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1

Bark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is now utilized as material for insulation, floor cleaners, and as a substitute for wool in fabrics. The bark of a tree has been transposed into clinks of the almighty dollar...

2

Stephanie Greenish Vincent Hayw ard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stephanie Greenish Vincent Hayw ard hayward@cim.mcgill.ca Center for Intelligent Machines Mc use at www.cim.mcgill.ca/ haptic/tissue/data.html. 1 Introduction Virtual surgery holds many promises

Hayward, Vincent

3

LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICIhF ARD RADIATION BIOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDICIhF ARD RADIATION BIOLOGY MEDICIhF ARD RADIATION BIOLOGY . - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORMA 90024 Ah" DEPARTXENT OF RADIOLOGY UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This work was p a r t i a l l y supported by ERDA Contract gEY-76-C-03-0012 and N I H g r a n t 7-R01-GM-24839-01. Prepared for U.S. Energy Research and Development Administrat ion under C o n t r a c t gEY-76-C-03-0012 ECAT: A New Computerized Tomographic Imaging System for Positron-Emitting Michael E. Phelps, Edward J . Hoffman Sung-Cheng Huang and David E . Kuhl Radiopharmaceuticals DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

4

OWS2GRID: A Prototype and Building System of WSRF-Enabled OGC Web Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, key methods and prototype that integrate OGC Web Service (OWS) into grid environment is analysed and we describe a resource-oriented architectural approach. The concrete is a progress in which a model extracting stateful resource under ... Keywords: grid computing, ows, wsrf, gis, introduce, globus

Yuke Zhou; Chenghu Zhou; Rongguo Chen; Yingdong Chen

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Jas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sh ort w av e Radiat iv e T rans f e r in t h e M ul t is cal e M ode l l ing Fram e w ork Jas on Col e 1 H ow ard Bark e r 2 M arat K h airout dinov 3 Dav id Randal l 4 1 Univ e...

6

Joint development normal to regional compression during exural-ow folding: the Lilstock buttress anticline, Somerset, England  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint development normal to regional compression during ¯exural-¯ow folding: the Lilstock buttress. At Lilstock Beach, joint sets in Lower Jurassic limestone beds cluster about the trend of the hinge of the Lilstock buttress anticline. In horizontal and gently north-dipping beds, J3 joints ( 295±2858 strike

Engelder, Terry

7

Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an eect of active or fossil upper mantle ow, or both?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an e¡ect of active or fossil upper mantle £ow, or both?§ Maggy, Brazil c Universidade de SaBrazil Received 26 the structure of the upper mantle beneath southeastern Brazil using teleseismic shear wave splitting

Barruol, Guilhem

8

Back to the Basics of Sustainability -- Houses of Bark and Energy of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Back to the Basics of Sustainability -- Houses of Bark and Energy Back to the Basics of Sustainability -- Houses of Bark and Energy of Sunshine Back to the Basics of Sustainability -- Houses of Bark and Energy of Sunshine August 2, 2012 - 2:23pm Addthis With new pipes and controls, the natural gas kilns Highland Craftsmen uses to produce poplar bark shingles will operate about 40 percent more efficiently, saving the company $5,000 a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of Highland Craftsmen. With new pipes and controls, the natural gas kilns Highland Craftsmen uses to produce poplar bark shingles will operate about 40 percent more efficiently, saving the company $5,000 a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of Highland Craftsmen. Julie McAlpin Communications Liaison, State Energy Program What are the key facts? With funds from the State Energy Program, Highland Craftsmen

9

Effective pine bark composting with the Dome Aeration Technology  

SciTech Connect

In South Africa garden refuse is primarily disposed of in domestic landfills. Due to the large quantities generated, any form of treatment would be beneficial for volume reduction, waste stabilization and resource recovery. Dome Aeration Technology (DAT) is an advanced process for aerobic biological degradation of garden refuse and general waste [Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999a. Advantages of dome aeration in mechanical-biological waste treatment. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Cagliari, 4-8 October 1999; Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999b. Mechanical-biological waste stabilization by the dome aeration method. Environment Protection Engineering 25 (3/99). Mollekopf, N., Brummack, J., Paar, S., Vorster, K., 2002. Use of the Dome Aeration Technology for biochemical stabilization of waste prior to landfilling. In: Proceedings of the Wastecon 2002, Waste Congress and Exhibition, Durban, South Africa.]. It is a non-reactor open windrow composting process, with the main advantage being that the input material needs no periodic turning. A rotting time of only 3-4 months indicates the high efficiency. Additionally, the low capital/operational costs, low energy inputs and limited plant requirements provide potential for use in aerobic refuse stabilization. The innovation in the DAT process is the passive aeration achieved by thermally driven advection through open windrows caused by temperature differences between the degrading material and the outside environment. This paper investigates the application of Dome Aeration Technology to pine bark composting as part of an integrated waste management strategy. A full-scale field experiment was performed at the Bisasar Road Landfill Site in Durban to assess the influence of climate, waste composition and operational conditions on the process. A test windrow was constructed and measurements of temperature and airflow through the material were taken. The process monitoring revealed that prevailing climatic conditions in a subtropical location do not affect the high efficiency of this technology. However, the composition of the input material can be detrimental for production of high quality compost because of a lack of nitrate.

Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)]. E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za; Polster, Andreas [Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Process Engineering and Environmental Technology, Helmholtzstrasse 14, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Effect of species and wood to bark ratio on pelleting of southern woods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six common southern hardwoods and loblolly pine were pelleted in a laboratory pellet mill. The pellet furnishes were blended to test the effect of different wood to bark ratios on pellet durability and production rate. Included was a ratio chosen to simulate the wood to bark ratio found in whole-tree chips. This furnish produced good quality pellets for all species tested. Pelleting of the pure wood of hardwoods was not successful; furnish routinely blocked the pellet mill dies. Pure pine wood, however, did produce acceptable pellets. It was noted that, as lignin and extractive content increased above a threshold level, the precentage of fines produced in a pellet durability test increased. Thus, all pine and tupelo wood/bark mixes produces high fines. This reduces the desirability of the pellets in the marketplace. Further research is necessary to confirm this relationship. This study suggests that both tree species and wood/bark ratio affect the durability of pellets and the rate with which they can be produced in a laboratory pellet mill. 9 references.

Bradfield, J.; Levi, M.P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Discrimination of bark from wood chips through texture analysis by image processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilization of wood chips for bioenergy requires classification and segregation of the constituents of the chipped mass to help optimize energy conversion. Wood chips obtained from processes such as forest thinning can contain a considerable amount of ... Keywords: Bark, Biomass, Image processing, Texture analysis, Wood chip

James R. Wooten; S. D. Filip To; C. Igathinathane; L. O. Pordesimo

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Use of BDST and an ANN model for prediction of dye adsorption efficiency of Eucalyptus camaldulensis barks in fixed-bed system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the Bohart and Adams' model taking into account bed depth, and influent dye concentration was studied to exhibit adsorption process of textile dyes (Basic Blue 41 - BB41 and Reactive Black 5 - RB5) in glass columns using tree barks (Eucalyptus ... Keywords: ANN, Adsorption columns, BB41, BDST, BDST model, neural networks, Dyes, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, MLP, RB5, Tree barks

Behzat Balci; Olcayto Keskinkan; Mutlu Avci

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Web gigantism in Darwin's bark spider, a new species from Madagascar (Araneidae: Caerostris) Matjaz Kuntner1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web gigantism in Darwin's bark spider, a new species from Madagascar (Araneidae: Caerostris) Matjaz, is grossly underestimated. Most species build large webs at forest edges, clearings, and gardens niche: casting its web across streams, rivers and lakes, so that the orb is suspended above water

Agnarsson, Ingi

14

High-tech tool predicts fire behavior in bark beetle-ravaged forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better computer models Better computer models High-tech tool predicts fire behavior in bark beetle-ravaged forests A high-tech computer model called HIGRAD/FIRETEC provides insights that are essential for front-line fire fighters. August 9, 2012 Researchers from LANL and the French Space Agency examine data from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover from inside the ChemCam Operations Center at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Monday, Aug. 6, 2012, less than a day after the rover landed on Mars. The ChemCam team received signals indicating that the instrument is healthy and all systems are ready to go. During the Las Conchas fire of 2011, a Los Alamos resident watches the Jemez Mountains burn just a few miles west of town and near LANL. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office

15

Measurement of $e^+ e^- \\to ??^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ near 10.6 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data samples of 89 fb$^{-1}$, 703 fb$^{-1}$, and 121 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider at center-of-mass energies 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, we study the exclusive reactions $e^+e^- \\to \\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ (Charge-conjugate modes are included implicitly). Significant signals of $\\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar{K}^0$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+$ are observed for the first time at these energies, and the energy dependencies of the cross sections are presented. On the other hand, no significant excesses for $K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0 \\bar{K}^0$ are found, and we set limits on the cross section ratios $R_{\\rm VP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+)}>$ 4.3, 20.0, and 5.4, and $R_{\\rm TP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+)}<$ 1.1, 0.4, and 0.6, for center-of-mass energies of 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, at the 90% C.L.

Belle Collaboration; C. P. Shen; C. Z. Yuan; A. Sibidanov; P. Wang; K. Hayasaka; X. L. Wang; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; M. -C. Chang; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Doleal; Z. Drsal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; B. R. Ko; P. Kody; S. Korpar; P. Krian; P. Krokovny; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; A. Moll; T. Mori; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; Y. Nagasaka; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; C. Ng; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; Y. Onuki; G. Pakhlova; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Rhrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. Shapkin; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

16

Use of bark-derived pyrolysis oils ass a phenol substitute in structural panel adhesives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this program was to pilot the world's first commercial-scale production of an acceptable phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin containing natural resin (NR) ingredients, for use as an adhesive in Oriented-Strand Board (OSB) and plywood panel products. Natural Resin products, specifically MNRP are not lignin ''fillers''. They are chemically active, natural phenolics that effectively displace significant amounts of phenol in PF resins, and which are extracted from bark-derived and wood-derived bio-oils. Other objectives included the enhancement of the economics of NR (MNRP) production by optimizing the production of certain Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP{trademark}) byproducts, particularly char and activated carbon. The options were to activate the char for use in waste-water and/or stack gas purification. The preliminary results indicate that RTP{trademark} carbon may ultimately serve as a feedstock for activated carbon synthesis, as a fuel to be used within the wood product mill, or a fuel for an electrical power generating facility. Incorporation of the char as an industrial heat source for use in mill operations was L-P's initial intention for the carbon, and was also of interest to Weyerhaeuser as they stepped into in the project.

Louisiana Pacific Corp

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Near-threshold production of a0(980) mesons in the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an effective Lagrangian approach as well as the Quark-Gluon Strings Model we analyze near-threshold production of a0(980)-mesons in the reaction NN -> d K \\bar{K} as well as the background of non-resonant K\\bar{K}-pair production. We argue that the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0 at an energy release Qproduction of the a0(980)-resonance. At larger energies the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K}^0-pair production - where the kaons are produced in a relative P-wave - becomes important. Then effects of final-state interactions are evaluated in a unitarized scattering-length approach and found to be in the order of a 20% suppression close to threshold. Thus in present experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY-J\\"ulich for Q<=107 MeV the a_0^+ signal can reliably be separated from the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K^0} background.

V. Yu. Grishina; L. A. Kondratyuk; M. Buescher; W. Cassing

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Pyrolysis of Wood and Bark in an Auger Reactor: Physical Properties and Chemical Analysis of the Produced Bio-oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-oil was produced at 450C by fast pyrolysis in a continuous auger reactor. Four feed stocks were used: pine wood, pine bark, oak wood, and oak bark. After extensive characterization of the whole bio-oils and their pyrolytic lignin-rich ethyl acetate fractions by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), calorific values, viscosity dependences on shear rates and temperatures, elemental analyses, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, water analyses, and ash content, these bio-oils were shown to be comparable to bio-oils produced by fast pyrolysis in fluidized bed and vacuum pyrolysis processes. This finding suggests that portable auger reactors might be used to produce bio-oil at locations in forests to generate bio-oil on-site for transport of the less bulky bio-oil (versus raw biomass) to biorefineries or power generation units. The pyrolysis reported herein had lower heat transfer rates than those achieved in fluidized bed reactors, suggesting significant further improvements are possible.

Ingram, L.; Mohan, D.; Bricka, M.; Steele, P.; Strobel, D.; Crocker, D.; Mitchell, B.; Mohammed, J.; Cantrell, K.; Pittman, C. U. Jr.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

On the min-cut max- ow ratio for multicommodity ows 1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 5, 2001 ... where k is the cardinality of the minimal vertex cover of the demand graph. ... We also show a similar bound for the maximum multicommodity...

20

FOOD PRESERVATION SERIES RECOMMENDED VARIETIES hOW TO STORE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, dressings, stews. Spearmint 18 24 9 Same as for peppermint. Leaves for garnishing iced drinks; lamb, jelly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FOOD PRESERVATION SERIES hOW TO STORE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

broccoli florets and/or stalks (peeled and cut into sticks) with a low-fat dip. Lightly brush cooked cup low-sodium chicken broth WO1047 #12;how to prepare 2 cups nonfat milk 2 tablespoons cornstarch; 3 grams (g.) fat; 10 milligrams (mg.) cholesterol; 225 mg. sodium. how to preserve Blanch Put water

22

Another Look at Bark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and durable. When shredded it is used in insulating materials and as a substitute for wool in fabrics; now it is being ground for use in floor cleaners and as a soil conditione....

23

OW THE NUMBER OF ZBR08 OF 80LUTIONIS OF A BECOWD-ORDER LINEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p h ~ ~ #12;~ n d ~ ~ ~ f l O h a 8 8 ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ 1 ~ We now **and porn I fwx s[a,h]. Frqf. ~~h

Knowles, Ian W.

24

Relations between phase mobilities and capillary pressures for two{phase ows in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Felipe Pereira y Li{Ming Yeh z March 11, 2002 1 Introduction The existence in fractured reservoirs is considered. This model corresponds physically to water ooding a naturally.2) where #26; water saturation; P is the global pressure; #3; #11

Douglas Jr., Jim

25

Dynamics of obsidian ows inferred from microstructures: insights from microlite preferred orientations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orientations Jonathan Castro a;? , Michael Manga b , Katharine Cashman c a Department of Geology, 52 W. Lorain and the type of flow across the surface. Microlite preferred orientations are used to investigate. Orientation distributions imply that radial spreading accompanied by flattening was the dominant mechanism

Manga, Michael

26

Scale e ects related to ow in rough fractures Y. M eheust and J. Schmittbuhl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the numerical point of view, it im- poses a superior limit to the size N of the grid used for sampling local

Schmittbuhl, Jean

27

Nonextensive statistical mechanics for a forced quasi-two-dimensional ow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, while it will make the inverter more expensive. Instead a small bicoloured Light Emitting Diode (LED

Texas at Austin. University of

28

Transform Your Future TAFE SA AwArd courSE guidE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Advanced TV Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering Columbia University, 1312 S.W. Mudd Building are selected automatically. In earlier work, we presented the Visual Apprentice, in which users can define automatically in building Visual Object Detectors. In the Visual Apprentice framework presented in [7], a user

South Australia, University of

29

Analytical and semi-analytical solutions of horizontal well capture times under no-ow and constant-head boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to calculate the capture times, and as benchmarks to validate numerical solutions. The limitations for oil and gas production in the past decade [15,21]. Extensive studies on pressure anal- ysis with surface restrictions (e.g., land®lls, lagoons, buildings, wetlands, lakes, utility lines, tanks), (2

Zhan, Hongbin

30

SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

w 0610 OW1 AL D 4BO.OW L men 0612 DZMYZOW OW1 AL D 67.600 w 0614 02(W2WO OW1 AL D' 456 .OW man 0615 WWZOOO OW1 AL D 428 .OW men 0616 DZMYZOW OW1 AL D 533 .OW . - & 0617...

31

A Parallel Second-Order Adaptive Mesh Algorithm for Incompressible Flow in Porous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solving multiphase, incompressible ?ows in porous media. Wemultiphase, multicomponent incompressible ?ow in hetero- geneous porous

Pau, George Shu Heng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Quantifying the effects of small-scale heterogeneities on fl ow and transport in undisturbed cores from the Hanford formation. Vadose Zone J  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT more than 4 million liters of hazardous and radioactive Accelerated migration of contaminants in the vadose zone has waste in the vadose zone. Relatively mobile radionuclides such as 99Tc, 129I, U, and 3 been observed beneath tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energys H have traveled further Hanford Reservation, Richland, WA. This paper focuses on quantify- than predicted by current models and have been deing hydrologic processes that control the fate and transport of contami- tected in the groundwater, which eventually flows to nants in the unsaturated sediments beneath the Hanford tank farms. the Columbia River (Dirkes and Hanf, 1997; Hartman The experimental approach involved the use of field relevant, longterm unsaturated nonreactive transport experiments in undisturbed sediments from the Hanford Formation. Undisturbed sediment cores were collected from a laminated fine-grained sand unit within the Hanford Formation in both the vertical direction (flow cross bedding) and the horizontal direction (flow bedding parallel). Laboratory-scale saturated and unsaturated flow experiments were conducted using multiple nonreactive tracers to investigate hydrologic processes controlling

M. N. Pace; M. A. Mayes; P. M. Jardine; T. L. Mehlhorn; J. M. Zachara; B. N. Bjornstad

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ow Jane E. Luckhardt 621 Capitol Moll, 18'" Floor iIuck ha ,dtlg1downey bro nd.com Sacramento, CA 95814  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) are working on future standards. Turbine Sound Power Measurement-scale wind turbine sound power levels is the International Electrotechnical Commission IEC 61400-11 StandardWind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory

34

Strictly hyperbolic models of co-current three-phase flow with gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanics for multiphase porous-media ?ow including phases,thermodynamics of multiphase ?ow in porous media includingdescriptions of multiphase ?ow in porous media, which

Juanes, Ruben; Patzek, Tadeusz W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. (2002). Multiphase ?ow in homogeneous porous media within hydrogeology and multiphase ?ow in porous media. I amimplementa- tion of multiphase ?ow in porous media.

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NREL PV AR&D 11th review meeting, May 13--15, 1992, Denver Marriott City Center, Denver, Colorado. Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a collection of abstracts from papers presented at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) research and development review meeting held May 1992. Subject areas covered include solar cell and solar module manufacturing and development, materials, polycrystalline thin films, applications, amorphous silicon, solar cell performance and testing, crystalline silicon and other photovoltaic and safety perspectives. (GHH)

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Modeling quasi-static poroelastic propagation using an asymptotic approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model for multiphase ?ow through deformable fractured porousmultiphase ?uid ?ow, heat transfer, and deformation in fractured porous

Vasco, D.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Response to Comments on Abrupt-Interface Solution for Carbon Dioxide Injection into Porous Media by Dentz and Tartakovsky (2008) by Lu etal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuum mechanics for multiphase porous-media ?ow includ-Brenner, H. : Multiphase ?ow in porous media. Ann. Rev.

Dentz, Marco; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

On the transport of emulsions in porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tions related to multiphase ?ow in porous media. We haveof multiphase ?ow. Key words: emulsion, porous media,

Cortis, Andrea; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Pattern Matching for Advanced Lithographic Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CD Distribution Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.1ow for the CD Distribution Generation. . . . . . . . . . . .ow for the CD Distribution Generation. . . . . . . . . .

Rubinstein, Juliet Alison

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chemically reacting plumes, gas hydrate dissociation and dendrite solidification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

non-linearity in a multiphase porous media ?ow as a resulta multiphase ?ow will still exist outside the porous medium,multiphase ?ow extensions to the well-known single-phase porous

Conroy, Devin Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nitrate removal using compost and pine bark as a carbon source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Emissions resulting from waste degradation processes have a high polluting potential and are responsible for negative impacts on the environment. Landfill leachate is hazardous for (more)

Pisano, Giulia.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Harvesting Energy-Options and Challenges from the Bark Beetle Epidemic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to grow. · The downturn in sawmill production caused a shortage of raw material supply for wood pellet American wood pellet production is increasing swiftly and is primarily focusing on the European market. · Canada continues to be the world's largest wood pellet exporter, shipping large amounts to power stations

44

The ultrastructure of book lung development in the bark scorpion Centruroides gracilis (Scorpiones: Buthidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hemo- lymph channels of adult book lungs in scorpions and16 References 1. Farley RD: Book gill development in embryosrelationship of the lung-book of Scorpio to the gill-book of

Farley, Roger D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Non-isothermal flow in low permeable porous media: A comparison of Richards' and two-phase flow approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for multiphase ?ow and transport in porous mediaMultiphase ?ow ?elds in in-situ air sparging and its effect on remediation. Transp Porous

Wang, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Analytical Solution to the Riemann Problem of Three-Phase Flow in Porous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties governing multiphase ?ow in porous media. Waterof multicomponent, multiphase displacement in porous media.e?ects We study multiphase ?ow in porous media under the

Juanes, Ruben; Patzek, Tadeusz W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Some aspects of $?^+$ parity determination in the reaction $? N\\to ?^+ \\bar{K}\\to N K \\bar{K}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the problem of how to determine the parity of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark in the reaction $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta\\to NK\\bar{K}$, where $N=n,p$. Our model calculations indicate that the contribution of the non-resonant background of the reaction $\\gamma N\\to NK\\bar{K}$ cannot be neglected, and that suggestions to determine the parity based solely on the initial-stage process $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta$ cannot be implemented cleanly. We discuss the various mechanisms that contribute to the background, and we identify some spin observables which are sensitive.

A. I. Titov; H. Ejiri; H. Haberzettl; K. Nakayama

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

The impact of bark beetle infestations on monoterpene emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation in western North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last decade, extensive beetle outbreaks in western North America have destroyed over 100 000 km2 of forest throughout British Columbia and the western United States. Beetle infestations impact monoterpene emissions ...

Berg, A. R.

49

New pests and diseases: Sudden oak death syndrome fells 3 oak species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Against Bark Beetles and Ambrosia Beetles. Pest Alert #3B,western oak bark beetle and ambrosia beetles have been asso-absence of bark beetles and ambrosia beetles in the treated

Garbelotto, Matteo M.; Svihra, Pavel; Rizzo, David M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Multiscale-stabilized solutions to one-dimensional systems of conservation laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the simulation of multiphase porous media ?ow, and theTreatment of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media, Lecture NotesMortar upscaling for multiphase ?ow in porous media, Comput.

Juanes, Ruben; Patzek, Tadeusz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Climatic Comparisons of Estimated and Measured Winds from Ships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speed records from twelve Ocean Weather Stations (OWS's) are compared to estimates from transient ships in the general vicinity of the on-station OWS position. Measured and estimated winds from transient ships within specified areas are also ...

Robert G. Quayle

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Exposing the non-collectivity in elliptic flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

located, is due to collective hydro- dynamic expansion: Theinto two components[11] the hydro ?ow yield and the jets-deviations from the average hydro ?ow yield in L/R bins, and

Koch, Volker

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Euphausiids of Southeast Asian waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the northeast winds. Offshore winds in the eastern Gulf havewinds and mean northerly current ?ow in both the southern and offshorewinds and strong southward ?ow of coastal water. Temperatures also were low in the offshore

Brinton, Edward

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Final_Report.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

activities through a gas and water bearing zone that extends from 583' to 648' below ground level. This would explain the signifi cant loss of fl ow vs. the fl ows that were...

55

Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracture model for multiphase ?ow in porous media. AIChEsingle- and multiphase transport in fractured porous media

Geiger, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Understanding foams & foaming D.D. Joseph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; this property makes foam a good drilling uid for carrying away cuttings in underbalanced drilling. The foam ows

Joseph, Daniel D.

57

Farmers Markets Search | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ard.ragland@ams.usda.gov Unique Identifier USDA-4034 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary Data Download URL http:apps.ams.usda.govfarmersmarkets Format HTML License...

58

Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 to K0K0bar and B+ to K0barK+ Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Physics Higgs Boson and Beyond: This summer a highly-anticipated particle was discovered at the Large Hadron Collider. Is this particle the Higgs boson? The Higgs boson gives mass to quarks and electrons

Knowles, David William

59

Colorado Bark Beetle Mitigation Fund Helps Our Future Forests 1.5 Million Acres of Colorado's Forests Affected by Mountain Pine Beetle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

long-term sustainable forest management to reduce the impacts of insect and disease outbreaks started, MPB has killed most of the mature pines and beetle populations have decreased. The Real Costs the cost of managing our forests. The role of CSFS is to treat priority acres on state and private lands

60

Co-simulation of innovative integrated HVAC systems in buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canada: International Building Perfor- mance SimulationExternal coupling between building energy simulation andexternal coupling of building energy and air ow modeling

Trcka, Marija

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and outlet pressures, pipeline length, and mass ?ow. Thethat characterize pipeline lengths and truck travelof the city). for pipeline length vs station number are ?t

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Problem Formulations for Ecological Risk Assessments Conducted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- deformities, fin erosion, lesions, and tumors ERA - ecological risk assessment HHRA - human health risk assessments ow K - octanol-water partition coefficients oc K - organic...

63

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the experimental results. Two different crude oils and SAE 3OW oil were used for these experiments. Crude oils were tested ...

64

Enrichment, isolation and characterization of fungi tolerant to 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bourne, MA, USA). Carbon dioxide concentration was measuredOrangeburg, NY, USA). Carbon dioxide and ?ow data wereReddy et al. 2009). Carbon dioxide evolution rates (CER)

Singer, S.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

On the feasibility of dynamic congestion-based pricing in differentiated services networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. Anantharam, Utility-based rate control in the internetcorrespond to zero utility, and intermediate rates typicallyof total user utility over ?ow rates of each user on each

Jin, N; Jordan, Scott

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum: Part I. Thermal Behavior Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

showed that the cooling rate increases with increasing meltbecause the melt ?ow rate increases with increasing nozzlethe average cooling rate increase with decreasing droplet

Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Labor Market Frictions, Interest Rates, and Macroeconomic Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

endogenous separation rate increases, that is the ?ow intoinduces higher real interest rate, increases the demand forendogenous separation rate increases. We assume match-speci?

Zhang, Ji

68

Chemically reacting plumes, gas hydrate dissociation and dendrite solidification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Thermal Energy Transport . . . . . 2. Twophase ?ow in a1. Thermal Energy . . . . . . . . .the conversion of chemical to thermal energy is small (small

Conroy, Devin Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Interactions of White Certificates for energy efficiency and other energy and climate policy instruments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The EU and its member states are developing their ow policies targeting at energy supply, energy demand an environmental goals that are indirectly linked to (more)

Oikonomou, Vlasios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Users' Experience with ADIFOR 2.0 Argonne Preprint ANL/MCS-P589-0496  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, cyclotron modeling, low-energy nuclear physics reaction theory, numerical weather prediction, reactive ow modeling, earthquake ground motion modeling, atmospheric pollution modeling, chemical reactor modeling

71

Silicon microrefrigerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ows. Thus, when we take heat conduction between hot and coldbulk Joule heating and heat conduction are au- tomaticallyby solving Fourier heat conduction equa- tion, Poisson

Zhang, Y; Zeng, G H; Shakouri, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

LOW ENERGY PROCESSES IN ELECTRONIC MATERIALS: III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program Organizers: Rajiv K. Singh, University of Florida, 317 MAE, PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400; O.W. Holland, Solid State Division, Oak Ridge...

73

Malaria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cinchona tree, also called Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, was brought to Europe from Peru in the 1600's and used to combat fevers, but it was not until 1820 that two Frenchmen...

74

The goldspotted oak borer (GSOB), Agrilus auroguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by GSOB but later also be colonized by western oak bark beetles, ambrosia beetles, or cerambycid wood mechanical damage or fire. Scolytidae (bark and ambrosia beetles) Monarthrum species, Gnathotrichus pilosus and Xyleborinus saxeseni (ambrosia beetles) round

Ishida, Yuko

75

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supratragus $hi.h is not sristed bi.k$ards (Figur. 17. ci. I-rrs6 a l E./,rifd). usuallv {ith butl pal.h b

Standiford, Richard B.

76

Advisor Edition DIRECTORYOF CLASSES,..  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supratragus $hi.h is not sristed bi.k$ards (Figur. 17. ci. I-rrs6 a l E./,rifd). usuallv {ith butl pal.h b

Queitsch, Christine

77

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The TREC Conferences: A n Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... legal: Baron, O ard, Thom pson, Tom linson m illion query: J am es A llan QA : H oa D ang, D iane Kelly, J im my Lin spam : Gord Corm ack ...

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Arnold Schwarzenegger Preserving California's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Preserving California's Energy Resources for residential O N REGULATIONS/STANdARdS nonresidential alternative calculation Method (acM) approval Manual, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison Company, San Diego Gas and Electric Company

80

Anomalous Sea Surface Temperatures and Local AirSea Energy Exchange on Intraannual Timescales in the Northeastern Subtropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here 11 years of surface data (196172, excluding 1963) taken at ocean weather ship N (OWS N) are analyzed. OWS N is located in the subtropical eastern Pacific Ocean (140W, 30N). Bulk formulas are employed to calculate each component of the ...

R. E. Ronca; D. S. Battisti

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ATLAS I: A Single-chip ATM switch for NOWs Manolis G.H. Katevenis Panagiota Vatsolaki  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ows these are handled in either of two ways. Some networks allow packets/cells to be dropped, and use latency, and and (ii) they drop cells when (even short-term) congestion happens. In this paper, we present- pressure (credit-based) ow control which never drops ATM cells. The architecture of ATLAS I has been fully

Markatos, Evangelos P.

82

A Modelica-based Model Library for Building Energy and Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the temperature of the boiler is con- trolled based onDampers Motors Valves Boilers Chillers Delays HeatExchangersuid ?ow systems. A dynamic boiler model is in Fluid.Boilers

Wetter, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Secondary air interaction with main flow in axial turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secondary air, known as purge air, is injected through seals in the hub and shroud of axial turbines to prevent hot gas ingestion into the endwall cavities. An investigation into the interaction of purge ow with turbine ...

Zlatinov, Metodi B. (Metodi Blagoev)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Numerical Investigation of the Performance of Three Hinge Designs of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters on bilea?et mechanical heart valve ?ow dynamics.J. Heart Valve Dis. 18:535545, 2009. Gross, J. M. , M. C.two bilea?et mechanical heart valves under aortic and mitral

Simon, Hlne A.; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000 stainless steel tubes that conduct the ow of steam. Due to stress and corrosion, the tubes develop cracks over time. Cracks are detected during planned inspections. The cracked tubes are subsequently plugged

86

NDRPProtocolTechBasisCompiled020705.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area of the film that was shielded on both the front and back by only a thin layer of Brass metal and is referred to as the soft gamma field, and OW represents that portion of...

87

Time-of-flight flow imaging using NMR remote detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

line is a ?t of the dispersion of the gas inside the rock asxenon gas provides a unique opportunity to study dispersiongas or liquid phases with varying pressures or ?ow rates, di?erent regimes of dispersion

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

330.ps.Z - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 24, 2001 ... tion of ow through a pipe is modeled by a disjunction. ...... ing, S.T., Klepeis, J.L., Meyer, C.A. and Schweiger, C.A. Handbook of Test Problems.

89

BNL Small Coil Test Winding Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Coil Test Winding Session 4: Interaction Region Subgroup Chairs: Fulvia Pilat, Tom Markiewicz (Tuesday afternoon) 1 cm LHe Fl ow Space Coi lSupportTubes Sext upol e Coi l...

90

I I Environmental Protection Agency Reports  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I Environmental Protection Agency . . Reports Book .4 Preliminary Data Report, Project Rulison Off-Site Surveillance Flaring Period - October 4-5, 1970 ' . - 3 5 s 3 ow. O c t o...

91

Equilibrium management of fisheries with altruistic overlapping generations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they discount their own utility at rate ? so their presentfuture generations utility ?ows at a rate pos- sibly di?on her discount rate for the utility of the not-yet born, ?.

Ekeland, Ivar; Karp, Larry; Sumaila, Rashid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Carocal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TCSC (Series Comp.) Static Sync. SC Univ. Power Flow C. Interline PFC HVDC Courtesy: P rinceton P ow er System s Slide 4 Goals: Specs for DevicesModules ...

93

Thermal catalytic conversion of the used isobutyl isoprene rubber into valuable hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuous ?ow reactor for thermal degradation of polymers.Qian J. Studies of the thermal degradation of waste rubber.10.1007/s10973-009-0577-3 Thermal catalytic conversion of

Rasul Jan, M.; Jabeen, Farah; Shah, Jasmin; Mabood, Fazal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Computational methods for analyzing and detecting genomic structural variation : applications to cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating CGH and ESP data into a ?ow problem. . . . .integrating arrayCGH and ESP. Personal Communi- cation. [End-Sequence Pro?ling (ESP) and Paired-end Mapping (PEM)

Bashir, Ali

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Erosion and Optimal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Modeling and Computing Two-settlement Oligopolistic Equilibrium in a Congested Electricity Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

network where ?ows on transmission lines are constrained byGenerator outages, transmission line outages and demandnodes, and a set L of transmission lines. There is a set G

Yao, Jian; Adler, Ilan; Oren, Shmuel S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Controlling the Biodegradation Rate of Magnesium-Based Implants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Z. Pu, D. Puleo, O.W. Dillon, Jr., I.S. Jawahir. On-Site ... By proper selection of machining conditions, magnesium-based implants with customized...

98

Fast spot-based multiscale simulations of granular drainage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ow in a pebble-bed nuclear reactor, Phys. Rev. E 74 (2006)is the pebble-bed nuclear reactor concept (2; 3), thatThe pebble-bed modular reactor, Nuclear News 44. [4] http://

Rycroft, Chris H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Understanding order flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the future market-wide information that dealers useWe term this, the market-wide information ow. On importantbreak down the market-wide information into its component

Evans, MDD; Lyons, Richard K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Noise and zero point drift in 1.7 mu m cutoff detectors for SNAP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acceleration Probe. Effects of Fowler sampling depth andapply to the case where Fowler sampling is performed for 15dark > 1*mean f ow le r fowler Figure 1: Comparison of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for SRS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

evaluat design evaluat predict to guid * Th so in w es sy * Th is m * Th fle m de fu The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S Report Date: J ited States valuation i Why DOE ow...

102

Bifurcation of low Reynolds number flows in symmetric channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ow elds in two-dimensional channels with discontinuous expansions are studied numerically to understand how the channel expansion ratio in uences the symmetric and non-symmetric solutions that are known to occur. For improved con dence and understanding, two distinct numerical techniques are used. The general ow eld characteristics in both symmetric and asymmetric regimes are ascertained by a time-marching nite volume procedure. The ow elds and the bifurcation structure of the steady solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are determined independently using the nite-element technique. The two procedures are then compared both as to their predicted critical Reynolds numbers and the resulting ow eld characteristics. Following this, both numerical procedures are compared with experiments. The results show that the critical Reynolds number decreases with increasing channel expansion ratio. At a xed supercritical Reynolds number, the location at which the jet rst impinges on the channel wall grows linearly with the expansion ratio. 1

Francine Battaglia; Simon J. Tavener Y; Anil K. Kulkarni Z; Charles L. Merkle X

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Assessing Macroprudential Policies: Case of Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops methods for assessing the sensitivity of capital ows to global nancial conditions, and applies the methods in assessing the impact of macroprudential policies introduced by Korea in 2010. Relative to a comparison group of countries, we nd that the sensitivity of capital ows into Korea to global conditions decreased in the period following the introduction of macroprudential policies. JEL codes: Keywords: F32, F33, F34 Capital ows, credit booms, macroprudential policy Prepared for the symposium issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Economics on capital ows. We are grateful to Maurice Obstfeld and two referees for their comments and guidance on an earlier draft. One of the authors (Shin) was involved in the design of the macroprudential policy tools introduced in Korea in 2010, and hence is not a disinterested party in the ndings reported in this paper. 1 1

Valentina Bruno; Hyun Song Shin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DETAILED LOOP MODEL (DLM) ANALYSIS OF LIQUID SOLAR THERMOSIPHONS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DLM on the other hand con- pipes heat loss from ows. para 11~ headers~ connecting pipes~ and heat exchanger tubes) isconnecting pipes (riser and downcomer) and a heat exchanger

Mertol, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

304.ps - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems use heat intercepts to minimize the heat ow from a hot to. a cold surface. In Figure 1, the cooling temperature T i is a control imposed ...

106

Loss mechanisms in turbine tip clearance flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of tip clearance ow have been carried out to dene the loss generation mechanisms associated with tip leakage in unshrouded axial turbines. Mix- ing loss between the leakage, which takes the form of a ...

Huang, Arthur (Arthur C.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

OBSERVATIONS ON THE REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF THE COWNOSE RAY, RHINOPTERA BONASUS, IN CHESAPEAKE BAyI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

90 em OW. Macroscopic inspection of the oviducts suggested that females began to mature at 85-92 cm on commercially important shellfish (Merriner and Smith 1979). Because of the severe damage to shellfish beds

108

Experimental and Numerical Examination of the Thermal Transmittance of High Performance Window Frames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

windows are often called passive -house wind ows, as windowse window frames, like passive-house windows. In this p aperare supposed to satisfy the Passive house requirements of

Gustavsen Ph.D., Arild

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

North Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

With new pipes and controls, the natural gas kilns Highland Craftsmen uses to produce poplar bark shingles will operate about 40 percent more efficiently, saving the company...

110

Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEJ, Stark RW. The bark and ambrosia beetles of California (oleracea, Adocia ambrosia, Hymedesmia cf. levis, ClionaRhizochalina oleracea/Adocia ambrosia/Hymedesmia cf. levis/

Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Mycol. Rrs. 98 (11): 1272-1276 (1994) Prillted ill Great Britain 1272 Graphium pseudormiticum sp. nov.: a new hyphomycete with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and systematics of bark and ambrosia beetles, pp. 181Ð235. In F. Lieutier, K. R. Day, A. Batisttisti, J.-C. Gre

112

Forest nurseries face critical choices with the loss of methyl bromide fumigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seedlings over mature composts in USDA Forest Serviceseedlings planted into compost-amended soil that had eitherbio- solid and bark-based composts had the highest average

Weiland, Jerry E; Littke, Will R; Haase, Diane L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

One- and Two-Phase Conversion of Biomass to Furfural  

Exploiting the energy potential of biomass high in cellulose and ligninincluding grasses, shrubs, husks, bark, yard and mill offal not readily ...

114

Chapter 1. Net Generation - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Wood/wood waste solids (including paper pellets, railroad ties, utility poles, wood chips, bark, and wood waste solids), wood waste liquids (red liquor, ...

115

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood and Wood-derived fuels include wood/wood waste solids (including paper pellets, railroad ties, utility poles, wood chips, bark, and wood waste solids), ...

116

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood and wood-derived fuels include wood/wood waste solids (including paper pellets, railroad ties, utility poles, wood chips, bark, and wood waste solids), ...

117

Transient response of flow-direction-switching vapor-phase biofilters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pellet ?Celite R-635? Compost-isolite-limestone Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes UF UF Polyurethane foam Peat-bark-wood

Wright, W F; Schroeder, E D; Chang, Daniel P.Y.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Investigation of Episodic Flow from Unsaturated Porous Media into a Macropore  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Th e recent literature contains numerous observations of episodic or intermittent fl ow in unsaturated flow systems under both constant fl ux and ponded boundary conditions. Flow systems composed of a heterogeneous porous media, as well as discrete fracture networks, have been cited as examples of systems that can exhibit episodic fl ow. Episodic outfl ow events are significant because relatively large volumes of water can move rapidly through an unsaturated system, carrying water and contaminants to depth greatly ahead of a wetting front predicted by a one-dimensional, gravity-driven diff usive infiltration model. In this study, we model the behavior of water flow through a sand column underlain by an impermeable-walled macropore. Relative permeability and capillary pressure relationships were developed that capture the complex interrelationships between the macropore and the overlying porous media that control fl ow out of the system. The potential for episodic flow is assessed and compared to results of conventional modeling approaches and experimental data from the literature. Model results using coupled matrixmacropore relative permeability and capillary pressure relationships capture the behavior observed in laboratory experiments remarkably well, while simulations using conventional relative permeability and capillary pressure functions fail to capture some of the observed fl ow dynamics. Capturing the rapid downward movement of water suggests that the matrix-macropore capillary pressure and relative permeability functions developed have the potential to improve descriptions of fl ow and transport processes in heterogeneous, variably saturated media.

R. K. Podgorney; J. P. Fairley

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Woody Biomass for Energy in Michigan TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AND INQUIRY EXTENSION BULLETIN E-3094  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of pelletizing presses. There's no particular mystery in wood handling systems, drying ovens, pellet presses. A number of market-ready, off-the-shelf systems can be considered. Pellets are formed under heat and high roundwood is removed) contains a high proportion of bark. Bark tends to increase the ash content and lower

120

Walnut twig beetle (WTB), Pityophthorus juglandis, (Figure 1) is a small native phloeophagous (phloem-feeding) insect that has  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bark and ambrosia beetles, aphids, flies, thrips, and wasps) have been minimal in fun- nel traps baited ambrosia beetles that will complicate trap catch processing and positive identification of the WTB numbers of about 30 other bark and ambrosia beetle species were trapped (Table 1). To minimize the extent

Hammock, Bruce D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Anaerobic pyrite oxidation rates determined via direct volume-loss measurements: a Vertical Scanning Interferometric approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determina- tion of dissolution/precipitation kinetic rates. A VSI assessment of pyrite dissolution rates et al., 2008) with applications to oxic ARD processes. Presented here are rate data for the inorganic experiments the bulk chemical changes in the solution composition (e.g. Fe2+ /Fe3+ ) were used to determine

Benning, Liane G.

122

JEM Table of Contents: May 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

J.P. Tower, S.P. Tobin, M. Kestigian, P.W. Norton, A.B. Bollong, H.F. Schaake, and C.K. Ard. Etch Pit Characterization of CdTe andCdZnTe Substrates for Use in ...

123

A budget of inversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two problems of inversion are considered. First are the inverses in a stand ard circle of curves based on two fixed points, i.e., Circles of Apollonius, Conic Sections and Ovals of Cassini; then the inverses of lines not passing through the center of ... Keywords: Circles of Apollonius, City block metric, Conies, Inversion, Ovals of Cassini

J. A. Nickel

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Oklahoma Book Award Lizards, Windows to the Evolution of Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oklahoma Book Award Lizards, Windows to the Evolution of Diversity March 14, 2004 Literary Book with the prestigious Oklahoma Book Award for "Lizards, Windows to the Evolution of Diversity", a comprehensive-Purdue University "This book is the first to provide a comprehensive introduction to the diver- sity of liz- ards

Pianka, Eric R.

125

Microsoft PowerPoint - Coal contaminants PNNL.ppt [Compatibility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOFC T l Li it f SOFC Tolerance Limits for Phosphorus and Arsenic J.W. Stevenson, O.A. Marina, L.R. Pederson,* C.A. Coyle, E C Thomsen and D J Ed ards E.C. Thomsen, and D.J....

126

IDL Version 7.0 November 2007 Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

So- ciety. Washington, DC: Carnegie En- dowment for International Peace. Genieys, William and Marc or during an extraor- dinary "window of opportunity" and the use of coercion afforded by hard conditionality, and The George Washington University. Mitchell A. Orenstein is the S. Rich- ard Hirsch Associate Professor

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

127

COLLECTIONS BY THE OREGON IN THE GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLLECTIONS BY THE OREGON IN THE GULF OF MEXICO Marine Biological Laboratory MAR G - 1957 WOODS COLLECTIONS BY THE OHEG-ON IN THE GULF OF MEXICO List of Crustaceans, Mollusks, ard Fishes Identified From Collections Made by the Exploratory Fishing Vessel Oregon in the Gulf of Mexico and Adjacent Seas 1950 Through

128

Three-dimensional hybrid grid generator and unstructured flow solver for compressors and turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A numerical method for the simulation of compressible turbulent ?ows is presented. This method includes a novel hybrid grid generation for airfoil cascades and an unstructured mesh ?ow solver. The mesh tool incorporates a mapping technique and a grid smoothing method. The mapping technique is used to build an initial volume mesh and the grid smoothing method is used to improve the quality of the initial mesh. The grid smoothing is based on the optimization of mesh-quality parameters. The further improvement of the smoothed mesh is achieved by an edge-swapping and node-insertion technique. The unstructured ?ow solver is developed for a hybrid grid. This ?ow solver uses a rotational frame of reference. The convective and viscous ?uxes are numerically solved by an upwind scheme and an averaged nodal gradient. A higher-order spatial accuracy is achieved by a piece-wise linear reconstruction. An explicit multi-stage method is employed for integration in time. The Menter?s k ?? model is implemented to simulate the turbulence e?ects. The ?ow solver is validated against the analytical and experimental results. A parametric study is performed for a high speed centrifugal compressor.

Kim, Kyusup

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thermal diagnostic of the Optical Window on board LISA Pathfinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum conditions inside the LTP Gravitational Reference Sensor must comply with rather demanding requirements. The Optical Window (OW) is an interface which seals the vacuum enclosure and, at the same time, lets the laser beam go through for interferometric Metrology with the test masses. The OW is a plane-parallel plate clamped in a Titanium flange, and is considerably sensitive to thermal and stress fluctuations. It is critical for the required precision measurements, hence its temperature will be carefully monitored in flight. This paper reports on the results of a series of OW characterisation laboratory runs, intended to study its response to selected thermal signals, as well as their fit to numerical models, and the meaning of the latter. We find that a single pole ARMA transfer function provides a consistent approximation to the OW response to thermal excitations, and derive a relationship with the physical processes taking place in the OW. We also show how system noise reduction can be accomplished by means of that transfer function.

M. Nofrarias; A. F. Garcia Marin; A. Lobo; G. Heinzel; J. Ramos-Castro; J. Sanjuan; K. Danzmann

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

130

Investigation of combustive flows and dynamic meshing in computational fluid dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a ?eld that is constantly advancing. Its advances in terms of capabilities are a result of new theories, faster computers, and new numerical methods. In this thesis, advances in the computational ?uid dynamic modeling of moving bodies and combustive ?ows are investigated. Thus, the basic theory behind CFD is being extended to solve a new class of problems that are generally more complex. The ?rst chapter that investigates some of the results, chapter IV, discusses a technique developed to model unsteady aerodynamics with moving boundaries such as ?apping winged ?ight. This will include mesh deformation and ?uid dynamics theory needed to solve such a complex system. Chapter V will examine the numerical modeling of a combustive ?ow. A three dimensional single vane burner combustion chamber is numerically modeled. Species balance equations along with rates of reactions are introduced when modeling combustive ?ows and these expressions are discussed. A reaction mechanism is validated for use with in situ reheat simulations. Chapter VI compares numerical results with a laminar methane ?ame experiment to further investigate the capabilities of CFD to simulate a combustive ?ow. A new method of examining a combustive ?ow is introduced by looking at the solutions ability to satisfy the second law of thermodynamics. All laminar ?ame simulations are found to be in violation of the entropy inequality.

Chambers, Steven B.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Unsupervised intralingual and cross-lingual speaker adaptation for HMM-based speech synthesis using two-pass decision tree construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the Pass 2 leaf node contexts. C-Na sal?L-V ow el? L-Vo wel? C-Vo wel? C-Na sal? L-Vo wel? C-Vo wel? C-Na sal? R-st res sed? 2 syl lable s in u tt? Pass 1 Pass 2 R-st res sed? 2 3 C-Na sal?L-V ow el? 2 syl lable s in utt? 1 4 5 C-Na sal?L-V ow el... ? 5 4 3 2 1 Full con text mo dels (singl e-c om pone nt) Trip hone mo dels (mult i-com pone nt) Map ping Inve rse ma ppin g Mod el ma ppin g Fig. 1. Two-pass decision tree construction. Mapping functions permit sharing of components between full...

Gibson, Matthew; Byrne, William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Data co-processing for extreme scale analysis level II ASC milestone (4745).  

SciTech Connect

Exascale supercomputing will embody many revolutionary changes in the hardware and software of high-performance computing. A particularly pressing issue is gaining insight into the science behind the exascale computations. Power and I/O speed con- straints will fundamentally change current visualization and analysis work ows. A traditional post-processing work ow involves storing simulation results to disk and later retrieving them for visualization and data analysis. However, at exascale, scien- tists and analysts will need a range of options for moving data to persistent storage, as the current o ine or post-processing pipelines will not be able to capture the data necessary for data analysis of these extreme scale simulations. This Milestone explores two alternate work ows, characterized as in situ and in transit, and compares them. We nd each to have its own merits and faults, and we provide information to help pick the best option for a particular use.

Rogers, David; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Oldfield, Ron A.; Fabian, Nathan D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Other Members of the Maple Clan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

found together in the north woods: the Striped Maple, which has green bark with white stripes, and the Mountain Maple. They are valuable as browse for deer and moose, and the buds...

134

The Tulip Tree  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Tulip Tree -- the state tree of Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee and North Carolina. The paper or canoe birch of the north woods, because of its white bark and dainty leaves, is...

135

Population increases have not slowed down; Colorado saw even greater growth in 2001 and 2002. What is new  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organic materials such as compost and bark. Pollutants are degraded by a natural population). 9. Webster T. S., Devinny J. S., Torres E.M. and Basrai S. S., Microbial ecosystems in compost

136

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BTU input, for "wood and bark combustion in boilers." ) DataCH4 emission from the combustion of wood chips is almost 100combustion Feedstock natural gas natural gas natural gas natural gas natural gas natural gas wood

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Whip-Poor-Will  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

now and then the drone of an automobile on a highway; maybe the barking of a distant dog. In early summer and sometimes in September in wooded country you also hear the clear...

138

Communicating with dolphins  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

they are, we can't as yet understand their language any better than we do the bark of a dog. For a little more information on how we communicate with both dolphins and dogs,...

139

The Illiniwek  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and the inner bark of basswood, or willow roots. Their only domestic animal was the dog. They were Stone Age people. An Illini had three homes. In early spring they...

140

Talking dolphins  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

they are, we can't as yet understand their language any better than we do the bark of a dog. For a little more information on how we communicate with both dolphins and dogs,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Mockingbirds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

borrowed from as many as twenty birds in its neighborhood but also the barking of a dog, the cackling of a hen, the squeal of a pig, or even the squeaking of a wagon wheel....

142

Winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nibbled the tender bark of shrubs, or perhaps where one was chased by a fox or a hunting dog. If it was a fox, his tracks are more pointed and more nearly in a straight line than...

143

Animal Noise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why do animals make sounds, are they trying to talk to us? Replies: You bet. When the dog barks loud and nasty, he's trying to tell you to stay out of his yard, and when he...

144

Tree Rings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was a lean year or a fat one. Each year, beneath the bark, the tree adds a layer of wood to its trunk which becomes that much larger in diameter. When conditions are ideal, the...

145

A Simple Model to Predict Scalar Dispersion within a Successively Thinned Loblolly Pine Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bark beetles kill millions of acres of trees in the United States annually by using chemical signaling to attack host trees en masse. As an attempt to control infestations, forest managers use synthetic semiochemical sources to attract beetles to ...

Steven L. Edburg; Gene Allwine; Brian Lamb; David Stock; Harold Thistle; Holly Peterson; Brian Strom

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Advanced Class Waiver of Patent Rights for Technology Developed Under  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ard commercial buildings. The objective is to accelerate high-payoff technologies ard commercial buildings. The objective is to accelerate high-payoff technologies that, because of their risk, are unlikely to be developed in a timely manner without a partnership between industry and the Federal government. Nineteen (19) prime contracts were awarded under Round I of the program, and seventeen (17) prime contracts have been awarded under Round II. Of these awards, eight (8) firms would be eligible for application of this waiver for Round I, and six (6) for Round II. A list of cooperative agreements entitled to participate in this class waiver is attached. As set out in the following, this advance class waiver is intended to apply to inver.tions of all current and future contractors and subcontractors participating in this program who agree to the terms of the waiver, regardless of tier, except participants obtaining

147

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sanyo Electric Co. 1 Case Number: 20 10-CE- 12 10 Sanyo Electric Co. 1 Case Number: 20 10-CE- 12 10 (Refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and ) freezers) 1 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: September 8,201 0 Number of alleged violations: 58 Maximum possible assessment: $3,501,400 Proposed civil penalty: $3 16,333 The Office of the General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) alleges that Sanyo Electric Co. violated certain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. $6201 etseq., 10 C.F.R. Part 430, or both. Specifically, DOE alleges: I. Sanyo Electric Co. manufactures or privately labels a variety of refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers, including the following models: FF-1152SS FF-4 1 ES FF-43ES FF-7 1 ARD 1 04AB 1 OWL ARD204AB"

148

On the relevance of automatically selected single-voxel MRS and multimodal MRI and MRSI features for brain tumour differentiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the relevance of magnetic resonance (MR) features selected by automatic feature selection techniques to build classifiers for differential diagnosis and tissue segmentation two data sets containing MR spectroscopy data from patients ... Keywords: ANOVA, ARD, Ala, Automatic feature selection, Brain tumour, CSF, Cho, Cr, Differential diagnosis, Gd, Glc, Glx, Gly, HLSVD, LDA, LS-SVM, Lac, Lip, MR, MRI, MRS, MRSI, NAA, PD, PRESS, QDA, STEAM, SVM, TE, TM, TR, Tau, mI

Geert J. Postma; Jan Luts; Albert J. Idema; Margarida Juli-Sap; ngel Moreno-Torres; Witek Gajewicz; Johan A. K. Suykens; Arend Heerschap; Sabine Van Huffel; Lutgarde M. C. Buydens

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SpRiNg 2008 COLUMNSChEMiCAL AND BiOMOLECuLAr ENgiNEEriNg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jiao Tong University in China. #12;COLUMNS spring 2008 4 facultyNEWS SENgErS TOurS EurOPE AS iAsses the stAtor. the stAtor slot flow field ContAins An outwArdly direCted disChArge Jet thAt forms when settings, and prepare them to teach. The team has also developed a one-day workshop for new science

Shapiro, Benjamin

150

Prediction of solubility of gases in polystyrene by Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System and Radial Basis Function Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF NN) have been developed for prediction of solubility of various gases in polystyrene. Solubility of butane, isobutene, carbon dioxide, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane ... Keywords: ANFIS, ANN, ARD, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), BP, HCFC-142b, HFC-134a, HFC-l52a, MLP, PS, Polystyrene, RBF NN, Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF NN), S-L EOS, Solubility

Aboozar Khajeh; Hamid Modarress

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Impact of C-reactive protein (CRP) on surfactant function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma levels of the acute-phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), increase up to one thousand-fold as a result of trauma or inflammation. CRP binds to phosphorylcholine (PC) in a calcium-ion dependent manner. The structural homology between PC and the major phospholipid component of surfactant, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), led to the present study in which we examined if CRP levels might be increased in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and subsequently interfere with surfactant function. Our results showed that CRP levels in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) was increased in patients with ARDS (97.8 +/- 84.2 micrograms/mg total protein vs. 4.04 +/- 2.2 micrograms/mg total protein in normals). Our results show that CRP binds to liposomes containing DPPC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). As a result of this interaction, CRP inhibits the surface activity of a PG-DPPC mixture when tested with a Wilhelmy surfactometer or with the Enhorning pulsating bubble apparatus. Furthermore, the surface activity of a clinically used surfactant replacement, Surfactant TA (2 mg/ml), was also severely impaired by CRP in a dose-dependent manner (doses used ranging from 24.5 to 1,175 micrograms/ml). In contrast, human serum albumin (HSA) at 500 and 900 micrograms/ml had no inhibitory effect on Surfactant TA surface activity. These results suggest that CRP, although not an initiating insult in ARDS, may contribute to the subsequent abnormalities of surfactant function and thus the pathogenesis of the pulmonary dysfunction seen in ARDS.

Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Hales, C.A.; Thompson, B.T.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F. (Shriners Burns Institute, Boston, MA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Acoustic black holes Matt Visser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic black holes Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint Louis USA Ole Miss you develop a number of use- ful connections between supersonic uid ow and black holes in general is the basis underlying a deep and fruitful analogy between the black holes of Einstein gravity and supersonic

Visser, Matt

153

TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services Jon describes TESLA, a transparent and extensible framework allowing session- layer services to be developed using a high-level ¤ow- based abstraction. TESLA services can be deployed transparently using dynamic

154

Computational upscaled modeling of heterogeneous porous media flow utilizing finite volume method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation we develop and analyze numerical method to solve general elliptic boundary value problems with many scales. The numerical method presented is intended to capture the small scales e?ect on the large scale solution without resolving the small scale details, which is done through the construction of a multiscale map. The multiscale method is more e?ective when the coarse element size is larger than the small scale length. To guarantee a numerical conservation, a ?nite volume element method is used to construct the global problem. Analysis of the multiscale method is separately done for cases of linear and nonlinear coe?cients. For linear coe?cients, the multiscale ?nite volume element method is viewed as a perturbation of multiscale ?nite element method. The analysis uses substantially the existing ?nite element results and techniques. The multiscale method for nonlinear coe?cients will be analyzed in the ?nite element sense. A class of correctors corresponding to the multiscale method will be discussed. In turn, the analysis will rely on approximation properties of this correctors. Several numerical experiments verifying the theoretical results will be given. Finally we will present several applications of the multiscale method in the ?ow in porous media. Problems that we will consider are multiphase immiscible ?ow, multicomponent miscible ?ow, and soil in?ltration in saturated/unsaturated ?ow.

Ginting, Victor Eralingga

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A CYBORG BEETLE: INSECT FLIGHT CONTROL THROUGH AN IMPLANTABLE, TETHERLESS MICROSYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-out equipment setup used in the experiments described here include a 588 nm light emitting diode and a CMOS measurements. The light source was a 588 AlInGaP light emitting diode, placed above the ¯ow channels, which the application and heat dissipation problems. The most convenient alternatives include solid-state light emitting

Lee, Luke P.

156

Seismic wave propagation in cracked porous media Tim Pointer,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Pi plays an important role. There is much higher attenuation and dispersion for gas (which is more, as for PARTIAL ALIGN, there is no velocity dispersion; there is also increased P and SV attenuation as the gas in there is high attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. Fluid £ow may be on either a wavelength scale

Edinburgh, University of

157

A variational approach to motion of triple junction of gas, liquid and solid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variational approach to motion of triple junction of gas, liquid and solid Kensuke Yokoia;b;c;1 a to deal with motion of triple junctions of gas, liquid (or two kinds of uid) and solid based on the level with triple junctions of gas, liquid and solid. Numerical simulations for free surface ows with moving

Soatto, Stefano

158

ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DANFORT H HILL S WIN TER C AM P BIG RID GEC O DRY FORKC O DRY FORKC O PR ICKLY PEAR BOOK CLIFF S COYOTE BASIN COON H OLL OW DRY CR EEKUT WEAVER RID GE ASBUR Y CREEK SKIN NER...

159

AUTHORS AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By acceptance of thlsart!cle. thepubl!sher recognizes that the US Government retains anonexcluslve, royalty-free l)cense topubl!sh or reproduce thepublSheCl form of this contnbutton. or to allOw others to do so, for U.S Government purposes.

R. Irel; J. Ireland; J. Sapir; G. Farnum; G. Russel; W. Sommer; W. Rider; B. Krohil; W. Wilson; R. Perry; R. Labauve; P. Lisowslci; E. Arthur; L. Linford; R. Manzanares; K. Ames; G. Mirabal

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gain Scheduled Control of a Solar Power Plant Tor A. Johansen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a tube where oil is pumped through in order to collect the solar power. The control problem is to keep the temperature of the oil leaving the eld at its desired value by manipulating the oil pump ow rate. It is shown, is described. A eld of parabolic collectors focus the solar radiation onto a tube where oil is pumped through

Johansen, Tor Arne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Interfacial Mixing in Viscous Pipe Flows Interim report to Imperial Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction The cost of energy to pump oil through a pipe line is greatly reduced if the ow is not turbulent in this area, in part, because oil companies have only recently considered pumping oil through pipesInterfacial Mixing in Viscous Pipe Flows Interim report to Imperial Oil D. Van Vliet and B. R

Sutherland, Bruce

162

Kheshbn No. 123- Spring 1994 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pia vpp ^a n OTp'onp ORH ny ,(anp oTPiyopRiRD lupaia m lytoyn r r a Dxyrnysra 1922 pR .anp-D^yn psny ps maanp-nnto armOW ,pp pyiiR oaytoya i n anp , p m pR pnayaa'ra a v pun

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Resonances in long time integration of semi linear Hamiltonian PDEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- surements, status information, and circuit-breaker signals to and from Remote Terminal Units (RTUs phase angles from power ows measure- ments z, ^xk+1 = ^xk + (HT k R-1 Hk)-1 HT k R-1 (z - h(^xk )), (4) where ^xk Rn , k denotes iteration number, and Hk is the Jacobian evaluated at ^xk , Hk := h x (^xk

Faou, Erwan

164

LOCAL ZOOM COMPUTATION OF TWO-PHASE FLOWS IN STEAM GENERATORS USING A LOCAL DEFECT CORRECTION METHOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zoom simulations of the U-tube bundle and of the ow distribution ba#15;e regions of a SG Mock induced by the tube bundle leads us to neglect the wall shear stress). 3 NUMERICAL CONSIDERATIONS.16 m in height. The inside is #12;lled with U-shaped tube bundle, 7.2 m in height, into which the hot

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

165

SOILS--------Bacillus thuringiensis were spliced into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOILS-------- Bacillus thuringiensis were spliced into a maize hybrid, known as Bt corn, to create.geotimes.org Donald L. Sparks N oW is an exciting time to be a soil scientist. We face many chal lenges, the wise use of soil and ecosystems will become ever more important in meet ing food production needs

Sparks, Donald L.

166

Unite de recherche INRIA Lorraine LORIA, Technopole de NancyBrabois, Campus scientifique,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to balls of various but bounded radii, to polyhedra of bounded aspect ratio, and even to non-fat 3D objects that are essential for the realistic rendering of 3D scenes. In global illu- mination algorithms, where the ow on visibility queries in radiosity simulations [12]. One approach to speeding up rendering is to store global

Dujmoviæ, Vida

167

A Locally Conservative Eulerian-Lagrangian Numerical Method and its Application to Nonlinear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport in Porous Media Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Felipe Pereira y Li-Ming Yeh z November 3, 2000 Abstract picture of the local behav- ior in water ooding a fractally heterogeneous medium. A brief discussion on the simulation of two{ phase, immiscible, incompressible ows in porous media (i.e., the \\water ood prob- lem

Douglas Jr., Jim

168

A Parallelizable Method for Two-Phase Flows in Naturally-Fractured Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Felipe Pereira y Li-Ming Yeh z March 27, 2002 Abstract A parallelizable, semi-implicit numerical method-porosity, medium- block model as described in [15, 20] for the same type of ow, which corresponds to water-fractured medium. We will consider the water ooding problem in this paper; the groundwater problem

Douglas Jr., Jim

169

This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (www.hvac.okstate.edu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.E. Fisher, R.J. Liesen. 1997. Development of a Heat Balance Procedure for Calculating Cooling Loads, ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 103, Pt. 2, pp. 459-468. Reprinted by permission from ASHRAE Transactions (Vol. #103 Part 2. Pedersen, Ph.D. Fe//ow ASHRAE Daniel E. Fisher, Ph.D. Member ASHRAE Richard J. Liesen, Ph.D. Associate

170

A dynamic assertion-based verification platform for validation of UML designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capacity limitations continue to impede widespread adoption of formal property verification in the design validation ow of software and hardware systems. The more popular choice (at least in the hardware domain) has been dynamic property verification ... Keywords: UML, assertion checking, dynamic property verification, software verification

A. Banerjee; S. Ray; P. Dasgupta; P. P. Chakrabarti; S. Ramesh; P. Vignesh; V. Ganesan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

INITIAL BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS FOR A QUASILINEAR PARABOLIC SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INITIAL BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS FOR A QUASILINEAR PARABOLIC SYSTEM IN THREE-PHASE CAPILLARY FLOW problems for a quasi- linear parabolic system motivated by three-phase ow in porous medium in the presence quasilinear parabolic sys- tems of the form (1.1) u t + f(u) x = (B(u)u x ) x ; 0

172

Upper Ocean Thermal Response to Strong Autumnal Forcing of the Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CASID free-drifting thermistor chain buoys that utilized Service ARGOS positioning and data collection were deployed in the northeast Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of OWS-P in late autumn in both 1980 and 1981 as part of the Storm Transfer and ...

W. G. Large; J. C. McWilliams; P. P. Niiler

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN ON A ALBANY CAT RON CREEK DALEY BU LL CREEK LEE C HAPEL AR Y ROT HWELL MEAD OW CR EEK HOL LY CREEK CON CORD TAU LBEE KH...

174

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ftp from wahoo.ee.washington.edu. 2A copy of this program, including ac dc FACTS sample sys- tems the continuation power ow program PFLOW 14 , which allows to carry out voltage collapse studies in ac dc FACTS sys and a tutorial, for DOS, Windows and UNIX can be ob- tained from http: iliniza.uwaterloo.ca,or through anonymous

175

Invention and International Diffusion of Climate Change Mitigation Technologies: An Empirical Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquisition system of on-line sensors, which provided measurements of pH, temperature, rH, and biogas ¯ow rate model only the biogas production rate Q is meas- urable, and we suppose that the initial values of Bioinstrumentation and Automation, BAS, So®a. References Ahring BK. 1995. Methanogenesis in thermophilic biogas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 530:357361, 2000 February 10 2000. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon chain backbones. Rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined to high accuracy of several metastable cumulene carbene isomers in the interstellar and circumstel- lar gas provides of the supersonic nozzle, a gas pulse 150 ks long, and a nozzle pressure of 2.5 atm. The average ?ow rate of gas w

177

Jet Formation in Highly Variable Accretion Flow Tomoyuki Hanawa, Koji Nobuta, & Satoshi Kawaguchi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waves form when the gas tori bounce near the black hole owing to the centrifugal force. The shock waves. Torus K.E. 3. 1st Shock Wave 5. High Pressure Gas 6. Jets 4. 2nd Shock Wave centrifugal barrier 2: #12. The accretion ow has two components, less dense gas having a low speci#12;c angular momentum and dense gas

Enomoto, Ryoji

178

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS A REPORT SUBMITTED;Abstract A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous ow of steam and water in porous media with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeability for steam phase

Stanford University

179

Characterization,demulsification and transportation of heavy crude oil: Pipeline trasportation; emulsion stability; demulsification; droplet size; shear stress & shear rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable concentrated oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were prepared and their application for heavy oil pipeline transportation was investigated using very viscous Malaysian heavy crude oil. Two Malaysian heavy crude oil samples, Tapis and a blend of Tapis ...

Abdurahman H. Nour; Chew Fern Tan; Azhari H. Nour

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE undergraduate programs THE RENSSELAER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-out equipment setup used in the experiments described here include a 588 nm light emitting diode and a CMOS measurements. The light source was a 588 AlInGaP light emitting diode, placed above the ¯ow channels, which the application and heat dissipation problems. The most convenient alternatives include solid-state light emitting

Linhardt, Robert J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microsoft Word - LL_Report_3-8-13rev.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

o f h ow b lack h oles a nd g alaxies e volve. To r ead m ore, g o t o U PI. Windmills i n C alifornia. Wind i s n o l onger t he e nergy source o f t he f uture. I t's r...

182

The NRS Transect 7:2 (spring 1989)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leZ! uefuo aq1 JOUO! le1SIej! ~OIO! g eAlas el aIn:JfiJ lOJj alOW Pa~~OI osIt? n . ~OIO -! q pUt? IPOOM 'It? 0 put? l.

UC Natural Reserve System

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Beam power and angle adaptation in multibeam 2.5 Gbit/s spot diffusing mobile optical wireless system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobility can induce significant signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance degradation in optical wireless (OW) systems based on diffuse as well as spot-diffusing configurations. Two methods (beam angle and beam power adaptation) are introduced to the design ... Keywords: beam angle adaptation, diversity receiver, optical wireless communication, transmit power adaptation

Fuad E. Alsaadi; Jaafar M. H. Elmirghani

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Isospin Properties of ($K^-$, $N$) Reactions for the Formation of Deeply-bound Antikaonic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of deeply-bound antikaonic $K^-/\\bar{K}^0$ nuclear states by nuclear ($K^-$, $N$) reactions is investigated theoretically within a distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA), considering the isospin properties of the Fermi-averaged $K^-+ N \\to N + \\bar{K}$ elementary amplitudes. We calculate the formation cross sections of the deeply-bound $\\bar{K}$ states by the ($K^-$, $N$) reactions on the nuclear targets, $^{12}$C and $^{28}$Si, at incident $K^-$ lab momentum $p_{K^-}$ = 1.0 GeV/c and $\\theta_{\\rm lab} = 0^{\\circ}$, introducing a complex effective nucleon number $N_{\\rm eff}$ for unstable bound states in the DWIA. The results show that the deeply-bound $\\bar{K}$ states can be populated dominantly by the ($K^-$, $n$) reaction via the total isoscalar $\\Delta T=0$ transition owing to the isospin nature of the $K^-+ N \\to N + \\bar{K}$ amplitudes, and that the cross sections described by ${\\rm Re}N_{\\rm eff}$ and ${\\rm Arg}N_{\\rm eff}$ enable to deduce the structure of the $\\bar{K}$ nuclear states; the calculated inclusive nucleon spectra for a deep $\\bar{K}$-nucleus potential do not show distinct peak structure in the bound region. The few-body $\\bar{K}\\otimes [NN]$ and $\\bar{K}\\otimes [NNN]$ states formed in ($K^-$, $N$) reactions on $s$-shell nuclear targets, $^3$He, $^3$H and $^4$He, are also discussed.

T. Koike; T. Harada

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Combustion characteristics of Douglas Fir planer shavings. Technical progress report No. 4, September 16, 1977--September 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant quantities of wood residue fuels are presently being used in industrial steam generating facilities. Recent studies indicate that substantial additional quantities of wood residue fuels are available for energy generation in the form of steam and/or electricity. A limited data base on the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels has resulted in the installation and operation of inefficient combustion systems for these fuels. This investigation of the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels was undertaken to provide a data base which could be used to optimize the combustion of such fuels. Optimization of the the combustion process in industrial boilers serves to improve combustion efficiency and to reduce air pollutant emissions generated in the combustion process. This report presents data on the combustion characteristics of Douglas Fir planer shavings. The data were obtained in a pilot scale combustion test facility at Oregon State Univerisity. Other technical reports present data on the combustion characteristics of: Douglas Fir bark, Red Alder sawdust, Red Alder bark, Ponderosa pine bark, Hemlock bark, and Eastern White Pine bark. An executive summary report is also available which compares the combustion characteristics of the various fuel species.

Junge, D.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fiber, fuel and food from whole-tree chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future shortages of fiber, fuel, and food are predicted. Because forests are renewable, they have the potential of solving long and short-term shortages if each tree is more completely utilized. The combined vacuum-airlift and steaming-compression debarking process developed by the USDA Forest Service segregates whole-tree chips into foliage, wood chips, bark, and fines at an estimated processing cost of $5.14 per oven-dry debarked metric ton. Several alternatives are available for utilizing the wood chips, bark, and foliage. The value of the bark as a fuel and the folage as an animal feed supplement more than covers the cost of upgrading the whole-tree chips. Beneficiation of whole-tree chips coupled with intergrated utilization should improve chip quality, reduce costs, and help the pulp and paper industry become energy self-sufficient. (Refs. 34).

Sturos, J.A.; Dickson, R.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

TITLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CNT OW048 CNT OW048 Review of Environmentally Sensitive Resources at Off-Site Locations Nevada Test Site Nevada ~nvironmental Restoration Review of Environmentally Sensitive Resources at Off-Site Locations Prepared for: U.S. Deparuncnt of Energy Nevada Field Office Las Vcgas, Nevada R e p d by: l T Corporation Las Vcgas, Nevada Work Pcrformcd Under Conmct DE-AC08-92NV10972 March, 1993 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1 Hazardous. Contaminated. or Polluted Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2 Environmentally Sensitive Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.1 Property of Historic. Archaeological. or Archirectural Significance . . . . . . 1-3 1 2 . 2 Threatened. Endangered. or Candidate Species .

188

flow_loop.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLOW ASSURANCE TEST LOOP FLOW ASSURANCE TEST LOOP Objective O ver a decade ago, RMOTC began cooperatively building a full-scale facility to test new fl ow assurance technology, mainly in the areas of hydrates and paraffi ns. Today, RMOTC's test facility consists of fi ve individual loop sections, including chilling and heated pipe-in-pipe water sections, bare lines, and a mixing section. The facility was designed to represent typical deepwater production systems in order to simulate full-scale tests and apply the results to fl ow assurance fi eld applications and technology. The current facility design consists of a 6" x 3,600 maximum allowable operating pressure test pipeline in fi ve separate loops. The test loops begin and ter- minate at a central location just north

189

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment at diff erent temperatures * Biomass is heated by steam injection to temperatures of 120°C to 210°C in the pressurized mixing tube * Preheated, premixed biomass is retained for specified residence time in vertical holding vessel; material continuously moves by gravity from top to bottom of reactor in plug-fl ow fashion * Residence time is adjusted by changing amount of material held in vertical vessel relative to continuous fl ow of material entering and exiting vessel * Optional additional reactor vessel allows for secondary pretreatment at lower temperatures-120°C to 180°C-with potential to add other chemical catalysts * First vessel can operate at residence

190

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PI-OW~M Advanced Research Projects Agency - PI-OW~M Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy 0 1 -Field Ofice: Proiect T i t l e : (0289-1632) lnfinia - Stirling Air Conditioner (StAC) for Compact Cooling Location: Washington Proposed Action or Project Description: American Reconr)- and R e i o ~ ~ t m s n t Act: Fundingwill support laboratoryscale research and development on a Stirling Air Conditioner that combines a Stirling Cycle with innovative heat transfer coupling to produce improvements in campad cooling. The proposed work is consistent with the goal of BEETIT: the development of energy efficient cooling technologies and air conditioners for buildings, to save energy and reduce GHG emissions. Proposed work consists entirely of RD&Dwork to be completed at lnfinia's commercially-zoned headquarters facility in Kennewick, WA. The work

191

Implementing image processing applications on a real-time architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents three examples of realtime image processing applications that were implemented on a data- ow architecture developed at the ETCA. Low-level image processing is performed on a regular three-dimensional network of 1024 custom data- ow processors. Image features previously extracted in the low-level step are handled by a two-dimensional network of 12 general purpose processors. Fast prototyping of real-time image processing applications is achieved through a programming environment including a complete stream from functional programming speci cation to network con guration. A large class of algorithms can be implemented. Among them we describe a non-linear lter, a connected component labeling and a colored object tracking. Figure 1: The Functional Computer I.

G. Quenot; C. Coutelle; J. Serot; B. Zavidovique

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

On the axial dispersion induced by vibrations of a exible D. Brodaya,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dispersion of drugs in conduits of the cow's milk system is similar to gas dispersion in airways. Antibiotics that dispersion due to streaming eects in gas-®lled ¯exible tubes which vibrate in a long wave-length radial mode of enhancing dispersion in gas-®lled elastic tubes due to ¯ow induced by vibrations of the tube-walls. We

193

The NRS Transect 11:2 (fall 1993)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~u-es alfl pate;uJ aAe\\{ ~OIO! q pue I~olo -a~ 'at1! W1p JoaAHeu JOuoHeJo:jsaJ pill! ~OIO;)a a\\fl ~UHe~ -HS;}AU! s~OJd4M-, .aAJasa~ aow a4~ a4~ '~OIo:>a anb! Ull sAuno:> a4~ Jo

UC Natural Reserve System

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

methane hydrate science plan-final.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Period Start Date: October 1, 2012 Period Start Date: October 1, 2012 Project Period End Date: December 31, 2013 Principal Authors: / h [ a I t { { / h [ DUNS #:046862582 1201 New York Avenue, NW Fourth Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005 Prepared for: { 5 9 b 9 [ DO E Aw ard No .: DE -FE 00 10 19 5 Proje ct Title: Met hane Hyd rate Field Prog ram : Deve lopm ent of { t Met hane Hyd rate -Foc used Mar ine Drill ing, Logg ing and Cori ng Prog

196

Form Approved  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! , i P_Oli re_r_in _.burden for th_s olJect_on of;nformatJon _s est_azec _ to averacje _ hot:r per respOnse, inc.iuding the time for rewew_ng insrructlons. _earchJ_g ex_stlng data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and ompletlng and rev,ewlncj the tolled;on of m_,ormatlon. Send comments r,_,arding this burden estimate or any other aspect Of this

J. W. Campbell; George C. Marshall; Report Documentation; J. W. Campbell

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WITHDRAWING LIGHT ISOTOPIC PRODUCT FROM A LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process and apparatus are described for removing enriched product from the columns of a thermal diffusion plant for separation of isotopes. In the removal cycle, light product at the top cf the diffusion columns is circulated through the column tops and a shipping cylinder connected thereto unttl the concertation of enriched product in the cylinder reaches the desired point. During the removal, circulation through the bottoms is blocked bv freezing. in the diffusion cycle, the bottom portion is unfrozen, fresh feed is distributed to the bottoms of the columns, ard heavy product is withdrawn from the bottoms, while the tops of the columns are blocked by freezing.

Dole, M.

1959-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

198

Correlation of Oil-Water and Air-Water Contact Angles of Diverse Silanized Surfaces and Relationship to Fluid Interfacial Tensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of air-water, {Theta}{sub wa}, or air-liquid contact angles is customary in surface science, while oil-water contact angles {Theta}{sub ow}, are of paramount importance in subsurface multiphase flow phenomena including petroleum reocovery, nonaqueous phase liquid fate and transport, and geological carbon sequestration. In this paper we determine both the air-water and oil-water contact angles of silica surfaces modified with a diverse selection of silanes, using hexadecane as the oil. The silanes included alkylsilanes, alkylarylsilanes, and silanes with alkyl or aryl groups that are functionalized with heteroatoms such as N, O, and S. These silanes yielded surfaces with wettabilities from water-wet to oil wet, including specific silanized surfaces functionalized with heteroatoms that yield intermediate wet surfaces. The oil-water contact angles for clean and silanized surfaces, excluding one partially fluorinated surface, correlate linearly with air-water contact angles with a slope of 1.41 (R = 0.981, n = 13). These data were used to examine a previously untested theoretical treatment relating air-water and oil-water contact angles in terms of fluid interfacial energies. Plotting the cosines of these contact angles against one another, we obtain a linear relationship in excellent agreement with the theoretical treatment; the data fit cos {Theta}{sub ow} = 0.667 cos {Theta}{sub ow} + 0.384 (R = 0.981, n = 13), intercepting cos {Theta}{sub ow} = -1 at -0.284. The theoretical slope, based on the fluid interfacial tensions {Theta}{sub wa}, {Theta}{sub ow}, and {Theta}{sub oa}, is 0.67. We also demonstrate how silanes can be used to alter the wettability of the interior of a pore network micromodel device constructed in silicon/silica with a glass cover plate. Such micromodels are used to study multiphase flow phenomena. The contact angle of the resulting interior was determined in situ. An intermediate wet micromodel gave a contact angle in excellent agreement with that obtained on an open planar silica surface using the same silane.

Grate, Jay W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

RSE Table 3.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

200

Colorado State University Cooperative Extension. 9/92.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, pink to red Tatarian maple rounded winged seeds in summer, yellow fall color, tolerant of alkaline or large shrub, gray bark, Rocky Mountain maple oval yellow fall color, bright red winter buds. Acer grandidentatum 25 15 Broad, m L Survives in dry sites once established; orange- Wasatch maple spreading -red fall

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PlainsCottonwood QuakingAspen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;BristleconePine #12;Piñon Pine Pinus edulis Description Bark: Gray, smooth and thin when young; red on young trees; nearly 3 inches thick, red-orange and furrowed into large flat scaly plates on mature trees that form tufts near the end of branches. Fruit: Light red-brown cones; 3 to 4 inches long; egg

202

Colorado State University Cooperative Extension. 2/99.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Colorado. Injured pines also can be attacked by the red turpentine beetle (D. valens). Mountain pine beetles in pines by the shape of the hind wing cover (Figure 1, top). In side view, it is gradually curved. The wing cover of Ips or engraver beetles, another common group of bark beetles attacking conifers

203

Gridling Trees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gridling Trees Gridling Trees Name: Ellen Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I need help!!!! Rabbits gridled three of my new trees last week. I am a first-time tree planter and I had no idea that this would happen and the folks at the nursery hadn't told us that this was a danger. The bark is gone. Is there any way I can save these trees? The trees are about seven feet tall. They are a crabapple, a dogwood, and an Eastern redbud. Is there any such thing as an artificial bark that I can put on them? Thank you for your help. Ellen Replies: Dear Ellen, "How can I save a tree that's been girdled by rabbits this winter? Can it be saved? That depends on several factors. How large is the tree? How much bark is girdled away? Girdling cuts off the tree's transportation system and could kill it. To prevent further damage from rabbits use a cage made of hardware mesh 1/4-inch. Enclose trunk far enough from bark to allow trunk diameter to expand as tree matures, and at least two feet higher than expected snow line. To protect against mice and voles push mesh two inches into the ground. (Protecting Trees and Shrubs Against Winter Damage, MES FO-1411-B.) "

204

Cambium Damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cambium Damage Cambium Damage Name: Jamie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If the bark from the lower part of trees (elm trees) is almost completly removed (in this case by animals)to a height of about 8ft, is it possible that the trees will still live? What can be done to help the trees? Replies: If the tree has been girdled, that is, the bark and cambium layer beneath it, has been removed completely around the tree, then it will die. If there is any portion of the bark remaining it may live, but if that remaining is small it probably will die fairly soon due to general decline. If the cambium layer has not been destroyed it may recover, but once the bark is stripped away it is most likely doomed because of the likelihood of invasion by fungi, insects, etc. A local forester or landscaper might be able to offer more help if they see it.

205

"RSE Table N5.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

206

X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopic analysis of arborescent lycopsid cell wall composition and Carboniferous coal ball preservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition and Carboniferous coal ball preservation C. Kevin Boyce a, , Mike Abrecht b , Dong Zhou b , P that were canopy dominants of many Pennsylvanian coal swamp forests. Its periderm or bark--the single greatest biomass contributor to many Late Paleozoic coals--is found to have a greater aliphatic content

Boyce, C. Kevin

207

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 NITROGEN #1NITROGEN #1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels Biomasses & waste - derived fuels Coal 0.5 ­ 3 Wood 0.1 ­ 0.5 Bark ~ 0.5 Oil .153 NO formation in pulverised coal, oil andNO formation in pulverised coal, oil and natural gas firingnatural gas OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Time (s) Concentration(ppmv) Kinetic modelling of coalKinetic modelling of coal

Zevenhoven, Ron

208

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or multiple leaders; tight vertical branches where bark is squeezed between two branches or between branch. 50 (0.30-mm) sieve. E. Sand: Clean, washed, natural or manufactured, and free of toxic materials. F ­ minimum of 2%. ii. Silt ­ minimum of 15%. iii. Sand ­ 15 to 50%. iv. Clay ­ 15 to 35%. v. Foreign

Texas at Austin, University of

209

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- organisms, bark or ambrosia beetles, and woody host tissue: an annotated bibliography, 1956­1974. USDA and ambrosia beetles. In: Wilding N, Collins NM, Ham- mond PM, Webber JF, eds. Insect-fungus interactions origins of ambrosia fungi. Mycologia 88:596­601. De Beer ZW, Harrington TC, Vismer HF, Wingfield BD

Arnold, Jonathan

210

The European Forest Institute and the Finnish Forest Research Institute: The supply of woody biomass from the forests in the EU can be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass from the forests in the EU can be significantly increased The supply of woody biomass from. The theoretical biomass potential from the European forests in 2010 is nearly 1.3 billion m3 including bark and woody biomass from early thinnings in young forests. The potential is, however, reduced to about 750

211

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY CLEMSON, SOUTH CAROLINA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disasters -- both natural (hurricanes, flooding, droughts and famines) and human-made (oil spills, sludge the experience started a thought-process that led to ways to clean up pollutants in water -- oils, heavy metals-quality lignin. Manure fiber proved to be a highly effective absorbent for oil and other contaminants. Tree bark

Duchowski, Andrew T.

212

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is needed to answer most of the important ques- tions about regeneration, long-term ecological impacts and Its Uses Essential oils are the concentrated aromatic oils of plant leaves, flowers, seeds, bark best when diluted (as in other oils, colognes, and shampoos). Those essential oils obtained from trees

213

Investigations of the transportation characteristics of biomass fuel particles in a horizontal pipeline through CFD modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Various materials: flour, willow, wood, bark and a mixture of flour and willow, have been considered of biomass are analogies to coal, the physical properties of the milled biomass are significantly different-treatment and milling or pulverising process used in a particular power plant. Most biomass particles in use

Yan, Yong

214

Tree health update Sarah Green  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;25/03/20116 Symptoms on Lawson cypress #12;25/03/20117 Symptoms on yew #12;25/03/20118 Damage toll · A survey on Lawson cypress #12;25/03/201110 Aerial lesions on Lawson cypress #12;25/03/201111 Diagnostics · Take bark via roots, but French outbreaks show aerial infections · Evidence that P. lateralis can be air

215

South Dakota timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of a survey of all primary wood-using mills in South Dakota in 1993 and compares those findings with earlier surveys. Reports production and receipts of industrial roundwood by product, species, and county. Also reports the quantity, type, and disposition of wood and bark residues generated by South Dakota`s primary wood-using industry.

Hackett, R.L.; Sowers, R.A.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

Modeling of cryogen leakage through composite laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryogenic composites ?nd critical application in the manufacture of fuel tanks for reusable launch vehicles due to signi?cant reduction in overall structural weight of the tank. These fuel tanks contain pressurized cryogen such as hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Exposure to varying temperatures and mechanical loads resulting from ?ight cycle, containment of pressurized cryogen causes thermo-mechanical loading of the composite. The thermo-mechanical loading cycles combined with anisotropy of the composite and mismatch in the thermal and mechanical properties of ?bers and matrix lead to transverse matrix cracks (TMC) in each ply. TMC in adjacent plies intersect in localized regions at ply interfaces called crack junctions, which open up due to delamination on application of thermo-mechanical load. TMC and crack junctions usually form a network of leakage paths that assists leakage of cryogen through the composite. In this study, the volumetric ?ow rate of cryogen leaking through a damaged cross-ply composite with ?ve plies is determined by estimating the effective conductance of the leakage paths. For a given damage state and applied load, crack junction and TMC openings are obtained by ?nite element analysis. A computational ?uid dynamics model is ?rst used to estimate the effective conductance of a leakage path to hydrogen leakage and then a simplified analytical model is used to compute the effective conductance from individual conductances of each crack junction and TMC through a series-parallel combination. A single phase ?ow model is considered for the numerical analysis of hydrogen ?ow through TMC and crack junctions. The simulations are carried out using a commercial computational ?uid dynamics software, FLUENT. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the dependence of leak rate of hydrogen on the irregularities of the TMC geometry and TMC, crack junction openings. The simpli?ed model predictions of the effective conductance for the ?ve ply composite show good comparison with numerical simulations.

Peddiraju, Naga Venkata Satya Pravin Kumar

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Smoothed particle hydrodynamics Non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface ?ows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is veri?ed by simulating Poiseuille ?ow, plane shear ?ow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian ?uid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian ?uid and non-Newtonian ?uid, such that the e?ect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glens law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.lio.ontario.ca/imf-ows/imf.jsp?site=renew_en Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/ontario-renewable-energy-atlas-canada Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation The Renewable Energy Atlas is an interactive tool designed for everyone interested in renewable energy, including government policy makers, decision makers in the renewable energy industry, and educational and community institutions who wish to learn more about renewable energy in the

219

MEMORANDUM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

! ! Owner contacted 0 yes TYPE OF OPERATION 1. ~~~_~---~~~~----- IJ Research & Development ------^------------------- if yes, date contacted ----------_-- Facility Type 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies q Sample & Analysis !a Production 0 Disposal/Storage 0 Research Organization 0 Gavernment Sponsoryd Facility 0 Other --------------------- I 0 Prime 0 IJ Subcontractbr Other information Ci.q., cost 0 Purchase Order ( ?ors i& Ie ) + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, qtr) I .. ------- I .1 -I-----____-,-____--~~~~-- Contract/Purchase Order # ---------------------------- --------------------------------- AEC/MED nEc/nED GOVT GOUT CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR !WNEE LEA_S_E_D _ow_N!z LEASED OWNED --m-m- --------__ LL_EEQ n cl

220

May 13, 1998 Gas Frac. Mol.Wt. Density Speci c Ht. Boil. Pt.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Argon 30 39.95 1.784 0.125 Butane 8 58.12 2.6 0.389 -0.5 HFC-134a 62 102.0 4.5 0.20 -26.3 Table 1-pressure for every 1 m height. Gas is non- ammable. Butane and HFC-134a must be heated during winter 1 #12;RPC drop across one layer less than 5 mmH2O at 10 cc=min ow rate. 2 #12;(Outside) Ar Butane Scale Thermal

Llope, William J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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221

A Study of the Macrozooplankton within the Samples Taken at theMobile Site from November 1977 through November 1978:A Data Report of theLawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report brings together the results of a re-examination of zooplankton samples from the Mobile OTEC site (29{sup o}N-88{sup o}W) in the northern Gulf of Mexico for macrozooplankton larger than 15 mm. Five cruises were made to the Mobile OTEC site aboard the R/V Virginia Key. Cruise dates were: 17-20 November 1977; 27 February-2 March 1978; 9-17 June 1978; 15-24 August 1978; and 21 October-3 November 1978.

Steen, John; Gunter, Gordon

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Polarization Observables in $?N\\to K\\bar{K}N$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore some of the rich structure of the polarization observables recently developed for processes like $\\gamma N\\to\\pi\\pi N$ and $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$ in the framework of a specific model for the latter process. Emphasis is placed on observables that may be accesible at existing facilities in the near future. The sensitivity of the observables to the details of the model indicate that they will be a very useful tool in differentiating between different models for reactions like these. In the framework of a model for $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$, we examine the sensitivity of the observables to coupling constants of the $\\phi$, to the properties of the $\\Lambda(1405)$, and to the existence of the $\\Theta^+$.

W. Roberts

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste" " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

224

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009" August 2009" "Revised: October 2009" "Next MECS will be conducted in 2010" "Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,"Waste" ,,,,"Blast",,,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars" "NAICS",,,,"Furnace/Coke",,,"Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Oven Gases","Waste Gas",,"Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

225

Woody Biomass Supply Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woody biomass is the feedstock for the majority of biomass power producers. Woody biomass consists of bark and wood and is generally obtained as a byproduct or waste product. Approximately 40% of timber biomass is left behind in the form of slash, consisting of tree tops, branches, and stems after a timber harvest. Collecting and processing this residue provides the feedstock for many utility biomass projects. Additional sources of woody biomass include urban forestry, right-of-way clearance, and trees k...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Investigation of the particle size distribution and particle density characteristics of Douglas fir hogged fuel fly ash collected under known combustion conditions. Technical Progress Report No. 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The increased interest in wood as a fuel source, coupled with the increasing demand to control the emission generated by wood combustion, has created a need for information characterizing the emissions that occur for given combustion conditions. This investigation characterizes the carbon char and inorganic fly ash size and density distribution for each of thirty-eight Douglas fir bark samples collected under known conditions of combustion.

Lang, A.J.; Junge, D.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Molecular Similarity and Xenobiotic Metabolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

started with collections of natural products (14); wide ranges of natural materials such as plants, roots, bark and marine organisms were collected, with as great a biodiversity as possible, and as many chemical compounds extracted as possible... ) and optimisation strategies (22). As computers have increased in power and decreased in price it has become feasible to carry out computational screening of ever larger databases, using algorithms of increasing sophistication. It is fairly trivial to screen...

Adams, Samuel E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle to Grid Vehicle to Grid Demonstration Project by Willett Kempton College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Center for Carbon-free Power Integration University of Delaware 2010 Smart Grid Peer Review Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE Purpose & Objectives * Create the Gri d I ntegrated V ehi cl e (GIV), then operate, permit, and test it * A nalyze vehicle use, our vehicles & large data base of 400 vehicles daily driving * A nalyze market for EVs and V2G * Develop softw are to dispatch pow er from vehicles -> Operate in real time! * Tw o-year aw ard, $750,000, close N ov '10 Activities (2-year) * Research: Driving patterns; economic value; self-learning trip predictions * Industrial: Facilitate EV retrofit operation

229

SWP.SACROC.factsheet919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M i d l a n d B a s i n Claytonville Pennsylvanian reef reservoirs Modified from Galloway, et al. (1983) SACROC LYNN G ARZA KENT STONEW ALL DA W SON TERRY HASKELL KNO X BO RDEN SCURRY FISHER JO NES T AYLO R NO LAN M ITCHELL HO W ARD MARTIN CO KE 0 20 mi 0 30 km QAd4569x Figure 1. Regional Location Map. FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail William O'Dowd NETL William.ODowd@NETL.DOE.GOV Principal Investigator Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name

230

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement Improvement Initiative (PPII) CONTACTS Brad Tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PARTNER Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Garden City, KS Sunflower's 360 MWe Wall-fired Holcomb Station Achieving new Source PerformAnce StAndArdS (nSPS) through integrAtion of Low-no X BurnerS with An oPtimizAtion PLAn for BoiLer comBuStion (comPLeted) A unique combination of high-tech combustion modifications and sophisticated control systems was planned to be tested on a coal-fired boiler at Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Power Station in Finney County, Kansas, to demonstrate how new technology can reduce air emissions and save costs for ratepayers. However, due to larger than anticipated costs

231

Field Offfce, OakRidge P.0.B0x2001 Oak Ridge,Tennesree3793f-6723  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.~.~. "- ..,- ,.._ .~. 1- ~,I -.. ._ .- -- Department of Energy Field Offfce, OakRidge P.0.B0x2001 Oak Ridge,Tennesree3793f-6723 'I ', April 20. 1993 Mr. William J. Condon Chief, Environmental Radiatfon Section Bureau of Environmental Radiation Protection New York State Department of Health 11 University Place Albany, New York 12203-3313 Dear Hr. Condon: BAKER ARD WILLIAM HAREHOUSES SITE - CORPLETION OF CLEANUP ACTIVITIES The purpose of this notice is to inform you about further scheduled cleanup activities to be conducted by the Department of Energy (WE) at 513-519 West 20th Street in New York, New York. This property is one of three buildings that make up the site of the former Baker and Yfllfams warehouses. Final remedfatfon of this site by WE is scheduled for Ray and June 1993.

232

T  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

l D +;$ Iohn !Y. Ruch, Dlrector Feed Msterlal€ Dlvtslon - OR A. J, Breglla, Dlrector Ilsalth Prot€e$on Engtneerlng Dlv1slon, EASL. lnf CoIIIIMINAUON SLRVEY Ar FTACTwE MEtl\LS, INC., SETMOUR, ?HNEcT"Yt IfSH:AIB fiurnmafv Accompanted bf lr{r. A. Grella of tleactlve lrtetals, on Octcber 2l , 1964e l vtetted the Selnaour t'aclllty, Iorurerly occupled by Reactlve l\'tetals, to perforn ttre gunrey reguesied ln your telagram to Dr. Sartey ard gdndfag roon, and Dlpapack Br€Br All rcoms rr€re free of prccess and oi0ce equlprnent and wers cleaa tn appearanceo local e

233

FUELS NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Dirk Link Name Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Dirk Link NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Dirk Link Name Title Affiliation Dogan, Omer N Materials Research Eng NETL Haynes, Daniel ST (Chem Eng) NETL How ard, Bret H Research Chemist NETL Link, Dirk D Research Chemist NETL Morreale, Bryan D General Engineer NETL Poston, James A Physicist NETL Shekhaw at, Dushyant General Engineer NETL Smith, David K Physical Science Tech NETL Sorescu, Dan C Research Physicist NETL Ciocco, Mike Project Lead URS Smith, Mark Project Lead URS Abdelsayed, Victor Research Scientist URS Floyd, Donald Scientist URS Smith, Mark Research Engineer URS Name Project Role Affiliation University Project Title Veser, Goetz PI Pitt Task 221 Development of Catalysts for Coal-gas Component Conversion Enick, Robert M PI Pitt Task 331 Membrane Reaction Process for Conversion of Coal-Gas Components

234

National Environmental Policy Act RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Environmental Policy Act Review Module National Environmental Policy Act Review Module March 2010 CD- N -0 OFFICE O National E C CD-1 OF ENVIRO Standa Environm Rev Critical Deci CD-2 M ONMENTA ard Review mental P view Modul ision (CD) A C March 2010 AL MANAG Plan olicy Act le Applicability D-3 GEMENT t (NEPA) CD-4 ) Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

235

Plasma Focusing & Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pf pf Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content Department of Energy Page Content Plasma Focusing & Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration

236

FACET User Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content

237

Plasma Wakefield Acceleration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rpwa rpwa Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content Department of Energy Page Content Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

238

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Refer to File No. AEGR-1 The CommandinS Officer '  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

*>I ' *>I ' { q;' ' y,,",' T 3 ,> 0 ,I- \! - . :. p EPA L ,v " _ ' . \ / UNITED STATES , . .- . t ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Refer to File No. AEGR-1 . The CommandinS Officer ' Ltaricn Zngineer Depot Marion, Ohio Dear Sir: Subject: REPORT CF F2GIATICN ' SUEiVZY radiation Transmitted herewith, in duplicate, is a report of the su,rveg made at your Znstallation April 17, 1947 by Messrs. Russell Hayes and Ellery Storm of the Rochester Project, United States Atomic Energy Commission. ~~~ j/p z, i,' 3 P. 0. Box 288, Station .L3 Rochester 7,'NewYork ' . Y ' May 22, 1947 ' i 4$ 4I#74f/ w/ \' - . ' . _ I In line 6th paragraph 2'of recommendations, yo& instal- lattion may continue to request film badges and for%ard'themto this office for monitoring.

239

Advanced reactor design study. Assessing nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Advanced Reactor Design Study (ARDS) is to identify and evaluate nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors (LWRs). The results of this study provide a basis for selecting and demonstrating specific nonbackfittable concepts that have good potential for implementation. Lead responsibility for managing the study was assigned to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in LWRs on the once-through fuel cycle were selected separately for PWRs and BWRs due to basic differences in the way specific concepts apply to those plants. Nonbackfittable concepts are those that are too costly to incorporate in existing plants, and thus, could only be economically incorporated in new reactor designs or plants in very early stages of construction. Essential results of the Advanced Reactor Design Study are summarized.

Fleischman, R.M.; Goldsmith, S.; Newman, D.F.; Trapp, T.J.; Spinrad, B.I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Laser Cladding With Powder: effect of some machining parameters on clad properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ardness, bonding and microstructure. Hence, it was decided to introduce this technique in the Dutch industry. The project consisted of three parts. One part covered the achievement and enhancement of insight in phenomena that occur in laser cladding. The second part involved the development of tools that facilitate the use of laser cladding. The third part consisted of the development of practical applications. Some aspects of this project are discussed in this thesis. This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO 2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa- 6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is attained with an arbitrarily shaped intensity profile. Input parameters for this model are laser machining parameters and properties of the laser beam, as well as material properties and the absorption of laser energy at the s

Marcel Schneider; Dr. Ir. J. Meijer

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CLIPPER WINDPOWER LLC ET AL. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLIPPER WINDPOWER LLC ET AL. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF CLIPPER WINDPOWER LLC ET AL. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PA TENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE AW ARD NO . DE-EE0005 l 4 l ; W(A) 2012-020, AND AN IDENTIFIED WAIVER OF CERTAIN INVENTIONS ALREADY IDENTIFIED Clipper Windpower, LLC ("Clipper") has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights of the United States of America in all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced grant entitled "Novel Low Cost, High Reliability Wind Turbine Drivetrain." Clipper has further requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patents of the United States of America in all subject inventions arising from the participation of its subcontractors United Technologies Research Center ("UTRC") and Hamilton Sundstrand. Each of Clipper,

242

PDSF User Meeting 08-06-13.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August August 6 , 2 013 Lisa Gerhardt Utilization --- 2 --- Past / Planned Outages * Past - July 26 th 4 d ays: e liza18 d isk f ailure, d egraded a ccess - July 30 th a ll d ay: U pgrade a nd r ework n etwork, n ew kernal and n ew G PFS, A LICE g rid u pdates, t heory g roup m oved from " other" t o " pdtheory" - July 31 st 6 h ours: p roject u navailable e verywhere * Planned - August 2 0 th A ll d ay: M endel u pgrade ( PDSF w ill b e o nline, just r educed n odes) Other Topics from PDSF Staff * PDSF u ser m eeow m onthly - Will i ncrease a s r equested * Best P racow t o k ill y our j obs * "Office H ours" - Every o ther T hursday ( starXng t his w eek), 2 :00 t o 4 :00 p m i n room 5 0---0143. G ood X me f or n ew u sers t o

243

The EETD Newsletter Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The The E ETD N ewsletter C ollection Table o f C ontents EETD N ews # 45 - F all 2 013, V ol. 1 2, N o. 2 * A Q &A w ith C indy R egnier, M anager o f t he F acility f or L ow---Energy e Xperiments i n B uildings (FLEXLAB) * CalCharge P rovides E nergy S torage C ompanies w ith A ccess t o S treamlined, C ost---Effective R esearch * Berkeley L ab F inds S teady G rowth A mong U .S. E SCOs, D espite R ecession * Bringing E nergy E fficiency t o H igh P erformance C omputing * U.S. I nstalled P rice o f S olar P hotovoltaic S ystems C ontinues R apid D ecline * Berkeley L ab S tudy F inds N o E vidence o f R esidential P roperty V alue I mpacts N ear U .S. W ind Turbines * Berkeley L ab R esearch H ighlights B est S trategies t o A chieve L ow---Carbon D ata C enters * Conductive A dhesive I mproves L ithium---ion B attery S torage b y 3 0

244

David_practical_calc.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prac%cal Prac%cal c alcula%ons o f s emiconductors a nd m etals David A . S trubbe Department o f M aterials S cience a nd E ngineering, Massachuse8s I ns:tute o f T echnology BerkeleyGW t utorial 22 November 2013 Outline 1. Screening m odels f or E psilon 2. Construc%on o f k ---grids 3. Special t reatment f or m etals i n E psilon 4. Symmetry a nd d egeneracy 5. Linearizing t he D yson e qua%on 6. Real a nd c omplex v ersion Mean-Field φ MF nk , E MF nk WFN , V xc vxc.dat , ρ RHO epsilon -1 G,G (q, E) eps0mat,epsmat sigma E QP nk eqp.dat kernel K vck,v c k bsedmat,bsexmat absorption A s vck , Ω s , eigenvectors,eigenvalues.dat (ω), JDOS(ω) absorption eh.dat k co k fi Screening m odels: H ow d o w e u se ε? Screening m odels: H ow d o w e u se ε? Sigma i ntegrates o ver q w ith ε ---1 (q) Absorp%on i

245

Microsoft Word - Document11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Margaret Margaret L ivingstone What A rt C an T ell Us A bout T he Brain Abstract: Artists h ave b een d oing e xperiments o n v ision l onger t han n eurobiologists. S ome major w orks o f a rt h ave p rovided i nsights a s t o h ow w e s ee; s ome o f t hese i nsights are s o f undamental t hat t hey c an b e u nderstood i n t erms o f t he u nderlying neurobiology. F or e xample, a rtists h ave l ong r ealized t hat c olor a nd l uminance c an play i ndependent r oles i n v isual p erception. P icasso s aid, " Colors a re o nly s ymbols. Reality i s t o b e f ound i n l uminance a lone." T his o bservation h as a p arallel i n t he functional s ubdivision o f o ur v isual s ystems, w here c olor a nd l uminance a re processed b y t he n ewer, p rimate---specific W hat s ystem, a nd t he o lder, c olorblind, Where ( or H ow) s ystem. M any

246

The mechanism of HIV-1 Nef-mediated downregulation of CD4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he lp er T ce lls , w hi le C D 8 T c el ls b ec om e cy to to xi c T ly m ph oc yt es ( no t sh ow n; h ow ev er , t he m ec ha ni sm o f T l ym ph oc yt e di ff er en tia tio n is d es cr ib ed i n Se ct io n 1. 2. 3) . I n... th e B c el l r ec ep to r an d se cr et ed a nt ib od ie s ar e de pi ct ed a s bl ac k [ Y ] . T he s qu ar e ba ck gr ou nd s fo r ea ch c el l i nd ic at es th e lo ca tio n th at th e ce ll is m os t l ik el y to b e fo...

Chaudhuri, Rittik

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

247

Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.  

SciTech Connect

We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

Barnhart, Kevin Scott

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Clinical Study LH Dynamics in Overweight Girls with Premature Adrenarche and Slowly Progressive Sexual Precocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2010 Brian Bordini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Excess adiposity and premature adrenarche (PA) are risk factors for the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods. Girls with slowly progressive precocious breast development, who were overweight and had PA (SPPOPA, 6.2 8.2 years, n = 5), overweight PA (6.610.8 years, n = 7), and overweight premenarcheal controls (OW-PUB, 10.612.8 years, n = 8) underwent hormonal sleep testing and GnRH agonist (GnRHag) and ACTH tests. Results. Despite an insignificant sleeprelated increase in LH and prepubertal baseline hormone levels, SPPOPA peak LH and estradiol responses to GnRHag were intermediate between those of PA and OW-PUB, the LH being significantly different from both. Conclusions. GnRHag tests indicate that SPPOPA is a slowly progressive form of true puberty with blunted LH dynamics. These results argue against the prepubertal hyperandrogenism of excess adiposity or PA enhancing LH secretion or causing ovarian hyperandrogenism prior to menarche. Excess adiposity may contribute to both the early onset and slow progression of puberty. 1.

Brian Bordini; Elizabeth Littlejohn; Robert L. Rosenfield

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Three Models for Waterflooding in a Naturally Fractured Petroleum Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction. For the purposes of this paper a naturally fractured reservoir is a porous medium that has been fractured in a regular geometric fashion; the resulting medium consists of a collection of porous matrix blocks, each of which is quite small with respect to the size of the reservoir, essentially lling out the reservoir, and a set of thin fractures that separate the blocks. The fractures will be considered to be generated by either two or three families of parallel planes. Though the total volume in the fractures is very small in comparison to the total void volume in the porous blocks, the ow of uids in such a fractured reservoir is seriously aected by the existence of the fractures, since the resistance to ow in the fractures is much smaller than that in the blocks. Flow in the blocks will be described by means of the usual Darcy and conservation laws [17]. Flow in the fractures will also be described using Darcy's law; this implies that the fractures will be t

Jim Douglas, Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DENVER, CO DENVER, CO WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT ACTIVITIES ACTIVITIES O.W. EATON MANAGER, EXTERNAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OPENING OF NEW ROUTES COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 102 579 WIPP LANDWITHDRAWL 102-579 WIPP LANDWITHDRAWL ACT OF 1992 1082 EMERGENCY PERSONNEL TRAINED IN 2010 *MERRTT 1082 EMERGENCY PERSONNEL TRAINED IN 2010 MERRTT *INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM *HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS *HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS *MEDICAL EXAMINER DISPATCHER (BETA) *DISPATCHER (BETA) RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR FOR FOR FOR HOSPITAL PERSONNEL HOSPITAL PERSONNEL Based on FEMA Course G-346 iNTRODUCTION 4 Hazardous Materials Accidents Part 1 WIPP EXTERNAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT EXERCISES CONDUCTED E ercise Location Date Exercise Location Date TRANSAX 90 Colorado Springs, Colorado November 8, 1990 1

251

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

252

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

54 Federal Register 54 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 146 / Friday, July 29, 2011 / Notices (1) Explain your views as clearly as possible and provide specific examples. (2) Describe any assumptions that you used. (3) Provide copies of any technical information and/or data you used that support your views. (4) If you estimate potential burden or costs, explain how you arrived at the estimate that you provide. (5) Offer alternative ways to improve the collection activity. (6) Make sure to submit your comments by the deadline identified under DATES. 7. To ensure proper receipt by EPA, be sure to identify the docket ID number of EPA-HQ-OW-2008-0150 in the subject line on the first page of your response. You may also provide the name, date, and Federal Register citation.

253

ORI. RAD-1 IO IWX' ARTYENT OF HEALTX AIVD REKABILtTATIVt SERVICPS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ORI. RAD-1 IO ORI. RAD-1 IO , IWX' ARTYENT OF HEALTX AIVD REKABILtTATIVt SERVICPS IHVIRION OF HEALTR ?wt ow** m.. mo JDebnr.llh. Pwwu* a- , Pagi 1 of 2' Pa& RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS LlCENiEH** 396-2, MSUMmT IED. 4 k8o Pursuant to Chapter 290, Florida' Statutes, and Chapter IqD-56, Florida Administrative Code, Control of Radiation Hazards, an in reliance on statements and representations heretofore made by the licensee designated below, a license is hereby issued authorizin :uch licensee to transfer, receive, possess and use the radioactive material(s) designated below and to use such radioactive material (S for the purpose(s) and at the place(s) designated below. This license is aubjcct to all applicable rules, regulations and orders of tl state of Florida, Department of health and Rchabilitetive Servicrc now or hereafter in effect and to any conditions specified belo)

254

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM: P Lf9inC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

P Lf9inC P Lf9inC ---'------------ SUBJECT: &j;&,&,ti ~eco~rlyev\bQo(+~r7 DATE ---------- CITY: %,+ ~--~~~---__--~~--_~---~~~- STATE- I+- - ------ -------- ow~:::~~~~wh i Me-me -----------A-- current: mkem./y ---------____---___-______ Owner contacted q yes &no; if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION -------__~~---__- p Research & Development p Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage 0 Prime 0 Subcontract& F Purchase Order m Facility Type a Hanuf acturing q University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time 81 material, etc)

255

TYPE OF OPERATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~__--------_____ ~~__--------_____ q Research & Development q Production scale testing Cl Pilat Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies a Sample & Analysis c] Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ~~__-------_--__ 0 Prime 0 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order a d//F- a Faci 1 i ty Type a tlanuf acturi ng 0 University q Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility a other --------------__----- Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, qtr) ------- -1------------------_L______ Contract/Purchase Order # CONTRACTING PE?IOD- 42 --------------L---- --------- ----------------_---______ OWNERSHIP: AEC/MED AEC/tlED OWNED ----- LE_A_sEE GOUT GO' JT CONTRACTOR E!!!!E!z LEASED - ----_ ---_OW_E!L LANDS BUILDINGS

256

Simulation information regarding Sandia National Laboratories%3CU%2B2019%3E trinity capability improvement metric.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory each selected a representative simulation code to be used as a performance benchmark for the Trinity Capability Improvement Metric. Sandia selected SIERRA Low Mach Module: Nalu, which is a uid dynamics code that solves many variable-density, acoustically incompressible problems of interest spanning from laminar to turbulent ow regimes, since it is fairly representative of implicit codes that have been developed under ASC. The simulations for this metric were performed on the Cielo Cray XE6 platform during dedicated application time and the chosen case utilized 131,072 Cielo cores to perform a canonical turbulent open jet simulation within an approximately 9-billion-elementunstructured- hexahedral computational mesh. This report will document some of the results from these simulations as well as provide instructions to perform these simulations for comparison.

Agelastos, Anthony Michael; Lin, Paul T.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

"U ,-r-r-r ..- - "U ,-r-r-r ..- - ku 117 Booker case Pilu Jtav. prot. Duror.0 -1.Y.S. Dupartaant of Lau lkw York, Icu rork I A. Pmduetlom klnion: 591 drmr of K-65 have been dumped into the lower aectlon otthe 0 toimr sina* the iwuption or operst1ona. making a tatal or 199e tom 6f slud@ mow stored therein. Irfteentona ot SSP 505Test Bonctor roda shippad rzy IPOC to Bridy"" Panas Corpsn~ to be cold dryprior to m.%hWng" e Mlaoellaneou~ rod shlplsnt.reremad.toBstbLaba-Stab Co-, Alls,@+ney-LudluStml Conpany,Nationalbsd~~,?emald~. Gwmnl Bectrlc Ccapany,Banford. andArgonn.~Eation~Labora:o~kSSS. Shiped of rodm. acrap and oxidm mre rscslrd Iram karlcan Yheblne k Foundry Co.. OE,Nanford, Allegbausy-Ludlun and Eethleham. Approximately lS.OW pounds of machined uraniv metal hare beem

258

Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Market Luciana Juvenal (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis and International Monetary Fund) Ivan Petrella (Birkbeck College, University of London) Motivation Introduction Econometric Method Data and Speci...cation VAR and FAVAR Extended Model Conclusion Appendix Disclaimer The views expressed are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily re‡ect o¢ cial positions of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, the Federal Reserve System, the Board of Governors, or the International Monetary Fund. Motivation Introduction Econometric Method Data and Speci...cation VAR and FAVAR Extended Model Conclusion Appendix Big picture ! Increase in oil prices since 2004 coincided with: Large ‡ow of investment into commodity markets Financial institutions invested billions of dollars in futures markets Assets allocated to commodity index trading increased from

259

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Details Activities (9) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: We apply a new method to target potential geothermal resources on the regional scale in the Great Basin by seeking relationships between geologic structures and GPS-geodetic observations of regional tectonic strain. First, we establish a theoretical basis for underst~dingh ow the rate of fracture opening can be related to the directional trend of faults

260

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Memorandum for Improving DOE HQ Recruitment and Hiring Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~ ~ e ~ u t ~ ~ l o ~ f @ i j Washington, DC 20585 hlEMORANDUM TO DEPARTMENTAL ELEh@NT& FROM: SUBJECT: DANIEL B. P O N W Improving the Headquarters' Hiring Processes Secretary Chu has set forth an athbitious agenda for the D of Energy i f l - a f d a to build a clean, secure, and prosperous energy future for our Nation. Fulfilling that agenda requires that we act with urgency and purpose. Success will depend largely on ow ability to recruit and retain a dedicated, high-performing workforce. To accomplish our expanded mission, the Department will hire hundreds of new employees during the next year. At Headquarters, we must make certain that we have the capacity to hire staff quickly yet wisely. We have already begun to strengthen the Headquarters' hiring process by launching such initiatives as accelerated procedures for

262

2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories (EPA 822-S-12-001)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edition of the Drinking Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories 2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories EPA 822-S-12-001 Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC Spring 2012 Date of update: April, 2012 Recycled/Recyclable Printed on paper that contains at least 50% recycled fiber. Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories Spring 2012 Page iii of vi iii The Health Advisory (HA) Program, sponsored by the EPA's Office of Water (OW), publishes concentrations of drinking water contaminants at Drinking Water Specific Risk Level Concentration for cancer (10 -4 Cancer Risk) and concentrations of drinking water contaminants at which noncancer adverse health effects are not anticipated to occur over specific exposure

263

Post-Remedial Action Report the Chapman Valve Site E I P I I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Post-Remedial Action Report the Chapman Valve Site E I P I I I t I 1 I I I 1 I li I I Pnnted on recycledkecyclable paper 24 19 0186 1 DOE/OW21949-408 Formerly Utilized Sites Remed Contr: al Action Program (FUSRAP) L C t NO. DE-AC05-91 OR21 949 Indian Orchard, assac h.usetts November 1996 DOE/OR/2 1949-408 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE CHAPMAN VALVE SITE INDIAN ORCHARD, MASSACHUSETTS NOVEMBER 1996 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-91 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee . . Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page . FIGURES ................................................................................... 1 .............................................................. iv

264

FRm : John A. Deny, DitiSion Of  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to : lieads of Divisions am3 Man DAW.: December 6, 1954 to : lieads of Divisions am3 Man DAW.: December 6, 1954 FRm : John A. Deny, DitiSion Of SPNBOL : csm-R:AcB The attached tabulation of active AEC contracts over $l,ooO,Mx) haa been ,xepared as a result of recurring requests fcr infmmatirm cm ow larger contracts. It consists ox- Pa-t I - E+ime contracts and Pert II - Sub- ccdxacts, and lists the contracts alphabetically bq Operations Office to shar; (1) tne of work being prformed by the contractcr; (2) contract rmter; (3).ac&ated dollar obligation; (4) tspe of contract, i.e., cost m or fixed ,rlce; ad, (5) the est+ted completion date. 1. Arcbitict-Engineer (AE) 2. DnSita constnlctfon 3. Research and Dewlopnent (R&D) 4. Haterids, Supplies and EquiFment for Constructian (=---.) 5. Materials, supplies and Equippent, other @e&other)

265

This refers to tbe%aspectioa cooducted,ooMlny 2 - 5, 1961. of  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

refers to tbe%aspectioa cooducted,ooMlny 2 - 5, 1961. of refers to tbe%aspectioa cooducted,ooMlny 2 - 5, 1961. of activities at your~&tyhevbWorlce, Pitteburg, Kaaaas, licensed under Source Material Liaemee.Plo~~~C-4352 and Special Nuclear Meteriel License boos. SX+l% and SW-329. ~. .:. :Y: ,_,(, ..s,; . . : ~~ .: I& appears that certain of yuu~actikities were not &mdu&ed & full ccapliance with a condition of a license and.the requirements of the ASC'a "Standards for Protection Against Radiation," Part.20, Title 10, .Code Of Pederd %QUhtfOW.. in. that: .,: : ;. .:. :: ..,_, : ;I. hzrvep cmduetd~pursuant to Section 20.201(b), "' ._; .' . " ' "-==P l ' I were insufficient as follows: :..: a. ,_. m oetoppnc~-studies aud.&e wei.$ited ; -:. ..~ ,'.;;- 'expoeure evaluations had not been made to

266

Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADVANCE ADVANCE WAIVERS - LIMITATION OF APPLICABILITY, IPI 10 CFR 784.8(b) provides that a new request for advance waiver will be required if the purpose, scope, or cost of the contract is substantially altered. It is appropriate that this change should be reflected in Statements of Considerations. Accordingly, effective immediately, all Statements of Considerations for advance (blanket) waivers shall be prepared with the following sentence added to the paragraph just preceding the signatures of the program official Assistant General Counsel for TT & IP: "This waiver shall not apply to a modification or extension of this contract where, through such modification or extension, the purpose, scope, or cost of the contact has been substantially altered." O[)&W '~-PaulA/Gottlieb Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property *Printedwithsoy

267

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

268

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Synthesis and Stability of NaSICON for Sodium-Based Batteries - Dave Ingersoll & Erik Spoerke, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No No c rossover, e liminates c athode---anode m aterials c ompa4bility i ssues * Planar b ipolar s tacks & fl ow d esigns a re p ossible Phosphate G lasses Silicate G lasses Engineered s ol---gel p rocessing a llows f or l ower t emperature p rocessing a nd t ailoring o f NaSICON c omposi4on t o a ddress s econdary Z rO 2 f orma4on. Reducing fi ring t emperature below 1 100 o C o r i ntroducing a small e xcess o f s odium t o t he sol---gel p recursors d rama4cally reduces Z rO 2 f orma4on. !" #!" $!!" $#!" %!!" %#!" &!!" &#!" '!!" ()*+*)",-."%/" 012*)",-."$&/" !!"#$%&#'()*+,-# 3*4*)56" 7*8)56*9:" 35+*9:" ;<52-<5892" ! "#!µ$! !"#$%&'"(% $#))"*+,$% -*.))/% 012*3)#"1%

269

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

b-0 b-0 <' A : /yj +- [J & I 5Pti PIP+ b DOE/OW20722-4 UC-70A FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM (FUSRAP) CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-8 1 OR20722 3 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER SHPACK LANDFILL NORTON, MASSACHUSETTS MARCH 1984 Bechtel Job 14501 Bechtel National, Inc. Advanced Technology Division --_.. - .-__ I .._.. -. . ..lll ~. _. DOE/OR/20722-4 Radiological Survey of the Former Shpack Landfill March 1984 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-ACOS-810R20722 BY Bechtel National, Inc. P. 0. Box 350 Oak Ridge, TN 37830 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 2.0 SITE DESCRIPTION AND HISTORY 2.1 Location and Description 2.2 Site History 3.0 SURVEY PROCEDURES 3.1 General 3.2 Field Measurements 3.3 Sample Collection and Analysis

270

L:LCB:lg  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L:LCB:lg L:LCB:lg '. ,. ), .; ..:.;; ~ .,. Fhazmon sAmi.now uatsri.als co. 7356 sanca !.tonioa Boulevard Eollymod 46, Calif. Attr Mr. J. 2. Alburger CslItlI%LOIll - Ootober, 9, l&2 ,:;.. ~. Tk have your letter dabed Ootobor~B, 1962 &ah is euffioient to give w a better plotwe of the we wblch you propose to make ofuraniumoorrpovndE inluud.now'paintpignonts. We are attaahing licanse number C-2663 uhi&.permits you to purchase three pounds ofuraniumoompounda for demlop3mt mrk. 1% want ybu to understand in admum, hovemar, that we till bc reluctant to JESUS additional liconm3e for production of lumin- ow paints exceptforpignenta to be wed ex~lwiwly inprodu~ta having ntilitaqy or olearly defined industrial &ility. znclosurea Lioewe Eoo, C-2863

271

Point of Collapse and Continuation Methods for Large AC/DC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the implementation of both Point of Collapse (PoC) methods and continuation methods for the computation of voltage collapse points (saddle-node bifurcations) in large ac/dc systems. A comparison of the performance of these methods is presented for real systems of up to 2158 buses. The paper discusses computational details of the implementation of the PoC and continuation methods, and the unique challenges encountered due to the presence of high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission, area interchange power control, regulating transformers, and voltage and reactive power limits. The characteristics of a robust PoC power ow program are presented, and its application to detection and solution of voltage stability problems is demonstrated.

Claudio A. Caizares; Fernando L. Alvarado

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reduced-Order Model Based Feedback Control For Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani Model  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modi ed Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in ow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then a modelbased feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators (LQR). Finally, a linear quadratic gaussian (LQG) controller, which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

I.R. Goumiri, C.W. Rowley, Z. Ma, D.A. Gates, J.A. Krommes and J.B. Parker

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Standard hydrogen monitoring system - E operation and maintenance manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide information for the operation and maintenance of the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System- E (SHMS-E) used in the 200E and 20OW area tank farms on the Hanford Site. This provides information specific to the mechanical operation of the system and is not intended to take the place of a Plant Operating Procedure. However, it does provide more information on the system than a Plant Operating Procedure. The intent here is that the system is started up by a technician or engineer who has completed tank farms training course for SHMS, and then the only actions performed by Operations will be routine log taking. If any problems not addressed by the operating procedure are encountered with the unit, engineering should be contacted.

Schneider, T.C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Camfridge Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Camfridge Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Camfridge Ltd Place Cambridge, United Kingdom Zip CB4 OWS Sector Efficiency Product Camfridge is a spinout of the University of Cambridge. It started in 2004 to focus on the development of high efficiency magnetic refrigeration technology. References Camfridge Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Camfridge Ltd is a company located in Cambridge, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Camfridge Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Camfridge_Ltd&oldid=343181" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

275

Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1162  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COLUMBIA COLUMBIA RIVER MANAGEMENT PR GORGE OJECT VEGETAT ON Final Environmental Assessment DO E/EA-l 162 BONNEVILLE row,. ..", ",,,,.,,0. W x ? -- -- ------ .- .-- b I . , (, I I I ( t ,1 ,0 , . ,' I , ,- , !" 1 , I I ,; ,, 1 1 I .1 . . COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (Hanford-Ostrander and North BonnevilI&Midway Transmission Line Rights-of-Way) Table of Contents Page . 2 3 pqose and Need Background hbfic evolvement Swq ' ' Decbions to Be Made PROPOSED A~ON AND ~~RNA~S Mtemative k No Action " Manual, Mechnical, and Biological Metbh - Ntemative W. Proposed Action- htegrated Vegetation Management ~) tih Herbicides Herbici& Meth& -. PhedActions Comparison of Mtematives ~ . . . . . . ti~D E~OW~ ~ E_O_~m .. CONSEQ~N~S Affmd Environment . Environment Consquen~ hti Use Soils Vegetation Water Resources WildlfeResources Air Quali@lGlobal Warning

276

EPICS: Allen-Bradley hardware reference manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual covers the following hardware: Allen-Bradley 6008 -- SV VMEbus I/O scanner; Allen-Bradley universal I/O chassis 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, and -A4B; Allen-Bradley power supply module 1771-P4S; Allen-Bradley 1771-ASB remote I/O adapter module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IFE analog input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OFE analog output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IG(D) TTL input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OG(d) TTL output; Allen-Bradley 1771-IQ DC selectable input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OW contact output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IBD DC (10--30V) input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OBD DC (10--60V) output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IXE thermocouple/millivolt input module; and the Allen-Bradley 2705 RediPANEL push button module.

Nawrocki, G.

1993-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

277

Other Elms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elms Elms Nature Bulletin No. 280-A October 28, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OTHER ELMS The oldest record of any elm is dated approximately 50 million years ago. At one time they even grew in tropical jungles but, today, they are found only in the northern hemisphere. There are 6 species native in the United States but none west of the Rockies, and 12 others in Europe, Asia and North Africa. Of our native elms, the Slippery Elm, also called Red Elm, is next to the American elm in abundance and natural range. It is found along streams banks or low fertile slopes, although it sometimes grows on rocky ridges. It lacks the graceful symmetry of the American elm and is a smaller tree -- usually from 40 to 60 feet high with a rather short trunk from one to two feet in diameter and stout spreading limbs. It has leaves that are extremely rough on the upper surface, and the bark on old trunks is dark reddish brown, rather than ashy gray. It gets its name from the inner bark, which is so mucilaginous and aromatic that children love to chew it -- as the Indians and pioneers often did to quench their thirst -- and it is good for a sore throat. The Indians made boxes and baskets of the bark, crude canoes, and covered their wigwams with it. The wood is strong, heavy and, being fairly durable in the soil, is used for fence posts and railroad ties. It is also used for furniture, wheel hubs, sills for buildings, shipbuilding and farm implements.

278

Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,"Waste",," " ,,,"Blast",,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars" "NAICS",,,"Furnace/Coke",,"Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",9.1,"X",25,"X","X",6,55.6 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",8.9,"X",47.4,"X","X",0,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,"X",0,"X","X",0,"X"

279

PERIODICITY OF ESTROUS CYCLE IN ALBINO RATS; RESPONSE TO SOME CRUDE DRUG COMBINATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The extracts of bark, leaves and stem of A. indica, fruits of P. longum, berries of E. officinalis and seeds of G. indicum were prepared using different solvents. Three different combinations of these extracts were tried on the female albino rats for their effect on the estrous cycle. The combination consisting of alcoholic extracts of leaves and stem of A. indica, fruits of P. longum, berries of E. officinalis and seeds of G. indicum has exhibited considerable effect on estrous cycle by prolongation of diestrous phase.

C. K. Kokate; M. Krishna; Reddy; N. Chari

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fuel Cost Savings Through Computer Control of a Boiler Complex - - Two Case Histories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the growing need for energy efficiency in industry and describes a new, packaged approach to fuel optimization through direct digital control and accurate in-stack measurement of combustion products. Results are presented for a large pulp and paper mill complex in which multiple power boilers and turbine generators are controlled so as to meet the total energy demand of the mill at minimum cost. Also discussed are results from a second installation involving control of a combined bark and gas boiler, a gas package boiler and a turbine generator, including utility tie-line control.

Worthley, C. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Understanding biogas generation. Technical paper  

SciTech Connect

Biogas is a by-product of the biological breakdown - under oxygen-free conditions - of organic wastes such as plants, crop residues, wood and bark residues, and human and animal manure. Biogas generators or digesters yield two products: the biogas itself, and a semi-solid by-product called effluent or sludge. Biogas systems are most popular for their ability to produce fuel from products that might otherwise be wasted-crop residues, manures, etc. The fuel is a flammable gas suitable for cooking, lighting, and fueling combustion engines. The digested waste--sludge--is a high quality ferterlizer.

Mattocks, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Measurement of exclusive $?(1S)$ and $?(2S)$ decays into Vector-Pseudoscalar final states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using samples of 102 million $\\Upsilon(1S)$ and 158 million $\\Upsilon(2S)$ events collected with the Belle detector, we study exclusive hadronic decays of these two bottomonium resonances to $\\ks K^+ \\pi^-$ and charge-conjugate (c.c.) states, $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0 \\pi^0$, and $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$, and to the two-body Vector-Pseudoscalar ($K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar{K}^0+ {\\rm c.c.}$, $K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+ + {\\rm c.c.}$, $\\omega\\pi^0$, and $\\rho\\pi$) final states. For the first time, signals are observed in the modes $\\Upsilon(1S) \\to \\ks K^+ \\pi^- + {\\rm c.c.}$, $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0 \\pi^0$, and $\\Upsilon(2S) \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0 \\pi^0$, and evidence is found for the modes $\\Upsilon(1S)\\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)^0 \\bar{K}^0+ {\\rm c.c.}$, and $\\Upsilon(2S) \\to \\ks K^+ \\pi^- + {\\rm c.c.}$ Branching fractions are measured for all the processes, while 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions are also set for the modes with a statistical significance of less than $3\\sigma$. The ratios of the branching fractions of $\\Upsilon(2S)$ and $\\Upsilon(1S)$ decays into the same final state are used to test a perturbative QCD prediction for OZI-suppressed bottomonium decays.

Belle Collaboration; C. P. Shen; C. Z. Yuan; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; B. Bhuyan; M. Bischofberger; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; J. Dingfelder; Z. Doleal; Z. Drsal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; K. Dutta; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; T. Hara; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kody; S. Korpar; P. Krian; P. Krokovny; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; S. -H. Lee; R. Leitner; J. Li; Y. Li; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. Q. Liu; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyata; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; T. Mori; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; Y. Nagasaka; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; W. Ostrowicz; P. Pakhlov; C. W. Park; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; T. Peng; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Rhrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. Shapkin; V. Shebalin; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; P. Smerkol; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stani?; M. Stari?; M. Steder; M. Sumihama; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; T. Tsuboyama; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; P. Wang; X. L. Wang; M. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; H. Yamamoto; J. Yamaoka; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; Y. Yusa; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; A. Zupanc

2013-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hand axes and Knives in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hand axes and Knives in the Forest Preserves Hand axes and Knives in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 16 May 26, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation HANDAXES AND KNIVES IN THE FOREST PRESERVES Handaxes and hunting-knives may not be carried in the forest preserves. The rangers must confiscate them wherever found. This rule is necessary because so many people in Cook County use these tools to damage or destroy trees and shrubs. In a county of 4 million people, mostly city people ignorant of how to conduct themselves in the woods, it is unfortunately necessary to make such rules to protect these forest preserves so that they will remain wild, unspoiled and beautiful. A real woodsman knows that he should not cut down a young tree or sapling for firewood. Green wood will not burn. A real woodsman knows that he should not strip the bark from a tree because then that tree will die. He knows that if a notch or deep blaze is made through the rough, protecting, outer bark, then there is created a place where rot and destructive insects can enter to eventually kill that tree.

284

Chewing Gum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chewing Gum Chewing Gum Nature Bulletin No. 621-A December 11, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CHEWING GUM Since ancient times, in many lands, people have found relaxation and comfort in the simple act of chewing some gummy substance. Somehow it relieves muscular and nervous tension. For example, at football, basketball and baseball games you will see some of the athletes and many spectators methodically chewing on wads of gum. On the other hand it relieves the tedium of doing nothing. For those reasons, and because it also relieves thirst, chewing gum was included in the combat rations of our armed forces. Here in the Middle West, many years ago when we were boys, chewing gum was not sold in stores as it is now. We were always experimenting with things to chew on. One of our favorites was the aromatic, mucilaginous, inner bark of the slippery elm. Another was paraffin wax, used by our mothers to seal glasses of homemade jelly. For a penny we could buy a black stick of licorice and spit like a tobacco-chewing man. We chewed the gummy sap that exudes from wounds in the bark of peach and cherry trees. We chewed beeswax in honeycombs.

285

Principle Wood Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood, bark, and the wax-coated seeds from Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb. syn. Triadica sebifera (L.) Small), an invasive tree species in the southeastern United States, were subjected to extractions and degradative chemical analyses in an effort to better understand the mechanism(s) by which this tree species aggressively competes against native vegetation, and also to facilitate utilization efforts. Analysis of the wood extractives by FTIR spectroscopy showed functionalities analogous to those in hydrolyzable tannins, which appeared to be abundant in the bark; as expected, the seeds had a high wax/oil content (43.1%). Compared to other fast-growing hardwoods, the holocellulose content for the Chinese tallow tree wood was somewhat higher (83.3%). The alpha-cellulose (48.3%) and Klason lignin (20.3%) contents were found to be similar to those for most native North American hardwoods. Results suggest that Chinese tallow tree wood utilization along with commercial wood species should not present any significant processing problems related to the extractives or cell-wall chemistry. Keywords: Cellulose, Chinese tallow tree, extractives, Klason lignin, utilization.

Thomas L. Eberhardt; Usda Forest Service; Xiaobo Li; Chung Y. Hse; Usda Forest Service

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstra*on/Integra*on Demonstra*on/Integra*on Breakout S ession Grid T echnologies C ollabora*ve Conference 10 June 2013 Breakout s ession o verview * External p ar*cipants i ncluded r epresenta*ves f rom NRECA, K eyLogic, U TRC, P JM, G ridTech, D OE ( Pat Hoffman s pent c onsiderable * me i n o ur s ession). * Morning b reakout: 1 h our s pent o n t he N avy Y ard s ite (there w as a L OT o f Q &A o n t he s ite's c apabili*es), 1 hour s pent o n t he r ole o f d emonstra*on i n t he p roduct life c ycle. * A\ernoon b reakout: M ost o f t he * me s pent d iscussing what o utcomes i ndustry w ould l ike t o s ee f rom a ny demonstra*on a nd w hat t he p oten*al u nique contribu*ons o f G TC w ould b e. Breakout s ession d iscussion t opics 1. At w hat p oint i n t echnology d evelopment d o we n eed t o m ove f rom t he s tand t o t he demonstra*on

287

R ES0 L U TI(it; 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ES0 L U TI(it; 1\ (;. ______ ES0 L U TI(it; 1\ (;. ______ lH T the i\£ '-'yor of tl,e Ctty of AmarHlo i.lli hE'rretr\ IHlthortzeti ~.nd directed to execute on oot~lf of the City ci:~ n,l!lnllo a contract between the Vnited :3rates o.f j\ ITJerica, reoresented by the l:"nited. Statf'8 p, tomie Ener~y CommiluJion. Amari.no .f~rea (,(fice, and dest!5nsted as Contract '1 (2~)-2) 224.9 ar"d the Citj Dr /\r:rarillo. Te:k.1ll8. authorilol.n'l the use of certain oroperty located a.t the .Amarino ,,\ir J'o:rc. Base by the Atorr,ic J~n~r~.v Co.n.lmiesion of the United Staws.. .). .. ~ 1/ . * 13.' .. ·If? . Contract AT(29-2)2249 CONTRACT This CONTRACT, entered into effective as hereinafter provided, by and between THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (hereinafter called the "Government

288

RS- External Correspondence-RFETS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOB NUMBER JOB NUMBER R E Q U E S T F O R R E C O R D S D I S P O S I T I O N A U T H O R I T Y (See Instructions on reverse) TO NATIONAL ARCHIVES and RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (NIR) WASHINGTON, DC 20408 1 FROM (Agency or establ~shment) Department o f Energy 2 MAJOR SUBDIVISION Kaiser-Hill, RFETS 3 MINOR SUBDIVISION Records Management In accordance w ~ t h the provlslons of 44 U S C 3303a rne olsposlrlon request. I includ~ng amendments, 1 s approved except for items rnai may oe marked 'o~spos~non not approved" or 'wlthdrawn" In column 10 I 4 NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER David Prochnow, Manager Contractor Records Management, R F E T S \ 1 I hereby certify that 1 am authorized to act for this agency in patters pertaining to the dlsposltlon of its records ard tha: the recolds proposed for disposal on the attached. paag(s) are not now needed for the busmess

289

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY C O M M ISSION WASHINGTON 25. D. C.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

w - w - 1 .' " . . . - --,.* : * . UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY C O M M ISSION WASHINGTON 25. D. C. $. _,._^. :\ SOUFtCE K47'FXIAL LICPJWS Liaense No. C-3Ll7 D8tidr kmmber 10, 1%5 SouthamRwwarah Inatituta 917 south 20th 3-t BlrRdngh88 5, Alabaa Attontlon: Hr. Ibak8 WhIta, Jr. Oontlom onr Pursuant to tbo At0810 IBerm Aot of 19% ard Saotion 163.21 of thr, Co& of Faderal Regulrtlon8, fit18 10 - Atonlc B m rgy, Chaptar 1, P*rt 40 - Cbntrolof Sourco Xakrlal,~u are horubylla~srd to ncalrcr powem ion of rnd/or title tro fUty-flvo (55) pound8 of rm. flned m ura nw1tar1al during tbo tan, of this liconeo fmm prooorm rs and dlrtrlbutorr liaOn8m d by the Atorio l&mrgy Corm i881on, for u8e in roeamchoa pXWF4Wt1.8 of umn1u~-l1~idata~fuo1 l lmnte, You l rafurtherlIc8n8od to trum

290

Chattan  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chattan Chattan ooga Eag le For d Devo nian (Ohi o) Mar cellu s Utica He rm osa Nio bra ra* Bak ken *** Nio bra ra* Mo nte rey Mo nte rey - Tem blo r Ava lon Heath ** Tuscaloosa Mow ry Ant rim Bar net t Ben d New Alban y Wo odf ord Ba rn ett - Wo od for d Le wis Hilli ard- Ba xter - Man cos -Nio bra ra Exc e llo- Mul ky Fay ette ville Floyd- Neal Gam m on Cody Hayn esvil le- Boss ier Ma nco s Pie rre- Nio bra ra Conasauga Colo rado Grou p Utica Doig Phosphate Montney Muskwa- Otter Park Muskwa-Otter Park, Evie-Klua Lower Besa River Frederick Brook Horton Bluff Pimienta Eagle Ford, Tithonian Maltrata Eagle Ford, La Casita Pimienta, Tamaulipas North American shale plays 0 400 800 200 600 Miles ± Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies. Canada and Mexico plays from ARI. Updated: May 9, 2011 (as of May 2011) * Mixed shale & chalk play

291

SYNTHESIS AND FABRICATION OF REFRACTORY URANIUM COMPOUNDS. Quarterly Report No. 4 for March 1 to April 30 and July 31, 1960  

SciTech Connect

Additional work on the synthesis and fabrication of uranium nitride produced an improved product free of oxide contamination as indicated by x-ray analysis. Further work to increase the density of the sintered pellets is needed. A stock of several pounds of stoichiometric uranium monocarbide was prepared by carbon reduction of uranium dioxide. Pellets having bulk densities ranging from 93 to 96% theoretical were obtained by cold pressing and sfntering. Initial experiments on the fabrication of bars, 3 by 1/2 by 1/4 in., by cold pressing and sintering, resulted in sound but somewhat low-density bodies. A few experiments were conducted on the production of uranium monocarbide from ammonium diuranate. The results indicate that considerable addftional work may be necessary to consistently produce a stoichiometric product. The simultaneous synthesis ard hot pressing of uranium monocarbide was funther studied and pellets with balk densities as high as 96.6% theoretical (based on 100% UC) were produced. However, metallographic examination disclosed the presence of some free uranium metal in all pellets. The synthesis of 1-lb batches of U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ of improved quality was successfully carried out by a nonquench method. Using the U/ sub 3/Si/sub 2/ so produced, sound pellets with bulk densities up to 98.5% theoretical were prepared by cold pressing and sintering. The sintering technique was also used to produce 3- by 1/2- by 1/4-in. bars for physical- property tests. (auth)

Taylor, K.M.; Lenie, C.A.; Doherty, P.E.; McMurtry, C.H.

1960-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Bioleaching of Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioleaching is the term used to describe the microbial dissolution of metals from minerals. The commercial bioleaching of metals, particularly those hosted in sulfide minerals, is supported by the technical disciplines of biohydrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, chemistry, electrochemistry, and chemical engineering. The study of the natural weathering of these same minerals, above and below ground, is also linked to the fields of geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry. Studies of abandoned and disused mines indicate that the alterations of the natural environment due to man's activities leave as remnants microbiological activity that continues the biologically mediated release of metals from the host rock (acid rock drainage; ARD). A significant fraction of the world's copper, gold and uranium is now recovered by exploiting native or introduced microbial communities. While some members of these unique communities have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, our knowledge of the composition of these communities, and the function of the individual species present remains relatively limited. Nevertheless, bioleaching represents a major strategy in mineral resource recovery whose importance will increase as ore reserves decline in quality, become more difficult to process (due to increased depth, increased need for comminution, for example), and as environmental considerations eliminate traditional physical processes such as smelting, which have served the mining industry for hundreds of years.

F. Roberto

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Statistical Relationships of the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Precipitation and Large-scale Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship between precipitation and large-flow is important to understand and characterize in the climate system. We examine statistical relationships between the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) 3B42 gridded precipitation and large-scale ow variables in the Tropics for 2000{2007. These variables include NCEP/NCAR Re-analysis sea surface temperatures (SSTs), vertical temperature pro files, omega, and moist static energy, as well as Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) vertical temperatures and QuikSCAT surface divergence. We perform correlation analysis, empirical orthogonal function analysis, and logistic regression analysis on monthly, pentad, daily and near-instantaneous time scales. Logistic regression analysis is able to incorporate the non-linear nature of precipitation in the relation- ship. Flow variables are interpolated to the 0.25 degrees TRMM 3B42 grid and examined separately for each month to o set the effects of the seasonal cycle. January correlations of NCEP/NCAR Re-analysis SSTs and TRMM 3B42 precipitation have a coherent area of positive correlations in the Western and Central Tropical Pacific on all time scales. These areas correspond with the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). 500mb omega is negatively correlated with TRMM 3B42 precipitation across the Tropics on all time scales. QuikSCAT divergence correlations with precipitation have a band of weak and noisy correlations along the ITCZ on monthly time scales in January. Moist static energy, calculated from NCEP/NCAR Re-analysis has a large area of negative correlations with precipitation in the Central Tropical Pacific on all four time scales. The first few Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFs) of vertical temperature profiles in the Tropical Pacific have similar structure on monthly, pentad, and daily timescales. Logistic regression fit coefficients are large for SST and precipitation in four regions located across the Tropical Pacific. These areas show clear thresholded behavior. Logistic regression results for other variables and precipitation are less clear. The results from SST and precipitation logistic regression analysis indicate the potential usefulness of logistic regression as a non-linear statistic relating precipitation and certain ow variables.

Borg, Kyle

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT forests have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of a characteristic CNT sample was measured to be 232 m2/g with a cryogenic (77K) hydrogen storage of 0.85 wt%. This level of hydrogen adsorption is slightly higher than that predicted by the Chahine rule, indicating that these CNTs may bind hydrogen more strongly than other carbonaceous materials. More work is needed to confi rm and determine the reason for increased hydrogen adsorption in these CNTs, and to test them for use as catalyst support networks. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing CNTs for energy storage applications using water-assisted CVD.

Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009 August 2009 Revised: October 2009 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Waste Blast Pulping Liquor Oils/Tars NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, and Waste Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Materials Total United States 311 Food 10 0 3 0 0 7 Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 7 0 1 0 0 6 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5 0 * 0 0 4 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food Q 0 * 0 0 0 Q 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * 0 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 1 0 1 0 0 * * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

297

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

298

Search for CP Violation in the Decay $D^+\\rightarrow K^0_S K^+$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for CP violation in the decay $D^+\\rightarrow K^0_S K^+$ using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 977 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB $e^+e^-$ asymmetric-energy collider. No CP violation has been observed and the CP asymmetry in $D^+\\rightarrow K^0_S K^+$ decay is measured to be $(-0.25\\pm0.28\\pm0.14)%$, which is the most sensitive measurement to date. After subtracting CP violation due to $K^0-\\bar{K}^0$ mixing, the CP asymmetry in $D^+\\rightarrow\\bar{K}^0 K^+$ decay is found to be $(+0.08\\pm0.28\\pm0.14)%$.

B. R. Ko; E. Won; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; K. Arinstein; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; K. Belous; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Doleal; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; S. Esen; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; Y. Iwasaki; T. Julius; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; C. Kiesling; H. O. Kim; J. B. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; S. Korpar; R. T. Kouzes; P. Krian; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; Y. Li; C. Liu; D. Liventsev; R. Louvot; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; N. Muramatsu; Y. Nagasaka; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; E. Nedelkovska; C. Ng; N. Nellikunnummel; S. Nishida; K. Nishimura; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; S. Okuno; C. Oswald; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; K. Prothmann; M. Ritter; M. Rhrken; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; P. Smerkol; Y. -S. Sohn; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; T. Sumiyoshi; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsuboyama; M. Uchida; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; Y. Yamashita; C. C. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

299

JGI - Why Sequence Xanthoria parietina?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Xanthoria parietina? Xanthoria parietina? photo of lichen The lichen-forming fungus Xanthoria parietina would be the first lichen fungus to be sequenced. A lichen is an association between a fungus (usually an ascomycete) and either a microalga or a cyanobacterium, or both. Lichens are widely regarded as the classic example of a mutualistic symbiosis. Lichens grow in soil-less habitats such as on rocks or tree bark, or on poorly developed soils. Although these habitats occur in all terrestrial biomes, they are particularly abundant at high latitudes in the Subarctic, Arctic, and Antarctic, where lichens are of great ecological importance and where global warming and climate change pose a special threat. There are approximately 13,500 species of lichen-forming fungi, each producing a distinct lichen association (i.e., a "lichen species").

300

Waginogans and Other Indian Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waginogans and Other Indian Homes Waginogans and Other Indian Homes Nature Bulletin No. 578 October 31, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor Richard Becker, Naturalist WAGINOGANS AND OTHER INDIAN HOMES The American Indians built homes of many types that varied according to the materials available and the customs and culture of each tribe or nation. Sioux and other plains Indians who followed the buffalo lived in teepees. The "longhouse" of the Iroquois, built of poles covered with bark and surrounded by a palisade, was a large permanent structure housing several families. So, too, were the fort-like pueblos and cliff dwellings built of rocks and adobe clay by some of the southwestern "agricultural" Indians.

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301

GEE Energy GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEE Energy GmbH Co KG GEE Energy GmbH Co KG Jump to: navigation, search Name GEE Energy GmbH & Co. KG Place Hamburg, Germany Zip 20459 Sector Biomass Product Biomass trader delivering wood pellets, wood and bark briquettes to Germany, Scandinavia, Austria, Italy and Switzerland. Coordinates 53.553345°, 9.992455° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.553345,"lon":9.992455,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

302

Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drought-induced forest mortality Drought-induced forest mortality Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint LANL-UNM studies. July 10, 2013 Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." Research has dire global implications for forests LOS ALAMOS, N. M., July 10, 2013- Many southwestern forests in the United

303

Publications from Research Conducted at MR | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications from Research Conducted at MR Publications from Research Conducted at MR 2013 Publications Erickson M. J., "Surface and interface effects in nanoscopic metallic spin transport devices", University of Minnesota , (2013). Ji N., Lauter V., Zhang X., Ambaye H., Wang J.-P., "Strain induced giant magnetism in epitaxial Fe16N2 thin film", Applied Physics Letters 102, 072411 (2013). Jiang C. Y., Tong X., Brown D. R., Lee W. T., Ambaye H., Craig J. W., Crow L., Culbertson H., Goyette R., Graves-Brook M. K., Hagen M. E., Kadron B., Lauter V., McCollum L. W., Robertson J. L., Winn B., Vandegrift A. E., "Polarized 3He neutron spin filters at Oak Ridge National Laboratory", Physics Procedia 42, 191-199 (2013). Ke X., Belenky L. J., Lauter V., Ambaye H., Bark C. W., Eom C. B.,

304

NREL: News Feature - Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices May 24, 2010 Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player. When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But that's what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus. In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S.

305

Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drought-induced forest mortality Drought-induced forest mortality Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint LANL-UNM studies. July 10, 2013 Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." Research has dire global implications for forests LOS ALAMOS, N. M., July 10, 2013- Many southwestern forests in the United

306

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 23, 2012 August 23, 2012 New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector Taking a moment to break-down key findings from the latest Clean Energy Jobs Roundup. August 13, 2012 INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America August 3, 2012 A worker suppresses dust during the final demolition stages of the historic DP West site, located at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area 21. The demolition was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and is part of $212 million in ARRA funds the Lab received for environmental remediation. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Photo of the Week: August 3, 2012 Check out our favorite energy-related photos! August 2, 2012 With new pipes and controls, the natural gas kilns Highland Craftsmen uses to produce poplar bark shingles will operate about 40 percent more efficiently, saving the company $5,000 a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of Highland Craftsmen.

307

Microsoft Word - Chap7.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Seven May 2005 Seven May 2005 2004 Site Environmental Report 7-1 Sloan's Crayfish - The state-listed threatened Sloan's crayfish (Orconectes sloanii) is found in southwest Ohio and southeast Indiana. It prefers streams with constant (though not necessarily fast) current flowing over rocky bottoms. A large, well-established population of Sloan's crayfish is found at the Fernald site in the northern reaches of Paddys Run. Indiana Brown Bat - The federally listed endangered Indiana brown bat (Myotis sodalis) forms colonies in hollow trees and under loose tree bark along riparian (stream side) areas during the summer. Excellent habitat for the Indiana brown bat has been identified at the Fernald site along the wooded banks of the northern reaches of Paddys Run.

308

The Entire Botany Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Botany Archives Botany Archives Botany Archives, Since May 2000 Table of Contents: Ginseng Caterpillars and Pin Oaks Seaweed and Nutrition Blue Leaves Walnut Problems Italian Trees Purple Plants Poplar Up-date European Tree Design Planting Magnolia Trees Schoolyard Plants Poplar Droppings Fungi Spores Woodland Adaptations Growing Lichen Apple Tree Maturity Horse Poison Plants Honeysuckle Poison Old Trees Leaking Popular Cottonwood Infestation Tulip Tree Seeds Bald Cypress Ecology Maple Recovery Leaf Minors Catalpa Problem Berm Enhancement Organic Gardening Ailing Burr Oak Damaged Cypress Tree Reed Ridding Berm Enhancement Tulip Tree Flowering Lichens Weed Seeds Plants at Night Kombu Seaweed Plants at Night Crab Grass Phloem Physiology Elm Disease Bark Thickness Poison Sumac Growing Fields Killing Pine Trees

309

Poison Ivy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26 August 4, 1945 26 August 4, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation POISON IVY It is blackberry time. Persons wandering through the woods should learn to recognize and avoid poison ivy. It is a pernicious and frequent vine along fences, roadsides and hedgerows; it grows in large patches of erect plants in the deep woods, spreading by means of many underground runners; and it climbs trees, clinging to the bark with countless aerial rootlets. After the war we expect to eradicate large areas of poison ivy, particularly in picnic centers and along the trails, utilizing some of the new selective weedkillers that have been developed. Poison ivy should not be confused with the harmless Virginia Creeper, or Woodbine, which has five leaves coarsely toothed all around their edges.

310

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY LOUISIANA PACIFIC CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LOUISIANA PACIFIC CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE LOUISIANA PACIFIC CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-FC36-00GO10597; W(A)-00-028; CH-1044. The Petitioner, Louisiana Pacific Corporation (LP), has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above identified contract by its employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, or National Laboratories. LP is leading a teaming arrangement including various industrial participants and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop the use of bark-derived pyrolysis oils as a phenol substitute in structural panel adhesives.

311

Wading Into Wetlands .  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fall 2011 Volume 8 Issue 4 Fall 2011 Volume 8 Issue 4 Wading Into Wetlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Of the Fungi and the Forests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Barking Beetle Sugar Fix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Schmutz Leading Plant Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 In the News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 The oceans capture significant amounts of carbon, but the processes involved in their contribution to managing the global carbon budget are still not fully understood. One of the questions that remains only partially answered is how marine microbes process carbon without the aid of the sun. Many marine organ- isms rely on sunlight to produce the food they need to survive, but the light does not penetrate all the way to the bottom of the ocean. In the September 2, 2011 issue of Science, DOE JGI scientists and longtime collaborators employed single cell sequencing techniques to identify a pathway by which microbes in the "twilight

312

Investment in generation is heavy, but important needs remain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasting the direction of the US electric power industry for 2007, much less the distant future, is like defining a velocity vector; doing so requires a direction and speed to delineate progress. In this special report, the paper looks at current industry indicators and draws conclusions based on more than 100 years of experience. To borrow verbatim the title of basketball legend Charles Barkely's book 'I may be wrong but I doubt it'. The forecast takes into consideration USDOE's National Electric Transmission Congestion Study (August 2006),a summary of industry data prepared by Industrial Info Resources (IIR) and NERC's 2006 Long-Term Reliability Assessment (October 2006). It also reports opinions of industry specialists. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Maize, K.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas: Interim Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process is being developed that produces a fuel gas with a heating value of 500 Btu/SCF from diverse forms of biomass, including shredded bark, wood chips, and sawdust. The system uses a high throughput, non-oxygen gasifier that employs sand circulation to supply process heat. Results obtained with a 10-inch I.D. gasifier are presented and compared with those in a 6-inch I.D. reactor. Feed rates up to 12 tons/day (dry) have been achieved corresponding to a specific wood throughput of 2000 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr. Gas compositions in the two reactors are in excellent agreement and performance in the larger reactor, as measured by carbon conversion, is significantly improved. Cost projections comparing this process with direct combustion are presented that indicate gasification technology should have very significant cost advantages for both generation of plant steam and cogeneration of electricity. 5 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Feldmann, H.G.; Paisley, M.A.; Appelbaum, H.R.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Chronic disease and early exposure to air-borne mixtures. 2. Exposure assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is part of a larger study of the impact of early exposure to releases from industry on the etiology of cancer. Releases from all kraft and sulfite mills, coke ovens, oil refineries, copper, nickel, and lead/zinc smelters operating in Canada during the exposure period of 1967-1970 have been determined. All plumes have been expressed in g BaP eq/d using the RASH methodology. The releases have been divided into process, boiler fuel, dioxin, and SO{sub 2} emissions. Combustion sources have been defined with FIREv6.23. Dioxin congenors are expected in all source types when the boiler fuel is heavy fuel oil, wood or wood bark, or coal. All about 90 communities examined have an inverted sex ratio. 53 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

James Argo [IntrAmericas Centre for Environment and Health, Wolfe Island, ON (Canada)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Measurement of biocarbon in flue gases using 14C  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary investigation of the biocarbon fraction in carbon dioxide emissions of power plants using both fossil- and biobased fuels is presented. Calculation of the biocarbon fraction is based on radiocarbon content measured in power plant flue gases. Samples were collected directly from the chimneys into plastic sampling bags. The C-14 content in CO{sub 2} was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Flue gases from power plants that use natural gas, coal, wood chips, bark, plywood residue, sludge from the pulp factory, peat, and recovered fuel were measured. Among the selected plants, there was one that used only fossil fuel and one that used only biofuel; the other investigated plants burned mixtures of fuels. The results show that C-14 measurement provides the possibility to determine the ratio of bio and fossil fuel burned in power plants.

Haemaelaeinen, K.M.; Jungner, H.; Antson, O.; Rasanen, J.; Tormonen, K.; Roine, J. [University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland). Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Stem Densities of Trees from Overstocked Mixed Conifer Stands of Western Hemlock, Douglas-fir and Western Redcedar.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results from a stem density (wood and bark combined) study conducted on trees from overstocked mixed conifer stands of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and western redcedar (Thuja plicata) located on the Quilcene Ranger District, Olympic National Forest in the State of Washington. Information on the density of stem wood that is available in literature generally have been derived from trees growing in stands of normal stocking levels. Stem densities, an essential parameter in the determination of stem biomass, have not been investigated for trees growing in overstocked conditions. Predictive estimators of density based on data derived from studies of normally stocked stands can not be applied to trees growing in an overstocked condition with any reliability. There is need to specifically examine stem densities in trees grown under these adverse conditions. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

Pong, W.Y.; Waddell, Dale R.; Biomass and Energy Project (Portland, Or.)

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

318

$?$ baryon strong decays in a chiral quark model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strong decays of $\\Xi$ baryons up to N=2 shell were studied in a chiral quark model. The strong decay properties of these well-established ground decuplet baryons were reasonably described. We found that (i) $\\Xi(1690)$ and $\\Xi(1820)$ could be assigned to the spin-parity $J^P=1/2^-$ state $|70,^{2}{8},1,1,1/2^->$ and the spin-parity $J^P=3/2^-$ state $|70,^{2}{8},1,1,3/2^->$, respectively. Slight configuration mixing might exist in these two negative parity states. (ii) $\\Xi(1950)$ might correspond to several different $\\Xi$ resonances. The broad states ($\\Gamma\\sim 100$ MeV) observed in the $\\Xi\\pi$ channel could be classified as the pure $J^P=5/2^-$ octet state $\\Xi^0|70,^{4}8,1,1,5/2^->$ or the mixed state $|\\Xi 1/2^->_3 $ with $J^P=1/2^-$. The $\\Xi$ resonances with moderate width ($\\Gamma\\sim 60$ MeV) observed in the $\\Xi\\pi$ channel might correspond to the $J^P=1/2^+$ excitation $|56,^{4}10,2,2,1/2^+>$. The second orbital excitation $|56,^{4}10,2,2,3/2^+>$ and the mixed state $|\\Xi 1/2^->_1$ might be candidates for the narrow width state observed in the $\\Lambda \\bar{K}$ channel, however, their spin-parity numbers are incompatible with the moment analysis of the data. (iii) $\\Xi(2030)$ could not be assigned to either any spin-parity $J^P=7/2^+$ states or any pure $J^P=5/2^+$ configurations. It seems to favor the $|70,^{2}8,2,2,3/2^+>$ assignment, however, its spin conflicts with the moment analysis of the data. To find more $\\Xi$ resonances, the observations in the $\\Xi(1530)\\pi$ and $\\Sigma(1385) \\bar{K}$ channels are necessary.

Li-Ye Xiao; Xian-Hui Zhong

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of a Combination Boiler Simulator using General Purpose Simulation Tools, ISA01-P1063, paper presented at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology with which a detailed simulation of a typical Combination Boiler (multiple-fuel) was developed for use in training and analysis. The boiler that was simulated is a vintage Riley Traveling Grate Spreader Stoker-fired drum unit that is fired by crushed coal and wood bark. It is controlled by a Digital Control System (DCS) and is installed in a paper-mill powerhouse, which is owned by a major paper-manufacturing corporation. Many of the personnel who have operated this boiler for the last 30 to 40 years are nearing retirement age, and the customer felt it was important to have a tool which could be used to familiarize new personnel with boiler operations, and to provide training for current personnel as they worked their way to Operator status. In addition, it could be used to evaluate system design changes prior to them being implemented on the real system. The customer desired a simulation platform that was open, that is, not dependent on a control vendor or special hardware. It needed to run in real-time to be useful for training, and it was also required that it be on a personal computer platform utilizing the Windows operating system. The simulator was constructed using general-purpose simulation software and graphic user interface (GUI) tools. The simulator system was delivered on a networked three-PC platform, with touch-screens and a special keyboard for emulating the actual DCS keyboard. The resulting simulation includes very detailed mathematical models of the combustion and steam generation processes. The simulator is used to teach startup, shutdown, maneuvering and the proper response to various system upsets. It was also utilized as the platform for testing design changes which significantly modified the over-fire air, coal and bark fuel systems, and a complete revision to the boiler control strategy.

Philip S. Bartells; Joseph S. Gauthier

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Association between severity of prescribed burns and subsequent activity of conifer-infesting beetles in stands of longleaf pine  

SciTech Connect

A randomized complete block experiment was performed to measure the effect of prescribed, dormant-season burns of three different levels of severity (measured as fuel consumption and soil surface heating) on subsequent insect infestation and mortality of mature longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Multiple-funnel traps baited with a low release rate of turpentine and ethanol were used to monitor activity of certain coniferophagous beetles. Non-aggressive species, including the root beetles Hylastes salebrosus Eichhoff and H. tenuis Eichhoff, the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus pubescens Zimmermann, the reproduction weevil Pachylobius picivorus (Germar), and buprestid borers, were attracted to burned plots in numbers that correlated positively with burn severity. Beetle attraction to burned sites was greatest in the first weeks post-burn and disappeared by the second year. Two potential tree-killing bark beetles, Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier) and Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), were trapped in significant numbers but exhibited no attraction to burned plots. Tree mortality correlated significantly with the severity of the burns and amounted to 5% of stems in the hottest burn treatment after 3 years. The majority of the mortality was observed in the second and third years post-burn. Attacks of Ips and Dendroctonus bark beetles were apparent on nearly all dead or dying trees, and evidence suggested that root pathogens may have contributed to tree susceptibility to beetle attack and mortality. Our data indicate that selection of burn regimes that reduce or eliminate consumption of duff (e.g., favoring heading fires over backing fires) could significantly reduce mortality of longleaf pine managed for long rotations Published by Elsevier B.V.

Sullivan, Brian, T; Fettig, C. J.; Otrosina, William, J.; Dalusky, Mark, J.; Berrisford, C.W.

2003-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

HPCToolsExperiences.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences w ith T ools a t N ERSC Richard G erber NERSC User Services Programming w eather, c limate, a nd e arth---system m odels on h eterogeneous m ul>---core p la?orms September 7 , 2 011 a t t he N a>onal C enter f or A tmospheric R esearch i n B oulder, C olorado 2 * Thanks f or t he i nvita>on * My p rofessional g oal i s t o e nable s cien>sts t o u se H PC easily a nd e ffec>vely * Contribute t o i mportant d iscoveries a bout h ow o ur natural w orld w orks * Make a d ifference * So i t i s a n h onor & m eaningful t o m e t o p ar>cipate i n this c onference * One o f m y p rimary r oles i s a s d eputy o n o ur n ext procurement t eam & w e a re e xtremely i nterested i n learning a bout y our e xperiences w ith h ybrid s ystems and p rogramming 3 * Recent e xperiences p roviding t ools *

322

M  

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" " Listening t o..." M odel: An mSurvey a pproach t o h igh--- frequency d ata c ollec@on 2012 INTERNATIONAL OPEN G OVERNMENT D ATA CONFERENCE Organized b y t he W orld B ank a nd D ata.gov Amparo B allivian a nd W ill D urbin, W orld B ank J ust I magine... Being a ble t o c ommunicate ...with j ust a bout a nyone... 3 ...just a bout a nywhere... 4 ...just a bout a ny@me... 5 ...just a s o Oen a s y ou n eed... 6 ...with t he s ame p eople o ver @ me... 7 ...at l ow c ost ( free t o r espondents). 8 * ...having d ata every m onth f or thousands o f h ouseholds * ...having c omparable d ata f or e very country * ...tracking c hanges in w elfare a nd responses t o c rises * ...having d ata t o h elp decision--- making i n r eal 8 me 9 Imagine... Contrast t he c urrent r eality 10 Crisis No u p---to---date d

323

Woo-Sun Yang! NERSC User Services Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yang! Yang! NERSC User Services Group Debugging with DDT --- 1 --- February 1 5, 2 013 Why a debugger? * Your c ode f ails a nd y ou w ant t o k now w hy * You c ontrol t he p ace o f r unning t he c ode a nd e xamine execu@on fl ow o r v ariables t o s ee i f i t i s r unning a s expected ( beDer t han a p rint s tatement!) * Typical s cenario - Set a p lace i n y our p rogram w here y ou w ant y our p rogram t o stop e xecu7on - Let y our p rogram r un u n7l t he p lace i s r eached - Check v ariables * Gdb i s g ood b ut w e n eed t o c ontrol m ul@ple p rocessors for a p arallel p rogram --- 2 --- DDT * Distributed D ebugging T ool b y A llinea * Graphical d ebugger c apable o f d ebugging - Serial - MPI - OpenMP - CAF - UPC - CUDA ( NERSC d oesn't h ave a l icense o n D irac) * Intui@ve a nd s imple u ser i nterfaces * Available o n H opper,

324

McGrawMonterey1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PERSPECTIVES ON THE ROLE OF ÔLUCKY DROPSÕ IN DRIZZLE PERSPECTIVES ON THE ROLE OF ÔLUCKY DROPSÕ IN DRIZZLE FORMATION Robert McGraw, Yangang Liu and Peter Daum Atmospheric Sciences Division * * * * * * 10µ ... ... 20µ 30µ * ... * ... * cloud droplet growth kinetics cloud droplets drizzle drops condensation evaporation collection β g cond g D = γ g eff β g coll dg dt v dv drop dt g L = = ≈ × - 1 3 13 10 1 13 2 ( ) . (Long's polynomial collection kernel) 3. Threshold Function (T LDM ) Autoconversion parameterizations can be generically written as: where P 0 is the rate after onset of the autoconversion process and T describes the threshold behavior. T P P 0 = H H H HI I I IG G G GH H H H D D D DR R R RI I I IZ Z Z ZZ Z Z ZL L L LE E E E C C C CO O O ON N N ND D D DI I I IT T T TI I I IO O O ON N N NS S S S L L L LO O O OW W W W D D D DR R R RI I I IZ Z Z ZZ Z Z ZL L L LE E E E T LDM = 0.9 0.1 N D = droplet concentration (cm -3 ) L = liquid water fraction

325

JGI_Training_FileSystems_Feb2012.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jason Jason H ick Storage Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley Na:onal Lab 10 February 2012 A N ew 2 PB G PFS fi le s ystem f or the JGI "projectb" The n ew 2 PB " projectb" fi le s ystem i s a vailable o n Phoebe n ow * Some high level specs for users * 2.8 PB * Has a "per project" non--- purged, b acked---up por:on w ith s maller quota ( 1---5 T B) * And a " per u ser" p urged, not b acked---up p or:on with l arger q uota ( 10TB) File s ystems b est p rac:ces * Unfortunately d isk i s s :ll expensive * All o f t he J GI's d ata c an not c on:nue t o b e s tored on d isk w ithin t he c urrent budget * Archive a nd d elete d ata you no longer need * Disk u sage w ill b e controlled t hrough quotas i n s ome c ases a nd purging i n o thers There a re t wo a reas o f s torage w ithin

326

STAT^. OF DELAWAU OFFICE OF T H E GOVERNOR TATNALL BL~ILDINC. S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAT^. OF DELAWAU STAT^. OF DELAWAU OFFICE OF T H E GOVERNOR TATNALL BL~ILDINC. S ~ C O N D FLOOR WILLIAM PENN S.I~REF.T, DOVER. DL 19901 February 27, 2009 The Honorable Steven Chu Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: State Energy Program Assurances Dear Secretary Chu: As a condtlon of receiving our State's share of the $3.1 billion fundmg for the State Energy Program (SEP) under the American Recovery and Renewal Act of 2009 (H.R. l)(ARRA), I am providing the f o l l o m g assurances. I have written to ow public unlity commission and requested that they consider additional actions to promote energy efficiency, consistent with the Federal statutory language contained in H.R. 1 and theix obligations to maintain just and reasonable rates, while protecting the public. I have also written to the State Legislatute and

327

Shreyas Cholia!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shreyas Cholia! Shreyas Cholia! scholia@lbl.gov! Outreach, Software and Programming Group NEWT Tutorial NUG 2013 --- 1 --- February 1 5, 2 013 Introduction --- 2 --- Science on the Web * Increasing d emand f or a ccess t o N ERSC v ia t he w eb We n ow h ave * Several Science Gateways * "My N ERSC" w eb i nterface * NERSC M obile A pp --- 3 --- What this tutorial is about * Building y our o wn w eb i nterface a ka " Science Gateway" t o N ERSC * How t o u se a W eb A PI t o a ccess N ERSC * Using J avascript/HTML5 t o a ccess j obs, fi les, N IM, interacUve c ommands, c ustom d ata s tores, s ystem informaUon e tc. NEWT = N ice a nd E asy W eb T oolkit * Harnessing the power of this liXle guy --- 4 --- Web APIs * Making a s ervice a vailable o ver a n h Xp U RL * When y ou q uery t he U RL i n c onjuncUon w ith a command

328

T  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility l imits f or T rinity LA---UR---13---23896 June 4, 2013 Parameter Minimum Target Maximum Voltage t o a ll h igh---powered r acks 480 V A C, 3 ---phase Configuration Prefer D elta ( 4---wire), p hase b alanced, limited h armonics Power c onnections Direct w ired w ith a p rovided m eans o f disconnect, o r a p lug Alternative v oltage f or l ow p owered racks, e .g. s torage o r s upport 208V s ingle--- o r 3 ---phase ( prefer D elta configuration). D ual v oltages t o t he r ack will n ot b e s upported. Aggregate p eak r eached p ower 15 M W Peak r eached p ower p er r ack 120 kW System f ootprint 80 f t b y 1 00 f t Rack h eight d uring d elivery i ncluding wheels 106 inches Static p oint l oad o n a o ne s quare i nch area, w ithout o ther n earby l oads 1500 lbs Dynamic l oad u sing a C ISCA W heel 1 s ize, without o ther n earby l oads

329

3emrsl I[. E. field?, Dlrwctor of  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

emrsl I[. E. field?, Dlrwctor of emrsl I[. E. field?, Dlrwctor of best wrwd if these l dditioual s@s.idas~ad specifloetions providedby e? ow or tte &eign agencl.m. be perfomad in +uLldlngs City of hffelo, 3s~ York tmuter end in pee by the tenenw and proQcKcm of cd3?ion-oar, etenderds l stebllshed by the ConrpLmZon. arvlws smy be required inc1ud.l~ cher@as lorosa &Y l stinvted at $&O~oaO~OOO for fi?cal par U5$ i!;hlb no a~st CM bs mde now, ft is estkntadthet emual costs for mr~ will bs of Us3 ewe3 or grwtar es&t*. 1 ; ~&ItbOu&.ww reap 6mrv cow&bmretlon we3 &v&t.+ tId Uui&~ dbsr oontreotors for th per&xmence df this r*rllshd tbBt WQ ACP b4 tht? "bum-h& other mrlier coxltnrctrr, whleh would par m! paaiuo+Aon dlrsctiwes provided by Joq ofl-ice.

330

eCopy, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

';'h8 slJt:'·'T'iit'~~i manuscript has been authored ';'h8 slJt:'·'T'iit'~~i manuscript has been authored by a cont,'.;ctor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109--ENG-38. According(y, the U. S. Government retains a nonexc(usIve, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or al(ow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. 1. Introduction LS-174 Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) Power Supply by: Masoud Fathizadeh The Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) consists of 8 dipole magnets connected in series. These magnets are energized via one 12-pulse dc power supply. Figure 1 shows the block diagram for the power supply. The power supply consists of four phase controlled half-wave wye group converters. Each of the two half-wave converters are connected through an interphase transformer to obtain a full-

331

Richard Gerber! Deputy Group Lead
 NERSC User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deputy Group Lead
 Deputy Group Lead
 NERSC User Services Introduction to High Performance Parallel I/O --- 1 --- August 6 , 2 013 Some s lides f rom K a0e A ntypas Images f rom D avid R andall, P aola C essi, J ohn B ell, T S cheibe I/O Needs Getting Bigger All the Time * I/O n eeds g rowing e ach year i n s cien;fic community * I/O i s a b o?leneck f or many * Data s izes g rowing w ith system memory * For l arge u sers I /O parallelism i s m andatory * Titan h as 1 0 P B o f d isk and Blue Waters 22 PB!!! Outline * Storage A rchitectures * File S ystems * I/O S trategies * MPI I /O * Parallel I /O L ibraries 3 I s i t I / O ? I O ? I - O ? I s a y , w h o c a r e s ? Images f rom D avid R andall, P aola C essi, J ohn B ell, T S cheibe Why is Parallel I/O for science applications difficult? * Scien;sts t hink a bout data i n t erms o f h ow a system is represented

332

Richard Gerber, NERSC 7 Deputy! Tina Declerck, NERSC 7 Systems Lead!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC 7 Deputy! NERSC 7 Deputy! Tina Declerck, NERSC 7 Systems Lead! Zhengji Zhao, NERSC 7 Services Lead! Edison Update --- 1 --- February 1 2, 2 013 Edison - Cray XC30 Phase 1 [Phase 2] * 4 [TBA] GB memory per core for applica6ons * 1.6 / 6 .4 P B o f s cratch d isk * CCM c ompa6bility m ode available * Intel, C ray, G NU c ompilers 2 * 10K [ 104K] c ompute c ores * Cray " Aires" i nterconnect * Two 8 ---core I ntel ' Sandy B ridge' 2.6 G Hz p rocessors p er n ode [Phase 2 T BA] * 16 [TBA] processor cores per node * 64 GB of memory per node * 42 [ 333] T B o f a ggregate memory * Edison P hase 1 a ccess F eb. 2013 [ Phase 2 i n S ummer o r Fall 2 013] Edison Phase I is Here! --- 3 --- Quick Status * Edison Phase I is up and running * Added fi rst e arly u sers o n F eb. 4 - We'll a dd y ou n ow i f y ou're n ot

333

TITLE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

p p a * T A olistii. ..ow ... Unlted States awernment 00))#~Tmsnt of Energy - - memorandum D*=APR 0 2 1987 muym NE-23 A m OR W C I : Revised Guidelines f o r Resldual R a d ~ o a c t i v e M a t e r i a l a t N S R A P and R e m t e SRIP S l t e s Ahrends, OR Kluk, OP-124 Nelson, WSSPd Schrelber , SSDPD Welty, EH-23 G I l b e r t , MIL Berven, ORHL Berger, ORAL! Young, Aerospace Attached I s a revjsed copy o f thc Department's Guidelines f o r n s l d u a l r a d l o a c t f v e material. This versfon o f the doculnent has been revised t o i n c l u d e comnents from EH and t o address the h o t spot and s u p p l m n t a l . I i m l t/except{ons procedures out1 i n e d during t h e July 1906 workshop and subsequent working group meetings. EH intends t o include these guidelines i n d r a f t DOE Order 5480.x~. R a d i a t i o n P r o t e c t i o n o f t h e Publlc and

334

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?am-3 . ,' .*. . - yp: -.* : .- ., ._ ' Yi * <. ? :+". thfa prcbputir. 80,UUU lb. of tmmiuu, J.m,cDu lb. of 3wukdlw crper' tiwu 5.8 t&i8 l atr:irur ral u&d i.Wttd&?# Bir;n8 i;orammant end rUl rid nrtrlcial by uo&utboFlwd putqlm. ). The ~&&a, ' 8m ;altielJ 79 p-rmlt arrgora ted and ttw tap t.ha aikalini~, . L pokotlal brlf)r, bU88M 8-i .ii.i co# sat8 awtaet wltb the mBtmtl8a. aada q*iast fb a8v0-*..u @ow +.ta p-?Y h&al. . .; . ' 6 G.. ..*... . ,,z.. ,. ..*,:: I c,; i ; ' . Total oont of= oc.rLpl.cu~ed Jo); 8 War Ilsp3~-Zz,-i !- . 2.7 -,I -,:,JI:' :' ---- - 2OCCI.3 y- . . i_;: ,.+-a,., ;: s;,!z ; . 5;1 :. ,' ' ;. I &. , I "1 .~ : .. . '. :, :1' 5 .j. j' . ,*,' jF,-,',' , .: . '5 i- t 3 1 . _? ., \ i : ' .

335

Microsoft Word - 34365R05 final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T T E G R A T E D D R I L L I N G S Y S T E M U S I N G M U D A C T UA T E D D OW N H O L E H A M M E R A S P R I M A RY E N G I N E R E P O R T # 3 4 3 6 5 R 0 5 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Reporting period start date 9/30/97 Reporting period end date 9/01/05 AUTHORS: JOHN V. FERNANDEZ, DAVID S. PIXTON REPORT DATE: DECEMBER 2005 D O E A W A R D N U M B E R : D E - F C 2 6 - 9 7 F T 3 4 3 6 5 2 1 8 5 S o u t h L a r s e n P a r k w a y P r o v o , U T 8 4 6 0 6 ii D i s c l a i m e r This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

336

Thermal signature reduction through liquid nitrogen and water injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The protection of aircraft against shoulder fired heat seeking missiles is of growing concern in the aviation community. This thesis presents a simple method for shielding the infrared signature of a jet engine from heat seeking missiles. The research efforts investigated two approaches to shield the thermal signature of the Noel Penny Type 401 turbojet at the Texas A&M University Propulsion Lab Test Cell. First, liquid nitrogen was injected through a manifold at a flow rate equivalent to the flow rate of exhaust gases, producing a small temperature reduction in the exhaust but no infrared shielding. Second, water was injected at a flow rate of 13% of the flow of exhaust gases, producing a greater temperature reduction and some shielding. Water was then injected through a manifold at a ?ow rate of 118% of the flow rate of exhaust gases, producing a substantial reduction in temperature and complete shielding of the infrared signature. Additionally, numerical simulations were performed using FLUENT to support these experiments. Results are presented in the form of thermocouple data and thermal images from the experiments, and in the form of temperature contours and streamtraces from the simulations.

Guarnieri, Jason Antonio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends the long-run growth model of Esfahani et al. (2012a) to a labour exporting country that receives large inows of external income the sum of remittances, FDI and general government transfers from major oil exporting economies. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long-run relationships: an output equation as predicted by theory and an equation linking foreign and domestic ination rates. It is shown that real output in the long run is shaped by (i) oil prices through their impact on external income and in turn on capital accumulation, and (ii) technological transfers through foreign output. The empirical analysis of the paper conrms the hypothesis that a large share of Jordans output volatility can be associated with uctuations in net income received from abroad (arising from oil price shocks). External factors, however, cannot be relied upon to provide similar growth stimuli in the future, and therefore it will be important to diversify the sources of growth in order to achieve a high and sustained level of income.

Kamiar Mohaddes A; Mehdi Raissi B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

On demand responsiveness in additive cost sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We propose two new axioms of demand responsiveness for additive cost sharing with variable demands. Group Monotonicity requires that if a group of agents increase their demands, not all of them pay less. Solidarity says that if agent i demands more, j should not pay more if k pays less. Both axioms are compatible in the partial responsibility theory postulating Strong Ranking, i.e., the ranking of cost shares should never contradict that of demands. The combination of Strong Ranking, Solidarity and Monotonicity characterizes the quasi-proportional methods, under which cost shares are proportional to rescaled demands. The alternative full responsibility theory is based on Separability, ruling out cross-subsidization when costs are additively separable. Neither the Aumann-Shapley nor the Shapley-Shubik method is group monotonic. On the other hand, convex combinations of nearby xed-path methods are group-monotonic: the subsidy-free serial method is the main example. No separable method meets Solidarity, yet restricting the axiom to submodular (or supermodular) cost functions leads to a characterization of the xed-ow methods, containing the Shapley-Shubik and serial methods. JEL Classication numbers: C 71, D 63.

Herv Moulin; Yves Sprumont

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Multithreaded Algorithms for Graph Coloring  

SciTech Connect

Graph algorithms are challenging to parallelize when high performance and scalability are primary goals. Low concurrency, poor data locality, irregular access pattern, and high data access to computation ratio are among the chief reasons for the challenge. The performance implication of these features is exasperated on distributed memory machines. More success is being achieved on shared-memory, multi-core architectures supporting multithreading. We consider a prototypical graph problem, coloring, and show how a greedy algorithm for solving it can be e*ectively parallelized on multithreaded architectures. We present in particular two di*erent parallel algorithms. The first relies on speculation and iteration, and is suitable for any shared-memory, multithreaded system. The second uses data ow principles and is targeted at the massively multithreaded Cray XMT system. We benchmark the algorithms on three di*erent platforms and demonstrate scalable runtime performance. In terms of quality of solution, both algorithms use nearly the same number of colors as the serial algorithm.

Catalyurek, Umit V.; Feo, John T.; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Pothen, Alex

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

Modeling and Simulation of a JBIG2 Compliant Color Printer Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a computer aided design (CAD) tool for the simulation and testing of a color image printing pipeline. True color images typically have three color planes (red, green and blue) with eight bits of resolution per pixel per image plane. Printing these images involves a binarization process called halftoning which converts each color plane into a binary image for rendering on binary devices such as printers. While the halftoning algorithm is the heart of the printer pipeline, several preprocessing methods are often required to perform basic image manipulations. These include printer dependent color transformations, image scaling/resizing, and image compression. Thus images at various stages in the printer pipeline are subjected to various types of distortions. Simulation of the printer pipeline is of key importance for end-to-end performance optimization. We model the printer pipeline using the synchronous data ow (SDF) model of computation in the Ptolemy design environment. We simulate typical tradeo s in a color printer pipeline using JBIG2 compliant image compression. We also provide an interactive high level interface to key pipeline parameters via MATLAB and/or the Ptolemy graphical user interface (GUI).

Niranjan Damera-Venkata; Chase Krumpelman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Inter-stage and Performance Tests of a Two-stage High-pressure Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existing 3-stage research turbine at Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL) facility, Texas A & M University (TAMU) was replaced with a newly designed and manufactured 2-stage turbine in accordance with the design requirements as per DooSan, DHI. This new design of turbine consisted of bowed stator and rotor blades to study the effect on reduction of secondary ow losses and thus improvement in turbine efficiency if any. The new design also incorporated labyrinth seals on both inner and outer shrouds. Extensive Inter-stage and Performance experiments were carried out on this new turbine. Inter-stage measurements were accomplished by traversing three 5-hole probes radially and circumferentially, using the existing probe traverse system in TPFL. Performance tests were conducted for varying pressure ratio, at fixed rotational speed and for varying rotational speed with fixed pressure ratio and the efficiency was plotted against u/c_0. Each condition was tested and measured two to three times to check for reproducibility of the data. The results from inter-stage experiments show that the rotor row loss coefficient is about four times higher than the stator row loss coefficient. This high rotor loss coefficient reduces the total to static efficiency. From the performance tests, the maximum total-to-static efficiency observed was 85.2 percent located at around u/c_0 = 0.75. This relatively low efficiency is in consonance with the inter-stage results (high rotor loss coefficient).

Sharma, Kapil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

An experimental investigation of the countercurrent flow limitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new correlation for the prediction of the Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) in a large diameter tube with a falling water lm is proposed. Dierent from previous correlations, it predicts the onset of ooding by considering the relative velocities of the working uids and the lm thickness of the liquid layer. This provides a more complete accounting of the physical forces contributing to CCFL. This work has been undertaken in order to provide a better estimate of CCFL for reactor safety codes such as MELCOR, MAAP, and SCDAP/RELAP. Experiments were conducted to determine the CCFL for a 3-inch inner diameter smooth tube with an annular liquid lm and air injection from the bottom. The size of the test section and the range of working uid ow rates were based on a scaling analysis of the surge line of a PressurizedWater Reactor pressurizer. An experimental facility was designed and constructed based on this analysis in order to collect data on the CCFL phenomenon. In order to capture some of the physical phenomena at the onset of ooding visual pictures were taken at high speed. These pictures provided a new understanding of the process of transition to ooding. The facility also produced a new set of ooding data. This can also lead to a more comprehensive mechanistic model.

Solmos, Matthew Aaron

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Measuring Energy Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purpose of measurement, energy sustainability is defined as ensuring that future generations have energy resources that enable them to achieve a level of well-being at least as good as that of the current generation. It is recognized that there are valid, more comprehensive understandings of sustainability and that energy sustainability as defined here is only meaningful when placed in a broader context. Still, measuring energy sustainability is important to society because the rates of consumption of some fossil resources are now substantial in relation to measures of ultimate resources, and because conflicts between fossil energy use and environmental sustainability are intensifying. Starting from the definition, an equation for energy sustainability is derived that reconciles renewable fl ows and nonrenewable stocks, includes the transformation of energy into energy services, incorporates technological change and, at least notionally, allows for changes in the relationship between energy services and societal well-being. Energy sustainability must be measured retrospectively as well as prospectively, and methods for doing each are discussed. Connections to the sustainability of other resources are also critical. The framework presented is merely a starting point; much remains to be done to make it operational.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Bounds on the number of bound states in the transfer matrix spectrum for some weakly correlated lattice models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the interaction of particles in weakly correlated lattice quantum field theories. In the imaginary time functional integral formulation of these theories there is a relative coordinate lattice Schroedinger operator H which approximately describes the interaction of these particles. Scalar and vector spin, QCD and Gross-Neveu models are included in these theories. In the weakly correlated regime H=H{sub o}+W where H{sub o}=-{gamma}{Delta}{sub l}, 0 lattice Laplacian: {gamma}={beta}, the inverse temperature for spin systems and {gamma}={kappa}{sup 3} where {kappa} is the hopping parameter for QCD. W is a self-adjoint potential operator which may have non-local contributions but obeys the bound Double-Vertical-Line W(x, y) Double-Vertical-Line Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To cexp ( -a( Double-Vertical-Line x Double-Vertical-Line + Double-Vertical-Line y Double-Vertical-Line )), a large: exp-a={beta}/{beta}{sub o}{sup (1/2)}({kappa}/{kappa}{sub o}) for spin (QCD) models. H{sub o}, W, and H act in l{sub 2}(Z{sup d}), d Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1. The spectrum of H below zero is known to be discrete and we obtain bounds on the number of states below zero. This number depends on the short range properties of W, i.e., the long range tail does not increase the number of states.

O'Carroll, Michael [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada e Estatistica, ICMC-USP, C.P. 668,13560-970 Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

An advanced fuel cell simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cell power generation systems provide a clean alternative to the conventional fossil fuel based systems. Fuel cell systems have a high e?ciency and use easily available hydrocarbons like methane. Moreover, since the by-product is water, they have a very low environmental impact. The fuel cell system consists of several subsystems requiring a lot of e?ort from engineers in diverse areas. Fuel cell simulators can provide a convenient and economic alternative for testing the electrical subsystems such as converters and inverters. This thesis proposes a low-cost and an easy-to-use fuel cell simulator using a programmable DC supply along with a control module written in LabVIEW. This simulator reproduces the electrical characteristics of a 5kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack under various operating conditions. The experimental results indicate that the proposed simulator closely matches the voltage-current characteristic of the SOFC system under varying load conditions. E?ects of non-electrical parameters like hydrogen ?ow rate are also modeled and these parameters are taken as dynamic inputs from the user. The simulator is customizable through a graphical user interface and allows the user to model other types of fuel cells with the respective voltage-current data. The simulator provides an inexpensive and accurate representation of a solid oxide fuel cell under steady state and transient conditions and can replace an actual fuel cell during testing of power conditioning equipment.

Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Office of River Protection Integrated Safety Management System Phase 1 Verification Corrective Action Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to demonstrate the OW planned and/or completed actions to implement ISMS as well as prepare for the RPP ISMS Phase II Verification scheduled for August, 1999. This Plan collates implied or explicit ORP actions identified in several key ISMS documents and aligns those actions and responsibilities perceived necessary to appropriately disposition all ISM Phase II preparation activities specific to the ORP. The objective will be to complete or disposition the corrective actions prior to the commencement of the ISMS Phase II Verification. Improvement products/tasks not slated for completion prior to the RPP Phase II verification will be incorporated as corrective actions into the Strategic System Execution Plan (SSEP) Gap Analysis. Many of the business and management systems that were reviewed in the ISMS Phase I verification are being modified to support the ORP transition and are being assessed through the SSEP. The actions and processes identified in the SSEP will support the development of the ORP and continued ISMS implementation as committed to be complete by end of FY-2000.

CLARK, D.L.

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

Mike Jensen; Jennifer Comstock; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

348

Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for SRS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workflo Workflo The ob Proces Savann Dispos assess evaluat design evaluat predict to guid * Th so in w es sy * Th is m * Th fle m de fu The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S Report Date: J ited States valuation i Why DOE ow Diagram bjective of the rev ss Simulation To nah River Site (S sition System Pla s whether the too te methods used , construction, p te methods to im ions; and (4) det e actual executio What th he current Syst oftware tools to formation, and aste. These to stimates, but th ystem planning he capability of limited. This h mid to long-term here is a need exibility, and tu model prediction ecouple safety unctions. To view the full E http://www.em.doe. urpose of an Externa ical risk associated w ct decisions. Technic Savannah Rive SRS System M June 2009 Departmen n of Sys n Suppo E-EM Did This view was to eva

349

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)  

SciTech Connect

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

Mike Jensen; Jennifer Comstock; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development and deployment of constitutive softening routines in Eulerian hydrocodes.  

SciTech Connect

The state of the art in failure modeling enables assessment of crack nucleation, propagation, and progression to fragmentation due to high velocity impact. Vulnerability assessments suggest a need to track material behavior through failure, to the point of fragmentation and beyond. This eld of research is particularly challenging for structures made of porous quasi-brittle materials, such as ceramics used in modern armor systems, due to the complex material response when loading exceeds the quasi-brittle material's elastic limit. Further complications arise when incorporating the quasi-brittle material response in multi-material Eulerian hydrocode simulations. In this report, recent e orts in coupling a ceramic materials response in the post-failure regime with an Eulerian hydro code are described. Material behavior is modeled by the Kayenta material model [2]and Alegra as the host nite element code [14]. Kayenta, a three invariant phenomenological plasticity model originally developed for modeling the stress response of geologic materials, has in recent years been used with some success in the modeling of ceramic and other quasi-brittle materials to high velocity impact. Due to the granular nature of ceramic materials, Kayenta allows for signi cant pressures to develop due to dilatant plastic ow, even in shear dominated loading where traditional equations of state predict little or no pressure response. When a material's ability to carry further load is compromised, Kayenta allows the material's strength and sti ness to progressively degrade through the evolution of damage to the point of material failure. As material dilatation and damage progress, accommodations are made within Alegra to treat in a consistent manner the evolving state.

Fuller, Timothy Jesse; Dewers, Thomas A.; Swan, Matthew Scot

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A critical evaluation of the upper ocean heat budget in the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis data for the south central equatorial Pacific  

SciTech Connect

Coupled ocean-atmospheric models suffer from the common bias of a spurious rain belt south of the central equatorial Pacific throughout the year. Observational constraints on key processes responsible for this bias are scarce. The recently available reanalysis from a coupled model system for the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data is a potential benchmark for climate models in this region. Its suitability for model evaluation and validation, however, needs to be established. This paper examines the mixed layer heat budget and the ocean surface currents - key factors for the sea surface temperature control in the double Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone in the central Pacific - from 5{sup o}S to 10{sup o}S and 170{sup o}E to 150{sup o}W. Two independent approaches are used. The first approach is through comparison of CFSR data with collocated station observations from field experiments; the second is through the residual analysis of the heat budget of the mixed layer. We show that the CFSR overestimates the net surface flux in this region by 23 W m{sup -2}. The overestimated net surface flux is mainly due to an even larger overestimation of shortwave radiation by 44 W m{sup -2}, which is compensated by a surface latent heat flux overestimated by 14 W m{sup -2}. However, the quality of surface currents and the associated oceanic heat transport in CFSR are not compromised by the surface flux biases, and they agree with the best available estimates. The uncertainties of the observational data from field experiments are also briefly discussed in the present study.

Liu H.; Lin W.; Liu, X.; Zhang, M.

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Chemical, ultrastructural and supramolecular analysis of tension wood in Populus tremula x alba as a model substrate for reduced recalcitrance  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is one of the most abundant potential sustainable sources for fuel and material production, however to fully realize this potential an improved understanding of lignocellulosic recalcitrance must be developed. In an effort to appreciate the underlying phenotypic, biochemical and morphological properties associated with the reduced recalcitrance observed in tension stress-induced reaction wood, we report the increased enzymatic sugar yield and corresponding chemical and ultrastructural properties of Populus tension wood. Populus tremula x alba (PTA) was grown under tension and stem segments containing three different wood types: normal wood (NW), tension wood (TW) from the elongated stem side and opposite wood (OW) from the compressed stem side were collected. A variety of analytical techniques were used to describe changes occurring as a result of the tension stress-induced formation of a gelatinous cell wall layer (G-layer). For example, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that the molecular weight and crystallinity of cellulose in TW is greater than that of cellulose acquired from NW. Whole cell ionic liquid and other solid-state NMR analysis detailed the structure of lignin and hemicellulose in the samples, detecting the presence of variations in lignin and hemicellulose sub-units, linkages and semi-quantitatively estimating the relative amounts of syringyl (S), guaiacyl (G) and p-hydroxybenzoate (PB) monolignol units. It was confirmed that TW displayed an increase in PB or H-like lignin and S to G ratio from 1.25 to 1.50 when compared to the NW sample. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) were also used to evaluate the morphology and corresponding spatial distribution of the major lignocellulosic components. We found changes in a combination of cell wall properties appear to influence recalcitrance more than any single factor alone.

Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Hubbell, Christopher A [ORNL; Samuel, Reichel [ORNL; Jung, Seung-Yong [ORNL; Ding, Shi-You [ORNL; Zeng, Yining [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Sykes, Virginia R [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Rotting Logs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

441-A January 22, 1972 441-A January 22, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ROTTING LOGS Trees are like people. They die from diseases, infections, injuries, burns, drowning, malnutrition, and sometimes just plain old age. Walking through the woods we see, here and there, dead or dying trees of various kinds. For example: a big white oak, with its bark ripped from crown to root, was literally cooked by a bolt of lightning during a summer thunderstorm. In a grove of black oaks, many are dying lingering deaths from infected wounds started years ago when an autumn fire swept through the fallen leaves and scorched the living wood. In a dense forest there are many that have lost the battle for space and sunlight. In some places we see trees that are slowly starving because dashing rains have carried away the fertile topsoil and the trampling feet of picnickers have injured the shallow roots that bring them food.

355

Moose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moose Moose Nature Bulletin No. 504-A October 27, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MOOSE The word "moose" came to us from Algonquian Indians. Consequently its plural, instead of being "mooses" or "meese", is the same as the singular. That is true of most Indian names whether of a tribe, such as the Winnebago and Potawatomi, or of an object such as papoose. It is also true of many wildlife names not of Indian origin -- for example: deer, mink and grouse. Moose are the monarchs of the north woods, particularly forests surrounding innumerable lakes and swamps. They are splendid swimmers fond of wading into waters where they dredge up lily roots and other aquatic plants. On land, although they do graze on grasses and sedges, moose are primarily browsers feeding on the leaves and tender twigs of hardwood trees and shrubs, especially willows, in summer; on balsam and white cedar or other conifers in winter: on twigs and bark in early spring.

356

The Hackberry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hackberry Hackberry Nature Bulletin No. 63 April 27, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation THE HACKBERRY The hackberry is the "unknown" tree. Most people never heard of it many mistake it for an elm, which it resembles. However, it has a distinctive bark, usually ashy gray, with rough warts and ridges. On many hackberries, mostly near the tips of the branches, there will be thick clusters of small twigs, resembling mistletoe from a distance, called "witches' brooms". These are not a natural growth, as many think, but are caused by a fungous infection. They do not hurt the tree seriously nor detract from its appearance, and more hackberries should be planted as ornamental shade trees instead of elms. They are hardy, grow well even in unfavorable conditions of soil and moisture, and are resistant to diseases and insect pests. Our elms, on the other hand, are dying by the hundreds in some localities -- in the east from Dutch elm disease; in the middle west from a virus disease for which no cure has been found.

357

The Tipi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tipi Tipi Nature Bulletin No. 555-A February 22, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE TIPI In earlier years at the Little Red Schoolhouse nature center we erected a "waginogan" of the type used by the Ojibway, Potawatomi and other Indians who lived in the forests around the Great Lakes. It was oblong, with a dome-shaped roof, and its framework of light poles was covered with slabs of elm bark. This proved a surprise to many people who had had the impression that all Indians lived in teepees or wigwams -- portable cone-shaped "tents" covered with skins. Tipi is a Sioux word, meaning "to dwell in," for the lodge used by that nation (the Dakota) and most Indians of the Great Plains because they subsisted almost entirely on the vast herds of buffalo which they followed from place to place. The Ojibway, who feared the warlike Sioux, called it "bwahn wig' wahm" (enemy dwelling).

358

The Paper Birch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paper Birch Paper Birch Nature Bulletin No. 462-A September 16, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE PAPER BIRCH When we speak of a birch, most of us in Cook County are thinking of a small or medium-size tree with milk-white bark -- a slim graceful and very ornamental "lady of the forest". Singly or in clumps, we see it in parks, cemeteries and landscape plantings. That may be our native White Birch or it may be the European kind distinguished by its drooping branches. Of 30 or more species of birches found only in the northern hemisphere, 12 are native in North America and 3 of those are dwarfs such as the one upon which caribou and reindeer browse in Alaska. Of the 9 which become trees, only two are native in Illinois: the white birch, better known as the Paper or Canoe Birch, and, a southern species, the River or Red Birch.

359

Model of penetration of coal boilers and cogeneration in the paper industry  

SciTech Connect

A model has been developed to forecast the penetration of coal boilers and cogeneration of electricity in the paper industry. Given the demand for energy services (process steam and electricity) by the paper industry, the Penetration Model forecasts the demand for purchased fuel and electricity. The model splits the demand for energy service between energy carriers (coal, fuel oil/natural gas, bark, and spent liquor) on the basis of the installed capacity of 16 types of boilers (combinations of four types of energy carriers and four types of throttle conditions). Investment in new boilers is allocated by an empirical distribution function among the 16 types of boilers on the basis of life cycle cost. In the short run (5 years), the Penetration Model has a small price response. The model has a large price response in the long run (30 years). For constant fuel prices, the model forecasts a 19-percent share for coal and a 65-percent share for residual oil in the year 2000. If the real price of oil and gas doubles by the year 2000, the model forecasts a 68-percent share for coal and a 26-percent share for residual oil.

Reister, D.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nocturnal Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nocturnal Animals Nocturnal Animals Nature Bulletin No. 151 April 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation NOCTURNAL ANIMALS When the sun goes down and dusk steals over the land, the animals of the day grow drowsy and seek some sheltered spot to await another dawn. Birds slip quietly to their nests or favorite roosts. The chattering squirrel curls up in his hollow tree or a summer nest of leaves. Butterflies fold their wings and bees creep into their quiet hives. Bats and whip-poor-wills and nighthawks zigzag expertly through the air to feast on flying insects. Then darkness comes. Then the land becomes alive again as the animals of the night take over -- the hunted and the hunters. The cottontail rabbits come out to play and gorge themselves on fresh young clover and tender grass -- welcome food after nibbling all winter on the bark of hawthorn, willow, sumac and wild rose. Millions of mice scurry about. Muskrats emerge from the underwater entrances to their lodges and bank tunnels to swim and splash as they feed on tender shoots of cattails and sedges. Wild ducks and some of the shore birds feed regularly at night.

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361

Aphids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aphids Aphids Nature Bulletin No. 421-A May 29, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation APHIDS Aphids, or Plant Lice, are tiny defenseless insects that have soft bodies but needle-like beaks with which they puncture plants and suck the sap. They weaken or even kill many plants and also may infect them with virus, bacterial or fungus diseases. Aphids, unless controlled, multiply enormously and cause serious damage in orchards, vineyards, truck farms, gardens greenhouses, and field crops such as corn, cotton, small grains, clover and alfalfa. There are hundreds of species of aphids distributed over the world and there is scarcely a kind of plant, wild or cultivated, that is not infested by one or more kinds of plant lice. Some feed on stems and leaves, some on the roots, and some on both. Others feed on buds, and a few -- like the Hickory Aphid which infests hickory, maple and other forest trees -- feed on bark underneath the limbs. The hickory aphid is about one-quarter of an inch long, and one of the largest, but most kinds are about the size of a pinhead: less than one-twentieth of an inch in length. Most species are green but many are pink, white, brown or blackish. The woolly aphids, which feed on apple, pear, hawthorn and elm trees, are reddish or purplish but cover themselves with a cottony white secretion of wax.

362

SRS Environmental Reports for 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental reports 2003 Savannah River Site home srs environmental report - 2003 srs environmental data - 2003 soil & groundwater closure projects solid waste & infrastructure savannah river ecology laboratory high-level waste disposition site decommissioning & demolition USDA forest service - savannah river srs maps - 2003 savannah river site part of blue river space environmental reports 2003 Savannah River Site home srs environmental report - 2003 srs environmental data - 2003 soil & groundwater closure projects solid waste & infrastructure savannah river ecology laboratory high-level waste disposition site decommissioning & demolition USDA forest service - savannah river srs maps - 2003 savannah river site part of blue river space The Sycamore Tree The leaves and fruit of a fallen sycamore tree (Platanus occidentalis) dangle over the Savannah River as it flows along the southwestern border of the Savannah River Site. The sycamore can live for 500 to 600 years and reach a diameter greater than that of any other North American hardwood species. It grows in all states east of the Great Plains except Minnesota. Commonly found along streams and bottomlands, it frequently is planted as a shade tree because of its rapid growth; its distinctive, white, exfoliating bark; and its broad, dense crown. The fruit breaks apart during winter, producing an average of 200,000 seeds per pound.

363

DDT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DDT DDT Nature Bulletin No. 31 September 8, 1945 - [edited April,1998] Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation DDT Large scale experiments are being conducted on selected areas scattered all over the United States and Canada. The U, S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U. S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the Department of Agriculture, and the U. S. Public Health Service are among the agencies cooperating in these experiments. DDT is being applied in the form of dust, suspensions, solutions and emulsions, by means of airplanes, high-powered sprayers, knapsack sprayers, and hand atomizers. It is being tested against leaf-eaters, bark beetles, wood borers, termites, and a number of sucking insects, including mosquitoes and flies. The experiments indicate that DDT far surpasses any previous used substance for control of insects harmful to forests, orchards, gardens and man himself. Its remarkable lasting qualities, even after rains, the small amount required per acre, and its suitability to application by plane, would seem to make it the answer to most problems of control of harmful insects.

364

The Hickories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hickories Hickories Nature Bulletin No. 218-A February 19, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE HICKORIES Andrew Jackson, the rough tough uncouth backwoods-soldier who became our seventh president and ended the "reign" of the East coast aristocrats, was affectionately nicknamed "Old Hickory". The title is significant. The hickories are our most typically American trees, and the Shagbark Hickory -- with its long thin plates of light-gray bark which separate and curl outward at the ends to give the trunk its shaggy appearance -- is most distinctive. Except one found in China, and a few which range southward into Mexico or northward into Canada, all of the 18 or 20 species of hickories are native to the United States east of the Great Plains. They are among the most common and most valuable trees in our oak-hickory hardwood forests and have had a tremendous influence upon our American way of life.

365

Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards Nature Bulletin No. 706 February 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COLOR CHANGES IN FISH, FROGS AND LIZARDS Proverbially, the chameleon changes its color to suit every mood or situation. Hence the word is also an expression of contempt for a person who is fickle or changeable in character. That little lizard which is peddled at circuses or sold in pet shops under the name of "chameleon" is not the true Chameleon of the Old World tropics but the Anole, a native of the warm humid regions of our southeastern states. It is able to change from green to brown, or reverse, with some intermediate colors. Ordinarily it is pale green when quite warm or after it has been in the dark. In bright light or at low temperatures it is brown. Contrary to popular belief a brown anole may be found on a green leaf or a green one on brown bark.

366

After a Storm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After a Storm After a Storm Nature Bulletin No. 47 January 5, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation AFTER A STORM At daybreak on Monday, December 24, a blinding blizzard raged. About eight o'clock the snow ceased. Immediately the woods and meadows became alive with hungry animals and birds. The rabbits came out of their snug hiding places to cruise the thickets, gnawing the bark of young trees and shrubs, or racing about for exercise and play. The squirrels came down from their den trees and zigzagged here and there, digging out acorns from beneath the snow. The killers of the foxes, mink and weasel -- came out hunting for mice and any luckless bird or animal they could surprise. Everywhere in the tall grass and weeds of the meadows, the field mice had made telltale holes from their runways up to the surface, for air. Flocks of song sparrows hopped about, jumping up to seize the choice weed seeds. Pheasants stalked along, eating seeds and hunting patches of burdock or nubbins left in cornfields, where they could get a real meal. The juncoes cleaned up what the pheasants wasted.

367

Lichens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lichens Lichens Nature Bulletin No. 131 November 15, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation LICHENS When winter comes with its fogs, rains, and melting snow, the lichens flourish. In the country we find them on the bark of trees, boulders and patches of barren earth, but rarely in cities because they are very sensitive to poisonous gases in the smoky air. In Iceland and Greenland, and the vast tundras of the arctics, they are the dominant forms of plant life. A lichen is the partnership of a colorless plant and a green one: a fungus and an alga. The two exchange food materials. Fungus has remarkable power to absorb and store moisture. The alga, using that water, and using carbon dioxide from the air, manufactures food. The fungus absorbs the excess food and produces an acid which eats into the earth or wood or rock upon which it grows, anchoring it firmly in place.

368

Sugar Bush  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar Bush Sugar Bush Nature Bulletin No. 220-A Msrch 5, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SUGAR BUSH About this time of year in our northern states, when a cold clear night is followed by a warm sunny day, you know that spring is just around the corner and that, as they say in New England, "Sap's a-startin"'. Then you see squirrels in the maple trees, nibbling at little icicles of sap from broken twigs or wounds in the bark. For the farmer who owns a "sugar bush" -- a grove of sugar maple trees -- this means perhaps a month of hard tedious work for himself and his family and his hired help: tapping the trees, collecting the sap, and "boiling it down" into maple sugar and maple syrup. There will also be at least one "sugaring-off" party, at night, with hot buttered soda biscuits dunked in thin hot maple syrup, and maple candy pulled into taffy by the young folks.

369

Rapid Analysis of Ash Composition Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)  

SciTech Connect

Inorganic compounds are known to be problematic in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to syngas and ultimately hydrocarbon fuels. The elements Si, K, Ca, Na, S, P, Cl, Mg, Fe, and Al are particularly problematic and are known to influence reaction pathways, contribute to fouling and corrosion, poison catalysts, and impact waste streams. Substantial quantities of inorganic species can be entrained in the bark of trees during harvest operations. Herbaceous feedstocks often have even greater quantities of inorganic constituents, which can account for as much as one-fifth of the total dry matter. Current methodologies to measure the concentrations of these elements, such as inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry (ICP-OES/MS) are expensive in time and reagents. This study demonstrates that a new methodology employing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can rapidly and accurately analyze the inorganic constituents in a wide range of biomass materials, including both woody and herbaceous examples. This technique requires little or no sample preparation, does not consume any reagents, and the analytical data is available immediately. In addition to comparing LIBS data with the results from ICP-OES methods, this work also includes discussions of sample preparation techniques, calibration curves for interpreting LIBS spectra, minimum detection limits, and the use of internal standards and standard reference materials.

Tyler L. Westover

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

K anti-K N molecule state with I=1/2 and J^P=1/2^+ studied with three-body calculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A K \\bar{K} N system with I=1/2 and J^P=1/2^+ is investigated with non-relativistic three-body calculations by using effective \\bar K N, K \\bar K and KN interactions. The \\bar K N interaction describes the Lambda(1405) as a \\bar K N molecule, and the K\\bar K interaction is adjusted to give f_0(980) and a_0(980) states as K \\bar K molecules. The present investigation suggests that a bound K \\bar K N state can be formed below the K \\bar K N threshold (1930 MeV) with a 90 ~ 100 MeV width of three-hadron decays, which are dominated by K bar K N -> K pi Sigma and pi eta N. It is found that the K \\bar K N state is a weakly bound hadron molecular state with a size larger than an alpha particle because of the repulsive KN interactions.

Daisuke Jido; Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy values and estimation of power generation potentials of some non-woody biomass species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of high energy potentials in non-woody biomass species and an increasing interest in their utilization for power generation, an attempt has been made in this study to assess the proximate analysis and energy content of different components of Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species (both non-woody), and their impact on power generation and land requirement for energy plantations. The net energy content in Ocimum canum was found to be slightly higher than that in Tridax procumbens. In spite of having higher ash contents, the barks from both the plant species exhibited higher calorific values. The results have shown that approximately 650 and 1,270 hectares of land are required to generate 20,000 kWh/day electricity from Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species. Coal samples, obtained from six different local mines, were also examined for their qualities, and the results were compared with those of studied biomass materials. This comparison reveals much higher power output with negligible emission of suspended particulate matters (SPM) from biomass materials.

Kumar, M.; Patel, S.K. [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Preliminary assessment of off-season fuels for electricity generation at Indian sugar mills  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report on off-season fuels is part of a preliminary feasibility assessment to retrofit Indian sugar mills to cogenerate heat and power with sales of excess electricity to the local grid. To justify the high capital costs of retrofitting existing facilities, sugar mill operators must attempt to maximize the amount of power they sell to the local grid. This fact means that sugar mills must operate and sell power well-beyond the milling season, which typically lasts about 200 days. The purpose of this report is to assess and determine whether low cost and reliable sources of off-season fuels can be secured for two sugar mills (Simbhaoli and Daurala) within their respective sugar growing districts, located in western Uttar Pradesh. Off-season fuels under consideration include excess bagasse that is stored for off-season use, agricultural field residues (e.g., wheat straw), forest residues (e.g., bark and small limbs), and dedicated energy crops (short-rotation woody crops and herbaceous energy crops). Results of the pre-feasibility indicate that bagasse and some agricultural residues are available in sufficient quantity and may be available at reasonable cost.

Perlack, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ranney, J.W. [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Synoptic disturbances found in precipitable water fields north of equatorial Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origin and structure of tropical synoptic scale aphics. precipitable water (PWI anomalies estimated from TOVS satellite observations are analyzed as they propagate eastward across northern Africa during MAM 1988. Previous studies, accomplished by Mackey (1996), determined the location and season for the strongest and most coherent 3 to 8 day filtered PW signal. NCEP/NCAR reanalysis (2.50 resolution) provides data for a use study analysis of seven prominent anomalous PW events during the period. Six case wind field composite analysis is accomplished with both actual winds and reduced shear winds (zonal mean removed at each latitude band). Case study analysis revealed a doppler shifted propagating Rossby Wave (k = 6, c =-5 m/sec) at 500hPa and 250hPa that moved onto the west African coast imbedded within a mean zonal flow of approximately 17 m/sec. The wave then moved east across the continent at approximately 12 m/sec near 20ON. The wave's associated cusp-like feature adverts deep tropical moisture northward, resulting in Mackey's PW anomaly. Analysis of potential vorticity, specific humidity, temperature, and wind field composites at 850hPa, 500hPa and 250hPa fit well within the range of Rossby wave structure. Descriptive statistical analysis established confidence intervals for the composites at two resolutions within the localized grid (20OW to 40oE 00 to 30ON). A sample structure of the anomalies is displayed for each variable found to be statistically significant. The strongest correlation between observed PW and analyzed specific humidity and temperature is observed at 500mb and 250mb. Composite analysis of specific humidity and the appropriate standard deviation field supports this finding. PW amounts much greater than the climate mean state over the Gulf of Guinea are found within the PW anomaly structure, indicating an additional moisture source, possibly convection enhanced by the wave passage. 850mb upward vertical motion is also found to be slightly enhanced due to the anomalous flow associated with the wave passage. An empirical model is provided showing a four stage development of the PW anomalies during the five primary days of their life cycle and days prior.

Patla, Jason Eddy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Study of Air Infiltration Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of heat recovery on the energy impact of air infiltration, and the systematic error due to the steady-state method were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Two methodologies suitable for measurement of the overall heat loss factors in full-size houses have been developed and validated. Dynamic measurements of Infiltration Heat Exchange effectiveness (IHEE), which expresses the air infiltration heat recovery as a fraction of the classical value of air infiltration energy consumption, showed that results from earlier steady-state measurements can be approximately applied to dynamic conditions when solar radiation is not present. However, this study has shown for the first time that IHEE is strongly dependent on air flow direction due to the impacts of air flow on the recovery or rejection of solar radiation energy. IHEE values greater than one and less than zero have been measured. These values are impossible in the absence of solar radiation. The results highlight the necessity of considering the air infiltration heat recovery and improving the current design methods for calculating the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The experimental and theoretical investigation show that steady-state methodology can: *be used without systematic error in the case of constant air flow *result in IHEE prediction error in a range of 1% to 8% when one-way dynamic air f1ow is present *cause significantly larger error when balanced dynamic air flow is present. The SSP (Single input and Single output data Pair) method can identify UAo of an enclosure using short term measurement data, typically a few hours long. It has overcome most of the typical problems in UA0 identification, such as errors due to thermal storage, ground heat transfer, inter-correlated multi-inputs, and solar radiation. The STAM (Short Term Average Method) has also been developed which makes it possible for the first time to determine both the UA and the solar aperture precisely under outdoor conditions from a two-day or a three-day test. These methods were developed and used to measure heat loss factors needed to determine IHEE values in this study.

Liu, Mingsheng

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jason Tomlinson; Mike Jensen

376

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Mike Jensen

377

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

SciTech Connect

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jason Tomlinson; Mike Jensen

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

378

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

SciTech Connect

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Mike Jensen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development and commercial demonstration of an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system at Boise Cascade Corporation's pulp and paper mill in DeRidder, Louisiana. The advanced power generation system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as the primary fuel resource. The novel system is based on three advanced technology components: GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and 3-stage solid fuels combustion technologies coupled with one of the power generation approaches used in DOE's HIPPS program. Phase 1 of the project is a technical and economic evaluation of the system at the DeRidder site. A Continuation Application will be submitted at the conclusion of Phase 1 for authorization to proceed to testing and design in Phase 2. Phase 2 includes pilot-scale verification of selected system components and preparation of a detailed engineering design and cost estimate for retrofit of the advanced power system at the DeRidder mill. Phase 3 will complete procurement and construction of the system at the DeRidder site along with all required permitting activities. Phase 4 of the project will included plant commissioning, startup and demonstration operations. Design information for the Gasification Island was completed during the quarter. Two vendor quotations were received for the bark/hog fuel dryers. A final layout plan for the major equipment was developed and submitted to DeRidder for review and approval. The Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) completed a subcontract for a laboratory study on VOC emissions from wood waste drying using bark from the DeRidder mill. Samples of DeRidder's lime mud and green liquor dregs were collected and analyzed in GTI's laboratory. It was determined that lime mud is far too fine to be utilized as inert bed material in the fluidized bed gasifier. Results for the green liquor dregs are currently being reviewed. Design analysis for the in-furnace HPHT Air Heater was completed and the external Syngas Cooler/Air Heater was begun. Materials were received for the air heater tube testing system to be installed in Boiler No. 2 at DeRidder. A refractory interference problem with the original testing system design was discovered and resolved. Analyses of the externally recuperated gas turbine cycles (air heater and booster combustor in parallel or series) were continued including the effects of steam cooling and inlet air humidification on power output and operating cost. Discussions were continued with turbine manufacturers regarding the technical, time and cost requirements for developing an externally recuperated turbine engine suitable for use in the project. A 5-month no-cost time extension was requested and received for the project to accommodate design and evaluation of externally recuperated gas turbines using HPHT air as the working fluid.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

RESULTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR A NOVEL BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM FOR THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2001, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) entered into Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41108 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for an Agenda 2020 project to develop an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system for near-term deployment in the Forest Products Industry (FPI). The advanced power system combines three advanced components, including biomass gasification, 3-stage stoker-fired combustion for biomass conversion, and externally recuperated gas turbines (ERGTs) for power generation. The primary performance goals for the advanced power system are to provide increased self-generated power production for the mill and to increase wastewood utilization while decreasing fossil fuel use. Additional goals are to reduce boiler NOx and CO{sub 2} emissions. The current study was conducted to determine the technical and economic feasibility of an Advanced Power Generation System capable of meeting these goals so that a capital investment decision can be made regarding its implementation at a paper mill demonstration site in DeRidder, LA. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for all major equipment, boiler modifications and balance of plant requirements including all utilities required for the project. A three-step implementation plan was developed to reduce technology risk. The plant design was found to meet the primary objectives of the project for increased bark utilization, decreased fossil fuel use, and increased self-generated power in the mill. Bark utilization for the modified plant is significantly higher (90-130%) than current operation compared to the 50% design goal. For equivalent steam production, the total gas usage for the fully implemented plant is 29% lower than current operation. While the current average steam production from No.2 Boiler is about 213,000 lb/h, the total steam production from the modified plant is 379,000 lb/h. This steam production increase will be accomplished at a grate heat release rate (GHRR) equal to the original boiler design. Boiler efficiencies (cogeneration-steam plus air) is increased from the original design value of 70% to 78.9% due to a combination of improved burnout, operation with lower excess air, and drier fuel. For the fully implemented plant, the thermal efficiency of fuel to electricity conversion is 79.8% in the cogeneration mode, 5% above the design goal. Finally, self-generated electricity will be increased from the 10.8 MW currently attributable to No.2 Boiler to 46.7MW, an increase of 332%. Environmental benefits derived from the system include a reduction in NOx emissions from the boiler of about 30-50% (90-130 tons/year) through syngas reburning, improved carbon burnout and lower excess air. This does not count NOx reduction that may be associated with replacement of purchased electricity. The project would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the generation of electricity to meet the mill's power requirements, including 50,000 tons/yr from a net reduction in gas usage in the mill and an additional 410,000 tons/yr reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions due to a 34 MW reduction of purchased electricity. The total CO{sub 2} reduction amounts to about 33% of the CO{sub 2} currently generated to meet the mills electricity requirement. The overall conclusion of the study is that while significant engineering challenges are presented by the proposed system, they can be met with operationally acceptable and cost effective solutions. The benefits of the system can be realized in an economic manner, with a simple payback period on the order of 6 years. The results of the study are applicable to many paper mills in the U.S. firing woodwastes and other solid fuels for steam and power production.

Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Sunil Ghose; Jim Patel

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ow ard bark" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Algae for Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Algae for Oxygen Algae for Oxygen Name: Pam Burkardt Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I am Pam Burkardt, a seventh grader at Fox Chapel School. I have a question on algae. I read somewhere that someday people might take bath tubs full of algae onto spaceships to provide oxygen for the crew. How much oxygen does algae give off, is this really possible? Replies: I think that most of the oxygen in the atmosphere comes in fact from one-celled plants in the oceans, like algae. They are likely to produce a lot of oxygen per unit weight because they don't have non-photosynthesizing bark, roots, branches, etc., nor (I think) a major dormant period like temperate-zone plants. The cost of space travel at present is dominated by the expense of heaving weight up into Earth orbit (it costs very little extra to send it to the Moon, for example, or Mars). For missions of short duration the weight of the compressed oxygen you need to carry is less than the weight of algae, water and extra plumbing you'd need to carry if you relied on algae to produce your oxygen. The important use of green plants would be in very long duration space flight (years) or permanent inhabitation of worlds like the Moon, where you need an unlimited supply of oxygen. Now if you want to fantasize, Venus' atmosphere is almost all carbon dioxide. Suppose you dropped a whole lot of specially gene-tailored one-celled plants into the atmosphere (not the surface, it's too hot). Why then they might eat up all the carbon dioxide and produce a breathable atmosphere. The "greenhouse effect" would go away, and Venus would become a nice habitable if tropical world only 50 million miles away.

382

Metabolic Rate Constants for Hydroquinone in F344 Rat and Human Liver Isolated Hepatocytes: Application to a PBPK model.  

SciTech Connect

Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important industrial chemical that also occurs naturally in foods and in the leaves and bark of a number of plant species. Exposure of laboratory animals to HQ may result in a species-, sex-, and strain-specific nephrotoxicity. The sensitivity of male F344 vs. female F344 and Sprague-Dawley rats or B6C3F1 mice appears to be related to differences in the rates of formation and further metabolism of key nephrotoxic metabolites. Metabolic rate constants for the conversion of HQ through several metabolic steps to the mono-glutathione conjugate and subsequent detoxification via mercapturic acid were measured in suspension cultures of hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats and humans. An in vitro mathematic kinetic model was used to analyze each metabolic step by simultaneously fitting the disappearance of each substrate and the appearance of subsequent metabolites. An iterative, nested approach was used whereby downstream metabolites were considered first and the model was constrained by the requirement that rate constants determined during analysis of individual metabolic steps must also satisfy the complete, integrated metabolism scheme, including competitive pathways. The results from this study indicated that the overall capacity for metabolism of HQ and its mono-glutathione conjugate is greater in hepatocytes from humans than those isolated from rats, suggesting a greater capacity for detoxification of the glutathione conjugates. Metabolic rate constants were applied to an existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the model was used to predict total glutathione metabolites produced in the liver. The results showed that body burdens of these metabolites will be much higher in rats than humans.

Poet, Torka S.; Wu, Hong; English, J C.; Corley, Rick A.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Plant immune systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant immune systems Plant immune systems Name: stephanie Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Do plants have an immune system? How does it work? Are plants able to "fight off" infections such as Dutch Elm disease? Replies: In the broadest sense, an immune system is any method an organism has protect itself from succeeding to another organism's efforts to undermine its health and integrity. In this sense, yes, plants have immune systems. Plants do NOT have "active" immune systems, like humans, including macrophages, lymls, antibodies, complements, interferon, etc., which help us ward off infection. Rather, plants have "passive" mechanisms of protection. For instance, the waxy secretion of some plants (cuticle) functions to help hold in moisture and keep out microorganisms. Plants can also secrete irritating juices that prevent insects and animals from eating it. The thick bark of woody plants is another example of a defensive adaptation, that protects the more delicate tissues inside. The chemical secretions of some plants are downright poisonous to many organisms, which greatly enhance the chances of survival for the plant. Fruits of plants contain large amounts of vitamin C and bioflavonoids, compounds which have been shown in the lab to be anti-bacterial and antiviral. So in these ways, plants can improve their chances of survival. Hundreds of viruses and bacteria attack plants each year, and the cost to agriculture is enormous. I would venture to guess that once an organism establishes an infection in a plant, the plant will not be able to "fight" it. However, exposure to the sun's UV light may help control an infection, possibly even defeat it, but the plant does not have any inherent "active" way to fight the infection

384

Non-pulp utilization of above-ground biomass of mixed-species forests of small trees  

SciTech Connect

This solution proposes to rehabilitate annually - by clear felling, site preparation, and planting - 25,000 acres of level to rolling land averaging about 490 cubic feet per acre of stemwood in small hardwood trees 5 inches in diameter at breast height (dbh) and larger, and of many species, plus an equal volume of above-ground biomass in stembark and tops, and in trees smaller than 5 inches in dbh. By usual utilization procedures, such wood is an unmerchantable residue from the harvest of merchantable southern pines. On an annual basis, 398,265 tons (oven-dry basis) of such wood and bark will be harvested and converted in an energy self-sufficient plant to the following: 208,688 tons of structural flakeboard sheathing and decking (sold at $200/ton), 16,298 tons of decorative hardwood plywood ($400/ton), and 20.191 tons of long fabricated joists with parallel-laminated veneer flanges and flakeboard webs ($600/ton), for a total product yield of about 60% - all on a dry-weight basis. Following are projected operating results and other essential data for a three-shift operation: capital investment, including working capital, $50,000,000; operating costs, annual, $40,000,000; sales, annual, $60,371,400; net profit, annual (before income taxes) $20,371,400; return on sales 33.7%; return on investment 40.7%; number of mill employees (harvesting and planting are contracted 250; electrical energy purchased annually 0 kWh; diesel fuel and propane for front-end loaders and lift trucks (oil equivalent) 150,000 gallons; wood residues burned annually (oven-dry-weight basis), all available from mill residues. (Refs. 16).

Koch, P.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy Analysis of a Kraft Pulp Mill: Potential for Energy Efficiency and Advanced Biomass Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy use at a Kraft pulp mill in the United States is analyzed in detail. Annual average process steam and electricity demands in the existing mill are 19.3 MMBtu per ADST and 687 kWh per ADST, respectively. This is relatively high by industry standards. The mill meets nearly all its electricity needs with a back-pressure steam turbine. Higher electricity to heat ratios is an industry wide trend and anticipated at the mill. The potential for self-sufficiency in energy using only black liquor and bark available on-site is assessed based on the analysis of the present energy situation and potential process changes. The analysis here suggests that steam and electricity demand could be reduced by 89% by operating consistently at high production rates. Process modifications and retrofits using commercially proven technologies could reduce steam and electricity demand to as low as 9.7 MMBtu per ADST, a 50% reduction, and 556 kWh per ADST, a 19% reduction, respectively. Electricity demand could increase to about 640 kWh per ADST due to closed-cycle operation of the bleach plant and other efforts to improve environmental performance. The retrofitted energy efficient mill with low environmental impact could be self-sufficient in steam and electricity using conventional technology, such as a back pressure steam turbine or a condensing extraction steam turbine. In addition to meeting mill energy demand, about 1,000 kWh per ADST would be available for export from the mill if gasification/combined cycle technology were used instead.

Subbiah, A.; Nilsson, L. J.; Larson, E. D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Research, Development and Demonstration of Bio-Mass Boiler for Food Industry  

SciTech Connect

Frito-Lay is working to reduce carbon emissions from their manufacturing plants. As part of this effort, they invested in a ??biomass-fired? boiler at the Topeka, Kansas, plant. Frito-Lay partnered with Burns & McDonnell Engineering, Inc. and CPL Systems, Inc., to design and construct a steam producing boiler using ??carbon neutral? fuels such as wood wastes (e.g. tree bark), shipping pallets, and used rubber vehicle tires. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) joined with Frito-Lay, Burns & McDonnell, and CPL to analyze the reductions in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that result from use of biomass-fired boilers in the food manufacturing environment. DOE support provided for the data collection and analysis, and reporting necessary to evaluate boiler efficiencies and reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions. The Frito-Lay biomass-fired boiler has resulted in significant reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions from the Topeka production facility. The use of natural gas has been reduced by 400 to 420 million standard cubic feet per year with corresponding reductions of 24,000 to 25,000 tons of CO{sub 2}. The boiler does require auxiliary ??functions,? however, that are unnecessary for a gas-fired boiler. These include heavy motors and fans for moving fuel and firing the boiler, trucks and equipment for delivering the fuel and moving at the boiler plant, and chippers for preparing the fuel prior to delivery. Each of these operations requires the combustion of fossil fuels or electricity and has associated CO{sub 2} emissions. Even after accounting for each of these auxiliary processes, however, the biomass-fired boiler results in net emission reductions of 22,500 to 23,500 tons of CO{sub 2} per year.

Fisher, Steve; Knapp, David

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Solution to the Strong CP Problem with Gauge-Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that a certain class of low scale supersymmetric ``Nelson-Barr'' type models can solve the strong and supersymmetric CP problems while at the same time generating sufficient weak CP violation in the $K^{0}-\\bar{K}^{0}$ system. In order to prevent one-loop corrections to $\\bar{\\theta}$ which violate bounds coming from the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), one needs a scheme for the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters which can naturally give sufficient squark degeneracies and proportionality of trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters to Yukawa couplings. We show that a gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking sector can provide the needed degeneracy and proportionality, though that proves to be a problem for generic Nelson-Barr models. The workable model we consider here has the Nelson-Barr mass texture enforced by a gauge symmetry; one also expects a new U(1) gauge superfield with mass in the TeV range. The resulting model is predictive. We predict a measureable neutron EDM and the existence of extra vector-like quark superfields which can be discovered at the LHC. Because the $3\\times 3$ Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is approximately real, the model also predicts a flat unitarity triangle and the absence of substantial CP violation in the $B$ system at future $B$ factories. We discuss the general issues pertaining to the construction of such a workable model and how they lead to the successful strategy. A detailed renormalization group study is then used to establish the feasibility of the model considered.

Otto C. W. Kong; Brian D. Wright

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

Implementing Management Systems-Based Assessments  

SciTech Connect

A management system approach for evaluating environment, safety, health, and quality is in use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. As a multi-program national laboratory, SNL has many diverse operations including research, engineering development and applications, production, and central services supporting all activities and operations. Basic research examples include fusion power generation, nuclear reactor experiments, and investigation of combustion processes. Engineering development examples are design, testing, and prototype developments of micro-mechanical systems for safe'~arding computer systems, air bags for automobiles, satellite systems, design of transportation systems for nuclear materials, and systems for use in medical applications such as diagnostics and surgery. Production operations include manufacture of instrumented detection devices, radioisotopes, and replacement parts for previously produced engineered systems. Support services include facilities engineering, construction, and site management, site security, packaging and transportation of hazardous materials wastes, ES&H functional programs to establish requirements and guidance to comply with federal, state, local, and contractual requirements and work safety. In this diverse environment, unlike more traditional single function business units, an integrated consistent management system is not typical. Instead, each type of diverse activity has its own management system designed and distributed around the operations, personnel, customers, and facilities (e.g., hazards involved, security, regulatory requirements, and locations). Laboratory managers are not likely to have experience in the more traditional hierarchical or command and control structures and thus do not share oversight expectations found in centralized management systems. The resulting corporate management system gives the appearance of an assembly of multiple, nearly independent operating units. The executive management system maintains these separate units, encouraging autonomy and creativity by establishing a minimum of requirements and procedures. In any organization, senior management has a responsibility to ensure that all operating units are meeting requirements. Part of this responsibility is fulfilled by conducting oversight or assurance activities, to determine the effectiveness of established systems in meeting requirements and performance expectations. Internal independent assessment is one of these assurance activities. Independent appraisals are combined with external audits and appraisals, self-assessments, peer reviews, project reviews, and other internal and external audits (e.g., financial, contractual) for a more complete assurance view. At SNL, internal independent appraisals are performed by the Audit Center, which reports directly to the Executive Vice President. ES&H independent appraisals are the responsibility of the ES&H and Quality Assessments Department, with a staff complement of eight. With our organization's charter to perform internal, independent appraisals, we set out to develop an approach and associated tools, which would be useful in the overall SNL environment and within our resource limitations.

Campisi, John A.; Reese, Robert T.

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

389

Implementing the chemical weapons convention  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty implementing issues, showing how various States Parties have enacted measures that are responsive to CWC obligations. It is intended to highlight the issues that States Parties must address and to identify trends among States Parties that might be useful to States that have not yet made crucial decisions as to how to resolve key matters. At various points in the text, country names are listed in parenthesis to identify pieces of national legislation that demonstrate the point in the text. It should not be inferred that nations not listed have not addressed the point or have taken a different position. In some cases, a nation's position is explained in somewhat more depth to give specific detail to an assertion in the text. Attached to this paper is a chart which illustrates how States Parties in the Central European region as well as the United States respond to the issues raised. Obviously, in preparing such a chart, many subtle provisions in national legislation must be simplified. The point of the chart is to portray, on a few pages, the major trends of legislation.

Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

You are now leaving Energy.gov | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

https://www2.dteenergy.com/wps/portal/dte/business/productsPrograms/details/SolarCurrents/Benefits/!ut/p/b1/hZHJkptAEES_xR-goaFpliMMO2ITi4AL0SBAQgPCEmL7ekt22I6xY2bqVhEvK6MyiZSIibTD46nGw-nS4bfnnjIZ5LZ2hELHCxRfBPouCilG9IEqkQ8geQKOsPPpJwCA_AQkVzM5qFrsp3r0Ww8-GAG81yOoc0APBCiGkKIA_cf_Y-AL_z0RBwnFSxd9UuS0OuKoAcAQE3F3tnlNnjT89kZeGoU3qykvYRGId7h2xuIXrVWAkB8FT0dOxyDBPloMd5vH8gaZphaDjZvaB97IvXLJ3XywZ6lnumS33PyKMpcseSVB1cmnuNJL5VTPVZ_XpaReAcmbcYobdf-278WF1qHjC6Pnq9poHtF-Ew9CMihkAvY4s7iqlsK1yPN_c_j_0S96NIj0lLcvU9G-gBcasZCGNE-xiIYMhR4ppb8OfNLzT-CzIr-q0tYubUkkD4z9i22B_zBiHWRTHKSAQBMBEQM685ul19fzumtWb7bz1AokeQLXcArkNbLDMwiGyLYlbyHZENi5B_w1Mq0VQ9_W3EO0C0VBuM1RQb3_nOUYSNGQ4jjEIMBCImoSepZofZL1OHs9DxpTkPe6nRyj_67nQuhgZYv7K4k37mEfJMd7MFZ3VCK-4SvOPWqp61mqVaTF0Lllm3aidRoHNTp2ZY15XVavOw8fQOLj0rX2r5mKp0rBaRqpNsOm0uF-y4yZ20yLSZuR2s1b1wwUgLSD0cistRwum-05MaIp70Cfc0ITOudmza5ULJPDzYhx3ze-cwT1Mpx7EG0nNF5NsTeyqC5dUqLHSA0vWUB7rTNzLkn0bRiG4xYZciXFq_DtBw5NexQ!/dl4/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh/

391

Removal of Particles and Acid Gases (SO2 or HCl) with a Ceramic Filter by Addition of Dry Sorbents  

SciTech Connect

The present investigation intends to add to the fundamental process design know-how for dry flue gas cleaning, especially with respect to process flexibility, in cases where variations in the type of fuel and thus in concentration of contaminants in the flue gas require optimization of operating conditions. In particular, temperature effects of the physical and chemical processes occurring simultaneously in the gas-particle dispersion and in the filter cake/filter medium are investigated in order to improve the predictive capabilities for identifying optimum operating conditions. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) are known as efficient sorbents for neutralizing acid flue gas components such as HCl, HF, and SO{sub 2}. According to their physical properties (e.g. porosity, pore size) and chemical behavior (e.g. thermal decomposition, reactivity for gas-solid reactions), optimum conditions for their application vary widely. The results presented concentrate on the development of quantitative data for filtration stability and overall removal efficiency as affected by operating temperature. Experiments were performed in a small pilot unit with a ceramic filter disk of the type Dia-Schumalith 10-20 (Fig. 1, described in more detail in Hemmer 2002 and Hemmer et al. 1999), using model flue gases containing SO{sub 2} and HCl, flyash from wood bark combustion, and NaHCO{sub 3} as well as Ca(OH){sub 2} as sorbent material (particle size d{sub 50}/d{sub 84} : 35/192 {micro}m, and 3.5/16, respectively). The pilot unit consists of an entrained flow reactor (gas duct) representing the raw gas volume of a filter house and the filter disk with a filter cake, operating continuously, simulating filter cake build-up and cleaning of the filter medium by jet pulse. Temperatures varied from 200 to 600 C, sorbent stoichiometric ratios from zero to 2, inlet concentrations were on the order of 500 to 700 mg/m{sup 3}, water vapor contents ranged from zero to 20 vol%. The experimental program with NaHCO{sub 3} is listed in Table 1. In addition, model calculations were carried out based on own and published experimental results that estimate residence time and temperature effects on removal efficiencies.

Hemmer, G.; Kasper, G.; Wang, J.; Schaub, G.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

s-wave repulsion in the pion-nucleus optical potential and the subthreshold pion-nucleonT matrix  

SciTech Connect

A covariant theory of the pion-nucleus interaction has been used to calculate off-shell matrix elements of the first-order pion-nucleus optical potential in momentum space. The matrix elements Bark> are calculated for /sup 16/O and /sup 40/Ca, as a function of k, the momentum in the ..pi..-nucleus center-of-mass system, for W = m/sub ..pi../+M/sub N/. (As in our previous studies we have carried out a full integration over the Fermi motion of the target nucleons. Off-shell effects related to nuclear binding are treated carefully.) As this calculation is sensitively dependent upon the subthreshold ..pi..N T matrix, two different models for the T matrix are studied. One is the well known separable model of Londergan, McVoy, and Moniz. The second model includes terms describing the direct and crossed Born terms and therefore has the appropriate s- and u-channel nucleon poles. (In the calculations using this model both the pion and the nucleon are allowed to go off the mass shell.) The remaining part of the amplitude in the second model is represented by a separable form. For small k, the matrix elements of the optical potential calculated with these two models are significantly larger than those obtained when use is made of the fixed-scatterer approximation. Phenomenological optical potentials which describe low-energy pion-nucleus scattering data or pionic-atom data exhibit s-wave repulsion which is about 2--8 times that obtained from calculations made in the fixed-scatterer approximation. (The uncertainty in this enhancement factor reflects the uncertainty in the free-space values of the ..pi..N scattering lengths). We conclude that the explanation of a significant fraction of the s-wave repulsion in the low energy pion-nucleus interaction may lie in a careful treatment of off-shell effects using a good model for the subthreshold ..pi..N T matrix.

Bhalerao, R.S.; Shakin, C.M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Antimicrobial activities of saponin-rich guar meal extract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three saponin-rich extracts (20, 60, 100% methanol), four 100% methanol subfractions and seven independently acquired fractions (A-G) from guar meal, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. (syn. C. psoraloides), were evaluated for antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. These activities were compared against quillaja bark (Quillaja saponaria), yucca (Yucca schidigera), and soybean (Glycine max) saponins in 96-well plates using eight concentrations (0.01 to 1.0 and 0.1 to 12.5 mg extract/mL). Initial guar meal butanol extract was 4.8 0.6% of the weight of original material dry matter (DM). Butanol extract was purified by preparative reverse-phase C-18 chromatography. Two fractions eluted with 20, and one each with 60, and 100% methanol with average yields of 1.72 0.47, 0.88 0.16, 0.91 0.16 and 1.55 0.15% of DM, respectively. Further purification of the 100% methanol fraction using normal-phase silica gel preparatory high pressure liquid chromatography eluted 4 peaks at 16, 39, 44 and 46 min. Only the 100% methanol fraction, its 16 min peak, F and G fractions, and quillaja saponin, exhibited both hemolytic and antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium and E. coli, but 20 and 60% methanol fractions stimulated Lactobacillus spp. growth. Guar meal (0 or 5%) was added to diets fed to chicks from 1 to 21 days of age. Chicks fed both diets were unchallenged or challenged with 5 x 103 Eimeria tenella sporulated oocysts at 10 days. Guar meal diets reduced oocysts shed per gram of feces, body weight, and feed efficiency. Adding 2.5% guar meal, 1% guar gum, or 0.125% saponin-rich guar meal extract to diets fed to chicks to 21 days of age showed that guar meal increased the cfu concentrations of digesta more than controls following a challenge with 107 cfu of Clostridium perfringens at 14 days. Body weights of chicks fed guar meal and saponin-rich extract were significantly lower than control body weights at 21 days of age, whereas the weekly feed to gain ratio of chicks fed saponin-rich extract was higher than controls. Guar meal reduced severity of Eimeria tenella infection and guar saponin-rich extract exhibited antimicrobial activity against several common poultry pathogens.

Hassan, Sherif Mohamed

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Terebinth resin in antiquity: possible uses in the Late Bronze Age Aegean region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The remains of an estimated one metric ton of terebinth resin, the yellowish, semi-fluid, aromatic resin of a Pistacia tree, were recently discovered on the Late Bronze Age shipwreck site at Uluburun, Turkey. The resin was carried in an estimated 130 Canaanite amphoras, as part of a rich and diverse cargo that included eleven metric tons of copper and tin, as well as other raw materials, tools, weapons and luxury goods on a ship journeying to some destination west or south of Uluburun. This is the largest single deposit of terebinth resin from antiquity ever found, and the first to be identified by modern analytical methods. The botanical origin of the resin is thought to be Pistacia atlantica, but the Pistacia genus includes many resin-producing trees, all of which have been well known and economically important from ancient times to the present. The sources and characteristics of modern terebinth resin are described, followed by a discussion of Pistacia trees and their many products--resin, fruits, leaves, bark, wood and galls. Some possible uses of terebinth resin in the Late Bronze Aegean region are then explored, as this area is likely to have been one of the intended destinations of the Uluburun ship. A discussion of the accepted translation of the Linear B word ki-ta-no as the fruits of the terebinth tree demonstrates that the word might refer to any of the products of the terebinth tree, not only fruits or, as was suggested after the discovery of the Uluburun cargo, resin. The ideogram *123 usually associated with ki-ta-no indicates a dry good, and is often considered to signify an "aromatic"; all products of the terebinth tree can be characterized as dry goods, and all have aromatic and astringent properties. The evidence for the use of terebinth resin in the perfumed oil industry and as incense in Late Bronze Age Greece is then briefly surveyed. The Late Bronze Age evidence from the Aegean region is scanty, but parallels from other regions and later periods allow the tentative conclusion that terebinth resin might have been used for both of these purposes. Confirmation requires discovery and analysis of residues.

Peachey, Claire Patricia

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Processing Cost Analysis for Biomass Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The receiving, handling, storing, and processing of woody biomass feedstocks is an overlooked component of biopower systems. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to identify and characterize all the receiving, handling, storing, and processing steps required to make woody biomass feedstocks suitable for use in direct combustion and gasification applications, including small modular biopower (SMB) systems, and (2) to estimate the capital and operating costs at each step. Since biopower applications can be varied, a number of conversion systems and feedstocks required evaluation. In addition to limiting this study to woody biomass feedstocks, the boundaries of this study were from the power plant gate to the feedstock entry point into the conversion device. Although some power plants are sited at a source of wood waste fuel, it was assumed for this study that all wood waste would be brought to the power plant site. This study was also confined to the following three feedstocks (1) forest residues, (2) industrial mill residues, and (3) urban wood residues. Additionally, the study was confined to grate, suspension, and fluidized bed direct combustion systems; gasification systems; and SMB conversion systems. Since scale can play an important role in types of equipment, operational requirements, and capital and operational costs, this study examined these factors for the following direct combustion and gasification system size ranges: 50, 20, 5, and 1 MWe. The scope of the study also included: Specific operational issues associated with specific feedstocks (e.g., bark and problems with bridging); Opportunities for reducing handling, storage, and processing costs; How environmental restrictions can affect handling and processing costs (e.g., noise, commingling of treated wood or non-wood materials, emissions, and runoff); and Feedstock quality issues and/or requirements (e.g., moisture, particle size, presence of non-wood materials). The study found that over the years the industry has shown a good deal of ingenuity and, as a result, has developed several cost effective methods of processing and handling wood. SMB systems usually cannot afford to perform much onsite processing and therefore usually purchase fuels processed to specification. Owners of larger systems try to minimize onsite processing to minimize processing costs. Whole truck dumpers are expensive, but allow for faster and easier unloading, which reduces labor costs and charges by the haulers. Storage costs are a major factor in overall costs, thus the amount of fuel reserve is an important consideration. Silos and bins are relatively expensive compared to open piles used for larger facilities, but may be required depending on space available, wood characteristics, and amount of wood to be stored. For larger systems, a front-end loader has a lot of flexibility in use and is an essential piece of equipment for moving material. Few opportunities appear to exist for improving the cost effectiveness of these systems.

Badger, P.C.

2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils  

SciTech Connect

The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (< 10%). Improved oil recovery techniques must be developed for these reservoirs. The proximity to the permafrost is an issue for thermal methods; thus nonthermal methods must be considered. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methods for the Ugnu reservoir on the top of Milne Point. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation includes 1.5% of an alkali, 0.4% of a nonionic surfactant, and 0.48% of a polymer. The secondary waterflood in a 1D sand pack had a cumulative recovery of 0.61 PV in about 3 PV injection. The residual oil saturation to waterflood was 0.26. Injection of tertiary alkaline-surfactant-polymer slug followed by tapered polymer slugs could recover almost 100% of the remaining oil. The tertiary alkali-surfactant-polymer flood of the 330 cp oil is stable in three-dimensions; it was verified by a flood in a transparent 5-spot model. A secondary polymer flood is also effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. The secondary polymer flood recovered about 0.78 PV of oil in about 1 PV injection. The remaining oil saturation was 0.09. The pressure drops were reasonable (<2 psi/ft) and depended mainly on the viscosity of the polymer slug injected. For the heavy crude oil (of viscosity 10,000 cp), low viscosity (10-100 cp) oil-in-water emulsions can be obtained at salinity up to 20,000 ppm by using a hydrophilic surfactant along with an alkali at a high water-to-oil ratio of 9:1. Very dilute surfactant concentrations (~0.1 wt%) of the synthetic surfactant are required to generate the emulsions. It is much easier to flow the low viscosity emulsion than the original oil of viscosity 10,000 cp. Decreasing the WOR reverses the type of emulsion to water-in-oil type. For a low salinity of 0 ppm NaCl, the emulsion remained O/W even when the WOR was decreased. Hence a low salinity injection water is preferred if an oil-in-water emulsion is to be formed. Secondary waterflood of the 10,000 cp heavy oil followed by tertiary injection of alkaline-surfactants is very effective. Waterflood has early water breakthrough, but recovers a substantial amount of oil beyond breakthrough. Waterflood recovers 20-37% PV of the oil in 1D sand pack in about 3 PV injection. Tertiary alkali-surfactant injection increases the heavy oil recovery to 50-70% PV in 1D sand packs. As the salinity increased, the oil recovery due to alkaline surfactant flood increased, but water-in-oil emulsion was p

Kishore Mohanty

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation includes 1.5% of an alkali, 0.4% of a nonionic surfactant, and 0.48% of a polymer. The secondary waterflood in a 1D sand pack had a cumulative recovery of 0.61 PV in about 3 PV injection. The residual oil saturation to waterflood was 0.26. Injection of tertiary alkaline-surfactant-polymer slug followed by tapered polymer slugs could recover almost 100% of the remaining oil. The tertiary alkali-surfactant-polymer flood of the 330 cp oil is stable in three-dimensions; it was verified by a flood in a transparent 5-spot model. A secondary polymer flood is also effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. The secondary polymer flood recovered about 0.78 PV of oil in about 1 PV injection. The remaining oil saturation was 0.09. The pressure drops were reasonable (polymer slug injected. For the heavy crude oil (of viscosity 10,000 cp), low viscosity (10-100 cp) oil-in-water emulsions can be obtained at salinity up to 20,000 ppm by using a hydrophilic surfactant along with an alkali at a high water-to-oil ratio of 9:1. Very dilute surfactant concentrations (~0.1 wt%) of the synthetic surfactant are required to generate the emulsions. It is much easier to flow the low viscosity emulsion than the original oil of viscosity 10,000 cp. Decreasing the WOR reverses the type of emulsion to water-in-oil type. For a low salinity of 0 ppm NaCl, the emulsion remained O/W even when the WOR was decreased. Hence a low salinity injection water is preferred if an oil-in-water emulsion is to be formed. Secondary waterflood of the 10,000 cp heavy oil followed by tertiary injection of alkaline-surfactants is very effective. Waterflood has early water breakthrough, but recovers a substantial amount of oil beyond breakthrough. Waterflood recovers 20-37% PV of the oil in 1D sand pack in about 3 PV injection. Tertiary alkali-surfactant injection increases the heavy oil recovery to 50-70% PV in 1D sand packs. As the salinity increased, the oil recovery due to alkaline surfactant flood increased, but water-in-oil emulsion was p

Kishore Mohanty

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z