, shower length and column density, and cloud layers are also studied. For UAS, we present acceptances for events over land (rock), and over the ocean (water). The latter are larger by about an order of magnitude, thus favoring space-based detectors. We revisit the idea of Kusenko and Weiler to infer sigma_nuN at E_nu ~ 10^20 eV from the ratio of HAS-to-UAS events, and find favorable results. Our calculation is mostly analytic. Included in the UAS calculation are realistic energy-losses for taus, and Earth-curvature effects.

Sergio Palomares-Ruiz; Andrei Irimia; Thomas J. Weiler

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

127

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores  

SciTech Connect

Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg{sup -1}) were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg{sup -1}). Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg{sup -1} dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using microfocused X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. This is the first reported study investigating the protective effect of hyperaccumulated Se against cell-disrupting herbivores. The finding that Se protected the two hyperaccumulator species from both cell disruptors lends further support to the elemental defense hypothesis and increases the number of herbivores and feeding modes against which Se has shown a protective effect. Because western flower thrips and two-spotted spider mites are widespread and economically important herbivores, the results from this study also have potential applications in agriculture or horticulture, and implications for the management of Se-rich crops.

Quinn, Colin F; Freeman, John L; Reynolds, Ray JB; Cappa, Jennifer J; Fakra, Sirine C; Marcus, Matthew A; Lindblom, Stormy D; Quinn, Erin K; Bennett, Lindsay E; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth AH

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Digital Library Approach to the Reconstruction of Ancient Sunken Ships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout the ages, countless shipwrecks have left behind a rich historical and technological legacy. In this context, nautical archaeologists study the remains of these boats and ships and the cultures that created and used them. Ship reconstruction can be seen as an incomplete jigsaw reconstruction problem. Therefore, I hypothesize that a computational approach based on digital libraries can enhance the reconstruction of a composite object (ship) from fragmented, incomplete, and damaged pieces (timbers and ship remains). This dissertation describes a framework for enabling the integration of textual and visual information pertaining to wooden vessels from sources in multiple languages. Linking related pieces of information relies on query expansion and improving relevance. This is accomplished with the implementation of an algorithm that derives relationships from terms in a specialized glossary, combining them with properties and concepts expressed in an ontology. The main archaeological sources used in this dissertation are data generated from a 17th-century Portuguese ship, the Pepper Wreck, complemented with information obtained from other documented and studied shipwrecks. Shipbuilding treatises spanning from the late 16th- to the 19th-centuries provide textual sources along with various illustrations. Additional visual materials come from a repository of photographs and drawings documenting numerous underwater excavations and surveys. The ontology is based on a rich database of archaeological information compiled by Mr. Richard Steffy. The original database was analyzed and transformed into an ontological representation in RDF-OWL. Its creation followed an iterative methodology which included numerous revisions by nautical archaeologists. Although this ontology does not pretend to be a final version, it provides a robust conceptualization. The proposed approach is evaluated by measuring the usefulness of the glossary and the ontology. Evaluation results show improvements in query expansion across languages based on Blind Relevance Feedback using the glossary as query expansion collection. Similarly, contextualization was also improved by using the ontology for categorizing query results. These results suggest that related external sources can be exploited to better contextualize information in a particular domain. Given the characteristics of the materials in nautical archaeology, the framework proposed in this dissertation can be adapted and extended to other domains.

Monroy Cobar, Carlos A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2006 Final Season Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates predation by piscivorous waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River Basin. During 2006, study objectives in the Columbia River estuary, work funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, were to (1) monitor and evaluate previous management initiatives to reduce Caspian tern (Hydroprogne caspia) predation on juvenile salmonids (smolts); (2) measure the impact of double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) predation on smolt survival, and assess potential management options to reduce cormorant predation; and (3) monitor large colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds in the estuary (i.e., glaucous-winged/western gulls [Larus glaucescens/occidentalis]) to determine the potential impacts on smolt survival. Study objectives on the mid-Columbia River, work funded by the Walla Walla District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, were to (1) measure the impact of predation by Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants on smolt survival; and (2) monitor large nesting colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds (i.e., California gulls [L. californicus], ring-billed gulls [L. delawarensis], American white pelicans [Pelecanus erythrorhynchos]) on the mid-Columbia River to determine the potential for significant impacts on smolt survival. Our efforts to evaluate system-wide losses of juvenile salmonids to avian predation indicated that Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants were responsible for the vast majority of smolt losses to avian predators in the Columbia Basin, with most losses occurring in the Columbia River estuary. In 2006, East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary supported the largest known breeding colonies of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants in the world. The Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island consisted of about 9,200 breeding pairs in 2006, up slightly (but not significantly so) from the estimate of colony size in 2005 (8,820 pairs). There has not been a statistically significant change in the size of the Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island since 2000. Tern nesting success averaged 0.72 fledglings per breeding pair in 2006, significantly higher than in 2005 (0.37 fledglings per breeding pair), a year of poor ocean conditions. Despite the presumably higher availability of marine forage fishes in 2006, the proportion of juvenile salmonids in diets of Caspian terns (32% of prey items) averaged higher than in 2005 (23% of prey items) and 2004 (18% of prey items). Steelhead smolts were particular vulnerable to predation by East Sand Island terns in 2006, with predation rates as high as 20% on particular groups of PIT-tagged fish reaching the estuary. Consumption of juvenile salmonids by terns nesting at the East Sand Island colony in 2006 was approximately 5.3 million smolts (95% c.i. = 4.4-6.2 million), significantly higher than the estimated 3.6 million smolts consumed in 2005, but still roughly 7 million fewer smolts consumed compared to 1998 (when all terns nested on Rice Island in the upper estuary). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continue to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply, even in 2005 when availability of marine forage fishes declined due to poor ocean conditions. Further management of Caspian terns to reduce losses of juvenile salmonids would be implemented under the Caspian Tern Management Plan for the Columbia River Estuary; the Records of Decision (RODs) authorizing implementation of the plan were signed in November 2006. The ROD lists as the management goal the redistribution of approximately half of the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony to alternative colony sites in interior Oregon and San Francisco Bay, California (USFWS 2006). Implementation of the management plan is stalled, however, because of the lack of appropriated funds.

Roby, Daniel D. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University; Collis, Ken [Real Time Research, Inc.; Lyons, Donald E. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z