Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Property:Overseeing Organization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProceduresFY Description URLsEndDateC Central

2

Property:Main Overseeing Organization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to: navigation,PVYearsDisplay/GraphicsLength

3

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tidal heating and tidal evolution in the solar system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we examine the effects of tidal dissipation on solid bodies in application and in theory. First, we study the effects of tidal heating and tidal evolution in the Saturnian satellite system. We constrain the ...

Meyer, Jennifer Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

6

Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStraitTidalEnergyProject,TenaxEnergyTropicalTidalTestCentre,&o...

7

Chaos and Tidal Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the tidal capture mechanism for binary formation, an important process in globular cluster cores and perhaps open cluster cores. Tidal capture binaries may be the precursors for some of the low-mass X-ray binaries observed in abundance in globular clusters. They may also play an important role in globular cluster dynamics. We summarize the chaos model for tidal interaction (Mardling 1995, ApJ, 450, 722, 732), and discuss how this affects our understanding of the circularization process which follows capture.

Rosemary A. Mardling

1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Tidal Energy Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

Stelzenmuller, Nickolas [Univ of Washington; Aliseda, Alberto [Univ of Washington; Palodichuk, Michael [Univ of Washington; Polagye, Brian [Univ of Washington; Thomson, James [Univ of Washington; Chime, Arshiya [Univ of Washington; Malte, Philip [Univ of washington

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 23 GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS: SCENARIOS AND IMPACTS Scott C. Neubauer Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt, Dennis Whigham & Andrew Baldwin 2009, viii + 320pp Publishers GmbH This chapter was originally published in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy

Neubauer, Scott C.

10

Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2 × 10 5 M? swallow a typical 0.6 M ? white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star’s selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of LEdd ? 10 41 erg/s (Mbh/1000M?), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events. 1.

Stephan Rosswog; Enrico Ramirez-ruiz; W. Raphael Hix

11

Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than $2\\times 10^5$ M$_\\odot$ swallow a typical 0.6 M$_\\odot$ dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's self-gravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of $L_{\\rm Edd} \\simeq 10^{41} {\\rm erg/s} M_{\\rm bh}/1000 M$_\\odot$), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

S. Rosswog; E. Ramirez-Ruiz; W. R. Hix

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

TIDAL FRICTION AND TIDAL LAGGING. APPLICABILITY LIMITATIONS OF A POPULAR FORMULA FOR THE TIDAL TORQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal torques play a key role in rotational dynamics of celestial bodies. They govern these bodies' tidal despinning and also participate in the subtle process of entrapment of these bodies into spin-orbit resonances. This makes tidal torques directly relevant to the studies of habitability of planets and their moons. Our work begins with an explanation of how friction and lagging should be built into the theory of bodily tides. Although much of this material can be found in various publications, a short but self-consistent summary on the topic has been lacking in the hitherto literature, and we are filling the gap. After these preparations, we address a popular concise formula for the tidal torque, which is often used in the literature, for planets or stars. We explain why the derivation of this expression, offered in the paper by Goldreich and in the books by Kaula (Equation (4.5.29)) and Murray and Dermott (Equation (4.159)), implicitly sets the time lag to be frequency independent. Accordingly, the ensuing expression for the torque can be applied only to bodies having a very special (and very hypothetical) rheology which makes the time lag frequency independent, i.e., the same for all Fourier modes in the spectrum of tide. This expression for the torque should not be used for bodies of other rheologies. Specifically, the expression cannot be combined with an extra assertion of the geometric lag being constant, because at finite eccentricities the said assumption is incompatible with the constant-time-lag condition.

Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V., E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil [US Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC) series are international, technical and scientific conferences, focussed on ocean renewable energy and widely respected for their commitment to...

14

Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978) |Thrall,Tibagi Energetica Jump to:Tidal

15

Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tidal heating during the past billion years, perhaps enough to explain its large measured radius. Our models also show that GJ 876 d may have experienced tremendous heating and is probably not a solid, rocky planet. Theoretical models should include the role of tidal heating, which is large, but time-varying.

Brian Jackson; Richard Greenberg; Rory Barnes

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC) Laboratories »OrganicOrganization

17

A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tidal wetland below MHLW Table 4.19. Performance IndicatorsPerformance Indicator All Tidal wetlands Tidal wetlands All

Olson, Jessica J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Viscoelastic Models of Tidally Heated Exomoons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life is intensely studied on Solar System moons such as Europa or Enceladus, where the surface ice layer covers tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. For studying the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models, because it takes into account the temperature dependency of the tidal heat flux, and the melting of the inner material. With the use of this model we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), that strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon, and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ usi...

Dobos, Vera

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fitting orbits to tidal streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent years have seen the discovery of many tidal streams through the Galaxy. Relatively straightforward observations of a stream allow one to deduce three phase-space coordinates of an orbit. An algorithm is presented that reconstructs the missing phase-space coordinates from these data. The reconstruction starts from assumed values of the Galactic potential and a distance to one point on the orbit, but with noise-free data the condition that energy be conserved on the orbit enables one to reject incorrect assumptions. The performance of the algorithm is investigated when errors are added to the input data that are comparable to those in published data for the streams of Pal 5. It is found that the algorithm returns distances and proper motions that are accurate to of order one percent, and enables one to reject quite reasonable but incorrect trial potentials. In practical applications it will be important to minimize errors in the input data, and there is considerable scope for doing this.

James Binney

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations on Endangered...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is conducting a two-year study on the effects of tidal turbines on endangered beluga whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska-home to some of the greatest tidal...

23

TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Publishers, Weikersheim, 2009 Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy attached is provided by Margraf Publishers Gmb

Newman, Michael C.

24

Tidal interactions in multi-planet systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study systems of close orbiting planets evolving under the influence of tidal circularization. It is supposed that a commensurability forms through the action of disk induced migration and orbital circularization. After the system enters an inner cavity or the disk disperses the evolution continues under the influence of tides due to the central star which induce orbital circularization. We derive approximate analytic models that describe the evolution away from a general first order resonance that results from tidal circularization in a two planet system and which can be shown to be a direct consequence of the conservation of energy and angular momentum. We consider the situation when the system is initially very close to resonance and also when the system is between resonances. We also perform numerical simulations which confirm these models and then apply them to two and four planet systems chosen to have parameters related to the GJ581 and HD10180 systems. We also estimate the tidal dissipation rates t...

Papaloizou, J C B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association was awarded a U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program grant (DE-EE0005624) for the Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (Project). The goal of the Project was to perform a feasibility study to determine if a tidal energy project would be a viable means to generate electricity and heat to meet long-term fossil fuel use reduction goals, specifically to produce at least 30% of the electrical and heating needs of the tribally-owned buildings in False Pass. The Project Team included the Aleut Region organizations comprised of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA), and Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association (APICDA); the University of Alaska Anchorage, ORPC Alaska a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), City of False Pass, Benthic GeoScience, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The following Project objectives were completed: collected existing bathymetric, tidal, and ocean current data to develop a basic model of current circulation at False Pass, measured current velocities at two sites for a full lunar cycle to establish the viability of the current resource, collected data on transmission infrastructure, electrical loads, and electrical generation at False Pass, performed economic analysis based on current costs of energy and amount of energy anticipated from and costs associated with the tidal energy project conceptual design and scoped environmental issues. Utilizing circulation modeling, the Project Team identified two target sites with strong potential for robust tidal energy resources in Isanotski Strait and another nearer the City of False Pass. In addition, the Project Team completed a survey of the electrical infrastructure, which identified likely sites of interconnection and clarified required transmission distances from the tidal energy resources. Based on resource and electrical data, the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

Wright, Bruce Albert [Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association] [Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Regulation of Tidal and Wave Energy Projects (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State regulation of tidal and wave energy projects is covered under the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act (MWDCA), and complements regulation by the Federal Energy Regulation...

27

All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Renewable Power Company will unveil its first commercial-scale tidal turbine before it is deployed underwater to generate power. The pilot project -- supported by...

28

Temperature and Tidal Dynamics in a Branching Estuarine System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance of the Interconnectivity of Branching ChannelsImportance of the Interconnectivity of Branching Channels Inquestions about tidal interconnectivity in the Sacramento-

Wagner, Richard Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology. 1023527.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1949: FERC Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1949: FERC Final Environmental Assessment Tidal Energy Resource Assessment...

30

THE EFFECT OF MASS LOSS ON THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By combining mass loss and tidal evolution of close-in planets, we present a qualitative study on their tidal migrations. We incorporate mass loss in tidal evolution for planets with different masses and find that mass ...

Guo, Jianheng

31

Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective: Terminology andInformationTocardo Tidal

32

Tidal Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyThe Sun and Its EnergyMetalofAgreement forTidal Energy

33

Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978) |Thrall,Tibagi Energetica Jump to:TidalTest

34

Disc formation from stellar tidal disruptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of tidal disruption of stars to probe otherwise quiescent supermassive black holes cannot be exploited, if their dynamics is not fully understood. So far, the observational appearance of these events has been commonly derived from analytical extrapolations of the debris dynamical properties just after the stellar disruption. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of stars in highly eccentric orbits, that follow the stellar debris after disruption and investigate their ultimate fate. We demonstrate that gas debris circularize on an orbital timescale because relativistic apsidal precession causes the stream to self-cross. The higher the eccentricity and/or the deeper the encounter, the faster is the circularization. If the internal energy deposited by shocks during stream self-interaction is readily radiated, the gas forms a narrow ring at the circularization radius. It will then proceed to accrete viscously at a super-Eddington rate, puffing up under radiation pressure. If instead c...

Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

analysing tidally induced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We discuss the results of 3D simulations...

36

Hydrodynamic analysis of a vertical axis tidal current turbine   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal currents can be used as a predictable source of sustainable energy, and have the potential to make a useful contribution to the energy needs of the UK and other countries with such a resource. One of the technologies ...

Gretton, Gareth I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Geomorphic structure of tidal hydrodynamics in salt marsh creeks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the tidal signal within the marsh area. Citation: Fagherazzi, S., M. Hannion, and P. D'Odorico (2008 by elegant hydrological and geomorphological theories [Gupta et al., 1980; Rodriguez-Iturbe and Valdes, 1979

Fagherazzi, Sergio

38

Interactions Between Tidal Flows and Ooid Shoals, Northern Bahamas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

active sand waves and ripples. Towards the platform margin, tidal currents pass through narrow inlets. The main inlet opening oceanward (NW) of the shoal stretches between two Pleistocene bedrock islands, connected by a bedrock high that extends... include both flood and ebb tidal deltas, with generally lobate forms, convex away from the islands, and with endpoints at the inlets. Although the inner portions of these lobes are mainly seagrass-stabilized muddy peloidal and skeletal sands with local...

Reeder, Stacy Lynn; Rankey, Gene C.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nonrotating black hole in a post-Newtonian tidal environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the motion and tidal dynamics of a nonrotating black hole placed within a post-Newtonian external spacetime. The tidal perturbation created by the external environment is treated as a small perturbation. At a large distance from the black hole, the gravitational field of the external distribution of matter is assumed to be sufficiently weak to be adequately described by the (first) post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity. There, the black hole is treated as a monopole contribution to the total gravitational field. There exists an overlap in the domains of validity of each description, and the black-hole and post-Newtonian metrics are matched in the overlap. The matching procedure produces the equations of motion for the black hole and the gravito-electric and gravito-magnetic tidal fields acting on the black hole. We first calculate the equations of motion and tidal fields by making no assumptions regarding the nature of the post-Newtonian environment; this could contain a continuous distribution of matter or any number of condensed bodies. We next specialize our discussion to a situation in which the black hole is a member of a post-Newtonian two-body system. As an application of our results, we examine the geometry of the deformed event horizon and calculate the tidal heating of the black hole, the rate at which it acquires mass as a result of its tidal interaction with the companion body.

Stephanne Taylor; Eric Poisson

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Using Tidal Tails to Probe Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use simulations of merging galaxies to explore the sensitivity of the morphology of tidal tails to variations of the halo mass distributions in the parent galaxies. Our goal is to constrain the mass of dark halos in well-known merging pairs. We concentrate on prograde encounters between equal mass galaxies which represent the best cases for creating tidal tails, but also look at systems with different relative orientations, orbital energies and mass ratios. As the mass and extent of the dark halo increase in the model galaxies, the resulting tidal tails become shorter and less massive, even under the most favorable conditions for producing these features. Our simulations imply that the observed merging galaxies with long tidal tails ($\\sim 50-100$ kpc) such as NGC 4038/39 (the Antennae) and NGC 7252 probably have halo:disk+bulge mass ratios less than 10:1. These results conflict with the favored values of the dark halo mass of the Milky Way derived from satellite kinematics and the timing argument which give a halo:disk+bulge mass ratio of $\\sim 30:1$. However, the lower bound of the estimated dark halo mass in the Milky Way (mass ratio $\\sim 10:1$) is still consistent with the inferred tidal tail galaxy masses. Our results also conflict with the expectations of $\\Omega=1$ cosmologies such as CDM which predict much more massive and extended dark halos.

John Dubinski; J. Christopher Mihos; Lars Hernquist

1995-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tidal waves as yrast states in transitional nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The yrast states of transitional nuclei are described as quadrupole waves running over the nuclear surface, which we call tidal waves. In contrast to a rotor, which generates angular momentum by increasing the angular velocity at approximately constant deformation, a tidal wave generates angular momentum by increasing the deformation at approximately constant angular velocity. The properties of the tidal waves are calculated by means of the cranking model in a microscopic way. The calculated energies and E2 transition probabilities of the yrast states in the transitional nuclides with $Z$= 44, 46, 48 and $N=56, 58, ..., 66$ reproduce the experiment in detail. The nonlinear response of the nucleonic orbitals results in a strong coupling between shape and single particle degrees of freedom.

S. Frauendorf; Y. Gu; J. Sun

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Resonant Oscillations and Tidal Heating in Coalescing Binary Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal interaction in a coalescing neutron star binary can resonantly excite the g-mode oscillations of the neutron star when the frequency of the tidal driving force equals the intrinsic g-mode frequencies. We study the g-mode oscillations of cold neutron stars using recent microscopic nuclear equations of state, where we determine self-consistently the sound speed and Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency in the nuclear liquid core. The properties of the g-modes associated with the stable stratification of the core depend sensitively on the pressure-density relation as well as the symmetry energy of the dense nuclear matter. The frequencies of the first ten g-modes lie approximately in the range of $10-100$ Hz. Resonant excitations of these g-modes during the last few minutes of the binary coalescence result in energy transfer and angular momentum transfer from the binary orbit to the neutron star. The angular momentum transfer is possible because a dynamical tidal lag develops even in the absence of fluid viscosity. However, since the coupling between the g-mode and the tidal potential is rather weak, the amount of energy transfer during a resonance and the induced orbital phase error are very small. Resonant excitations of the g-modes play an important role in tidal heating of binary neutron stars. Without the resonances, viscous dissipation is effective only when the stars are close to contact. The resonant oscillations result in dissipation at much larger orbital separation. The actual amount of tidal heating depends on the viscosity of the neutron star. Using the microscopic viscosity, we find that the binary neutron stars are heated to a temperature $\\sim 10^8$ K before they come into contact.

Dong Lai

1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marsh. UC Berkeley LA 222 Hydrology Term Paper. Orr, M. , S.Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment forthree consists of a tidal hydrology analysis before and

Olson, Jessica J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

47

MHK Projects/Cohansey River Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETOCohansey River Tidal

48

TIDAL HEATING OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Brian Jackson, Richard Greenberg, and Rory Barnes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIDAL HEATING OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Brian Jackson, Richard Greenberg, and Rory Barnes Lunar and gas cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget governing

Barnes, Rory

49

LOFT as a discovery machine for jetted Tidal Disruption Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of jetted tidal disruption events. For a summary, we refer to the paper.

Rossi, E M; Fender, R; Jonker, P; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Prandoni, I; Zampieri, L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Heartbeat Stars and the Ringing of Tidal Pulsations Kelly Hambleton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heartbeat Stars and the Ringing of Tidal Pulsations Kelly Hambleton Andrej Prsa, Don Kurtz, Jim Fuller, Susan Thompson University of Central Lancashire kmhambleton@uclan.ac.uk March 27, 2014 Kelly 3 Summary Conclusions Future Work Kelly Hambleton (UCLan) Heartbeat Stars March 27, 2014 2 / 33 #12

Â?umer, Slobodan

51

Tidal Stage Variability of Fecal Coliform and Chlorophyll a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leachates, leaking sewer mains, wild and do- mestic animal wastes, and runo. However, the inter- action environmental hazards, to enter an estuarine environment characterized by high variability regarding temperature to understanding both the basic ecology of tidal creeks and the applied aspects of sampling protocols and pollutant

Mallin, Michael

52

Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

Wordsworth, Robin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Spatial motion of the Magellanic Clouds. Tidal models ruled out?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, Kallivayalil et al. derived new values of the proper motion for the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). The spatial velocities of both Clouds are unexpectedly higher than their previous values resulting from agreement between the available theoretical models of the Magellanic System and the observations of neutral hydrogen (HI) associated with the LMC and the SMC. Such proper motion estimates are likely to be at odds with the scenarios for creation of the large-scale structures in the Magellanic System suggested so far. We investigated this hypothesis for the pure tidal models, as they were the first ones devised to explain the evolution of the Magellanic System, and the tidal stripping is intrinsically involved in every model assuming the gravitational interaction. The parameter space for the Milky Way (MW)-LMC-SMC interaction was analyzed by a robust search algorithm (genetic algorithm) combined with a fast restricted N-body model of the interaction. Our method extended ...

Ruzicka, Adam; Palous, Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Investigation of tidal power, Cobscook Bay, Maine. Environmental Appendix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents information regarding existing terrestrial and marine resources and water quality conditions in the Cobscook Bay area. A preliminary assessment of impacts from a tidal power project is also presented and data gaps are identified. Reports contained in the appendix were prepared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the University of Maine at Orino, School of Forestry Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Extremely Close-In Giant Planets from Tidal Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planets that form around stars born in dense stellar environments are subject to dynamical perturbations from other stars in the system. These perturbations will strip outer planets, forming a population of free-floating planets, some of which will be tidally captured before they evaporate from the system. For systems with velocity dispersion of 1 km/s, Jupiter-mass planets can be captured into orbits with periods of 0.1-0.4 days, which are generally stable over a Gyr, assuming quadratic suppression of eddy viscosity in the convective zones of the host stars. Under this assumption, and that most stars form several massive planets at separations 5-50 AU, about 0.03% of stars in rich, mature open clusters should have extremely close-in tidally captured planets. Approximately 0.005% of field stars should also have such planets, which may be found in field searches for transiting planets. Detection of a population of tidally-captured planets would indicate that most stars formed in stellar clusters. In globular clusters, the fraction of stars with tidally-captured planets rises to 0.1% -- in conflict with the null result of the transit search in 47 Tuc. This implies that, if the quadratic prescription for viscosity suppression is correct, planetary formation was inhibited in 47 Tuc: less than one planet of Jupiter-mass or greater (bound or free-floating) formed per cluster star. Less than half of the stars formed solar-system analogs. Brown dwarfs can also be captured in tight orbits; the lack of such companions in 47 Tuc in turn implies an upper limit on the initial frequency of brown dwarfs in this cluster. However, this upper limit is extremely sensitive to the highly uncertain timescale for orbital decay, and thus it is difficult to draw robust conclusions about the low-mass end of the mass function in 47 Tuc.

B. Scott Gaudi

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

58

Resonant oscillations and tidal heating in coalescing binary neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal interaction in a coalescing neutron star binary can resonantly excite the g-mode oscillations of the neutron star when the frequency of the tidal driving force equals the intrinsic g-mode frequencies. We study the g-mode oscillations of cold neutron stars using recent microscopic nuclear equations of state, where we determine self-consistently the sound speed and Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency in the nuclear liquid core. The properties of the g-modes associated with the stable stratification of the core depend sensitively on the pressure-density relation as well as the symmetry energy of the dense nuclear matter. The frequencies of the first ten g-modes lie approximately in the range of 10-100 Hz. Resonant excitations of these g-modes during the last few minutes of the binary coalescence result in energy transfer and angular momentum transfer from the binary orbit to the neutron star. The angular momentum transfer is possible because a dynamical tidal lag develops even in the absence of fluid viscosity. ...

Lai, D

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Tidal Capture of Stars by Intermediate-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent X-ray observations and theoretical modelling have made it plausible that some ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) are powered by intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). N-body simulations have also shown that runaway merging of stars in dense star clusters is a way to form IMBHs. In the present paper we have performed N-body simulations of young clusters such as MGG-11 of M82 in which IMBHs form through runaway merging. We took into account the effect of tidal heating of stars by the IMBH to study the tidal capture and disruption of stars by IMBHs. Our results show that the IMBHs have a high chance of capturing stars through tidal heating within a few core relaxation times and we find that 1/3 of all runs contain a ULX within the age limits of MGG-11, a result consistent with the fact that a ULX is found in this galaxy. Our results strengthen the case for some ULX being powered by intermediate-mass black holes.

H. Baumgardt; C. Hopman; S. Portegies Zwart; J. Makino

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

60

Modeling Tidal Streams in evolving dark matter halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore whether stellar tidal streams can provide information on the secular, cosmological evolution of the Milky Way's gravitational potential and on the presence of subhalos. We carry out long-term (~t_hubble) N-body simulations of disrupting satellite galaxies in a semi-analytic Galaxy potential where the dark matter halo and the subhalos evolve according to a LCDM cosmogony. All simulations are constrained to end up with the same position and velocity at present. Our simulations account for: (i) the secular evolution of the host halo's mass, size and shape, (ii) the presence of subhalos and (iii) dynamical friction. We find that tidal stream particles respond adiabatically to the Galaxy growth so that, at present, the energy and angular momentum distribution is exclusively determined by the present Galaxy potential. In other words, all present-day observables can only constrain the present mass distribution of the Galaxy independent of its past evolution. We also show that, if the full phase-space distribution of a tidal stream is available, we can accurately determine (i) the present Galaxy's shape and (ii) the amount of mass loss from the stream's progenitor, even if this evolution spanned a cosmologically significant epoch.

Jorge Penarrubia; Andrew J. Benson; David Martinez-Delgado; Hans-Walter Rix

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Modeling the Effects of Tidal Energy Extraction on Estuarine Hydrodynamics in a Stratified Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-dimensional coastal ocean model with a tidal turbine module was used in this paper to study the effects of tidal energy extraction on temperature and salinity stratification and density driven two-layer estuarine circulation. Numerical experiments with various turbine array configurations were carried out to investigate the changes in tidally mean temperature, salinity and velocity profiles in an idealized stratified estuary that connects to coastal water through a narrow tidal channel. The model was driven by tides, river inflow and sea surface heat flux. To represent the realistic size of commercial tidal farms, model simulations were conducted based on a small percentage of the total number of turbines that would generate the maximum extractable energy in the system. Model results indicated that extraction of tidal energy will increase the vertical mixing and decrease the stratification in the estuary. Extraction of tidal energy has stronger impact on the tidally-averaged salinity, temperature and velocity in the surface layer than the bottom. Energy extraction also weakens the two-layer estuarine circulation, especially during neap tides when tidal mixing the weakest and energy extraction is the smallest. Model results also show that energy generation can be much more efficient with higher hub height with relatively small changes in stratification and two-layer estuarine circulation.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to:

65

MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO La ReunionCape

66

MHK Projects/Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETOCohanseyHub <

67

MHK Projects/Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal

68

MHK Projects/Dorchester Maurice Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMar Landing <

69

MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMar Landing <DouglasForeland

70

MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMarFalmouthVinalhaven ME

71

MHK Projects/Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHKInformation BretonMOWiscasset Tidal

72

MHK Technologies/Deep Gen Tidal Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWEC < MHK<Tidal Turbines < MHK

73

MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWECHelix <IWAVE < MHKKESC Tidal

74

MHK Technologies/Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC < MHKPulse-Stream 120 < MHKRotech Tidal

75

MHK Technologies/Tidal Barrage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWEC <Generator.jpgTheTidal

76

MHK Technologies/Tidal Delay | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWEC <Generator.jpgTheTidalDelay

77

MHK Technologies/Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWEC <Generator.jpgTheTidalDelayTHG

78

Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energy ResourcesPark,is aHy9Hydesville,Hydra Tidal

79

A Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County CA: Predicting the Impact to the Federally Listed Plant Soft Bird's Beak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this study. Changes in hydrology are not the only potentialA Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branchmay change the tidal hydrology and impact the area occupied

Olson, Jessica J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid by Susan Margot Boronowski Committee Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid by Susan Margot, Canada that relies heavily on diesel fuel for energy generation. An investigation is done

Victoria, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents D of suspended sediment transport under cross-shore tidal currents on an intertidal mudflat. We employ a Lagrangian formulation to obtain periodic solutions for the sediment transport over idealized bathymetries

Hogg, Andrew

82

Intracranial Pressure Variation Associated with Changes in End-Tidal CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intracranial Pressure Variation Associated with Changes in End-Tidal CO2 Sunghan Kim, James Mc that the partial pressure of arterial CO2 (PaCO2) can affect cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and therefore ICP. The end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) is usually monitored by clinicians as a proxy for PaCO2. We show

83

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, respectively--together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentra- tion

Boss, Emmanuel S.

84

The Magellanic Bridge: The Nearest Purely Tidal Stellar Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on observations of the stellar populations in twelve fields spanning the region between the Magellanic Clouds, made with the Mosaic-II camera on the 4-meter telescope at the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The two main goals of the observations are to characterize the young stellar population (which presumably formed in situ in the Bridge and therefore represents the nearest stellar population formed from tidal debris), and to search for an older stellar component (which would have been stripped from either Cloud as stars, by the same tidal forces which formed the gaseous Bridge). We determine the star-formation history of the young inter-Cloud population, which provides a constraint on the timing of the gravitational interaction which formed the Bridge. We do not detect an older stellar population belonging to the Bridge in any of our fields, implying that the material that was stripped from the Clouds to form the Magellanic Bridge was very nearly a pure gas.

Jason Harris

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dynamical resonance locking in tidally interacting binary systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the dynamics of resonance locking in detached, tidally interacting binary systems. In a resonance lock, a given stellar or planetary mode is trapped in a highly resonant state for an extended period of time, during which the spin and orbital frequencies vary in concert to maintain the resonance. This phenomenon is qualitatively similar to resonance capture in planetary dynamics. We show that resonance locks can accelerate the course of tidal evolution in eccentric systems and also efficiently couple spin and orbital evolution in circular binaries. Previous analyses of resonance locking have not treated the mode amplitude as a fully dynamical variable, but rather assumed the adiabatic (i.e. Lorentzian) approximation valid only in the limit of relatively strong mode damping. We relax this approximation, analytically derive conditions under which the fixed point associated with resonance locking is stable, and further check these analytic results using numerical integrations of the coupled mode, spin, and orbital evolution equations. These show that resonance locking can sometimes take the form of complex limit cycles or even chaotic trajectories. We provide simple analytic formulae that define the binary and mode parameter regimes in which resonance locks of some kind occur (stable, limit cycle, or chaotic). We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications of our results for white dwarf and neutron star binaries as well as eccentric stellar binaries.

Joshua Burkart; Eliot Quataert; Phil Arras

2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating material body. I. External metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct the external metric of a slowly rotating, tidally deformed material body in general relativity. The tidal forces acting on the body are assumed to be weak and to vary slowly with time, and the metric is obtained as a perturbation of a background metric that describes the external geometry of an isolated, slowly rotating body. The tidal environment is generic and characterized by two symmetric-tracefree tidal moments E_{ab} and B_{ab}, and the body is characterized by its mass M, its radius R, and a dimensionless angular-momentum vector \\chi^a environment requires the introduction of four new quantities, which we designate as rotational-tidal Love numbers. All these Love numbers are gauge ...

Landry, Philippe

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Modeling Tidal Stream Energy Extraction and its Effects on Transport Processes in a Tidal Channel and Bay System Using a Three-dimensional Coastal Ocean Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical modeling study for simulating in-stream tidal energy extraction and assessing its effects on the hydrodynamics and transport processes in a tidal channel and bay system connecting to coastal ocean. A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) module was implemented in a three-dimensional (3-D) coastal ocean model using the momentum sink approach. The MHK model was validated with the analytical solutions for tidal channels under one-dimensional (1-D) conditions. Model simulations were further carried out to compare the momentum sink approach with the quadratic bottom friction approach. The effects of 3-D simulations on the vertical velocity profile, maximum extractable energy, and volume flux reduction across the channel were investigated through a series of numerical experiments. 3-D model results indicate that the volume flux reduction at the maximum extractable power predicted by the 1-D analytical model or two-dimensional (2-D) depth-averaged numerical model may be overestimated. Maximum extractable energy strongly depends on the turbine hub height in the water column, and which reaches a maximum when turbine hub height is located at mid-water depth. Far-field effects of tidal turbines on the flushing time of the tidal bay were also investigated. Model results demonstrate that tidal energy extraction has a greater effect on the flushing time than volume flux reduction, which could negatively affect the biogeochemical processes in estuarine and coastal waters that support primary productivity and higher forms of marine life.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn family also had higher c{sub p,min} than equivalently thick ellipses, indicating less susceptibility to cavitation. Microtabs applied on yy foils demonstrated improved energy capture. A series of variable speed and constant speed rotors were developed with the yyb07cn family of hydrofoils. The constant speed yyb07cn rotor (yy-B02-Rcs,opt) captured 0.45% more energy than the equivalent rotor with ellipses (e-B02-Rcs,opt). With microtabs deployed (yy?t-B02-Rcs,opt), the energy capture increase over the rotor with ellipses was 1.05%. Note, however, that microtabs must be applied judiciously to bidirectional foils. On the 18% thick ellipse, performance decreased with the addition of microtabs. Details of hydrofoil performance, microtab sizing and positioning, rotor configurations, and revenue impacts are presented herein.

Shiu, Henry [Research Engineer; van Dam, Cornelis P. [Professor

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

90

Tidal Downsizing model. II. Planet-metallicity correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Core Accretion (CA), the de-facto accepted theory of planet formation, requires formation of massive solid cores as a prerequisite for assembly of gas giant planets. The observed metallicity correlations of exoplanets are puzzling in the context of CA. While gas giant planets are found preferentially around metal-rich host stars, planets smaller than Neptune orbit hosts with a wide range of metallicities. We propose an alternative interpretation of these observations in the framework of a recently developed planet formation hypothesis called Tidal Downsizing (TD). We perform population synthesis calculations based on TD, and find that the connection between the populations of the gas giant and the smaller solid-core dominated planets is non linear and not even monotonic. While gas giant planets formed in the simulations in the inner few AU region follow a strong positive correlation with the host star metallicity, the smaller planets do not. The simulated population of these smaller planets shows a shallow pe...

Nayakshin, Sergei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Circularization of Tidally Disrupted Stars around Spinning Supermassive Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the circularization of tidally disrupted stars on bound orbits around spinning supermassive black holes by performing three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with Post-Newtonian corrections. Our simulations reveal that debris circularization depends sensitively on the efficiency of radiative cooling. There are two stages in debris circularization if radiative cooling is inefficient: first, the stellar debris streams self-intersect due to relativistic apsidal precession; shocks at the intersection points thermalize orbital energy and the debris forms a geometrically thick, ring-like structure around the black hole. The ring rapidly spreads via viscous diffusion, leading to the formation of a geometrically thick accretion disk. In contrast, if radiative cooling is efficient, the stellar debris circularizes due to self-intersection shocks and forms a geometrically thin ring-like structure. In this case, the dissipated energy can be emitted during debris circularization as a precurso...

Hayasaki, Kimitake; Loeb, Abraham

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

SPH simulations of tidally unstable accretion disks in cataclysmic variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically study the precessing disk model for superhump in the SU~UMa subclass of cataclysmic variables, using a two dimensional SPH code specifically designed for thin disk problems. Two disk simulations for a binary with mass ratio $q=\\frac{3}{17}$ (similar to OY~Car) are performed, in order to investigate the Lubow (1991 a,b) tidal resonance instability mechanism. In the first calculation, a disk evolves under steady mass transfer from $L_1$. In the second simulation, mass is added in Keplerian orbit to the inner disk. The two disks follow similar evolutionary paths. However the $L_1$ stream-disk interaction is found to slow the disk's radial expansion and to circularise gas orbits. The initial eccentricity growth in our simulations is exponential at a rate slightly less than predicted by Lubow (1991a). We do not observe a clearing of material from the resonance region via the disk's tidal response to the $m=2$ component of the binary potential as was described in Lubow (1992). Instead the $m=2$ response weakens as the disk eccentricty increases. Both disks reach an eccentric equilibrium state, in which they undergo prograde precession. The rate of viscous energy dissipation in the disks has a periodic excess with a period matching the disk's rotation. The source is identified as a large region in the outer disk, and the mechanism by which it is produced is identified. The time taken for the periodic excess to develop is consistent with the first appearance of superhumps in a superoutburst.

James R. Murray

1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-scale, for ti

Bruce, Allan J

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

Modeling the Energy Output from an In-Stream Tidal Turbine Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—This paper is based on a recent paper presented in the 2007 IEEE SMC conference by the same authors [1], discussing an approach to predicting energy output from an instream tidal turbine farm. An in-stream tidal turbine is a device for harnessing energy from tidal currents in channels, and functions in a manner similar to a wind turbine. A group of such turbines distributed in a site is called an in-stream tidal turbine farm which is similar to a wind farm. Approaches to estimating energy output from wind farms cannot be fully transferred to study tidal farms, however, because of the complexities involved in modeling turbines underwater. In this paper, we intend to develop an approach for predicting energy output of an in-stream tidal turbine farm. The mathematical formulation and basic procedure for predicting power output of a stand-alone turbine 1 is presented, which includes several highly nonlinear terms. In order to facilitate the computation and utilize the formulation for predicting power output from a turbine farm, a simplified relationship between turbine distribution and turbine farm energy output is derived. A case study is then conducted by applying the numerical procedure to predict the energy output of the farms. Various scenarios are implemented according to the environmental conditions in Seymour Narrows, British Columbia, Canada. Additionally, energy cost results are presented as an extension. Index Terms—renewable energy, in-stream turbine, tidal current, tidal power, vertical axis turbine, farm system modeling, in-stream tidal turbine farm 1 A stand-alone turbine refers to a turbine around which there is no other turbine that might potentially affect the performance of this turbine.

Ye Li; Barbara J. Lence; Sander M. Calisal

95

TIDAL DISSIPATION COMPARED TO SEISMIC DISSIPATION: IN SMALL BODIES, EARTHS, AND SUPER-EARTHS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the seismic quality factor and phase lag are defined solely by the bulk properties of the mantle, their tidal counterparts are determined by both the bulk properties and the size effect (self-gravitation of a body as a whole). For a qualitative estimate, we model the body with a homogeneous sphere, and express the tidal phase lag through the lag in a sample of material. Although simplistic, our model is sufficient to understand that the lags are not identical. The difference emerges because self-gravitation pulls the tidal bulge down. At low frequencies, this reduces strain and the damping rate, making tidal damping less efficient in larger objects. At higher frequencies, competition between self-gravitation and rheology becomes more complex, though for sufficiently large super-Earths the same rule applies: the larger the planet, the weaker the tidal dissipation in it. Being negligible for small terrestrial planets and moons, the difference between the seismic and tidal lagging (and likewise between the seismic and tidal damping) becomes very considerable for large exoplanets (super-Earths). In those, it is much lower than what one might expect from using a seismic quality factor. The tidal damping rate deviates from the seismic damping rate, especially in the zero-frequency limit, and this difference takes place for bodies of any size. So the equal in magnitude but opposite in sign tidal torques, exerted on one another by the primary and the secondary, have their orbital averages going smoothly through zero as the secondary crosses the synchronous orbit. We describe the mantle rheology with the Andrade model, allowing it to lean toward the Maxwell model at the lowest frequencies. To implement this additional flexibility, we reformulate the Andrade model by endowing it with a free parameter {zeta} which is the ratio of the anelastic timescale to the viscoelastic Maxwell time of the mantle. Some uncertainty in this parameter's frequency dependence does not influence our principal conclusions.

Efroimsky, Michael, E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil [U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Analytical Model of Tidal Distortion and Dissipation for a Giant Planet with a Viscoelastic Core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present analytical expressions for the tidal Love numbers of a giant planet with a solid core and a fluid envelope. We model the core as a uniform, incompressible, elastic solid, and the envelope as a non-viscous fluid satisfying the $n=1$ polytropic equation of state. We discuss how the Love numbers depend on the size, density, and shear modulus of the core. We then model the core as a viscoelastic Maxwell solid and compute the tidal dissipation rate in the planet as characterized by the imaginary part of the Love number $k_2$. Our results improve upon existing calculations based on planetary models with a solid core and a uniform ($n=0$) envelope. Our analytical expressions for the Love numbers can be applied to study tidal distortion and viscoelastic dissipation of giant planets with solid cores of various rheological properties, and our general method can be extended to study tidal distortion/dissipation of super-earths.

Storch, Natalia I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial-end tidal carbon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

kWh range. Typical cost ranges include: Tidal generation - between 16 and 38pkWh Offshore wind - between 15... account of multiple factors for each generation type...

100

Groundwater response to dual tidal fluctuations in a peninsula or an elongated island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 , Hongbin Zhan2,3, *, and Zhonghua Tang1 1 School of Environmental Studies, China University of the tidal fluctuations. This is called quasi-steady state condition *Correspondence to: Hongbin Zhan

Zhan, Hongbin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Status of Wave and Tidal Power Technologies for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the status of marine applications for renewable energy as of 2008 from a U.S. perspective. Technologies examined include wave, tidal, and ocean current energy extraction devices.

Musial, W.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hydraulic properties of an artificial tidal inlet through a Texas barrier beach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These littoral barriers are depositional structures continually changed by waves, tidal currents, and winds. Often the only connections between the open ocean and the bays are small restricted channels through the barrier beaches. These chan- nels, or tidal... too large on wide barrier beaches to permit sufficient scour. Breakthroughs also have been found to be caused by gradual buildups of water in the bays, followed by wind shifts to an off. ? shore direction (27). This tends to be supported by Price...

Prather, Stanley Harold

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gravitational self-force corrections to two-body tidal interactions and the effective one-body formalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidal interactions have a significant influence on the late dynamics of compact binary systems, which constitute the prime targets of the upcoming network of gravitational-wave detectors. We refine the theoretical description of tidal interactions (hitherto known only to the second post-Newtonian level) by extending our recently developed analytic self-force formalism, for extreme mass-ratio binary systems, to the computation of several tidal invariants. Specifically, we compute, to linear order in the mass ratio and to the 7.5$^{\\rm th}$ post-Newtonian order, the following tidal invariants: the square and the cube of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal tensor, the square of the gravitomagnetic quadrupolar tidal tensor, and the square of the gravitoelectric octupolar tidal tensor. Our high-accuracy analytic results are compared to recent numerical self-force tidal data by Dolan et al. \\cite{Dolan:2014pja}, and, notably, provide an analytic understanding of the light ring asymptotic behavior found by them. We transcribe our kinematical tidal-invariant results in the more dynamically significant effective one-body description of the tidal interaction energy. By combining, in a synergetic manner, analytical and numerical results, we provide simple, accurate analytic representations of the global, strong-field behavior of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal factor. A striking finding is that the linear-in-mass-ratio piece in the latter tidal factor changes sign in the strong-field domain, to become negative (while its previously known second post-Newtonian approximant was always positive). We, however, argue that this will be more than compensated by a probable fast growth, in the strong-field domain, of the nonlinear-in-mass-ratio contributions in the tidal factor.

Donato Bini; Thibault Damour

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

SKA as a powerful hunter of jetted Tidal Disruption Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observational consequences of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can enable us to discover quiescent SMBHs and constrain their mass function. Moreover, observing jetted TDEs (from previously non-active galaxies) provides us with a new means of studying the early phases of jet formation and evolution in an otherwise "pristine" environment. Although several (tens) TDEs have been discovered since 1999, only two jetted TDEs have been recently discovered in hard X-rays, and only one, Swift J1644+57, has a precise localization which further supports the TDE interpretation. These events alone are not sufficient to address those science issues, which require a substantial increase of the current sample. Despite the way they were discovered, the highest discovery potential for {\\em jetted} TDEs is not held by current and up-coming X-ray instruments, which will yield only a few to a few tens events per year. In fact, the best strategy is to use the Square Kilometer Array to detect TDEs an...

Donnarumma, I; Fender, R; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Van Velzen, S; Prandoni, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

"Circularization" vs. Accretion -- What Powers Tidal Disruption Events?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A tidal disruption event (TDE) takes place when a star passes near enough to a massive black hole to be disrupted. About half the star's matter is given elliptical trajectories with large apocenter distances, the other half is unbound. To "circularize", i.e., to form an accretion flow, the bound matter must lose a significant amount of energy, with the actual amount depending on the characteristic scale of the flow measured in units of the black hole's gravitational radius (~ 10^{51} (R/1000R_g)^{-1} erg). Recent numerical simulations (Shiokawa et al., 2015) have revealed that the circularization scale is close to the scale of the most-bound initial orbits, ~ 10^3 M_{BH,6.5}^{-2/3} R_g ~ 10^{15} M_{BH,6.5}^{1/3} cm from the black hole, and the corresponding circularization energy dissipation rate is $\\sim 10^{44} M_{BH,6.5}^{-1/6}$~erg/s. We suggest that the energy liberated during circularization, rather then energy liberated by accretion onto the black hole, powers the observed optical TDE candidates (e.g.A...

Piran, Tsvi; Krolik, Julian; Cheng, Roseanne M; Shiokawa, Hotaka

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

On tidal capture of primordial black holes by neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fraction of primordial black holes (PBHs) of masses $10^{17} - 10^{26}$ g in the total amount of dark matter may be constrained by considering their capture by neutron stars (NSs), which leads to the rapid destruction of the latter. The constraints depend crucially on the capture rate which, in turn, is determined by the energy loss by a PBH passing through a NS. Two alternative approaches to estimate the energy loss have been used in the literature: the one based on the dynamical friction mechanism, and another on tidal deformations of the NS by the PBH. The second mechanism was claimed to be more efficient by several orders of magnitude due to the excitation of particular oscillation modes reminiscent of the surface waves. We address this disagreement by considering a simple analytically solvable model that consists of a flat incompressible fluid in an external gravitational field. In this model, we calculate the energy loss by a PBH traversing the fluid surface. We find that the excitation of modes with the propagation velocity smaller than that of PBH is suppressed, which implies that in a realistic situation of a supersonic PBH the large contributions from the surface waves are absent and the above two approaches lead to consistent expressions for the energy loss.

Guillaume Defillon; Etienne Granet; Petr Tinyakov; Michel H. G. Tytgat

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Modeling of In-stream Tidal Energy Development and its Potential Effects in Tacoma Narrows, Washington, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding and providing proactive information on the potential for tidal energy projects to cause changes to the physical system and to key water quality constituents in tidal waters is a necessary and cost-effective means to avoid costly regulatory involvement and late stage surprises in the permitting process. This paper presents a modeling study for evaluating the tidal energy extraction and its potential impacts on the marine environment in a real world site - Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. An unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, fitted with a module that simulates tidal energy devices, was applied to simulate the tidal energy extracted by different turbine array configurations and the potential effects of the extraction at local and system-wide scales in Tacoma Narrows and South Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated the advantage of an unstructured-grid model for simulating the far-field effects of tidal energy extraction in a large model domain, as well as assessing the near-field effect using a fine grid resolution near the tidal turbines. The outcome shows that a realistic near-term deployment scenario extracts a very small fraction of the total tidal energy in the system and that system wide environmental effects are not likely; however, near-field effects on the flow field and bed shear stress in the area of tidal turbine farm are more likely. Model results also indicate that from a practical standpoint, hydrodynamic or water quality effects are not likely to be the limiting factor for development of large commercial-scale tidal farms. Results indicate that very high numbers of turbines are required to significantly alter the tidal system; limitations on marine space or other environmental concerns are likely to be reached before reaching these deployment levels. These findings show that important information obtained from numerical modeling can be used to inform regulatory and policy processes for tidal energy development.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

THE INFLUENCE OF ORBITAL ECCENTRICITY ON TIDAL RADII OF STAR CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed N-body simulations of star clusters orbiting in a spherically symmetric smooth galactic potential. The model clusters cover a range of initial half-mass radii and orbital eccentricities in order to test the historical assumption that the tidal radius of a cluster is imposed at perigalacticon. The traditional assumption for globular clusters is that since the internal relaxation time is larger than its orbital period, the cluster is tidally stripped at perigalacticon. Instead, our simulations show that a cluster with an eccentric orbit does not need to fully relax in order to expand. After a perigalactic pass, a cluster recaptures previously unbound stars, and the tidal shock at perigalacticon has the effect of energizing inner region stars to larger orbits. Therefore, instead of the limiting radius being imposed at perigalacticon, it more nearly traces the instantaneous tidal radius of the cluster at any point in the orbit. We present a numerical correction factor to theoretical tidal radii calculated at perigalacticon which takes into consideration both the orbital eccentricity and current orbital phase of the cluster.

Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Hurley, Jarrod R., E-mail: webbjj@mcmaster.ca [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

General Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulation of Accretion Flow from a Stellar Tidal Disruption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how the matter dispersed when a supermassive black hole tidally disrupts a star joins an accretion flow. Combining a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar disruption with a relativistic hydrodynamics simulation of the tidal debris motion, we track such a system until ~80% of the stellar mass bound to the black hole has settled into an accretion flow. Shocks near the stellar pericenter and also near the apocenter of the most tightly-bound debris dissipate orbital energy, but only enough to make the characteristic radius comparable to the semi-major axis of the most-bound material, not the tidal radius as previously thought. The outer shocks are caused by post-Newtonian effects, both on the stellar orbit during its disruption and on the tidal forces. Accumulation of mass into the accretion flow is non-monotonic and slow, requiring ~3--10x the orbital period of the most tightly-bound tidal streams, while the inflow time for most of the mass may be comparable to or longer than the mass accu...

Shiokawa, Hotaka; Cheng, Roseanne M; Piran, Tsvi; Noble, Scott C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A model-dye comparison experiment in the tidal mixing front zone on the southern flank of Georges Bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model-dye comparison experiment in the tidal mixing front zone on the southern flank of Georges; revised 8 June 2007; accepted 30 October 2007; published 9 February 2008. [1] A process-oriented model-dye the observed movement of dye across the tidal mixing front on the southern flank of Georges Bank during 22

Chen, Changsheng

112

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

A comparison of measured and modeled tidal currents in the Gulf of Maine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the persistence of the clockwise circulation around the Bank (Garrett er al. , 1978). Loder (1980) has shown theoretically that rectification of the strong semidiurnal tidal current across the steeply sloping northern edge of Georges Bank can produce a... astronomical forcing (Garrett, 1972; Brown and Moody, 1987). Garrett (1972) estimated the natural period of the Gulf of Maine-Bay of Fundy basin to be 13. 3M. 4 hours, which is near the frequency of the semidiurnal tidal constituents. Since the M2 semidiurnal...

Cook, Michael S

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Tidal hydraulics of San Luis Pass, Texas: a field and numerical investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIDAL HYDPAULICS OF SAN LUIS PASS, TEXAS: A FIELD AND VBKRICAL INSTIGATION A Thesis by SCOTT JEROME MORTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(II University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 i&Iajor Subject: Ocean Engineering TIDAL HyDRAULICS OF SAN LUIS PASS, TEXAS: A FIELD AND M&IERICAL INVESTIGATION A Thesis by SCOTI' JEROIIE MORTON Approved as to style and content by: (C?airman of Committee) (Member) /member...

Morton, Scott Jerome

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A numerical study of horizontal dispersion in a macro tidal basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Cobscook Bay, a macro tidal basin, is simulated using the three-dimensional, nonlinear, finite element regimes in different parts of Cobscook Bay. It is found that the effective Lagrangian dispersion ocean model, QUODDY_dry. Numerical particles are released from various transects in the bay at different

Maine, University of

116

Numerical study of the diapycnal flow through a tidal front with passive tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This qualitatively agrees with a recent field experiment using a dye tracer on Georges Bank. Additional experiments are performed to investigate the sensitivity of the tracer dispersion to the tidal phase and the location, the previous studies indicated Eulerian cross-front mean circu- lation maybe is in a multiple-cell structure

Dong, Changming "Charles"

117

Seasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal and meridional winds above  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1029/2007JD009687. 1. Introduction [2] Solar thermal tides are global-scale waves that dom- inate to conserve wave energy. When propagating into the MLT region, the horizontal wind tidal amplitude can reach with fluorescence lidar's advantages of high temporal and spatial resolution and the capability of full diurnal

118

Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. OurRole of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars Yongyun Hu1 and Jun Yang Laboratory for Climate and Atmosphere­Ocean Studies, Department of Atmospheric

Hu, Yongyun

119

PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1 Rebecca J, Lobban and Harrison 1997, Helmuth and Hofmann 2001). During high tide, intertidal algae are underwater algae may be emerged and exposed to increased light stress, elevated air tem- peratures, and increased

Martone, Patrick T.

120

Tidal Interactions and Disruptions of Giant Planets on Highly Eccentric Orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the evolution of planets undergoing a strong tidal encounter using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), for a range of periastron separations. We find that outside the Roche limit, the evolution of the planet is well-described by the standard model of linear, non-radial, adiabatic oscillations. If the planet passes within the Roche limit at periastron, however, mass can be stripped from it, but in no case do we find enough energy transferred to the planet to lead to complete disruption. In light of the three new extrasolar planets discovered with periods shorter than two days, we argue that the shortest-period cases observed in the period-mass relation may be explained by a model whereby planets undergo strong tidal encounters with stars, after either being scattered by dynamical interactions into highly eccentric orbits, or tidally captured from nearly parabolic orbits. Although this scenario does provide a natural explanation for the edge found for planets at twice the Roche limit, it does not explain how such planets will survive the inevitable expansion that results from energy injection during tidal circularization.

Joshua A. Faber; Frederic A. Rasio; Bart Willems

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Gravity and tectonic patterns of Mercury: Effect of tidal deformation, spin-orbit resonance, nonzero  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity and tectonic patterns of Mercury: Effect of tidal deformation, spin-orbit resonance of spin-orbit resonance, nonzero eccentricity, despinning, and reorientation on Mercury's gravity and tectonic pattern. Large variations of the gravity and shape coefficients from the synchronous rotation

Nimmo, Francis

122

Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods, California, USA Daniel B. Lluch-Cota Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas del Noroeste, La Paz, Mexico-period cooling are coincident with elevated levels of microbial pollution in the surf zone. This relationship can

Winant, Clinton D.

123

Nitrogen Cycling and Ecosystem Exchanges in a Virginia Tidal Freshwater Marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loading due to watershed development and urbanization. We present a process-based mass balance model of N habitats for juvenile fishes, and buffering storm and flood waters (Odum et al. 1984; Mitsch and Gosselink dominated tidal freshwater marsh in the York River estuary, Virginia. The model, which was based

Neubauer, Scott C.

124

Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal Marshes Refuge in northern San Francisco Bay, California. #12;iii Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response)................................................................... 7 Sea-level rise scenario model inputs

Fleskes, Joe

125

A CLASS OF ECCENTRIC BINARIES WITH DYNAMIC TIDAL DISTORTIONS DISCOVERED WITH KEPLER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have discovered a class of eccentric binary systems within the Kepler data archive that have dynamic tidal distortions and tidally induced pulsations. Each has a uniquely shaped light curve that is characterized by periodic brightening or variability at timescales of 4-20 days, frequently accompanied by shorter period oscillations. We can explain the dominant features of the entire class with orbitally varying tidal forces that occur in close, eccentric binary systems. The large variety of light curve shapes arises from viewing systems at different angles. This hypothesis is supported by spectroscopic radial velocity measurements for five systems, each showing evidence of being in an eccentric binary system. Prior to the discovery of these 17 new systems, only four stars, where KOI-54 is the best example, were known to have evidence of these dynamic tides and tidally induced oscillations. We perform preliminary fits to the light curves and radial velocity data, present the overall properties of this class, and discuss the work required to accurately model these systems.

Thompson, Susan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B.; Still, Martin; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Everett, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Mullally, Fergal; Rowe, Jason; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kurtz, Donald W.; Hambleton, Kelly, E-mail: susan.e.thompson@nasa.gov [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Modeling the dynamics of tidally-interacting binary neutron stars up to merger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an effective-one-body (EOB) model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to merger. Our EOB model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model dynamics (described by the gauge invariant relation between binding energy and orbital angular momentum), and the gravitational wave phasing, with new high-resolution multi-orbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement essentially within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all the configurations. Our model is the first semi-analytical model which captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate analytical representation of binary neutron star dynamics and waveforms currently available.

Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Alessandro Nagar; Tim Dietrich; Thibault Damour

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Dissolved oxygen stratification in two micro-tidal partially-mixed estuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissolved oxygen stratification in two micro-tidal partially-mixed estuaries Jing Lin a,*, Lian Xie online 21 August 2006 Abstract The controlling physical factors for vertical oxygen stratification that vertical stratification of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration can be explained by the extended Hansen

Mallin, Michael

128

Modeling the dynamics of tidally-interacting binary neutron stars up to merger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The data analysis of the gravitational wave signals emitted by coalescing neutron star binaries requires the availability of an accurate analytical representation of the dynamics and waveforms of these systems. We propose an effective-one-body (EOB) model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to merger. Our EOB model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model energetics and the gravitational wave phasing with new high-resolution multi-orbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all configurations. Our model is the first semi-analytical model which captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate analytical representation of binary neutron star dynamics and waveforms currently available.

Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Alessandro Nagar; Tim Dietrich; Thibault Damour

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Asymmetry of Tidal Plume Fronts in an Eastern Boundary Current Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water mass. This vorticity controls the transition of the tidal plume 2 #12;front to a subcritical state bulge, which in turn is embedded in far-field plume and coastal waters. Because of the mixing caused on its upwind or northern side) and marks a transition from supercritical to subcritical flow for 6

Jay, David

130

Asymmetry of Columbia River tidal plume fronts David A. Jay a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or northern side and mark a transition from supercritical to subcritical flow for up to 12 h after high water plume water mass. This vorticitycontrols the transition of the tidal plume front to a subcritical state plume may overlie newly upwelled waters, these fronts can mix nutrients into the plume. Symmetry would

Hickey, Barbara

131

Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines by Michael Robert Shives B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Thesis Submitted in Partial Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines examines methods for designing and analyzing kinetic turbines based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory

Victoria, University of

132

Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines by Michael Robert Shives B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines) #12;iii ABSTRACT This thesis examines methods for designing and analyzing kinetic turbines based

Pedersen, Tom

133

An analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of China. 1. Introduction In most coastal areas, groundwater and seawater are in con- stant communicationAn analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer Jiu of the solution presented in this paper. This solution is based on a conceptual model under the assumption

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

134

Tidal mixing around the Maritime continent: implications for1 paleoclimate simulations2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of mechanical energy for the ocean circulation and as such is 6 being incorporated changes in the ocean thermal structure, including 12 a ~1o C warming into state-of-the-art climate models. Calculation of the tidal energy flux depends on 7

135

Marine Tidal Current Electric Power Generation Technology: State of the Art and Current Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resurgence in development of renewable ocean energy technology. Therefore, several demonstration projects appreciated as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly categories: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands W. Lee, VA 23529-0276 rwhittec@odu.edu Introduction Federal and state wetlands protection regulations require the mitigation of impacts to jurisdictional wetlands via avoidance and minimization of damage whenever possible

Darby, Dennis

137

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands (EPA of wetland resources across the Mid-Atlantic physiographic region, efforts are currently underway in a number of states, most notably Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, to develop and implement wetland

138

Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed) in Tidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTE Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed: 3 July 2012 # Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation 2012 Abstract Nonnative Phragmites is among the most in- vasive plants in the U.S. Atlantic coast tidal wetlands, whereas the native Phragmites has

139

Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

Worthington, Monty [Project Director - AK] [Project Director - AK

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

140

Pool spacing, channel morphology, and the restoration of tidal forested wetlands of the Columbia River, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal forested wetlands have sustained substantial areal losses, and restoration practitioners lack a description of many ecosystem structures associated with these late-successional systems in which surface water is a significant controlling factor on the flora and fauna. The roles of large woody debris in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have been well described compared to functions in tidal areas. This study documents the role of large wood in forcing channel morphology in Picea-sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated freshwater tidal wetlands in the floodplain of the Columbia River, U.S.A. near the Pacific coast. The average pool spacing documented in channel surveys of three freshwater tidal forested wetlands near Grays Bay were 2.2 ± 1.3, 2.3 ± 1.2, and 2.5 ± 1.5. There were significantly greater numbers of pools on tidal forested wetland channels than on a nearby restoration site. On the basis of pool spacing and the observed sequences of log jams and pools, the tidal forested wetland channels were classified consistent with a forced step-pool class. Tidal systems, with bidirectional flow, have not previously been classified in this way. The classification provides a useful basis for restoration project design and planning in historically forested tidal freshwater areas, particularly in regard to the use of large wood in restoration actions and the development of pool habitats for aquatic species. Significant modifications by beaver on these sites warrant further investigation to explore the interactions between these animals and restoration actions affecting hydraulics and channel structure in tidal areas.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Montgomery, David R.

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

EVOLUTION OF PLANETARY ORBITS WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS AND TIDAL DISSIPATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intermediate mass stars and stellar remnants often host planets, and these dynamical systems evolve because of mass loss and tides. This paper considers the combined action of stellar mass loss and tidal dissipation on planetary orbits in order to determine the conditions required for planetary survival. Stellar mass loss is included using a so-called Jeans model, described by a dimensionless mass loss rate ? and an index ?. We use an analogous prescription to model tidal effects, described here by a dimensionless dissipation rate ? and two indices (q, p). The initial conditions are determined by the starting value of angular momentum parameter ?{sub 0} (equivalently, the initial eccentricity) and the phase ? of the orbit. Within the context of this model, we derive an analytic formula for the critical dissipation rate ?, which marks the boundary between orbits that spiral outward due to stellar mass loss and those that spiral inward due to tidal dissipation. This analytic result ? = ?(?, ?, q, p, ?{sub 0}, ?) is essentially exact for initially circular orbits and holds to within an accuracy of ?50% over the entire multi-dimensional parameter space, where the individual parameters vary by several orders of magnitude. For stars that experience mass loss, the stellar radius often displays quasi-periodic variations, which produce corresponding variations in tidal forcing; we generalize the calculation to include such pulsations using a semi-analytic treatment that holds to the same accuracy as the non-pulsating case. These results can be used in many applications, e.g., to predict/constrain properties of planetary systems orbiting white dwarfs.

Adams, Fred C. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bloch, Anthony M. [Math Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Math Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Structural Design of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine Composite Blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the structural design of a tidal composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the chord and twist distributions along the blade length that result in optimal performance of the tidal turbine over its lifetime. The extreme loads, i.e. the extreme flap and edgewise loads that the blade would likely encounter over its lifetime, are associated with extreme tidal flow conditions and are obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Given the blade external shape and the extreme loads, we use a laminate-theory-based structural design to determine the optimal layout of composite laminas such that the ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria are satisfied at all points in the blade. The structural design approach allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. In addition, certain fabrication criteria are imposed, for example, each composite laminate must be an integral multiple of its constituent ply thickness. In the present effort, the structural design uses only static extreme loads; dynamic-loads-based fatigue design will be addressed in the future. Following the blade design, we compute the distributed structural properties, i.e. flap stiffness, edgewise stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Such properties are required by hydro-elastic codes to model the tidal current turbine and to perform modal, stability, loads, and response analyses.

Bir, G. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Formation of Hot Planets by a combination of planet scattering, tidal circularization, and Kozai mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated the formation of close-in extrasolar giant planets through a coupling effect of mutual scattering, Kozai mechanism, and tidal circularization, by orbital integrations. We have carried out orbital integrations of three planets with Jupiter-mass, directly including the effect of tidal circularization. We have found that in about 30% runs close-in planets are formed, which is much higher than suggested by previous studies. We have found that Kozai mechanism by outer planets is responsible for the formation of close-in planets. During the three-planet orbital crossing, the Kozai excitation is repeated and the eccentricity is often increased secularly to values close enough to unity for tidal circularization to transform the inner planet to a close-in planet. Since a moderate eccentricity can remain for the close-in planet, this mechanism may account for the observed close-in planets with moderate eccentricities and without nearby secondary planets. Since these planets also remain a broad range of orbital inclinations (even retrograde ones), the contribution of this process would be clarified by more observations of Rossiter-McLaughlin effects for transiting planets.

M. Nagasawa; S. Ida; T. Bessho

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tidal inlet processes and deposits along a low energy coastline: easter Barataria Bight, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical, seismic and vibracore data were used to determine the geologic framework of sand deposits along the predominantly muddy coastline of eastern Barataria Bight, Louisiana. Three inlet types with distinct sand body geometries and morphologies were identified and are found 1) at flanking barrier island systems spread laterally across the front of interdistributary bays; 2) in old distributary channels; 3) at overwash breaches; or 4) combination of these. Barataria Bight, a sheltered barrier island shoreline embayment with limited sand supply, minimal tidal range (36 cm) and low wave energies (30 cm) can be used to show examples of each inlet type. Barataria Pass and Quatre Bayou Pass are inlets located in old distributary channels. However, Barataria Pass has also been affected by construction between barrier islands. Pass Ronquille is located where the coastline has transgressed a low area in the delta plain. This breach is situated in a hydraulically efficient avenue between the Gulf and Bay Long behind it. Pass Abel is a combination of a low-profile barrier breach and the reoccupation of an old distributary channel. Shelf and shoreline sands are reworked from abandoned deltaic distributaries and headlands. Inner shelf sands are concentrated in thick (10 m) shore-normal relict distributary channels with fine grained cross-bedded and ripple laminated sand overlain by burrowed shelf muds. Shoreface sand deposits occur as 2-3 m thick, fine-grained, coarsening upward and burrowed ebb-tidal delta sequences and shore-parallel relict tidal inlet channels filled through lateral accretion.

Moslow, T.F.; Levin, D.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Organic Superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

Charles Mielke

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Islands of Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha�¢����s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

TIDAL TAIL EJECTION AS A SIGNATURE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM WHITE DWARF MERGERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The merger of two white dwarfs may be preceded by the ejection of some mass in ''tidal tails,'' creating a circumstellar medium around the system. We consider the variety of observational signatures from this material, which depend on the lag time between the start of the merger and the ultimate explosion (assuming one occurs) of the system in a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). If the time lag is fairly short, then the interaction of the supernova ejecta with the tails could lead to detectable shock emission at radio, optical, and/or X-ray wavelengths. At somewhat later times, the tails produce relatively broad NaID absorption lines with velocity widths of the order of the white dwarf escape speed ({approx}1000 km s{sup -1}). That none of these signatures have been detected in normal SNe Ia constrains the lag time to be either very short ({approx}< 100 s) or fairly long ({approx}> 100 yr). If the tails have expanded and cooled over timescales {approx}10{sup 4} yr, then they could be observable through narrow NaID and Ca II H and K absorption lines in the spectra, which are seen in some fraction of SNe Ia. Using a combination of three-dimensional and one-dimensional hydrodynamical codes, we model the mass loss from tidal interactions in binary systems, and the subsequent interactions with the interstellar medium, which produce a slow-moving, dense shell of gas. We synthesize NaID line profiles by ray casting through this shell, and show that in some circumstances tidal tails could be responsible for narrow absorptions similar to those observed.

Raskin, Cody; Kasen, Daniel [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Do flares in Sagittarius A* reflect the last stage of tidal capture?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years the case for the presence of 3-4 10^6 M_sun black hole in our Galactic Center has gained strength from results of stellar dynamics observations and from the detection of several rapid X-ray and IR flares observed in the Sagittarius A* from 2000 to 2004. Here we explore the idea that such flares are produced when the central black hole tidally captures and disrupts a small body - e.g. a comet or an asteroid.

A. Cadez; M. Calvani; A. Gomboc; U. Kostic

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

Analysis of tidal current observations over the northeastern shelf of the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF TIDAL CURRENT OBSERVATIONS OVER THE NORTHEASTERN SHELF OF THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis By DONALD LEE DURHAM Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... by Project 286 of the Texas A&M Research Foundation; this project is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research under Contract Nonr 2119(04). The Texas State Fellowship which was granted to me by the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

Durham, Donald L

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

MHK Projects/Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO La Reunion

155

MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO La ReunionCape Islands

156

MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Alaska Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO LaCat Island

157

MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal <CETO LaCat

158

MHK Projects/Edgar Town Nantucket Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMar Landing

159

MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 TidalMarFalmouth < MHKFigueira

160

MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClick here Current /TidalITRI WEC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

GRB060218 AS A TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A WHITE DWARF BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate M-dot (t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X-ray light curve. The IMBH mass is found to be about 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} in three independent estimates: (1) fitting the tidal disruption M-dot (t) to the soft X-ray light curve, (2) computing the jet base radius in a jet photospheric emission model, and (3) inferring the mass of the central black hole based on the host dwarf galaxy's stellar mass. The position of the supernova is consistent with the center of the host galaxy, while the low supernova ejecta mass is consistent with that of a WD. The high expected rate of tidal disruptions in dwarf galaxies is consistent with one source observed by the Swift satellite over several years at a distance of 150 Mpc measured for GRB060218. Encounters with WDs provide much fuel for the growth of IMBHs.

Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Pe'er, Asaf [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haas, Roland [Theoretical AstroPhysics Including Relativity, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

OBLIQUITIES OF HOT JUPITER HOST STARS: EVIDENCE FOR TIDAL INTERACTIONS AND PRIMORDIAL MISALIGNMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We provide evidence that the obliquities of stars with close-in giant planets were initially nearly random, and that the low obliquities that are often observed are a consequence of star-planet tidal interactions. The evidence is based on 14 new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (for the systems HAT-P-6, HAT-P-7, HAT-P-16, HAT-P-24, HAT-P-32, HAT-P-34, WASP-12, WASP-16, WASP-18, WASP-19, WASP-26, WASP-31, Gl 436, and Kepler-8), as well as a critical review of previous observations. The low-obliquity (well-aligned) systems are those for which the expected tidal timescale is short, and likewise the high-obliquity (misaligned and retrograde) systems are those for which the expected timescale is long. At face value, this finding indicates that the origin of hot Jupiters involves dynamical interactions like planet-planet interactions or the Kozai effect that tilt their orbits rather than inspiraling due to interaction with a protoplanetary disk. We discuss the status of this hypothesis and the observations that are needed for a more definitive conclusion.

Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N. [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnson, John A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Butler, R. Paul [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Arriagada, Pamela [Department of Astronomy, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Hirano, Teruyuki [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Bakos, Gaspar; Hartman, Joel D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

Conformally curved binary black hole initial data including tidal deformations and outgoing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) By asymptotically matching a post-Newtonian (PN) metric to two tidally perturbed Schwarzschild metrics, we generate approximate initial data (in the form of a 4-metric) for a nonspinning black hole binary in a circular orbit. We carry out this matching through O(v^4) in the binary's orbital velocity v, so the resulting data are conformally curved. Far from the holes, we use the appropriate PN metric that accounts for retardation, which we construct using the highest-order PN expressions available to compute the binary's past history. The data set's uncontrolled remainders are thus O(v^5) throughout the timeslice; we also generate an extension to the data set that has uncontrolled remainders of O(v^6) in the purely PN portion of the timeslice (i.e., not too close to the holes). The resulting data are smooth, since we join all the metrics together by smoothly interpolating between them. We perform this interpolation using transition functions constructed to avoid introducing excessive additional constraint violations. Due to their inclusion of tidal deformations and outgoing radiation, these data should substantially reduce the initial spurious ("junk") radiation observed in current simulations that use conformally flat initial data. Such reductions in the nonphysical components of the initial data will be necessary for simulations to achieve the accuracy required to supply Advanced LIGO and LISA with the templates necessary for parameter estimation.

Nathan K. Johnson-McDaniel; Nicolas Yunes; Wolfgang Tichy; Benjamin J. Owen

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

167

The flattenings of the layers of rotating planets and satellites deformed by a tidal potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the Clairaut theory of the equilibrium ellipsoidal figures for differentiated non-homogeneous bodies in non-synchronous rotation adding to it a tidal deformation due to the presence of an external gravitational force. We assume that the body is a fluid formed by $n$ homogeneous layers of ellipsoidal shape and we calculate the external polar flattenings and the mean radius of each layer, or, equivalently, their semiaxes. To first order in the flattenings, the general solution can be written as $\\epsilon_k={\\cal H}_k*\\epsilon_h$ and $\\mu_k={\\cal H}_k*\\mu_h$, where $\\cal{H}_k$ is a characteristic coefficient for each layer which only depends on the internal structure of the body and $\\epsilon_h, \\mu_h$ are the flattenings of the equivalent homogeneous problem. For the continuous case, we study the Clairaut differential equation for the flattening profile, using the Radau transformation to find the boundary conditions when the tidal potential is added. Finally, the theory is applied to several example...

Folonier, Hugo; Kholshevnikov, Konstantin V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Exploration applications of a transgressive tidal flats model to Mississippian Midale carbonates, eastern Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midale (Mississippian) production was first established in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The unit was initially defined in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. That nomenclature is used in this report. During 1953, Midale production was found in the United States portion of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production westward into Burke County, North Dakota. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl, of which 640 million bbl are from Canadian fields. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Stratigraphic traps are formed by the lateral and vertical changes from grain-supported facies deposited in tidal channel, subtidal bar, or beach settings; seals are formed by mud-rich sediments. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, R.S.R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Exploration applications of a transgressive tidal-flats model to Mississippian Midale carbonates, eastern Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midale (Mississippian) production was first indicated in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The unit was initially defined in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. This same nomenclature is used in this paper. In 1953, Midale production was found on the US side of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production westward into Burke County, North Dakota, in 1955. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl with 640 million from the Canadian side of the Williston basin. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Stratigraphic traps are formed by the lateral and vertical changes from grain-supported facies deposited in tidal-channel, subtidal-bar, or beach settings; seals are formed by mud-rich sediments. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal-flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, F.S.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Formation of planetary debris discs around white dwarfs I: Tidal disruption of an extremely eccentric asteroid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25%-50% of all white dwarfs (WDs) host observable and dynamically active remnant planetary systems based on the presence of close-in circumstellar dust and gas and photospheric metal pollution. Currently-accepted theoretical explanations for the origin of this matter include asteroids that survive the star's giant branch evolution at au-scale distances and are subsequently perturbed onto WD-grazing orbits following stellar mass loss. In this work we investigate the tidal disruption of these highly-eccentric (e > 0.98) asteroids as they approach and tidally disrupt around the WD. We analytically compute the disruption timescale and compare the result with fully self-consistent numerical simulations of rubble piles by using the N-body code PKDGRAV. We find that this timescale is highly dependent on the orbit's pericentre and largely independent of its semimajor axis. We establish that spherical asteroids readily break up and form highly eccentric collisionless rings, which do not accrete onto the WD without add...

Veras, Dimitri; Bonsor, Amy; Gaensicke, Boris T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL/INFRARED COLOR SEQUENCES ALONG THE TIDAL RING/ARM OF Arp 107  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct UV/optical/IR spectral energy distributions for 29 star forming regions in the interacting galaxy Arp 107, using GALEX UV, Sloan Digitized Sky Survey optical, and Spitzer infrared images. In an earlier study utilizing only the Spitzer data, we found a sequence in the mid-infrared colors of star-forming knots along the strong tidal arm in this system. In the current study, we find sequences in the UV/optical colors along the tidal arm that mirror those in the mid-infrared, with blue UV/optical colors found for regions that are red in the mid-infrared, and vice versa. With single-burst stellar population synthesis models, we find a sequence in the average stellar age along this arm, with younger stars preferentially located further out in the arm. Models that allow two populations of different ages and dust attenuations suggest that there may be both a young component and an older population present in these regions. Thus the observed color sequences may be better interpreted as a sequence in the relative proportion of young and old stars along the arm, with a larger fraction of young stars near the end. Comparison with star forming regions in other interacting galaxies shows that the Arp 107 regions are relatively quiescent, with less intense star formation than in many other systems.

Lapham, Ryen C.; Smith, Beverly J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Struck, Curtis, E-mail: rlapham@nmt.edu, E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu, E-mail: curt@iastate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Revealing the escape mechanism of three-dimensional orbits in a tidally limited star cluster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this work is to explore the escape process of three-dimensional orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. The gravitational field of the cluster is represented by a smooth, spherically symmetric Plummer potential, while the tidal approximation was used to model the steady tidal field of the galaxy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins towards the two exit channels and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits. For this purpose, we split our investigation into three cases depending on the initial value of the $z$ coordinate which was used for launching the stars. The most noticeable finding is that the majority of stars initiated very close to the primary $(x,y)$ plane move in chaotic orbits and they remain trapped for vast time intervals, while orbits with relatively high values of $z_0$ on the other hand, form well-defined basins of escape. It was also observed, that for energy levels close to the critical escape energy the escape rates of orbits are large, while for much higher values of energy most of the orbits have low escape periods or they escape immediately to infinity. We hope our outcomes to be useful for a further understanding of the dissolution process and the escape mechanism in open star clusters.

Euaggelos E. Zotos

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Developing, Staffing, and Overseeing a State Energy Savings Performance Contracting Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) webinar held on March 26, 2013, dealing with energy savings performance contracting.

174

Audit Committee To oversee on behalf of Court the arrangements for external and internal audit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Having received a report from the Capex Committee: to make recommendations to Court on the budget for capital projects; to decide on all capex proposals involving expenditure of £500,000 or above, subject

Glasgow, University of

175

May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMay 20 ESTAP Webinar: CommissioningEnergy

176

Environmental links to interannual variability in shellfish toxicity in Cobscook Bay and eastern Maine, a strongly tidally mixed coastal region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental links to interannual variability in shellfish toxicity in Cobscook Bay and eastern e i n f o Keywords: Harmful algal blooms Gulf of Maine Cobscook Bay Shellfish toxicity a b s t r a c of Cobscook Bay, where strong tidal mixing tends to reduce seasonal variability in oceanographic properties

Townsend, David W.

177

NAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay and Tolay Creek Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of estuarine habitat comprised of deep and shallow water habitat, mudflats, salt marsh, and wetlandNAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Sears Point, the proposed project site, consists of approximately 960 acres of diked

US Army Corps of Engineers

178

On the statistical stability of the M2 barotropic and baroclinic tidal characteristics from along-track TOPEX//Poseidon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with internal tidal wave activity and for those who assimilate altimetric data in their models by giving-track TOPEX//Poseidon satellite altimetry analysis Loren Carre`re, Christian Le Provost, and Florent Lyard. [1] An along-track analysis of 7 years of TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) data has been performed on the global

179

Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Stephan Rosswog1, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz2, W. Raphael Hix3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Stephan Rosswog1, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz2, W. Raphael Hix3 1 in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate

Rosswog, Stephan

180

EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Draft Environmental AssessmentThis EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Tidally-Disrupted Asteroid Around the White Dwarf G29-38  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The infrared excess around the white dwarf G29-38 can be explained by emission from an opaque flat ring of dust with an inner radius 0.14 of the radius of the Sun and an outer radius approximately equal to the Sun's. This ring lies within the Roche region of the white dwarf where an asteroid could have been tidally destroyed, producing a system reminiscent of Saturn's rings. Accretion onto the white dwarf from this circumstellar dust can explain the observed calcium abundance in the atmosphere of G29-38. Either as a bombardment by a series of asteroids or because of one large disruption, the total amount of matter accreted onto the white dwarf may have been comparable to the total mass of asteroids in the Solar System, or, equivalently, about 1% of the mass in the asteroid belt around the main sequence star zeta Lep.

M. Jura

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

On the tidal interaction of massive extra-solar planets on highly eccentric orbit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we develop a theory of disturbances induced by the stellar tidal field in a fully convective slowly rotating planet orbiting on a highly eccentric orbit around a central star. We show that there are two contributions to the mode energy and angular momentum gain due to impulsive tidal interaction: a) 'the quasi-static' contribution which requires dissipative processes operating in the planet; b) the dynamical contribution associated with excitation of modes of oscillation. These contributions are obtained self-consistently from a single set of the governing equations. We calculate a critical 'equilibrium' value of angular velocity of the planet \\Omega_{crit} determined by the condition that action of the dynamical tides does not alter the angular velocity at that rotation rate. We show that this can be much larger than the corresponding rate associated with quasi-static tides and that at this angular velocity, the rate of energy exchange is minimised. We also investigate the conditions for the stochastic increase in oscillation energy that may occur if many periastron passages are considered. We make some simple estimates of time scale of circularization of initially eccentric orbit due to tides, using a realistic model of the planet, for orbits withperiods after circularization typical of those observed for extra-solar planets P_{obs} > 3days. We find that dynamic tides could have produced a very large decrease of the semi-major axis of a planet with mass of the order of the Jupiter mass M_{J} and final periods P_{obs} < 4.5days on a time-scale < a few Gyrs. We also discuss several unresolved issues in the context of the scenario of the orbit circularization due to dynamic tides.

P. B. Ivanov; J. C. B. Papaloizou

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evidence for tidal interaction and merger as the origin of galaxy morphology evolution in compact groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a morphological study based on NIR images of 25 galaxies, with different levels of nuclear activity, in 8 Compact Groups of Galaxies (CGs). We perform independently two different analysis: a isophotal study and a study of morphological asymmetries. The results yielded by the two analysis are highly consistent. For the first time, it is possible to show that deviations from pure ellipses are produced by inhomogeneous stellar mass distributions related to galaxy interactions and mergers. We find evidence of mass asymmetries in 74% of the galaxies in our sample. In 59% of these cases, the asymmetries come in pairs, and are consistent with tidal effects produced by the proximity of companion galaxies. The symmetric galaxies are generally small in size or mass, inactive, and have an early-type morphology. In 20% of the galaxies we find evidence for cannibalism. In 36% of the early-type galaxies the color gradient is positive (blue nucleus) or flat. Summing up these results, as much as 52% of the galaxies in our sample could show evidence of an on going or past mergers. Our observations suggest that galaxies in CGs merge more frequently under ``dry'' conditions. The high frequency of interacting and merging galaxies observed in our study is consistent with the bias of our sample towards CGs of type B, which represents the most active phase in the evolution of the groups. In these groups we also find a strong correlation between asymmetries and nuclear activity in early-type galaxies. This correlation allows us to identify tidal interactions and mergers as the cause of galaxy morphology transformation in CGs.[abridge

R. Coziol; I. Plauchu-Frayn

2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Organization Chart - Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LSD Logo About Us People & Organization Research News & Events Safety Internal Resources Organization Chart Departments Scientific Staff Directory Committees Organization Chart...

185

Selective oxidation of organic substrates to partially oxidized...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar...

186

An unstructured C-grid based method for 3-D global ocean dynamics: Free-surface formulations and tidal test cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and tidal test cases G.R. Stuhne *, W.R. Peltier Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George rights reserved. 1. Introduction In a previous paper (Stuhne and Peltier, 2006, hereafter SP), we

Peltier, W. Richard

187

Tides and Tidal Capture in post-Main Sequence Binaries: A Period Gap for Planets Around White Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of a close, low-mass companion is thought to play a substantial and perhaps necessary role in shaping post-Asymptotic Giant Branch and Planetary Nebula outflows. During post-main-sequence evolution, radial expansion of the primary star, accompanied by intense winds, can significantly alter the binary orbit via tidal dissipation and mass loss. To investigate this, we couple stellar evolution models (from the zero-age main-sequence through the end of the post-main sequence) to a tidal evolution code. The binary's fate is determined by the initial masses of the primary and the companion, the initial orbit (taken to be circular), and the Reimer's mass-loss parameter. For a range of these parameters, we determine whether the orbit expands due to mass loss or decays due to tidal torques. Where a common envelope phase (CEP) ensues, we estimate the final orbital separation based on the energy required to unbind the envelope. These calculations predict a period gap for planetary companions to white dwarfs...

Nordhaus, J; Ibgui, L; Goodman, J; Burrows, A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty perform research in molecular machines, exotic CHEMISTRY FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS Anne M. Andrews, Professor-in-Residence: Understanding how areas of interest include cross- coupling reactions, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and natural

Levine, Alex J.

189

Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Long Term Spectral Evolution of Tidal Disruption Candidates Selected by Strong Coronal Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of follow-up optical spectroscopic observations of seven rare, extreme coronal line emitting galaxies reported by Wang et al. (2012) with Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT). Large variations in coronal lines are found in four objects, making them strong candidates of tidal disruption events (TDE). For the four TDE candidates, all the coronal lines with ionization status higher than [Fe VII] disappear within 5-9 years. The [Fe VII] faded by a factor of about five in one object (J0952+2143) within 4 years, whereas emerged in other two without them previously. A strong increment in the [O III] flux is observed, shifting the line ratios towards the loci of active galactic nucleus on the BPT diagrams. Surprisingly, we detect a non-canonical [O III]5007/[O III]4959 2 in two objects, indicating a large column density of O$^{2+}$ and thus probably optical thick gas. This also requires a very large ionization parameter and relatively soft ionizing spectral energy distribution (e.g. blackbody with $T < ...

Yang, Chenwei; Ferland, Gary; Yuan, Weimin; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Water gate array for current flow or tidal movement pneumatic harnessing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention, which provides a system for harnessing power from current flow or tidal movement in a body of water, comprises first and second hydro-pneumatic chambers each having ingress and egress below the water surface near the river or ocean floor and water gates operative to open or seal the ports to the passage of water. In an exemplary embodiment, the gates are sychronized by shafts so that the ingress ports of each chamber are connected to the egress ports of each other chamber. Thus, one set of gates is closed, while the other is open, thereby allowing water to flow into one chamber and build air pressure therein and allowing water to flow out of the other chamber and create a partial vacuum therein. A pipe connects the chambers, and an air turbine harnesses the air movement within the pipe. When water levels are equilibrated, the open set of gates is closed by a counterweight, and the other set is allowed to open by natural force of the water differential. The water gates may be comprised of a plurality of louvers which are ganged for simultaneous opening and closing. The system is designed to operate with air turbines or other pneumatic devices. Its design minimizes construction cost and environmental impact, yet provides a clean renewable energy source.

Gorlov, Alexander M. (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

CONSTRAINTS ON THE LIFETIMES OF DISKS RESULTING FROM TIDALLY DESTROYED ROCKY PLANETARY BODIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spitzer IRAC observations of 15 metal-polluted white dwarfs reveal infrared excesses in the spectral energy distributions of HE 0110-5630, GD 61, and HE 1349-2305. All three of these stars have helium-dominated atmospheres, and their infrared emissions are consistent with warm dust produced by the tidal destruction of (minor) planetary bodies. This study brings the number of metal-polluted, helium and hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs surveyed with IRAC to 53 and 38, respectively. It also nearly doubles the number of metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs found to have closely orbiting dust by Spitzer. From the increased statistics for both atmospheric types with circumstellar dust, we derive a typical disk lifetime of log [t{sub disk}(yr)] = 5.6 {+-} 1.1 (ranging from 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} yr). This assumes a relatively constant rate of accretion over the timescale where dust persists, which is uncertain. We find that the fraction of highly metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs that have an infrared excess detected by Spitzer is only 23%, compared to 48% for metal-polluted hydrogen-rich white dwarfs, and we conclude from this difference that the typical lifetime of dusty disks is somewhat shorter than the diffusion timescales of helium-rich white dwarf. We also find evidence for higher time-averaged accretion rates onto helium-rich stars compared to the instantaneous accretion rates onto hydrogen-rich stars; this is an indication that our picture of evolved star-planetary system interactions is incomplete. We discuss some speculative scenarios that can explain the observations.

Girven, J.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Brinkworth, C. S.; Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Farihi, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Koester, D., E-mail: j.m.girven@warwick.ac.uk [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

Shrinking binary and planetary orbits by Kozai cycles with tidal friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At least two arguments suggest that the orbits of a large fraction of binary stars and extrasolar planets shrank by 1-2 orders of magnitude after formation: (i) the physical radius of a star shrinks by a large factor from birth to the main sequence, yet many main-sequence stars have companions orbiting only a few stellar radii away, and (ii) in current theories of planet formation, the region within ~0.1 AU of a protostar is too hot and rarefied for a Jupiter-mass planet to form, yet many "hot Jupiters" are observed at such distances. We investigate orbital shrinkage by the combined effects of secular perturbations from a distant companion star (Kozai oscillations) and tidal friction. We integrate the relevant equations of motion to predict the distribution of orbital elements produced by this process. Binary stars with orbital periods of 0.1 to 10 days, with a median of ~2 d, are produced from binaries with much longer periods (10 d to 10^5 d), consistent with observations indicating that most or all short-period binaries have distant companions (tertiaries). We also make two new testable predictions: (1) For periods between 3 and 10 d, the distribution of the mutual inclination between the inner binary and the tertiary orbit should peak strongly near 40 deg and 140 deg. (2) Extrasolar planets whose host stars have a distant binary companion may also undergo this process, in which case the orbit of the resulting hot Jupiter will typically be misaligned with the equator of its host star.

Daniel Fabrycky; Scott Tremaine

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

Firestone, Jeremy

195

Departmental Organization and Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

1993-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

196

draft data, November 2005 1 Mercury and Methylmercury Processes in North San Francisco Bay Tidal Wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Westcott and Kalff 1996; Xun et al. 1987), dissolved or total organic carbon (Barkay et al. 1997; Krabbenhoft et al. 1995; Westcott and Kalff 1996), and wetting and drying cycles (Krabbenhoft et al., 2005

197

Recoding of the stop codon UGA to glycine by a BD1-5/SN-2 bacterium and niche partitioning between Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria in a tidal sediment microbial community naturally selected in a laboratory chemostat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandy coastal sediments are global hot spots for microbial mineralization of organic matter and denitrification. These sediments are characterized by advective pore water flow, tidal cycling and an active and complex microbial community. Metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities sampled from such sediments showed that potential sulfuroxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and members of the enigmaticBD1-5/ SN-2 candidatephylumwereabundantinsitu (>10% and 2% respectively). By mimicking the dynamic oxic/anoxic environmental conditions of the sedimentin a laboratory chemostat, a simplified microbial community was selected from the more complex inoculum. Metagenomics, proteomics and fluorescenceinsituhybridization showed that this simplified community contained both a potential sulfuroxidizing Gamma proteobacteria (at 24 2% abundance) and a member of the BD1-5 / SN-2candidatephylum (at 7 6%abundance). Despite the abundant supply of organic substrates to the chemostat, proteomic analysis suggested that the selected gamma proteobacterium grew partially auto trophically and performed hydrogen/formate oxidation. The enrichment of a member of the BD1-5/SN-2candidatephylum enabled, for the first time, direct microscopic observation by fluorescent insitu hybridization and the experimental validation of the previously predicted translation of the stop codon UGA into glycine.

Hanke, Anna [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Hamann, Emmo [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Sharma, Ritin [ORNL; Geelhoed, Jeanine [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Hargesheimer, Theresa [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Kraft, Beate [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Meyer, Volker [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Lenk, Sabine [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Osmers, Harald [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Wu, Rong [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Makinwa, Kofi [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Tegetmeyer, Halina [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Strouss, Marc [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Effect of Tidal Inflation Instability on the Mass and Dynamical Evolution of Extrasolar Planets with Ultra-Short Periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the possibility of substantial inflation of short-period Jupiter-mass planets, as a result of their internal tidal dissipation associated with the synchronization and circularization of their orbits. We employ the simplest prescription based on an equilibrium model with a constant lag angle for all components of the tide. We show that for young Jupiter-mass planets, with a period less than 3 days, an initial radius about 2 Jupiter radii, and an orbital eccentricity greater than 0.2, the energy dissipated during the circularization of their orbits is sufficiently intense and protracted to inflate their sizes up to their Roche radii.

Pin-Gao Gu; Doug Lin; Peter Bodenheimer

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Tidal Waves -- a non-adiabatic microscopic description of the yrast states in near-spherical nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The yrast states of nuclei that are spherical or weakly deformed in their ground states are described as quadrupole waves running over the nuclear surface, which we call "tidal waves". The energies and E2 transition probabilities of the yrast states in nuclides with $Z$= 44, 46, 48 and $N=56, ~58,..., 66$ are calculated by means of the cranking model in a microscopic way. The nonlinear response of the nucleonic orbitals results in a strong coupling between shape and single particle degrees of freedom.

S. Frauendorf; Y. Gu; J. Sun

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Mixed crystal organic scintillators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 391, 237245 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13868.x Tidal heating of terrestrial extrasolar planets and implications for their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extrasolar terrestrial planets, Greenberg & Barnes 2008b). If such a planet is on an eccentric orbit, the dissipation of tidal energy within extrasolar planets are observed to be larger than theoretical modelling predicts (e.g. Bodenheimer, E

Barnes, Rory

202

Organic photovoltaics and concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

Mapel, Jonathan King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Organic photosensitive devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

204

Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: I. Along-channel Water Level Variations, Pacific Ocean to Bonneville Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part paper provides comprehensive time and frequency domain analyses and models of along-channel water level variations in the 234km-long Lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCRE) and documents the response of floodplain wetlands thereto. In Part I, power spectra, continuous wavelet transforms, and harmonic analyses are used to understand the influences of tides, river flow, upwelling and downwelling, and hydropower operations ("power-peaking") on the water level regime. Estuarine water levels are influenced primarily by astronomical tides and coastal processes, and secondarily by river flow. The importance of coastal and tidal influences decreases in the landward direction, and water levels are increasingly controlled by river flow variations at periods from ?1day to years. Water level records are only slightly non-stationary near the ocean, but become increasingly irregular upriver. Although astronomically forced tidal constituents decrease above the estuary, tidal fortnightly and overtide variations increase for 80-200km landward, both relative to major tidal constituents and in absolute terms.

Jay, D. A.; Leffler, K.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Seasonal patterns of coarse sediment transport on a mixed sand and gravel beach due to vessel wakes, wind waves, and tidal currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seasonal patterns of coarse sediment transport on a mixed sand and gravel beach due to vessel wakes, wind waves, and tidal currents Gregory M. Curtiss a, , Philip D. Osborne b,1 , Alexander R. Horner December 2008 Accepted 29 December 2008 Keywords: mixed sand and gravel beach ferry wake wash beach

Talke, Stefan

206

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer Total Organic Carbon Analyzer The carbon analyzer is used to analyze total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), total organic carbon (TOC), purgeable...

207

A water quality characterization of a tidally influenced flood control canal of Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H), specific conductance, sulfide, total organic carbon (TOC), and turbidity samples were collected at seven stations in HBDC and from the effluent of two municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWTP) discharging into HBDC in order to detect significant... to MWTP outfall. Specific conductance patterns mirrored salinity trends. TOC levels showed a steady bayward decrease. Turbidity levels were consistently highest in bottom waters. No trends were apparent for COD, pH, and sulfide. HBDC water quality...

Polasek, Jeffrey Steven

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The giant star of the symbiotic system YY Her: Rotation, Tidal wave, Solar-type cycle and Spots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the historical light curve of the symbiotic star YY Her, from 1890 up to December 2005. A secular declining trend is detected, at a rate of ~.01 magn in 1000 d, suggesting that the system could belong to the sub-class of symbiotic novae. Several outburst events are superposed on this slow decline. Three independent periodicities are identified in the light curve. A quasi-periodicity of 4650.7 d is detected for the outburst occurrence. We suggest that it is a signature of a solar-type magnetic dynamo cycle in the giant component. A period of 593.2 d modulates the quiescent light curve and it is identified as the binary period of the system. During outburst events the system shows a stable periodic oscillation of 551.4 d. We suggest that it is the rotation period of the giant.The secondary minima detected at some epochs of quiescence are probably due to dark spots on the surface of the rotating giant. The difference between the frequencies of these two last periods is the frequency of a tidal wave in the outer layers of the giant. A period which is a beat between the magnetic cycle and the tidal wave period is also apparent in the light curve. YY Her is a third symbiotic system exhibiting these cycles in their light curve, suggesting that a magnetic dynamo process is prevalent in the giant components of symbiotic stars, playing an important role in the outburst mechanism of some of these systems.

Liliana Formiggini; Elia M. Leibowitz

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

Organic vapor jet printing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effective Presentations Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Pericles Effective Presentations · Content · Organization · Delivery · Visual aids and graphics Be brave Graphics · KISS · Powerpoint: ­ Font · Bigger than you'd expect · San serif ­ Lines · Thicker than · Organization · Energy · Clarity · Poise Key: Practice Web Resources · http

Shull, David H.

212

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

Departmental Organization Management System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Public Law 95-91, 42 United States Code 7101, Department of Energy Organization Act, Section 642 gives to the Secretary of the Department of Energy the responsibility to approve organization changes affecting the number, designation, or mission of Departmental Elements and to approve the addition, deletion, or transfer of missions and/or functions of or between Departmental Elements. In order to streamline the organizational change process, the Secretary has delegate to the Heads of Departmental Headquarters and Field Elements the authority to approve organization changes. No cancellations.

1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

Organic Photovoltaics Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE funds research and development projects related to organic photovoltaics (OPV) due to the unique benefits it offers. Below are a list of the projects, summary of the benefits, and discussion on...

215

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled “Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River.” Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange VisitorsforDepartment ofNoOrganization Organization View

218

Organic contaminant separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

Del Mar, P.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY. Kelly, University of Western Australia, M015 SESE, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. E-mail: samuel.kelly@uwa.edu.au JULY 2012 K E L L Y E T A L . 1217 DOI: 10.1175/JPO-D-11-0231.1 Ã? 2012 American

220

A Low-order Model of Water Vapor, Clouds, and Thermal Emission for Tidally Locked Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the spirit of minimal modeling of complex systems, we develop an idealized two-column model to investigate the climate of tidally locked terrestrial planets with Earth-like atmospheres in the habitable zone of M-dwarf stars. The model is able to approximate the fundamental features of the climate obtained from three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) simulations. One important reason for the two-column model's success is that it reproduces the high cloud albedo of the GCM simulations, which reduces the planet's temperature and delays the onset of a runaway greenhouse state. The two-column model also clearly illustrates a secondary mechanism for determining the climate: the nightside acts as a ``radiator fin'' through which infrared energy can be lost to space easily. This radiator fin is maintained by a temperature inversion and dry air on the nightside, and plays a similar role to the subtropics on modern Earth. Since 1D radiative-convective models cannot capture the effects of t...

Yang, Jun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Organic aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Organic aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sludge organics bioavailability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Requestor's Name: Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requestor's Name: Organization: Address: (No PO BOX) City, State, Zip: Cell: Phone: Fax: E showing major natural gas pipelines identified by owner and pipe diameter. 6) California Wind Resource Annual Wind Speed, Annual Wind Power, and Seasonal Wind Speed measured at various elevations (meters

225

Organic solvent topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

Cowley, W.L.

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

REPRESENTATIONS & CERTIFICATIONS ORGANIZATION: PHONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or Agreement. 1. Labor Surplus Area: Offeror ___ will ___ will not, perform the work in an area classified labor surplus area; or (3) ___ substantial labor surplus area. 2. Type of Business Organization: Offeror Business Concern", means a small business concern that (1) is at least 51 percent unconditionally owned

Groppi, Christopher

227

CCPPolicyBriefing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BACKGROUND · Modern cartels are well-organized with sophisticated organizational structures. Disclosing to confidentiality, details on the organizational form of cracked cartels are rarely disclosed. · Theoretical to facilitating collusion. · Moreover, the efficiency gains of delegation in facilitating collusion can

Feigon, Brooke

228

Connecting the Physical Properties of Galaxies with the Overdensity and Tidal Shear of the Large-Scale Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have examined the correlations between the large-scale environment of galaxies and their physical properties, using a sample of 28,354 nearby galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the large-scale tidal field reconstructed in real space from the 2Mass Redshift Survey and smoothed over a radius of $\\sim 6 h^{-1}$Mpc. The large-scale environment is expressed in terms of the overdensity, the ellipticity of the shear and the type of the large-scale structure. The physical properties analyzed include $r$-band absolute magnitude $M_{^{0.1}r}$, stellar mass $M_\\ast$, $g-r$ colour, concentration parameter $R_{90}/R_{50}$ and surface stellar mass density $\\mu_\\ast$. Both luminosity and stellar mass are found to be statistically linked to the large-scale environment, regardless of how the environment is quantified. More luminous (massive) galaxies reside preferentially in the regions with higher densities, lower ellipticities and halo-like structures. At fixed luminosity, the large-scale overdensity depends strongly on parameters related to the recent star formation history, that is colour and D(4000), but is almost independent of the structural parameters $R_{90}/R_{50}$ and $\\mu_\\ast$. All the physical properties are statistically linked to the shear of the large-scale environment even when the large-scale density is constrained to a narrow range. This statistical link has been found to be most significant in the quasi-linear regions where the large-scale density approximates to an order of unity, but no longer significant in highly nonlinear regimes with $\\delta_{\\rm LS}\\gg 1$.

Jounghun Lee; Cheng Li

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R{sub o} ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R[sub o] ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally [open quotes]cool[close quotes] basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally [open quotes]cool[close quotes] basin.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Organic solvent topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

COWLEY, W.L.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

Baptista, António M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

Plan of organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~!lr fund available. By recent enactment the appropriation ib placed at the disposal of tEe screral States, and the station1 are being organized. OBJECT OF THE STATIONS. The purpose for which the Agricultural Experiment 11 mas passed is clearly... in the mails free. THE EXPERIMENT STATIONS were placed under the supervision of the Boards of Directors of the Agricultural and Mechanical Colleges, not for the pur- pose of assisting the colleges, but because it was thought the fund would be most...

McInnis, Louis L. (Louis Lowry); Scott, T. M.; Gulley, F. A. (Frank Arthur)

1888-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Bisfuel links - Professional organizations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,BiologicalPresentationsProfessional organizations

235

Organizations | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/O performance onAbout MissionOrganizations

236

Neighborhood Progress Through Organized Action.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Blank Page in Original Bulletin] ~ei~ h borhood Progress Through Organized Action E. C. MARTIN, Administrative Assistant BONNIE COX, Organization Specialist MRS. EULA NEWMAN, Specialist in Home Management TEXAS A. & M. COLLEGE SYSTEM "The... coord: lent r peo plt 1. mmunity organization is successful when all families erested groups participate. Such an organization may inate interest in the community and provide an excel- neans for channeling most programs. The interest...

Newman, Eula; Cox, Bonnie; Martin, E. C.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

Corces, Victor G.

238

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado field, South Texas; Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. Within the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity. The purpose of this report is (1) to describe and analyze the sand-body architecture, depositional facies variations, and structure of Prado field, (2) to determine controls on distribution of hydrocarbons pertinent to reexploration for bypassed hydrocarbons, (3) to describe reservoir models at Prado field, and (4) to develop new data affecting the suitability of Jackson oil fields as possible candidates for thermally enhanced recovery of medium to heavy oil.

Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Microorganisms for producing organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics...

242

Comparison of Agricultural Runoff between Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Agricultural Runoff between Organic Farming and Conventional Chemical Farming Nicole release #12;Organic Walnuts Filter strips Compost Organic pesticides Cover crops Monitoring of insects

243

Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

Sherrill, David

244

Method of doping organic semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus has a crystalline organic semiconducting region that includes polyaromatic molecules. A source electrode and a drain electrode of a field-effect transistor are both in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. A gate electrode of the field-effect transistor is located to affect the conductivity of the crystalline organic semiconducting region between the source and drain electrodes. A dielectric layer of a first dielectric that is substantially impermeable to oxygen is in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. The crystalline organic semiconducting region is located between the dielectric layer and a substrate. The gate electrode is located on the dielectric layer. A portion of the crystalline organic semiconducting region is in contact with a second dielectric via an opening in the dielectric layer. A physical interface is located between the second dielectric and the first dielectric.

Kloc,; Christian Leo (Constance, DE); Ramirez; Arthur Penn (Summit, NJ); So, Woo-Young (New Providence, NJ)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

245

Digestive System general organization throughout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digestive System general organization throughout: mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa, serosa digestive glands salivary pancreas liver (lobes: right, left, caudate, quadrate, diaphragmatic surface, bare

Houde, Peter

246

IX. Standards for Student Organizations Standards of all Student Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 of 8 IX. Standards for Student Organizations Standards of all Student Organizations As stated to the same standards of conduct to which students are held on an individual basis. Standards for Fraternities on February 25, 1976 - the University has developed the following standards for fraternity/sorority life

Marsh, David

247

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Acid Catalysis in Modern Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

catalyst for organic synthesis". That is the starting sentence of this book by Yamamoto and Ishihara, which follows their earlier book "Lewis Acids in Organic Synthesis (2000)", and covers the new developments book that should be available in every well-equipped chemistry library. It will certainly be helpful

Snyder, Scott A.

249

The Anaerobic Digestion of Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and commercialization. Anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic municipal solid waste and subsequent biogas and methaneThe Anaerobic Digestion of Organic Municipal Solid Waste in California. Anaerobic Digestion Technology 2.1. Feedstock Characterization 2.2. Collection & Sorting 2.2.1. Waste

Iglesia, Enrique

250

Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited. They are expected to anticipate and react quickly to prevent a potential threat while staying accountable to their public stakeholders, many of whom remain unaware of the very threats the organization is trying to address. When budgets are flush, it is easy to believe that money will solve all problems; but during times of economic hardship, managers must rely on creative and cost-effective management approaches to implement their missions. Fortunately, managers of nonproliferation organizations can draw on a wealth of research on organizational design and culture to help them identify the management strategies most appropriate for them. Such research can help nonproliferation managers think about their own organizational structures and cultures and adapt accepted management principles to their unique organizational mission. This analytical process is not straight forward, as some managers may find themselves taking risks that others might not take, such as making ostensibly risky investments for the common good, or supporting creative thinking to help mission accomplishment. Some management principles that are relatively straightforward for other organizations may be difficult to envision and implement in a nonproliferation organization. Therefore, the goal of this study is to help nonproliferation managers identify management principles that can be implemented in a nonproliferation organization and, in the process, help maximize the value of the organization's products and effectiveness of its mission.

Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

251

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZING John Priscu (Chair)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE John Priscu (Chair) Montana State University, USA Nina Gunde, USA Laurie Connell University of Maine, USA Hugh Ducklow MBL- Woods Hole, USA Beat Frey Swiss Federal

Wall, Diana

252

Seebeck coefficient in organic semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seebeck coefficient in organic semiconductors A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Deepak Venkateshvaran Fitzwilliam College & Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory University of Cambridge February 2014 “The end...

Venkateshvaran, Deepak

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Engineering Organization Chart Assistant Dean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Organization Chart Fall `12 Assistant Dean Outreach & Recruiting Matthew Cavalli and Geological Engineering Joseph Hartman Chair, Petroleum Engineering Steve Benson Chair, Electrical Engineering Forrest Ames (interim) Chair, Mechanical Engineering Matthew Cavalli Chair, Chemical Engineering Mike Mann

Delene, David J.

254

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Large-scale synthesis of inorganic and organic nanomaterials (single-crystalline nanowires and functionalized conducting polymer thin films) together with strategies for large-scale assembly are discussed

255

Reducing recombination in organic photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I consider two methods to improve organic photovoltaic efficiency: energy level cascades and promotion of triplet state excitons. The former relies on a thin layer of material placed between the active ...

Sussman, Jason M. (Jason Michael)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Three Essays on Industrial Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dissertation discusses issues in the field of industrial organization. When the government provides better infrastructure to competing firms for innovation, private firms' R&D expenditures are affected. When the ...

Lee, Yang Seung

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

257

Ambient-pressure organic superconductor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

New techniques in project portfolio management don't stifle innovation with excessive phasing and gates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing multiple ideas, candidate initiatives and in-flight projects across diverse business units is a large challenge for major organizations. Overseeing global demand for projects as well as resource needs, risks, ...

Fisher, Cameron (Cameron Ardell Mayhew)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Workforce Management Office (WFMO) Functional Statements WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and destruction. BMD oversees WFMO's personal property management, Freedom of Information Act responses, Entry, organizing, and administering comprehensive human resources management programs in collaboration wMay 2014 Workforce Management Office (WFMO) ­ Functional Statements WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE

260

Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2. Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2. Abstract: Using a variety of organic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Testing of the Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove Solar Oven  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 115{degrees}C (240{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80{degrees}C (175{degrees}F) in about two hours. Observations were made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on the operation of the solar oven were also noted.

Moss, T.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effects of non-native Spartina patens on plant and sediment organic matter carbon incorporation into the local invertebrate community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

western Europe with Phragmites australis reported as a hostora) over the native Phragmites australis in a salt marsh in1999) Expansion of Phragmites australis into tidal wetlands

Page, Henry M.; Lastra, Mariano; Rodil, Iván F.; Briones, María Jesús; Garrido, Josefina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Dear Colleagues, I am writing to those of you who oversee research laboratories to make you aware of two recent events that have  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improve our safety culture. UK Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) is currently in the process Regulation 6:3 http://www.uky.edu/regs/files/ar/ar6-3.pdf 2. Maintain a consistently strong safety culture and maintaining a strong safety culture. Incorporat

Hayes, Jane E.

264

Nature of Institutional Sponsorship/Compliance Policy/Definitions The GME Consortium will oversee all matters pertaining to graduate medical education including ensuring that all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or educational arrangement for major affiliation agreements. The DIO will provide periodic updates to the GME all matters pertaining to graduate medical education including ensuring that all GME programs comply, the GME Consortium will serve as the "sponsoring institution" for all graduate medical education conducted

Kornfeld, S. Kerry

265

Inorganic-organic hybrid aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organically modified silica aerogels were prepared by NH{sub 4}OH-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of RSi(OMe){sub 3} / Si(OMe){sub 4} mixtures, followed by supercritical drying of the alcogels with methanol or CO{sub 2}. Terminal alkyl or aryl groups, bridging groups or functional organic (methacryloxypropyl or glycidoxypropyl) groups were employed for R. By the proper choice of the organic groups, the RSi(OMe){sub 3} / Si(OMe){sub 4} ratio and the drying conditions, hydrophobic aerogels, being insensitive towards moisture, were obtained with no residual SiOH or Si-OMe groups left. The transparency and porosity of the organically modified aerogels was only slightly diminished relative to unmodified silica aerogels. The elastic constant of the aerogels was significantly influenced by the kind of organic groups. By pyrolysis of the phenyl-substituted aerogels, nanometer-sized carbon structures were generated. They partly coat the primary aerogel particles and provide a very high mass specific extinction in the wavelengths interval critical for thermal radiative transport.

Schubert, U.; Schwertfeger, F.; Huesing, N.; Seyfried, E. [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO)...

267

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning...

268

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood,...

269

Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Collaboration Key to Enabling On-The-Fly HPC...

270

Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/O performance on the LustreExcitonic

271

Updated July 2009 Operations Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All-Hands, Brown Bags, and COO Open-Door sessions Ongoing Conduct Operations Employee Climate SurveysOperations Strategic Plan Updated July 2009 #12;Operations Organization Chief Operating Officer deliver exceptional operational services in support of the scientific mission of Berkeley Lab. goals

Eisen, Michael

272

Method of doping organic semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method includes the steps of forming a contiguous semiconducting region and heating the region. The semiconducting region includes polyaromatic molecules. The heating raises the semiconducting region to a temperature above room temperature. The heating is performed in the presence of a dopant gas and the absence of light to form a doped organic semiconducting region.

Kloc, Christian Leo (Constance, DE); Ramirez, Arthur Penn (Summit, NJ); So, Woo-Young (New Providence, NJ)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Megahertz organic/polymer diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Featured is an organic/polymer diode having a first layer composed essentially of one of an organic semiconductor material or a polymeric semiconductor material and a second layer formed on the first layer and being electrically coupled to the first layer such that current flows through the layers in one direction when a voltage is applied in one direction. The second layer is essentially composed of a material whose characteristics and properties are such that when formed on the first layer, the diode is capable of high frequency rectifications on the order of megahertz rectifications such as for example rectifications at one of above 100KHz, 500KhZ, IMHz, or 10 MHz. In further embodiments, the layers are arranged so as to be exposed to atmosphere.

Katz, Howard Edan; Sun, Jia; Pal, Nath Bhola

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

274

Organic Chemistry 51B -Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions(s). Chapter 7: Nucleophilic Substitution + + NaOH CH3O- #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chapter 8: Elimination Reactions #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013

Rose, Michael R.

275

An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Insect Controls for Organic Gardeners.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gardening has increased in recent years. Organic gardening means enriching the garden soil with natural products (mulches, composts and animal manures) and controlling insects, diseases and weeds with cultural, mechanical and biological methods rather... damage. However, excessive amounts of compost or manure can encourage millipedes, white grubs and certain other pests. Changes in planting or harvesting time often will reduce plant damage or keep insect pests separated from susceptible stages...

Lewis, Kenneth R.; Turney, H.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Organic fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan:OregonTransmissionHeader.png Roadmap AgencyOrford,Organic

278

Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

279

Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

year record of carbon sequestration from a coastal lagoonR.E. , Milarn, C.S. 2012. Carbon sequestration and SedimentJ.C. 2003. Global carbon sequestration in tidal saline

Elgin, Barbara K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Conjugated Polymer Design and Engineering for Organic Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic photovoltaics (OPVs), with reported efficiencies asseparation efficiency in organic photovoltaics. 15CI, a

Woo, Claire Hoi Kar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

283

Rational design of hybrid organic solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we will present a novel design for a nano-structured organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic material that will address current challenges in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic-based solar cell materials. ...

Lentz, Levi (Levi Carl)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

STRUCTURAL CHANGE AND LEARNING WITHIN ORGANIZATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Change and Learning Within Organizations". In Dynamics of organizational societies : Models, theories to organizational learning. This approach defines learning, culture, structure and behavior at the individual and organizational level. When organizations, as synthetic agents learn important organizational behaviors emerge

Sadeh, Norman M.

285

Collaborative Networks for Biodiversity Domain Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, conservation groups, etc., referred to in this paper as BOs (Biodiversity-domain OrganizationsCollaborative Networks for Biodiversity Domain Organizations Ekaterina Ermilova, Hamideh, operating in the domains of biology, ecology, and biodiversity, strongly need to cooperate

Boyer, Edmond

286

Land Application of Organic Fertilizers or Amendments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying organic materials to your land can add beneficial nutrients to the soil. But when too much is applied, or when it is applied incorrectly, organic material can cause environmental problems. This publication will help you select the proper...

Harmel, Daren; Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

287

Volatile organic compound sensor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Embedding Sustainability into Manufacturing Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(14). G4, the latest version of the guidelines, was published in May 2013. An effort is underway to “harmonize” the reporting process for the CDP and GRI (7), which should ease the burden for companies reporting to both organizations. Table 1 lists... to the 2013 Global Corporate Sustainability Report from the United Nations Global Compact, company size is the most telling indicator of whether a company is pursuing sustainability (48). The report is based on survey results from over 1,700 of the 8...

Tutterow, V.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Our Organization | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC)Organization Ames Laboratory is a

290

Our Organization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergy General Law (GC-56)The4 InOur Organization

291

DOE-ID Organization Chart  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading Room Documents Freedom ofLast

292

Department of Energy Idaho - Organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINLNuclear262 2.272Organization Chart Last

293

PlanforSustainable OrganicGrowth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's infrastructure and productive capacity to create a self sustaining organic farm and a world leading educational

294

FAA Air Traffic Organization Safety Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Mark DeNicuolo, Manager Performance and Analyses Air Traffic Organization Safety and Technical Training Federal Aviation Administration

295

CHEMISTRY 324W Fall 2010 ORGANIC LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CHEMISTRY 324W Fall 2010 ORGANIC LABORATORY Lecture: ...................Monday and Friday 2 book for over 10,000 important organic substances. It has a handy cross index and molecular formula.) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Structure by March (McGraw-Hill) is particularly

Wagner, Diane

296

Student Organization Handbook Office of Student Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Organization Handbook Office of Student Activities Mattin Center, Suite 131 Updated November 2014 #12;StudentOrganizationHandbook 2 Welcome to Student Activities You have made a fantastic choice to get involved on campus! Johns Hopkins has over 300 student-run organizations, each one

Niebur, Ernst

297

Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets Erin T. Mansur and Matthew W. White October 2007 ­ Draft Abstract Electricity markets exhibit two different forms of organization costs. Our analysis points to the merits of organized market institutions for electricity, a central

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

299

Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risø National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

300

Chemistry 675 (CHE 675) Advanced Organic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 675 (CHE 675) Advanced Organic Chemistry Fall Semester 2011 Professor James Hougland675 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course that can be continued in the Spring semester as CHE685. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure

Mather, Patrick T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Self-Organization Nano-Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Organization for Nano-Computation and Nano-Assembly Bruce J. MacLennan Dept. of Computer Science University of Tennessee, Knoxville #12;6 March 2007 Self-Organization for Nano- Computation & Nano, or ­ inspired by that occurring in nature formal material #12;6 March 2007 Self-Organization for Nano

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

302

5, 11391174, 2008 Organic carbon and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 5, 1139­1174, 2008 Organic carbon and nutrient export from disturbed peatlands S. Waldron et al of Biogeosciences The significance of organic carbon and nutrient export from peatland-dominated landscapes subject Union. 1139 #12;BGD 5, 1139­1174, 2008 Organic carbon and nutrient export from disturbed peatlands S

Boyer, Edmond

303

Heavy metals in Antarctic organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate levels of essential (zinc and copper) and non-essential (mercury and cadmium) heavy metals, 34 species of organisms from different areas close to the Antarctic Peninsula were analysed. These included algae, filter-feeders, omnivorous invertebrates and vertebrates. Mercury was not detected, while cadmium was found in the majority of organisms analysed (detection limit was 0.05 ppm for both metals). The highest cadmium concentration was observed in the starfish Odontaster validus. Anthozoans, sipunculids and nudibranchs showed maximum levels of zinc, while the highest copper level was found in the gastropod Trophon brevispira. Mercury and cadmium levels in fishes were below the detection limit. Concentrations of essential and non-essential metals in birds were highest in liver followed by muscle and eggs. Cadmium and mercury levels in muscle of southern elephant seals were above the detection limit, whereas in Antarctic fur seals they were below it. The objective of the study was to gather baseline information for metals in Antarctic Ocean biota that may be needed to detect, measure and monitor future environmental changes. 46 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Moreno, J.E.A. de; Moreno, V.J. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Gerpe, M.S.; Vodopivez, C. [Instituto Antartico Argentino, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanic NationalElectric) JumpRupert,TacomaCivitasCentre,

305

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular and physical chemistry Course description and rationale CHE685 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure and reactivity

Mather, Patrick T.

306

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tidal | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place:InnovationFunds-BusinessOhioEnvironmentalism (E3G) Home

309

OpenEI Community - Tidal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahoma

310

Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978) |Thrall,Tibagi Energetica Jump

311

Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978) |Thrall,Tibagi Energetica

312

Structure-Function Relationships in Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties for organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Space-chargePolymers for Organic Photovoltaics By David Fredric JoelPolymers for Organic Photovoltaics by David Fredric Joel

Kavulak, David Fredric Joel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Metal-doped organic foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

Rinde, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Optical modeling of organic electronic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic materials, with their superior photoluminescence and absorbance properties have revolutionized the technologies for displays and solar energy conversion. Due to the large transition dipoles, the localization of ...

Celebi, Kemal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Participants and Information Outcomes in Planning Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................... 51 2.6 Planning Organizations .......................................................................... 54 ix 2.6.1 Organizational tasks and information behavior............................... 55 2.6.2 Environmental scanning, boundary spanning...

Bierling, David

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Magnetism in metal-organic capsules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Spin Chains in Magnetism: Molecules to Materials, J.Magnetism in metal-organic capsules Jerry L. Atwood,* a Euan

Atwood, Jerry L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processable polymer photovoltaic cells by self?organization Photodiodes,  and  Photovoltaic  Cells.   Applied Physics F,  Heeger  AJ.   Polymer  Photovoltaic  Cells  ?  Enhanced 

Yengel, Emre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

LANL named 2010 top corporate volunteer organization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

volunteer organization The Laboratory ranked ahead of dozens of other qualifying companies with 10,000 or more employees. May 18, 2011 Building and painting birdhouses with...

319

National Hispanic engineering organization names Sandia manager...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hispanic engineering organization names Sandia manager Engineer of the Year | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing...

320

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics can reach tophotovoltaics increase not only the power conversion efficiencycell efficiency tables (Version 27). Prog Photovoltaics.

Yengel, Emre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lafayette Metropolitan Planning Organization 2030 Transportation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

And Development Lafayette Metropolitan Planning Organization 2030 Transportation Plan DRAFT FINAL REPORT Prepared by Neel-Schaffer, Inc... ? 2020 DEFICIENCIES ........................................................................................... 51 FIGURE 11 ? 2030 DEFICIENCIES ........................................................................................... 52 FIGURE 12...

Lafayette Metropolitan Planning Organization

2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sector stakeholders to protect the bulk power electric grid and aid the integration of smart grid technology to enhance the security of the grid. The cyber organization is...

323

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is...

324

Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

325

International energy: Research organizations, 1986--1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Energy: Research Organizations publication contains the standardized names of energy research organizations used in energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). This publication identifies current organizations doing research in all energy fields, standardizes the format for recording these organization names in bibliographic citations, assigns a numeric code to facilitate data entry, and identifies report number prefixes assigned by these organizations. These research organization names may be used in searching the databases Energy Science Technology'' on DIALOG and Energy'' on STN International. These organization names are also used in USDOE databases on the Integrated Technical Information System. Research organizations active in the past five years, as indicated by database records, were identified to form this publication. This directory includes approximately 34,000 organizations that reported energy-related literature from 1986 to 1990 and updates the DOE Energy Data Base: Corporate Author Entries.

Hendricks, P.; Jordan, S. (eds.) (USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information, Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Barney Bricmont, Founder, California Certified Organic Farmers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic food group up in Sebastopol, was meeting and doingkept it going here. Once Sebastopol got in, then we went to

Farmer, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250.degree. C. to 500.degree. C. and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials.

Sealock, Jr., L. John (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250 to 500 C and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials. 7 figs.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Molecular Designs Toward Improving Organic Photovoltaics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that have been studied to date have poor power conversion efficiencies. This dissertation focuses on various molecular designs that could lead to… (more)

Nantalaksakul, Arpornrat

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Theoretical investigations of the electronic processes in organic photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of more efficient organic photovoltaics starts with an increase in understanding of the fundamental processes related to organic photovoltaics, such as the charge separation processes at the organic/organic ...

Yost, Shane Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

GEOL 482/582 Coal/Organic Petrology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, hydrocarbons (oil/gas), oil shales, and dispersed organics. · To be able to recognize organic components under

Nickrent, Daniel L.

332

Changed climate : networking, professionalization, and grassroots organizing in U.S. environmental organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My dissertation, "Changed Climate: Networking, Professionalization, and Grassroots Organizing in U.S Environmental Organizations," explores the efforts of four established U.S. environmental NGOs to change their organizational ...

Deshmukh Towery, Nathaniel S. (Nathaniel Stephen)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Chemistry 320N Organic Chemistry II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 320N Organic Chemistry II for Prehealth Professionals Unique number: 52365 Spring 2013 M students can access the information. #12;Required Text: Brown, Foote, Iverson, & Anslyn Organic Chemistry have the 6th Edition book, as many homework and exam questions will come directly from the 6th Edition

334

Carbon Allocation in Underground Storage Organs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Allocation in Underground Storage Organs Studies on Accumulation of Starch, Sugars and Oil Cover: Starch granules in cells of fresh potato tuber visualised by iodine staining. #12;Carbon By increasing knowledge of carbon allocation in underground storage organs and using the knowledge to improve

335

Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 ­ 2009 Karen Klonsky Kurt Richter Agricultural Issues Center University of California March 2011 #12;Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 ­ 2009 Karen Klonsky Extension Specialist Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

Ferrara, Katherine W.

336

Brain Organization and Computation Andreas Schierwagen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brain Organization and Computation Andreas Schierwagen Institute for Computer Science, Intelligent://www.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/~schierwa Abstract. Theories of how the brain computes can be differentiated in three general conceptions systems approach. The discussion of key features of brain organization (i.e. structure with function

Schierwagen, Andreas

337

Frustrated Organic Solids Display Unexpected Gas Sorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calixarene based organic solid can hold guests such as toluene and other organic molecules we have discovered a new type of material which believe involves a frustration of the solvate lattice as it moves toward the thermodynamically stable desolvated state. The intermediated phase with partial solvent content unexpectedly sorbs gases such as carbon dioxide and highly explosive acetylene deep inside the crystal lattice.

Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Atwood, Jerry L.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation of Radiation Resistance for Organic Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of colors Creation of UV-resistant plants Fibrous adsorbent for metals Biodegradable plastics Decomposition) -Gas evolution Modification Degradation Scheme of interaction between organic materials and radiation-015 Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Degradation of organic materials is accelerated at high temperature. O O C O n C C F F F F

McDonald, Kirk

339

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

Greenbaum, E.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Apparatus and method for oxidizing organic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method and apparatus using high cerium concentration in the anolyte of an electrochemical cell to oxidize organic materials. The method and apparatus further use an ultrasonic mixer to enhance the oxidation rate of the organic material in the electrochemical cell. 6 figs.

Surma, J.E.; Bryan, G.H.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Butner, R.S.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

342

5, 35953620, 2005 Detection of organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 5, 3595­3620, 2005 Detection of organic fraction using the UFO-TDMA P. Vaattovaara et al of organic fraction using the UFO-TDMA P. Vaattovaara et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions) and the lower end of Aitken mode particles (d50 nm) is still insufficient. In this work, we have applied the UFO

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

343

Formal Transition in Agent Organizations Eric Matson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the company's management must understand the methodology and process of transition, or more generally termedFormal Transition in Agent Organizations Eric Matson Department of Computer Science and Engineering define organization transition. Specifically, we describe a formal process of organi- zation transition

Deloach, Scott A.

344

Adapting to contradiction : competing models of organization in the United States organic foods industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

foods that many industry members felt were not compatible with organic agriculture, including ingredients made from genetically modified plants, irradiation

Haedicke, Michael Anthony

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

Wong; Pak C. (Richland, WA), Wong; Kwong K. (Sugar Land, TX), Foote; Harlan P. (Richland, WA)

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

346

Adsorption -capacity data for 283 organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on activated carbon is a widely used method for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gases and other exhaust streams. This article presents a compilation of adsorption-capacity data as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The results are useful in engineering and environmental studies, and in the design of carbon-based adsorption systems to remove unwanted organic pollutants from gases. For vapor control, carbon-based systems typically combine a carbon-adsorption unit with a secondary control method to reclaim or destroy the vapors desorbed during carbon-bed regeneration. To remove organics dissolved in wastewater, air stripping is typically used to transfer the organics to a vapor stream. Carbon adsorption is then used to separate the organics from the stripper exhaust. Collected vapors can be recovered for reuse or destroyed, depending on their value.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste.

Chrubasik, A.; Stich, W. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie Fungal spores Organic agriculture Pathogen dispersal Conventional agriculture uses herbicides, pesticides

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

349

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Understanding Degradation Pathways in Organic Photovoltaics (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs) recently attained power conversion efficiencies that are of interest for commercial production. Consequently, one of the most important unsolved issues facing a new industry is understanding what governs lifetime in organic devices and discovering solutions to mitigate degradation mechanisms. Historically, the active organic components are considered vulnerable to photo-oxidation and represent the primary degradation channel. However, we present several (shelf life and light soaking) studies pointing the relative stability of the active layers and instabilities in commonly used electrode materials. We show that engineering of the hole/electron layer at the electrode can lead to environmentally stable devices even without encapsulation.

Lloyd, M. T.; Olson, D. C.; Garcia, A.; Kauvar, I.; Kopidakis, N.; Reese, M. O.; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photosensitive device includes a plurality of organic photoconductive materials disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode, including a first continuous layer of donor host material, a second continuous layer of acceptor host material, and at least one other organic photoconductive material disposed as a plurality of discontinuous islands between the first continuous layer and the second continuous layer. Each of these other photoconductive materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor host material and the acceptor host material. Preferably, each of the discontinuous islands consists essentially of a crystallite of the respective organic photoconductive material, and more preferably, the crystallites are nanocrystals.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ); Rand, Barry P. (Somers, NY)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

352

Organizational images : towards a model of organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study develops a general theoretical framework for the analysis of organizational behavior by focusing on the notion that organizations develop unique information-processing frameworks, which it labels "organizational ...

Krishnan, Neel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Organizing Your 4-H Project Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project work allows 4-H volunteer leaders to teach and young people to learn new skills and gain new knowledge. Each project group should be organized in cooperation with the club's organizational leader. Use this guide when planning your first...

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Visible spectrometer utilizing organic thin film absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I modeled and developed a spectrometer for the visible wavelength spectrum, based on absorption characteristics of organic thin films. The device uses fundamental principles of linear algebra to reconstruct ...

Tiefenbruck, Laura C. (Laura Christine)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Thiophene-based covalent organic frameworks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the synthesis and characterization of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) incorporating thiophene-based building blocks. We show that these are amenable to reticular synthesis, and that bent ditopic monomers, such ...

Bertrand, Guillaume

356

Six Sigma for Non-Profit Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generate and manage income, manage staff, buildings, machinery, and provide services that the customer desires. There has been recognition in the world for the need for quality management practices in non-profit organizations. The United States, United...

Fiddick, Diana L.

2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Magnetism in metal-organic capsules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel and cobalt seamed metal-organic capsules have been isolated and studied using structural, magnetic and computational approaches. Antiferromagnetic exchange in the Ni capsule results from coordination environments enforced by the capsule framework.

Atwood, Jerry L.; Brechin, Euan K; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Inglis, Ross; Jones, Leigh F.; Mossine, Andrew; Paterson, Martin J.; Power, Nicholas P.; Teat, Simon J.

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Student Success Center Graduate Teaching Assistant ORGANIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSITION: Student Success Center Graduate Teaching Assistant ORGANIZATION: The College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (CASNR) Student Success Center is a part of CASNR's Academic Programs Office and supports student learning, development, and achievement by providing tools

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

360

Polybiphenylmethylenes: New Polymers for Bistable Organic Switches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architectures that can be used to fabricate high density storage elements ­ so called organic electronically to the referenced protocol. 2,2-Bis(4- trifluoromethanesulfonyloxyphenyl)propane (2a), 7,8 2,2-bis(4

Carter, Kenneth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Organic LEDs for optoelectronic neural networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I investigate the characteristics of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and assess their suitability for use in the Compact Optoelectronic Integrated Neural (COIN) coprocessor. The COIN coprocessor, a ...

Mars, Risha R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs are encouraging energy intensive industries to investigate alternative means of waste heat recovery from process streams. The use of organic fluids in Rankine cycles offers improved potential for economical cogeneration from...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERNPPE/95155  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERN­PPE/95­155 1 November 1995 Test of the Exponential Decay Law at Short Decay Times using Tau Leptons The OPAL Collaboration Abstract Quantum mechanics

364

The Paradox of Meritocracy in Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we develop and empirically test the theoretical argument that when an organizational culture promotes meritocracy (compared with when it does not), managers in that organization may ironically show greater ...

Castilla, Emilio J.

365

Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells Master of Engineering Final Report Shanel C. Miller................................................................................................................... 12 2.1 How do Solar Cells Work?.................................................................................................. 12 2.2 Types of Solar Cells that Exist Today

Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

366

DOE Organization Chart- October 6, 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

367

Management effects on labile organic carbon pools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well documented that increases in soil organic matter (SOM) improve soil physical properties and increase the overall fertility and sustainability of the soil. Research in SOM storage has recently amplified following the proposal...

Kolodziej, Scott Michael

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

Gas adsorption on metal-organic frameworks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention involves the use of certain metal organic frameworks that have been treated with water or another metal titrant in the storage of carbon dioxide. The capacity of these frameworks is significantly increased through this treatment.

Willis, Richard R. (Cary, IL); Low, John J. (Schaumburg, IL), Faheem, Syed A. (Huntley, IL); Benin, Annabelle I. (Oak Forest, IL); Snurr, Randall Q. (Evanston, IL); Yazaydin, Ahmet Ozgur (Evanston, IL)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERNEP/2002104  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERN­EP/2002­104 November 7, 2002 Performance Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, RU-630090 Novosibirsk, Russia. E. Aug´e, C. Bourdarios, D. Breton, W

370

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERNEP/9965  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERN­EP/99­65 April 27, 1999 A determination of the CP run performed during 1996 to measure these amplitudes [5], enabling this source of error

Boyer, Edmond

371

Spacing innovation and learning in design organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main research question of this thesis is the following: What is the relationship between spaces and innovation in the context of design organizations such as IDEO, the MIT Media Lab and Design Continuum? This thesis ...

García Herrera, Cristóbal, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Power, status, and learning in organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews the scholarly literature on the effects of social hierarchy—differences in power and status among organizational actors—on collective learning in organizations and groups. We begin with the observation ...

Bunderson, J. Stuart

373

A microfabricated dielectrophoretic micro-organism concentrator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project focuses on the development of a micro-organism concentrator. Pathogen detection, particularly MEMS based detection, is often limited by sample concentration. The proposed concentrator will interface with a ...

Muller, Rikky, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Suggestions for Organizing an Extension Homemakers Club.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)C l245.7 13 14ID __ 'SUGGESTIONS rr FOR ORGANIZING AN EXTENSION HOMEMAKERS CLUB LIB P.AR Y APR 20 1987 B?" h Texas Agricultural Extension Service ? The Texas A&M University System :~ Zerle L. Carpenter, Director ? College Station, Texas... Suggestions for Organizing ~ an Extension Homemakers Club June Cline* Extension Homemakers Clubs provide homemakers an opportunity for continuous informal education in a variety of areas relating to the home, family, community and country. An Extension...

Cline, June

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Burbank Transportation Management Organization: Impact Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Burbank Transportation Management Organization (BTMO), a private, membership-based, nonprofit organization dedicated to traffic reduction and air quality improvement, contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a U.S. Department of Energy-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory, to analyze its member programs and their benefits and effects. This report uses trip data collected by the BTMO, and defines and implements a methodology for quantifying non-traffic benefits such as gasoline savings, productivity, and pollution reduction.

Brown, E.; Aabakken, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Toxicity of certain organic insecticides to honeybees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TCXICITY OF CERTAIN ORGANIC INSECTICIDES TO HONEYBEES A Dissertation TC J AM S NETVIN WEAVER Approved as to style and content by: of Committee)(Chairman XIY (Head of Department or Student Advisor) May 1953 TCOOTTY OF CERTAIN ORGANIC... INSECTICIDES TO HONEYBEES By J A M S NEVIN HEAVERin A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR. OF PHILOSOPHY May 1953 Major...

Weaver, James Nevin

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Stable blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel combination of materials and device architectures for organic light emitting devices is provided. An organic light emitting device, is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer includes a host and a phosphorescent emissive dopant having a peak emissive wavelength less than 500 nm, and a radiative phosphorescent lifetime less than 1 microsecond. Preferably, the phosphorescent emissive dopant includes a ligand having a carbazole group.

Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark; Giebink, Noel

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, D.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig.

Bickford, D.F.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, Dennis F. (Aiken, SC)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Factors influencing participation in craft organizations: a study of East Tennessee craftspeople and their organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS INFLUENCING PARTICIPATION IN CRAFT ORGANIZATIONS: A STUDY OF EAST TENNESSEE CRAFTSPEOPLE AND THEIR ORGANIZATIONS A Thesis by PHILLIP MYRL MONK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment.... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Sociology FACTORS INFLUENCING PARTICIPATION IN CRAFT ORGANIZATIONS: A STUDY OF EAST TENNESSEE CRAFTSPEOPLE AND THEIR OGRANIZATIONS A Thesis by PHILLIP MYRL MONK Approved...

Monk, Phillip Myrl

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Semitransparent Organic Photovoltaic Cells with Laminated Top Electrode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semitransparent Organic Photovoltaic Cells with Laminated Top Electrode Jung-Yong Lee, Steve T demonstrate semitransparent small molecular weight organic photovoltaic cells using a laminated silver metal cathode due to differences in optical absorption. KEYWORDS Organic photovoltaics, transparent

Cui, Yi

384

Distant harvest : the production and price of organic food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic food is growing in popularity, enjoying a 15 to 20% increase in sales, yearly, since about 1997, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic produce makes up about 2% of the United States' total food sales ...

Sherburne, Morgan (Morgan L.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Organic Vegetable Gardening1 James M. Stephens2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"conventional" gardening mainly in the areas of fertilization and pest control. The organic gardener prefers, compost, or mixed organic fertilizer. Benefits

Jawitz, James W.

386

Contingency in the Direction and Mechanics of Soil Organic Matter...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contingency in the Direction and Mechanics of Soil Organic Matter Responses to Increased Rainfall. Contingency in the Direction and Mechanics of Soil Organic Matter Responses to...

387

Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional landform positions. Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional landform positions....

388

Lewis Acid-Base Interactions between Polysulfides and Metal Organic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lewis Acid-Base Interactions between Polysulfides and Metal Organic Framework in Lithium Sulfur Batteries. Lewis Acid-Base Interactions between Polysulfides and Metal Organic...

389

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. W. Yu, Organic photovoltaic devices with a crosslinkablein Nanostructured Photovoltaic Devices, Recent Patents oninterfaces in organic photovoltaic devices, Solar Energy

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ways of contending : community organizing and development in neighborhood context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores community organizing by Community Development Corporations (CDCs), the different outcomes achieved by organizing campaigns, and the factors that contribute to their successes and failures. Among ...

Greenberg, David Micah, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Amigo Bob Cantisano: Organic Farming Advisor, Founder, Ecological Farming Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grandpa was your only farm advisor. Cantisano: Yes, really.Holt Organic Farming Advisor Founder, Eco-Farm Conferenceonly independent organic farming advisor on the West Coast.

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning Aerosol. Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning...

393

antennulary sensory organs: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a modified cilium. Type II sense organsINTRODUCTION In multicellular organisms, sensory perception relies on cells with specialized Swoboda, Peter 2 The biomechanics of sensory...

394

Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Exhaust Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in...

395

Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells...

396

New Morphological Paradigm Uncovered in Organic Solar Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Morphological Paradigm Uncovered in Organic Solar Cells Print Organic solar cells are made of light, flexible, renewable materials; they require simple and inexpensive...

397

New Morphological Paradigm Uncovered in Organic Solar Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paradigm Uncovered in Organic Solar Cells Print Wednesday, 27 April 2011 00:00 Organic solar cells are made of light, flexible, renewable materials; they require simple and...

398

The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction solar cells The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction solar cells Print Monday, 28...

399

Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic...

400

Annex I ITER Organization Service Contract General Conditions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annex I ITER Organization Service Contract General Conditions (2014) Page 1 of 21 GENERAL CONDITIONS FOR ITER ORGANIZATION SERVICE CONTRACTS (2014) Definitions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SciTech Connect: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic Sorbents for Rapid and Efficient Extraction of Heavy Metals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metal-Organic Framework Templated...

402

The Development of Semiconducting Materials for Organic Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F. C. ; Norrman, K. Prog. Photovoltaics 2007, 15, 697–712.Processed Organic Photovoltaics that Generate Chargepolymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have attracted

Douglas, Jessica D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Comment on "coherence and uncertainty in nanostructured organic photovoltaics"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide new probes for photovoltaics. The develop- ment ofin Nanostructured Organic Photovoltaics. J. Phys. Chem. Lettin Nanostructured Organic Photovoltaics” Shaul Mukamel

Mukamel, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass...

405

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic Particles: Surprising Reactivity of NaCl with Weak Organic Acids Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt...

406

Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy. Abstract: Previous work on detection of low-volatility liquid organic (and...

407

Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins...

408

Emission Zone Control in Blue Organic Electrophosphorescent Devices...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Zone Control in Blue Organic Electrophosphorescent Devices Through Chemical Modification of Host Materials . Emission Zone Control in Blue Organic Electrophosphorescent Devices...

409

High efficiency and low roll-off blue phosphorescent organic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

efficiency and low roll-off blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices using mixed host architecture. High efficiency and low roll-off blue phosphorescent organic...

410

NSF/DOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics NSFDOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

411

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization...

412

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and...

413

Heterogeneous Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles Collected in Mexico City. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles Collected in Mexico City....

414

argentine organizations: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing...

415

Preservation of Organic Matter in Marine Sediments: Controls, Mechanisms, and an Imbalance in Sediment Organic Carbon Budgets?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preservation of Organic Matter in Marine Sediments: Controls, Mechanisms, and an Imbalance in Sediment Organic Carbon Budgets? David J. Burdige* Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Old.1. Organic Geochemistry of Marine Sediments: General Considerations 468 2. Molecularly Uncharacterized

Burdige, David

416

Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

417

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Aerogels derived from multifunctional organic monomers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional inorganic aerogels are mad via the hydrolysis and condensation of metal alkoxides. Recently, we reported the synthesis of organic aerogels based upon the aqueous polycondensation of (1) resorcinol with formaldehyde and (2) melamine with formaldehyde. The former materials can also be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form vitreous carbon aerogels. In both the inorganic and organic systems, the structure and properties of the dried aerogel are dictated by polymerization conditions. Factors such as pH, reactant ratio, and temperature influence the crosslinking chemistry and growth processes taking place prior to gelation. The ability to tailor the structure and properties of aerogels at the nanometer scale opens up exciting possibilities for these novel materials. This paper addresses the chemistry-structure-property relationships of organic aerogels. 22 refs., 7 figs.

Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Organic materials for fusion-reactor applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic materials requirements for fusion-reactor magnets are described with reference to the temperature, radiation, and electrical and mechanical stress environment expected in these magnets. A review is presented of the response to gamma-ray and neutron irradiation at low temperatures of candidate organic materials; i.e. laminates, thin films, and potting compounds. Lifetime-limiting features of this response as well as needed testing under magnet operating conditions not yet adequately investigated are identified and recomendations for future work are made.

Hurley, G.F.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Polaron spin current transport in organic semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their unique functional properties, such as a long spin life- time that reflects their light-atom, mainly carbon-based composition. To date, the focus in organic spintronics has mainly been on studies of spin valves with a thin organic semicon- ductor layer... was extracted by fitting the measured field dependence of the voltage using symmetric and asymmetric Lorentz-type functions. A constant offset voltage due to the microwave irradiation (typically ? 100 nV) was also subtracted. g The equivalent circuit...

Watanabe, Shun; Ando, Kazuya; Kang, Keehoon; Mooser, Sebastian; Vaynzof, Yana; Kurebayashi, Hidekazu; Saitoh, Eiji; Sirringhaus, Henning

2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

High mobility high efficiency organic films based on pure organic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of purifying small molecule organic material, performed as a series of operations beginning with a first sample of the organic small molecule material. The first step is to purify the organic small molecule material by thermal gradient sublimation. The second step is to test the purity of at least one sample from the purified organic small molecule material by spectroscopy. The third step is to repeat the first through third steps on the purified small molecule material if the spectroscopic testing reveals any peaks exceeding a threshold percentage of a magnitude of a characteristic peak of a target organic small molecule. The steps are performed at least twice. The threshold percentage is at most 10%. Preferably the threshold percentage is 5% and more preferably 2%. The threshold percentage may be selected based on the spectra of past samples that achieved target performance characteristics in finished devices.

Salzman, Rhonda F. (Ann Arbor, MI); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

424

Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and uses thereof for producing organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-tolerant microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), acrylic acid, and propionic acid. Further modifications to the microorganisms such as increasing expression of malonyl-CoA reductase and/or acetyl-CoA carboxylase provide or increase the ability of the microorganisms to produce 3HP. Methods of generating an organic acid with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers include replacing acsA or homologs thereof in cells with genes of interest and selecting for the cells comprising the genes of interest with amounts of organic acids effective to inhibit growth of cells harboring acsA or the homologs.

Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

425

National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR) project was to address cyber security issues for the electric sector, particularly in the near and mid-term. The following table identifies the strategies from the DOE Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity published in September 2011 that are applicable to the NESCOR project.

None, None

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Finance and Administration Organization FRANCINE G. MCNAIRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finance and Administration Organization PRESIDENT FRANCINE G. MCNAIRY VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE CONTRACTING RUTH SHEETZ ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION ELIZABETH W. KAREVICIUS PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION KENNETH E. DEARSTYNE JR. CONTROLLER TEH P. KRAJAN SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

Hardy, Christopher R.

427

Environmental performance indicators of organic spreading machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Environmental performance indicators of organic spreading machines M. Rousselet1 *, J. C. Roux1 to French spreading machines. The task consists in defining relevant indicators specifically for spreaders indicator before and after improvement on the machine. Keywords: Environmental Performance Indicator

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

428

IT Support for Sustainable Development in Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT Support for Sustainable Development in Organizations Andreas Moeller and Arno Rolf Leuphana phase of sustainable development, as well as their contributions to modified or new generalized action in economics) and systemic mechanisms. With respect to sustainable development, new concepts supporting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

429

ORGANIZATION/ENTITY NAME INFORMATION REQUEST LIST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

our understanding of your departmental operations and activities. This list is not intended to be all be useful to us in the conduct of this audit. If you or your staff have any questions or need clarification Due Date Date Received Operations 1. Organization/ Operational Departmental organizational chart (s

Cinabro, David

430

Murchison project organization and control. [North Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A description is given of the project management organization and the management control systems used for Conoco's Murchison field development in the North Sea. These systems created for Murchison proved largely successful and have been enhanced for use during the Hutton field development. Management concepts are described in the context of the cost control system. 3 refs.

Lauren, P.K.; Hall, J.N.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Kreutzer, Cory (Brighton, CO); Wilson, Carolina (Arvada, CO); Meiser, Manfred (Aurora, CO)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Heterogeneous organic acid uptake on soot surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observed the interaction between a number of carboxylic acids and soot from different fuel sources and formation mechanisms. A low pressure fast flow reactor was used to control the contact between the solid phase soot and gas phase organics, while chemical...

Levitt, Nicholas Paul

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction include a light-scattering medium disposed adjacent thereto. The light-scattering medium has a light scattering anisotropy parameter g in the range from greater than zero to about 0.99, and a scatterance parameter S less than about 0.22 or greater than about 3.

Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

434

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR PARTICLE PHYSICS CERNPPE/95172  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR PARTICLE PHYSICS CERN­PPE/95­172 24 November 1995 A Combination of Preliminary LEP Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model \\Lambda The LEP Collaborations Experiments to the 1995 International Europhysics Conference on High­Energy Physics, 27/7 to 2

435

Organizing Carbon Nanotubes with Liquid Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizing Carbon Nanotubes with Liquid Crystals Michael D. Lynch and David L. Patrick* Department, 2002; Revised Manuscript Received September 13, 2002 ABSTRACT Single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT and MWCNT) are of particular interest because these materials

Patrick, David L.

436

Organic chemical contaminants in Biosolids Sally Brown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the general classification "dioxins." Dioxins are one of the well known dangerous organic chemicals. Dioxins had commercial uses, primarily in the pulp and paper industry, but have been outlawed due. There are many types of dioxins. "Dioxin" is actually a general term for a large number of compounds that contain

Brown, Sally

437

Uncorrected Latitudinal Trends in Organic Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of freshwater wetlands to sequester C. Keywords Cesium-137 (137 Cs), climate change, Histosol, precipitation author: e-mail: ccraft@indiana.edu J. Vymazal (ed.), Wastewater Treatment, Plant Dynamics and Management relation- ships between climate (temperature) and C accumulation. Organic C accumulation was inversely

Craft, Christopher B.

438

Optimizing Organ Allocation and Acceptance OGUZHAN ALAGOZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it is transplanted is called the cold ischemia time (CIT). During this time, organs are bathed in storage solutions J. SCHAEFER Departments of Industrial Engineering and Medicine University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh of Transplant Recipients states that the acceptable cold ischemia time limit for a liver is 12 to 18 hours [22

Schaefer, Andrew

439

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

440

Technology Planning in Smaller Organizations or Nonprofits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Technology Planning in Smaller Organizations or Nonprofits (This is quite practical material...) Before we begin: See http://www.nten.org/ Why Undertake Technology Planning? Source: Podolsky, 2003 Wired for Good Planning can ensure technology supports the mission and strategic goals Planning

Schweik, Charles M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Enhanced Thin Film Organic Photovoltaic Devices  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

A novel structure design for thin film organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices provides a system for increasing the optical absorption in the active layer. The waveguided structure permits reduction of the active layer thickness, resulting in enhanced charge collection and extraction, leading to improved power conversion efficiency compared to standard OPV devices....

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

ECE 452: Computer Organization and Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECE 452: Computer Organization and Architecture - ECE251 Pre-requisites: Microprocessors Addressing - Microarchitecture design for supporting the instruction set architecture (datapath, control path) - Pipelined and network architectures · Off-chip bus architectures (e.g., PCI-E) - Multicore, multiprocessor, and cluster

Schumacher, Russ

443

Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80 lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002

444

A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and Licensing Procedures for New Nuclear the safety regulation and the licensing of new nuclear power plants. The paper considers both design safety approval and issues of site licensing. Advice from international organisations is summarised. Nuclear power

Aickelin, Uwe

445

Organic electrophosphorescence device having interfacial layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Techniques are described for forming an organic light emitting diode device with improved device efficiency. Materials having at least one energy level that is similar to those of a phosphorescent light emitting material in the diode are incorporated into the device to directly inject holes or electrons to the light emitting material.

Choulis, Stelios A. (San Jose, CA); Mathai, Mathew (Santa Clara, CA); Choong, Vi-En (San Jose, CA); So, Franky (Gainesville, FL)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

446

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERNPPE/9782  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERN­PPE/97­82 14 July 1997 Search for new physics in energetic single photon production in e + e \\Gamma annihilation at the Z resonance L3 Collaboration Abstract at the Z resonance is sensitive to new physics. Processes contributing to the invisible width \\Gamma inv

447

Bicycling ResouRces: organizations and Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bicycling ResouRces: organizations and Programs Caltrans Office of Bicycle Facilities, P.O. Box 942874, Sacramento CA 94274, (916) 653-2750. http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/tpp/offices/bike/bicycle_prgm.htm City of Davis Bicycle/Pedestrian Program, 23 Russell Boulevard, Davis, CA 95616, (530) 757-5686. E

Handy, Susan L.

448

SHIP3QARD ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY JOIDES RESOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: DepartmentSHIP3QARD ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY ON JOIDES RESOLUTION Kay-Christian Bneis Ocean Drilling Program 345 Middlefield Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&MUNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE

449

SIMULATING STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN ADAPTIVE ORGANIZATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelos (CESIMO), Universidad de Los Andes, Me´rida, Venezuela JUAN DE LARA MANUEL ALFONSECA Escuela´ LISANDRO AGUILAR CEMISID, Universidad de Los Andes, Me´rida, Venezuela ANA MUN~ OZ Instituto Universitario Tecnoloogico de Ejido, Ejido, Me´rida, Venezuela This paper presents an agent-based model of an organization

Alfonseca, Manuel

450

Investigation of the organic matter in inactive nuclear tank liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology for regulatory organics fails to account for the organic matter that is suggested by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) inactive nuclear waste-tank liquids and sludges. Identification and measurement of the total organics are needed to select appropriate waste treatment technologies. An initial investigation was made of the nature of the organics in several waste-tank liquids. This report details the analysis of ORNL wastes.

Schenley, R.L.; Griest, W.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

& MetalOrganic Frameworks Enhancing CO2 Separation Ability of a MetalOrganic Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that it is a promising material for sequestering CO2 from landfill gas. Introduction Metal­organic frameworks have been considered as promising materials for separating CO2 from landfill gas and industrial flue gas due

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

453

Rock Physics Characterization of Organic-Rich Shale Formations to Predict Organic Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rely on to assess the economic potential of these formations are: total organic carbon (TOC), thermal maturity, hydrocarbon saturation, porosity, mineralogy and brittleness. In this thesis, I investigate rock physics models and methods for the possible...

Bush, Brandon

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

454

Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol from the Direct Photolytic Generation of Organic Radicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The immense complexity inherent in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA)—due primarily to the large number of oxidation steps and reaction pathways involved—has limited the detailed understanding of its underlying ...

Kessler, Sean Herbert

455

Design and synthesis of organic chromophores for imaging, lithography and organic electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The absorption and emission maxima, photostabilities and photoreactivities of small-molecule organic chromophores can be tailored by (a) the choice of an appropriate parent structure and (b) the deliberate introduction of ...

Andrew, Trisha Lionel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Da Costa, Andre R. (Menlo Park, CA); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA); Amo, Karl D. (Mountain View, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

457

Method of making organic light emitting devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method for the preparation of organic light-emitting devices comprising a bilayer structure made by forming a first film layer comprising an electroactive material and an INP precursor material, and exposing the first film layer to a radiation source under an inert atmosphere to generate an interpenetrating network polymer composition comprising the electroactive material. At least one additional layer is disposed on the reacted first film layer to complete the bilayer structure. The bilayer structure is comprised within an organic light-emitting device comprising standard features such as electrodes and optionally one or more additional layers serving as a bipolar emission layer, a hole injection layer, an electron injection layer, an electron transport layer, a hole transport layer, exciton-hole transporting layer, exciton-electron transporting layer, a hole transporting emission layer, or an electron transporting emission layer.

Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Janora, Kevin Henry (Schenectady, NY); Parthasarathy, Gautam (Saratoga Springs, NY); Cella, James Anthony (Clifton Park, NY); Chichak, Kelly Scott (Clifton Park, NY)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

458

Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106.

Meacham, J.E.; and others

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

459

Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

460

Tailoring the properties of organic aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have recently succeeded in producing a new class of organic (or carbon) aerogels whose electrical, mechanical, and other properties are superior to those of the metal alkoxides. By tailoring properties to specific applications, we hope to achieve aerogels with even better performance. We have already tested carbon aerogels for use in inertial-confinement fusion targets and are currently studying applications to other technologies, such as battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. In several of these applications, the permeability of the carbon aerogels-that is, their resistance to fluid flow-is crucial to their performance. Here, we describe briefly the synthesis of organic aerogels and present the results of our permeability studies.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

White light-emitting organic electroluminescent devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light-emitting device comprises a light-emitting member, which comprises two electrodes, at least two organic electroluminescent ("EL") materials disposed between the electrodes, a charge blocking material disposed between the electrodes, and at least one photoluminescent ("PL") material. The light-emitting member emits electromagnetic ("EM") radiation having a first spectrum in response to a voltage applied across the two electrodes. The PL material absorbs a portion of the EM radiation emitted by the light-emitting member and emits EM radiation having second spectrum different than the first spectrum. Each of the organic EL materials emits EM radiation having a wavelength range selected from the group consisting of blue and red wavelength ranges.

Shiang, Joseph John; Duggal, Anil Raj; Parthasarathy, Gautam

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

462

Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

464

Testing of organic acids in engine coolants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effectiveness of 30 organic acids as inhibitors in engine coolants is reported. Tests include glassware corrosion of coupled and uncoupled metals. FORD galvanostatic and cyclic polarization electrochemistry for aluminum pitting, and reserve alkalinity (RA) measurements. Details of each test are discussed as well as some general conclusions. For example, benzoic acid inhibits coupled metals well but is ineffective on cast iron when uncoupled. In benzoic acid inhibits coupled metals well but is ineffective on cast iron when uncoupled. In general, the organic acids provide little RA when titrated to a pH of 5.5, titration to a pH of 4.5 can result in precipitation of the acid. Trends with respect to acid chain length are reported also.

Weir, T.W. [ARCO Chemical Co., Newtown Square, PA (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms. Environmental Health Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussng chemkal and geochemical aspects ofbiogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuckar aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of entering ecosystems, and their physical chemical forms are discussed. Important factors that influence bioavailability and disposition (e.g., organism-water partitioning, uptake via food, food meb transfer) are reviewed. These factors include solubilities of chemicals; partitioning of chemicals between solid surfaces, colloids, and soluble phases; variables rates of sorption, desorption; and physiological status of organism. It appears that more emphasis on considering food as a source of uptake and bioaccumulation is important in benthic and epibenthic ecosystems when sediment-associated pollutants are a nt source of input to an aquatic ecosystem. Progress with mathematical models for exposure and uptake of contaminant chemicals is discussed briefly.

John W. Farrington

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Advanced organic analysis and analytical methods development: FY 1995 progress report. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during FY 1995 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in developing and optimizing analysis techniques for identifying organics present in Hanford waste tanks. The main focus was to provide a means for rapidly obtaining the most useful information concerning the organics present in tank waste, with minimal sample handling and with minimal waste generation. One major focus has been to optimize analytical methods for organic speciation. Select methods, such as atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, were developed to increase the speciation capabilities, while minimizing sample handling. A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to improve separation capabilities while minimizing additional waste generation. In addition, considerable emphasis has been placed on developing a rapid screening tool, based on Raman and infrared spectroscopy, for determining organic functional group content when complete organic speciation is not required. This capability would allow for a cost-effective means to screen the waste tanks to identify tanks that require more specialized and complete organic speciation to determine tank safety.

Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Organic light emitting device architecture for reducing the number of organic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic light emitting device is provided. The device includes an anode and a cathode. A first emissive layer is disposed between the anode and the cathode. The first emissive layer includes a first non-emitting organic material, which is an organometallic material present in the first emissive layer in a concentration of at least 50 wt %. The first emissive layer also includes a first emitting organic material. A second emissive layer is disposed between the first emissive layer and the cathode, preferably, in direct contact with the first emissive layer. The second emissive material includes a second non-emitting organic material and a second emitting organic material. The first and second non-emitting materials, and the first and second emitting materials, are all different materials. A first non-emissive layer is disposed between the first emissive layer and the anode, and in direct contact with the first emissive layer. The first non- emissive layer comprises the first non-emissive organic material.

D'Andrade, Brian (Westampton, NJ); Esler, James (Levittown, PA)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

468

Organic Phosphoric Acid of the Soil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN NO. +6CT /36 CHEMICAL SECTION, FEBRUARY, 191 1 I TECHNICAL BULLETIN Organic Phosphoric Acid of the Soil BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist POSTOFFICE College Station, Brazos County, 'Texas. ,\\ustin... . ................................................ introduction 5 .............................. hmmonia-Soluble Phosphoric Acid 5 ................ Solubility of Phosphates in Ammonia 6 I Fixation of Phosphoric Acid from Ammonia .......... 7 Effect of Ratio of Soil to Solvent in Extraction of Phos- I I...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

"Mapping" Nonprofit Infrastructure Organizations in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?Mapping? Nonprofit Infrastructure Organizations in Texas The Bush School of Government and Public Service Capstone Seminar Research by graduate students in the MPSA program (Andrea Aho... Service Texas A & M University December 2010 Page 1 What is Capstone? Capstone research courses at The George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University are completed in lieu of a master‘s thesis project...

Aho, Andrea; Harris, Amanda; Kessel, Kendall; Park, Jongsoo; Park, Jong Taek; Rios, Lisa; Swendig, Brett

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

International Labor Organization (ILO) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climate compatible developmentClimateOrganization (ILO) Jump to:

471

Inhibition of nickel precipitation by organic ligands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewaters from electroplating are very complex due to the composition of the plating baths. A nickel plating bath typically consists of a nickel source (nickel chloride or nickel sulfate), complexing agents to solubilize nickel ions controlling their concentration in the solution, buffering agents to maintain pH, brighteners to improve brightness of the plated metal, stabilizers (inhibitors) to prevent undesired reactions, accelerators to enhance speed of reactions, wetting agents to reduce surface tension at the metal surface, and reducing agents (only for electroless nickel plating) to supply electrons for reduction of the nickel. Alkaline precipitation is the most common method of recovering nickel from wastewaters. However, organic constituents found in the wastewaters can mask or completely inhibit the precipitation of nickel. The objective of this study was to conduct an equilibrium study to explore the inhibition behavior of various organic ligands on nickel precipitation. This will lay the groundwork for development of technologies efficacious in the treatment of complexed nickel. The organic ligands used in this study are EDTA, triethanolamine (TEA), gluconate, and tartrate.

Hu, H.L.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Grasso, D. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Occupational health experience with organic additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Complexant stability investigation. Task 2. Organic complexants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety of high-level defense waste operations has always been given highest priority at the Hanford site. This document is part of the continued effort to appraise and reevaluate the safety of the waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Reservation. Hanford high-level defense waste consists mainly of moist, inorganic salts, NaNO/sub 3/, NaAl(OH)/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and other sodium salts. However, in addition to these salts, quantities of organic compounds constitute a significant portion of the waste. The potential reaction of the organic compounds with inorganic salts to form explosive substances is examined and found to be nonexistent or negligible. The concept that the waste mixture might react exothermically is found to be untenable under the present storage conditions. The phenomenon of slurry growth in double-shell waste storage tanks is expected to cause no increase in exothermic reaction potential within the waste. The results of this study indicate that the presence of organic material in the high-level defense waste does not constitute undue hazard under the present storage conditions.

Martin, E.C.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

TMVOC, simulator for multiple volatile organic chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TMVOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase non-isothermal flow of water, soil gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. It is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. TMVOC is designed for applications to contamination problems that involve hydrocarbon fuel or organic solvent spills in saturated and unsaturated zones. It can model contaminant behavior under ''natural'' environmental conditions, as well as for engineered systems, such as soil vapor extraction, groundwater pumping, or steam-assisted source remediation. TMVOC is upwards compatible with T2VOC (Falta et al., 1995) and can be initialized from T2VOC-style initial conditions. The main enhancements in TMVOC relative to T2VOC are as follows: a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals can be modeled; any and all combinations of the three phases water-oil-gas are treated; several non-condensible gases may be present; diffusion is treated in all phases in a manner that is fully coupled with phase partitioning. This paper gives a brief summary of the methodology used in TMVOC as well as highlighting some implementation issues. Simulation of a NAPL spill and subsequent remediation is discussed for a 2-D vertical section of a saturated-unsaturated flow problem.

Pruess, Karsten; Battistelli, Alfredo

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

475

Conclusion -The VGI ratio provides a simple and effective molecular parameter useful in determining the relative contributions of terrestrial and aquatic organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Connecticut and Thames River mouths have a greater terrestrial OM component (VGI of 0.15 to 0.23). The results barrier island and with marsh islands and mul- tiple urbanized tidal creeks, displays a very wide VGI

Columbia University

476

Faculty name Faculty lab website (if available)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.umass.edu/comparativegenomics/index.html Name of person to directly oversee apprentice LiJun Ma Position of person overseeing apprentice Faculty://www.umass.edu/turfpathology/ Name of person to directly oversee apprentice Geunhwa Jung Position of person overseeing apprentice of person to directly oversee apprentice Gina Davis Position of person overseeing apprentice Postdoc Title

Wadsworth, Patricia

477

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Advanced organic analysis FY 1996 progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Major focus during the first part of FY96 was to evaluate using organic functional group concentrations to screen for energetics. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy would be useful screening tools for determining C-H and COO- organic content in tank wastes analyzed in a hot cell. These techniques would be used for identifying tanks of potential safety concern that may require further analysis. Samples from Tanks 241-C-106 and -C-204 were analyzed; the major organic in C-106 was B2EHPA and in C-204 was TBP. Analyses of simulated wastes were also performed for the Waste Aging Studies Task; organics formed as a result of degradation were identified, and the original starting components were monitored quantitatively. Sample analysis is not routine and required considerable methods adaptation and optimization. Several techniques have been evaluated for directly analyzing chelator and chelator fragments in tank wastes: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection using Cu complexation. Although not directly funded by the Tanks Safety Program, the success of these techniques have implications for both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tanks Safety Programs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds and Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed by Photooxidation of Isoprene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI HR-MS) was used to probe molecular structures of oligomers in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated in laboratory experiments on isoprene photooxidation at low- and high-NOx conditions. Up to 80-90% of the observed products are oligomers and up to 33% are nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC). We observe oligomers with up to 8 monomer units in length. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) confirms NOC compounds are organic nitrates and elucidates plausible chemical building blocks contributing to oligomer formation. Most organic nitrates are comprised of methylglyceric acid units. Other important multifunctional C2-C5 monomer units are identified including methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, hydroxyacetic acid, glycolaldehyde, and 2-methyltetrols. The majority of the NOC oligomers contain only one nitrate moiety resulting in a low average N:C ratio of 0.019. Average O:C ratios of the detected SOA compounds are 0.54 under the low-NOx conditions and 0.83 under the high-NOx conditions. Our results underscore the importance of isoprene photooxidation as a source of NOC in organic particulate matter.

Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

479

Economic development, access to health care, strong civic leadership and a clean environment affect the quality of life for all Idahoans. Boise State oversees a broad array of research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Research Economic development, access to health care, strong civic leadership and a clean University focuses on the laws, plans, actions and behaviors of government; on health resources and priorities; and on energy issues and initiatives. at-a-glance RESEARCH CENTERS and institutes at Boise State

Barrash, Warren

480

High-Performance Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using ITO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Performance Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using ITO Anodes Grown on Plastic by Room,* Mark E. Madsen, Antonio DiVenere, and Seng-Tiong Ho Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabricated

Ho, Seng-Tiong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overseeing organization tidal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Polymorphism control and the formation of organic molecular nanocrystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of organic molecular nanocrystals is a topic of great interest in the pharmaceutical industry because of the potential increase in dissolution rate and solubility of organic crystals below 1 ptm and their ...

Yang, Xiaochuan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Microbial production and consumption of marine dissolved organic matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marine phytoplankton are the principal producers of oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM), the organic substrate responsible for secondary production by heterotrophic microbes in the sea. Despite the importance of DOM in ...

Becker, Jamie William

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Conjugated Polymer Design and Engineering for Organic Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in low-cost thin-film photovoltaic cells. Importantly, SubNcefficient organic photovoltaic cells with power conversionSubNc films in organic photovoltaic cells was evaluated in

Woo, Claire Hoi Kar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Batteries. The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Batteries....

485

Request for Proposals in Organic & Sustainability Systems Research, Teaching & Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Request for Proposals in Organic & Sustainability Systems Research, Teaching & Outreach Proposal at Cornell's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) requests proposals for innovative research, teaching and extension/outreach projects involving organics and sustainability in farm and food systems

Pawlowski, Wojtek

486

The Development of Semiconducting Materials for Organic Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photovoltaics (OPVs) has led to a significant increase in their power conversion efficiencies (Photovoltaics…………………………..………1 Motivation and Current Technology………………………………………………………1 Organic Photovoltaic Device Operation and Structure……………………………………2 Characterization of Organic Photovoltaic Device Efficiency……………………………..

Douglas, Jessica D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

White organic light-emitting diodes: Status and perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are ultrathin, large-area light sources made from organic semiconductor materials. Over the past decades, much research has been spent on finding suitable materials to realize ...

Reineke, Sebastian

488

11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations, Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because ...

Tendler, Judith

489

Electroluminescence in ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reports the light emission in ion gel gated, thin film organic semiconductor transistors and investigates the light emission mechanism behind these devices. We report that ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors emit...

Bhat, Shrivalli

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

490

Atmospheric processing of organic aerosols G. Barney Ellison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an aqueous core that is encapsulated in an inert, hydrophobic organic monolayer. The organic materials important roles in climate and elsewhere through their interaction with solar and terrestrial radiation

Ellison, Barney

491

New organically templated photoluminescence iodocuprates(I)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two types of organic cyclic aliphatic diamine molecules piperazine (pip) and 1,3-bis(4-piperidyl)propane (bpp) were used, respectively, to react with an inorganic mixture of CuI and KI in the acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions under the solvothermal conditions, generating finally three new organically templated iodocuprates as 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 (tmpip=N,N,N',N'-tetramethylpiperazinium) and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Note that the templating agent tmpip{sup 2+} in compound 2 originated from the in situ N-alkylation reaction between the pip molecule and the methanol solvent. The photoluminescence analysis indicates that the title compounds emit the different lights: yellow for 1, blue for 2 and yellow-green for 3, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The solvothermal self-assemblies of CuI, KI and pip/bpp in acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions created three iodocuprates 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Highlights: > A new layered iodocuprate(I) with 20-membered rings was hydrothermally prepared. > A simple approach to prepare the new organic templating agent was reported. > Photoluminescence analysis indicates the emission for iodocuprate(I) is associated with the Cu...Cu interactions.

Hou Qin [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Zhao Jinjing [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Zhao Tianqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Jin Juan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Yu Jiehui, E-mail: jiehuiyu@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xu Jiqing, E-mail: xjq@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

492

Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

494

Organic light emitting diodes with structured electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cathode that contain nanostructures that extend into the organic layer of an OLED has been described. The cathode can have an array of nanotubes or a layer of nanoclusters extending out from its surface. In another arrangement, the cathode is patterned and etched to form protruding nanostructures using a standard lithographic process. Various methods for fabricating these structures are provided, all of which are compatible with large-scale manufacturing. OLEDs made with these novel electrodes have greatly enhanced electron injection, have good environmental stability.

Mao, Samuel S.; Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen G.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

495

Organic rankine cycle waste heat applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A machine designed as a centrifugal compressor is applied as an organic rankine cycle turbine by operating the machine in reverse. In order to accommodate the higher pressures when operating as a turbine, a suitable refrigerant is chosen such that the pressures and temperatures are maintained within established limits. Such an adaptation of existing, relatively inexpensive equipment to an application that may be otherwise uneconomical, allows for the convenient and economical use of energy that would be otherwise lost by waste heat to the atmosphere.

Brasz, Joost J.; Biederman, Bruce P.

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

496

Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

497

HC Organization Chart | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of EnergyGeothermalGoingGuidelines forofHC Organization Chart

498

Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC) Laboratories »Organic Photovoltaics

499

Organic Photovoltaics | Center for Energy Efficient Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC) Laboratories »Organic

500

PNNL: Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis - Organization Chart  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC)OrganizationAdvisory Board