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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Phoenix Overcomes Barriers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phoenix Overcomes Barriers and Energizes Homeowners to Make Upgrades to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Phoenix Overcomes Barriers and Energizes...

2

Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual, Training materials Website: uneprisoe.org/ Cost: Free Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies Screenshot References: UNEP-Risoe[1] Logo: Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies This guidebook deals with the transfer of proven technologies both between countries and within them. "The purpose of the TNA project is to assist participant developing country

3

Step 6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption 6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption Description It is important for a state or jurisdiction to identify and overcome a variety of political, economic, and technical challenges when adopting or updating an energy code. Confusion throughout the process and unclear adoption language are two of the most common barriers associated with code adoption. Other barriers identified by advocates and stakeholders include initial cost, limited outreach and education resources, cost and availability of code support information, and state and local confusion. These barriers are often resolved by amending the adoption process, providing code education, or selecting a model energy code for adoption. Adoption Process The adoption process itself can be a barrier to code adoption. States

4

Carbon Capture and Storage Projects Overcoming Legal and Regulatory Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006/1236 2006/1236 June 23, 2006 International Carbon Capture and Storage Projects Overcoming Legal Barriers Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

5

Obstacles and Opportunity: Overcoming Barriers in Today's CHP Marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP), which can offer tremendous efficiency benefits to industrial facilities around the country, continues to be viewed as a long-term efficiency opportunity. However, the high up-front cost of CHP equipment and fuel-dependent operating costs have made CHP a difficult sell internally in some corporations. The recent recession and slow recovery have further discouraged facility managers and owners from making large capital investments such as CHP. This paper addresses the biggest barriers to new CHP project development from the perspective of those intimately involved in moving new CHP projects forward: CHP developers and CHP advocates. It identifies economic and financial barriers as the largest common barriers found throughout the U.S. It also suggests ways that CHP developers and advocates can address these barriers, and attempts to overcome them in the current economic context.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Stalker: overcoming linguistic barriers in open source intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The revolution in information technology is making open sources more accessible, ubiquitous and valuable. The international intelligence communities have seen open sources become increasingly easier and cheaper to acquire in recent years. But up to 80% ... Keywords: ICT, Stalker, communications technology, content-enabling systems, cultural diversity, deep searching, distributed multimedia, dynamic classification, electronic data, encoded information, focused crawling, functional role labelling, heterogeneous data, hidden information, information technology, intelligence communities, internet, language-independent searches, languages, linguistic barriers, morpho-syntactic analysis, multilinguality, natural language processing, networks, online organisations, open source intelligence, raw data, semantic analysis, supervised clustering, textual analysis, textual synthesis, unclassified information, unstructured information, unsupervised clustering, virtual organisations, web based organisations, web mining, world wide web

Federico Neri; Paolo Geraci; Massimo Pettoni

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.

Brent Bailey; Evan Hansen

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

Powering Your Community With Solar: Overcoming Market and Implementation Barriers (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document introduces the Energy Department's new Solarize Guidebook: A Community Guide to Collective Purchasing of Residential PV Systems. The guide is designed for 'green' consumers, utilities, local governments, and community groups who want to replicate the success of the Solarize Portland model, overcome barriers to implementation, and permanently transform the market for solar energy in their communities.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Geothermal (Ground-Source) Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pump systems (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pump or Geo-Exchange systems, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national energy and climate strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE s request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential and other benefits, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in a report along with conclusions and recommendations. This paper summarizes the key information from the report.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Overcoming restriction as a barrier to DNA transformation in Caldicellulosiruptor species results in efficient marker replacement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overcoming Overcoming restriction as a barrier to DNA transformation in Caldicellulosiruptor species results in efficient marker replacement Daehwan Chung 1,2 , Joel Farkas 1,2 and Janet Westpheling 1,2* Abstract Background: Thermophilic microorganisms have special advantages for the conversion of plant biomass to fuels and chemicals. Members of the genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic bacteria known. They have the ability to grow on a variety of non-pretreated biomass substrates at or near ~80°C and hold promise for converting biomass to bioproducts in a single step. As for all such relatively uncharacterized organisms with desirable traits, the ability to genetically manipulate them is a prerequisite for making them useful. Metabolic engineering of pathways for product synthesis is relatively simple compared to engineering the ability to utilize

11

Energy management action plan: Developing a strategy for overcoming institutional barriers to municipal energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Energy offices working to improve efficiency of local government facilities face not only technical tasks, but institutional barriers, such as budget structures that do not reward efficiency, a low awareness of energy issues, and purchasing procedures based only on minimizing initial cost. The bureau, in working to remove such barriers in San Francisco, has identified 37 institutional barriers in areas such as operations & maintenance, purchasing, and facility design; these barriers were then reorganized into three groupings-- policy & attitudes, budget & incentives, and awareness & information-- and mapped. This map shows that the barriers mutually reinforce each other, and that a holistic approach is required for permanent change. The city`s recreation & parks department was used as a model department, and information about facility energy use was compiled into a departmental energy review. Staff interviews showed how barriers affect conservation. The bureau then generated ideas for projects to remove specific barriers and rated them according to potential impact and the resources required to implement them. Four of the six projects selected focused on maintenance staff: a cost- sharing lighting retrofit program, a boiler efficiency program, a departmental energy tracking system, and a budgetary incentive program for conservation. The other two projects are city-wide: promotion of a new term contract supplying energy-efficient light materials, and publication/distribution of ENERGY NEWS newsletter. A general methodology, the EMAP Strategy Guide, has been created to assist other energy offices in developing EMAPs.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Geothermal(Ground-Source)Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pumps, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in this report along with conclusions and recommendations.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Overcoming Technical and Market Barriers for Distributed Wind Applications: Reaching the Mainstream; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes how the distributed wind industry must overcome hurdles including system costs and interconnection and installation restrictions to reach its mainstream market potential.

Rhoads-Weaver, H.; Forsyth, T.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Capital Costs in Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers Preprint Shanti Pless and Paul Torcellini To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55264 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

15

Overcoming Barriers to Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST-developed electrical measurements, for example ... and to apply them in motors, machines, and ... substances that generate electric voltage when ...

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barrier Resources Act Barrier Resources Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Barrier Resources Act Year 1982 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Wikipedia[1] FWS Coastal Barrier Resources Act Webpage[2] The Coastal Barrier Resources Act of the United States was enacted October 18, 1982. The United States Congress passed this Act in order to address the many problems associated with coastal barrier development. CBRA designated various undeveloped coastal barriers, which were illustrated by a set of maps adopted by law, to be included in the John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS). These designated areas were made ineligible for both direct and indirect Federal expenditures and financial assistance, which are believed to encourage development of fragile,

17

The Functional Requirements and Design Basis for Information Barriers  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the Information Barrier Working Group workshop held at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, February 2-4, 1999. This workshop was convened to establish the functional requirements associated with warhead radiation signature information barriers, to identify the major design elements of any such system or approach, and to identify a design basis for each of these major elements. Such information forms the general design basis to be used in designing, fabricating, and evaluating the complete integrated systems developed for specific purposes.

Fuller, James L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

WHAT ARE THE MAJOR BARRIERS TO INCREASED USE OF MODERN ENERGY SERVICES AMONG THE WORLDS POOREST PEOPLE AND ARE INTERVENTIONS TO OVERCOME THESE EFFECTIVE?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What are the major barriers to increased use of modern energy services among the world?s poorest people and are interventions to overcome these effective? CEE protocol 11-004. Collaboration for Environmental Evidence: www.environmentalevidence.org / SR11004.html. 1 1. Background Although there is no simple definition, modern energy services are often identified in terms that contrast them with traditional energy services such as those derived from the burning of biomass in open fires (UN-Energy 2005; Brew-Hammond 2010). As such, the notion tends to combine both energy carriers and associated technologies, together with the benefits to users that these afford: lighting, cooking, heating, transportation, and so forth (UNDP 2005). Examples of modern energy services, therefore, include (among others) electricity from solar home systems (SHSs) for lighting, natural gas burned in modern stoves for cooking and petroleum-based engines for motive power to enable agro-processing (Modi et al. 2005; Practical Action 2010). A lack of access to modern energy services among the world?s poor is widely recognised to have negative impacts on their health, education and quality of life, further deepening and

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Overcoming Barriers to Solar Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar water heating systems built during the past ten years represent the beginning of a strong North American Solar Industry. The opportunities provided through Government assistance programs have enabled the Industry to develop products, standards and the research capability to the edge of commercially realisable solar water heating systems for residential, commercial and industrial applications. With continued Government support and access to creative financing programs, the Solar Industry is a short step away from creating large demands from large sectors of the economy.

Halme, D. S.; Sicotte, J. R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Addressing Barriers to Wind Energy by Creating Consensus through Information Dissemination and Outreach: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK B188 The sixteen month project to address barriers to the development of VT wind energy was successful. The project built consensus on wind energy siting issues through four stakeholder workshops and engaged Vermonters on wind energy issues with a wind energy information dissemination and outreach campaign. There is still a great need for more outreach and accurate wind energy information dissemination on the local level where informed discussion on the cost and benefits of wind energy projects needs to be held. The stakeholder workshop framework and outreach tools that were created by this project will be helpful tools as state agencies, wind developers, non-profit organizations and concerned citizens (in Vermont and around the country) continue to discuss wind energy projects and the role of wind energy in comprehensive energy plans. Given the success of this project it is recommended that other states replicate this project as a way to help overcome the barriers to win d energy development. This report provides: an overview of the project accomplishments, detailed quarter by quarter descriptions of the project activities, activities spawned by the project, conclusions, and copies of all the documents created during the project as attachments (No.1-8).

Andrew Perchlik

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biofuels Topics: Implementation, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: tech-action.org/Perspectives/BioenergyIndia.pdf Country: India Cost: Free UN Region: Southern Asia Coordinates: 20.593684°, 78.96288° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":20.593684,"lon":78.96288,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Exploring the Possible Use of Information Barriers for future Biological Weapons Verification Regimes  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a path forward for implementing information barriers in a future generic biological arms-control verification regime. Information barriers have become a staple of discussion in the area of arms control verification approaches for nuclear weapons and components. Information barriers when used with a measurement system allow for the determination that an item has sensitive characteristics without releasing any of the sensitive information. Over the last 15 years the United States (with the Russian Federation) has led on the development of information barriers in the area of the verification of nuclear weapons and nuclear components. The work of the US and the Russian Federation has prompted other states (e.g., UK and Norway) to consider the merits of information barriers for possible verification regimes. In the context of a biological weapons control verification regime, the dual-use nature of the biotechnology will require protection of sensitive information while allowing for the verification of treaty commitments. A major question that has arisen is whether - in a biological weapons verification regime - the presence or absence of a weapon pathogen can be determined without revealing any information about possible sensitive or proprietary information contained in the genetic materials being declared under a verification regime. This study indicates that a verification regime could be constructed using a small number of pathogens that spans the range of known biological weapons agents. Since the number of possible pathogens is small it is possible and prudent to treat these pathogens as analogies to attributes in a nuclear verification regime. This study has determined that there may be some information that needs to be protected in a biological weapons control verification regime. To protect this information, the study concludes that the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array may be a suitable technology for the detection of the genetic information associated with the various pathogens. In addition, it has been determined that a suitable information barrier could be applied to this technology when the verification regime has been defined. Finally, the report posits a path forward for additional development of information barriers in a biological weapons verification regime. This path forward has shown that a new analysis approach coined as Information Loss Analysis might need to be pursued so that a numerical understanding of how information can be lost in specific measurement systems can be achieved.

Luke, S J

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers Developer Oak Ridge National Laboratory + Name Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to...

24

Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Energy Group Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Agriculture Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.cleanegroup.org/Reports/CEG_Accelerating_Climate_Technologies_0714 UN Region: "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

25

Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges  

SciTech Connect

This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges  

SciTech Connect

This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RICHMOND SITE RICHMOND SITE Site Background  90 acre campus  275,000 ft 2 DSC  220,000 ft 2 Paint Plant  30,000 ft 2 Resin Plant  353 Total Employees Site Background  Main Plant Built in 1976; Resin in 1985; DSC in 1994  Topography and flow consideration  Novel Management Style  No time clock, rotating shifts, team meeting rooms  Team input on overtime, hiring, capital and CI  Innovator Award Program Richmond Sustainability Timeline  2006 Capital Allocated to Reduce Natural Gas  2007 Began to Baseline Data and Implement Projects  2008 DOE Assessment Awarded (Natural Gas) & Formation of Site Energy Team  2009 DOE SEN Program at Richmond Site  2010 DOE SEN Program Expands at S-W Gaining Leadership Buy In Year kW Drop (%) Dem kW (%) Cost/ kW

28

Overcoming barriers to residential conservation: do energy audits help  

SciTech Connect

A study on the effects of energy audits on the pace and choice of household investment in energy-saving improvements in the home is reported. An evaluation based on the household's assessment of the usefulness of the audit which was provided for their home was performed. The number and types of recent conservation actions among audited and unaudited samples of households are compared. The audit's effect on household knowledge about the economically attractive options for their home and on the choice of recent improvements is assessed. Possible reasons are suggested for the weak effect of audits in stimulating activity and reorienting investment choices. (LEW)

Hoffman, W.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Toward sustainable stormwater management : overcoming barriers to green infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With their high concentrations of impervious surface, urban areas generate stormwater runoff that overwhelms existing infrastructure causing flooding, sewer overflows, water pollution, and habitat degradation. Under pressure ...

Hammitt, Sarah A. (Sarah Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Corporate Social Responsibility and Competitive Advantage: Overcoming the Trust Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research builds on the complementary corporate social responsibility (CSR) literatures in strategy and marketing to provide insight into the efficacy of CSR as a challenger's competitive weapon against a market leader. Through an investigation of ... Keywords: affective trust, challenger brand, competitive strategy, corporate social responsibility

Shuili Du; C. B. Bhattacharya; Sankar Sen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

ICME: Overcoming Barriers and Streamlining the Transition of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Assessing Data Completeness and Predictive Potential in ... Materials Engineering: Current Status and Future Challenges and Opportunities.

32

Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementa...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

furnaces, waste heat recovery But... ...being 'non-core', Energy Efficiency (EE) capital projects often take a backseat to other projects Organization Rick Bowen...

33

Overcoming organization barriers to adopting sustainable business practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Companies of all sizes are now looking for ways to reduce their energy use and carbon emissions, motivated by the desire to save money, improve public relations, and prepare for a possible carbon tax. From a technical ...

Chew, Mark P. (Mark Paul)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Overcoming Communication Latency Barriers in Massively Parallel Scientific Computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anton, a massively parallel special-purpose machine that accelerates molecular dynamics simulations by orders of magnitude, uses a combination of specialized hardware mechanisms and restructured software algorithms to reduce and hide communication latency. ... Keywords: Data communications, interprocessor communications, multiprocessor systems, network communication, parallel systems, special-purpose hardware, Anton

Ron Dror; J. P. Grossman; Kenneth Mackenzie; Brian Towles; Edmond Chow; John Salmon; Cliff Young; Joseph Bank; Brannon Batson; David Shaw; Jeffrey S. Kuskin; Richard H. Larson; Mark A. Moraes; David E. Shaw

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Overcoming barriers to energy efficiency for rental housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving building energy efficiency is widely recognized as one of the best strategies for combating climate change and other energy problems. Energy efficiency implementation has been slow, however, due to a number of ...

Williams, Beth E. (Beth Ellen)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Vehicle barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

Hirsh, Robert A. (Bethel Park, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Energy Taxation Forum: Renewable Energy Tax Policy and Overcoming...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Taxation Forum: Renewable Energy Tax Policy and Overcoming Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges Energy Taxation Forum: Renewable Energy Tax Policy and Overcoming...

39

NERSC Uses Stimulus Funds to Overcome Software Challenges for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Uses Stimulus Funds to Overcome Software Challenges for Scientific Computing NERSC Uses Stimulus Funds to Overcome Software Challenges for Scientific Computing October 30,...

40

Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/etsd/btric/pdfs/geothermal_report_12-08.pdf References: Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers[1] Overview "This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope included determining the status of global GHP markets

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Overcoming Scalability Challenges for Tool Daemon Launching  

SciTech Connect

Many tools that target parallel and distributed environments must co-locate a set of daemons with the distributed processes of the target application. However, efficient and portable deployment of these daemons on large scale systems is an unsolved problem. We overcome this gap with LaunchMON, a scalable, robust, portable, secure, and general purpose infrastructure for launching tool daemons. Its API allows tool builders to identify all processes of a target job, launch daemons on the relevant nodes and control daemon interaction. Our results show that Launch-MON scales to very large daemon counts and substantially enhances performance over existing ad hoc mechanisms.

Ahn, D H; Arnold, D C; de Supinski, B R; Lee, G L; Miller, B P; Schulz, M

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Enablers and barriers to the use of ICT in primary schools in Turkey: A comparative study of 2005-2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to reveal barriers encountered by Turkish primary school teachers in the integration of ICT, to propose potential enablers to overcome those barriers, and to compare the current status of ICT integration (in 2011) with the ... Keywords: ICT, ICT barriers, ICT enablers, ICT integration, M, MoNE, SD, SPSS

Yuksel Goktas; Nuray Gedik; Ozlem Baydas

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Argonne and DOE Team with Industry to Overcome Technical Barriers and Set Protocols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the forefront of at the forefront of hybrid and electric vehicle research. For more than 20 years its research has contributed to the growing acceptance of these vehicles as real alternatives to traditional gasoline-powered internal combustion engine vehicles. Argonne's technical expertise and top-of-the-line research facilities and equipment make Argonne a valuable partner to both well-established and up-and- coming players in the automotive industry. Developing SAE PHEV Fuel Economy Test Procedures Argonne's engineers are chairing the Society of Automotive Engineers SAE J1711 committee dedicated to determining test procedures for quantifying PHEV fuel and electrical energy consumption. A123 Systems Advanced Battery Testing A123 has enlisted Argonne's help in testing

44

Overcoming the l1 non-embeddability barrier: algorithms for product metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common approach for solving computational problems over a difficult metric space is to embed the "hard" metric into L1 which admits efficient algorithms and is thus considered an "easy" metric. This approach has proved successful ...

Alexandr Andoni; Piotr Indyk; Robert Krauthgamer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Can Real-Time Machine Translation Overcome Language Barriers in Distributed Requirements Engineering?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distant cultures with different languages and communication styles that, in turn, exacerbate communication software development requires close cooperation of individuals with distant cultural backgrounds. Cultural to explore the performance of MT in real-time text chat. The findings from our simulation are presented

Lanubile, Filippo

46

Overcoming Barriers to the Use of Osteopathic Manipulation Techniques in the Emergency Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

339. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume X, no .pain therapy in the emergency department. Emer Med Clin NoOsteopathic physicians in emergency medicine. Ann Emer Med.

Roberge, Raymond J; Roberge, Marc R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Electricity Transmission System Opportunities to Overcome Key Challenges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opportunities to Overcome Key Challenges Opportunities to Overcome Key Challenges Summary Results of Breakout Group Discussions Electricity Transmission Workshop Double Tree Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia November 2, 2012 Breakout Group Discussion Overview Opportunities to Overcome Key Challenges Each of the four breakout groups prioritized the critical issues facing the grid from the list of synthesized challenges identified in the first breakout session of the workshop. Focusing on these top priorities, each group proposed specific R&D activities and initiatives that DOE can pursue to overcome these challenges and address existing gaps. Summary of Synthesized Challenges A. Need improved understanding of the availability, utility, maintenance, exchange, and security of data and associated requirements.

48

Removing Barriers to Innovations: Related Codes and Standards CSI Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removing Barriers to Innovation Removing Barriers to Innovation Related Codes and Standards CSI Team PAM COLE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Meeting, April 29-30, 2013, Denver, CO PNNL-SA-95120 Background/History Transformation of U.S. housing markets to favor high- performance homes faces significant challenges, from education to technology to infrastructure and cost barriers. Some of the most difficult challenges involve industry codes and standards that may prevent or slow the innovation process. Building America Research has a history of: Successful market innovations and transformation and overcoming codes and standards barriers. Top 3 Existing Innovations C/S Challenges Thermal Bypass Air Barrier Requirements: Building America research teams effectively

49

20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final Report for '20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia'. The objective of this project was to examine the obstacles and constraints to the development of wind energy in West Virginia as well as the obstacles and constraints to the achievement of the national goal of 20% wind by 2030. For the portion contracted with WVU, there were four tasks in this examination of obstacles and constraints. Task 1 involved the establishment of a Wind Resource Council. Task 2 involved conducting limited research activities. These activities involved an ongoing review of wind energy documents including documents regarding the potential for wind farms being located on reclaimed surface mining sites as well as other brownfield sites. The Principal Investigator also examined the results of the Marshall University SODAR assessment of the potential for placing wind farms on reclaimed surface mining sites. Task 3 involved the conducting of outreach activities. These activities involved working with the members of the Wind Resource Council, the staff of the Regional Wind Energy Institute, and the staff of Penn Future. This task also involved the examination of the importance of transmission for wind energy development. The Principal Investigator kept informed as to transmission developments in the Eastern United States. The Principal Investigator coordinated outreach activities with the activities at the Center for Business and Economic Research at Marshall University. Task 4 involved providing technical assistance. This task involved the provision of information to various parties interested in wind energy development. The Principal Investigator was available to answer requests from interested parties regarding in formation regarding both utility scale as well as small wind development in West Virginia. Most of the information requested regarded either the permitting process for wind facilities of various sizes in the state or information regarding the wind potential in various parts of the state. This report describes four sub-categories of work done by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at Marshall University under this contract. The four sub-projects are: (1) research on the impacts of wind turbines on residential property values; (2) research on the integration of wind energy in regional transmission systems; (3) review of state-based wind legislation in consideration of model new policy options for West Virginia; and (4) promotion of wind facilities on former surface mine sites through development of a database of potential sites.

Patrick Mann; Christine Risch

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Construction Information Gateway Stephen R Lockley, Construction Informatics, Newcastle University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are overcome. 1 Parand, F. (1996) The Construction Information Gateway Demonstrator, CIBSE Journal (see also

Amor, Robert

51

Overcoming Challenges in America's Offshore Wind Industry | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overcoming Challenges in America's Offshore Wind Industry Overcoming Challenges in America's Offshore Wind Industry Overcoming Challenges in America's Offshore Wind Industry November 18, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy Steven Chalk speaks during the American Wind Energy Association WINDPOWER Offshore conference in Providence, Rhode Island. | Photo courtesy of American Wind Energy Association Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy Steven Chalk speaks during the American Wind Energy Association WINDPOWER Offshore conference in Providence, Rhode Island. | Photo courtesy of American Wind Energy Association Gregory M. Matzat PE; Senior Advisor, Offshore Wind Technologies A year of progress, preparation and promise was the theme connecting two days of panels and presentations last month at the 2013 American Wind

52

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

53

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

1980-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

54

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA); Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Liquid metal hydrogen barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

Grover, George M. (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Thurman G. (Los Alamos, NM); Keddy, Edward S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

inform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The monthly member publication of AOCS. inform Inform Magazine Membership Merchandise Subscriptions Journals Membership Merchandise 8C5A902BB64F1A5D499524EFF5918AE0 INFORM-NM 2008

57

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

58

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wowczuk, Andrew (Wheeling, WV); Vellenoweth, Thomas E. (Wheeling, WV)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Depar Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF November 9, 2011 Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup crews at the Idaho site recently disposed of a hot cell as heavy as nine fully loaded Boeing 737s. Unlike the aircrafts, the 1-million-pound concrete structure moved

60

Stepwise DNA Methylation Changes Are Linked to Escape from Defined Proliferation Barriers and Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization  

SciTech Connect

The timing and progression of DNA methylation changes during carcinogenesis are not completely understood. To develop a timeline of aberrant DNA methylation events during malignant transformation, we analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in an isogenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) culture model of transformation. To acquire immortality and malignancy, the cultured finite lifespan HMEC must overcome two distinct proliferation barriers. The first barrier, stasis, is mediated by the retinoblastoma protein and can be overcome by loss of p16(INK4A) expression. HMEC that escape stasis and continue to proliferate become genomically unstable before encountering a second more stringent proliferation barrier, telomere dysfunction due to telomere attrition. Rare cells that acquire telomerase expression may escape this barrier, become immortal, and develop further malignant properties. Our analysis of HMEC transitioning from finite lifespan to malignantly transformed showed that aberrant DNA methylation changes occur in a stepwise fashion early in the transformation process. The first aberrant DNA methylation step coincides with overcoming stasis, and results in few to hundreds of changes, depending on how stasis was overcome. A second step coincides with immortalization and results in hundreds of additional DNA methylation changes regardless of the immortalization pathway. A majority of these DNA methylation changes are also found in malignant breast cancer cells. These results show that large-scale epigenetic remodeling occurs in the earliest steps of mammary carcinogenesis, temporally links DNA methylation changes and overcoming cellular proliferation barriers, and provides a bank of potential epigenetic biomarkers that mayprove useful in breast cancer risk assessment.

Novak, Petr; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Retractable barrier strip  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McQueen, Miles A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

63

Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

Shurter, R.P.

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Method of installing subsurface barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Removing Barriers to Utility Interconnected Photovoltaic Inverters  

SciTech Connect

The Million Solar Roofs Initiative has motivated a renewed interest in the development of utility interconnected photovoltaic (UIPV) inverters. Government-sponsored programs (PVMaT, PVBONUS) and competition among utility interconnected inverter manufacturers have stimulated innovations and improved the performance of existing technologies. With this resurgence, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed a program to assist industry initiatives to overcome barriers to UIPV inverters. In accordance with newly adopted IEEE 929-2000, the utility interconnected PV inverters are required to cease energizing the utility grid when either a significant disturbance occurs or the utility experiences an interruption in service. Compliance with IEEE 929-2000 is being widely adopted by utilities as a minimum requirement for utility interconnection. This report summarizes work done at the SNL balance-of-systems laboratory to support the development of IEEE 929-2000 and to assist manufacturers in meeting its requirements.

Gonzalez, S.; Bonn, R.H.; Ginn, J.W.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

66

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: 20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The funds allocated through the Wind Powering America (WPA) grant were utilized by the State of Montana to support broad outreach activities communicating the benefits and opportunities of increased wind energy and transmission development. The challenges to increased wind development were also clearly communicated with the understanding that a clearer comprehension of the challenges would be beneficial in overcoming the obstacles to further development. The ultimate purpose of these activities was to foster the increased development of Montana's rich wind resources through increased public acceptance and wider dissemination of technical resources.

Tom Kaiserski; Dan Lloyd

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Barriers to energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

This study provides policy guidance to the FEA in its efforts to break down barriers to the efficient usage of finite energy sources. Such efforts may involve mechanisms to promote the more-efficient usage of current energy sources or to break down the barriers that presently inhibit the introduction of alternative energy sources. The major concern is with the energy used by finished products and not with the energy used in the production process itself. A wide range of such products, including many forms of construction, are dealt with. The primary exceptions are the various kinds of motor vehicles, which have been thoroughly covered both in Congressional hearings and in other studies. A large number of different types of barriers and potential incentives were examined during the study. They range from those that are essentially purely energy-related, such as the absence of adequate technology, to constraints that only unintentionally inhibit efficient energy usage (e.g., the antitrust laws).

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Affirmatively furthering fair housing : overcoming barriers to implementation of the Westchester County, NY false claims case settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Westchester County, NY was sued by the Anti-Discrimination Center of Metro New York, Inc. (ADC) under the False Claims Act for allegedly failing to meet its Affirmatively Further Fair Housing obligation for Community ...

Stein, Julie Iris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a set of 15 best practices for owners, designers, and construction teams of office buildings to reach high performance goals for energy efficiency, while maintaining a competitive budget. They are based on the recent experiences of the owner and design/build team for the Research Support Facility (RSF) on National Renewable Energy Facility's campus in Golden, CO, which show that achieving this outcome requires each key integrated team member to understand their opportunities to control capital costs.

Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Information Technology Solutions Hydroxyapatite Barriers for ...  

for the United States Department of Energys Na-tional Nuclear Security Administration under contact DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND #2010-0463P . Author:

71

Thermal barrier coating  

SciTech Connect

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers  

SciTech Connect

An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

Borns, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Natural completions - overcoming the damage caused by drilling and perforations  

SciTech Connect

Natural completions are suggested as a way to avoid or overcome damage to the formation caused by drilling and perforating. Formation damage may take the form of plugged passageways which remain closed because formation pressure does not exceed that of the plug material. Natural completions refer to using maximum differential pressure toward the wellbore, so that such obstructions in passageways can less easily exist. The method allows the formation pressure to backsurge perforation tunnels immediately following detonation of the guns, with the objectives of obtaining deep, clean perforations with the crushed zone and debris completely removed from the perforations. Procedures for natural completions are described and illustrated. A case history is given where the natural completion method restores productivity of a well.

Perry, G.; Smith, G.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Radiant Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barriers Barriers Radiant Barriers May 30, 2012 - 2:07pm Addthis What does this mean for me? Properly installed radiant barriers can reduce your cooling costs. Radiant barriers are easiest to install in new construction, but can be installed in your existing house, especially if it has an open attic. How does it work? Radiant barriers work by reflecting radiant heat away from living spaces. Radiant barriers are installed in homes -- usually in attics -- primarily to reduce summer heat gain and reduce cooling costs. The barriers consist of a highly reflective material that reflects radiant heat rather than absorbing it. They don't, however, reduce heat conduction like thermal insulation materials. How They Work Heat travels from a warm area to a cool area by a combination of

75

Radiant Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiant Barriers Radiant Barriers Radiant Barriers May 30, 2012 - 2:07pm Addthis What does this mean for me? Properly installed radiant barriers can reduce your cooling costs. Radiant barriers are easiest to install in new construction, but can be installed in your existing house, especially if it has an open attic. How does it work? Radiant barriers work by reflecting radiant heat away from living spaces. Radiant barriers are installed in homes -- usually in attics -- primarily to reduce summer heat gain and reduce cooling costs. The barriers consist of a highly reflective material that reflects radiant heat rather than absorbing it. They don't, however, reduce heat conduction like thermal insulation materials. How They Work Heat travels from a warm area to a cool area by a combination of

76

Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yearns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

Shurter, R.P.

1990-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Breaking Down the Barriers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breaking Down the Barriers Breaking Down the Barriers Engaging Agency Legal Resources to be Part of the Solution Daniel Gore US Coast Guard Energy Manager X ESPC ISC Kodiak ESPC/UESC Unit Contract Type Coast Guard Alternatively Financed Project Status Estimated Contract Value (Millions) Under Consideration Initial Proposal Delayed by lack of Contracting Officer or Champion Detailed Design Study Recently Awarded TRACEN Cape May ESPC X TRACEN Petaluma PPA X X ISC San Pedro UESC X X CG Academy ESPC X TRACEN Cape May UESC X Air Station Borenquin ESPC X X Sector New York (3 sites) ESPC X X CG Yard (BAMF) ESPC X E-City ESPC X West Coast - 9 Sites ESPC X Five Essentials for Alt. Financed Project * Site approval * Technical Champion * Contracting Officer * Financial Analyst * Legal Support

79

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, Charles A. (Tracy, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, C.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESD/10-4 ESD/10-4 Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities Energy Systems Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov.

83

Economic evaluation of closure cap barrier materials study  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of the Economic Evaluation of the Closure Cap Barrier Materials, Revision I contains detailed cost estimates for closure cap barrier materials. The cost estimates incorporate the life cycle costs for a generic hazardous waste seepage basin closure cap under the RCRA Post Closure Period of thirty years. The economic evaluation assessed six barrier material categories. Each of these categories consists of several composite cover system configurations, which were used to develop individual cost estimates. The information contained in this report is not intended to be used as a cost estimating manual. This information provides the decision makers with the ability to screen barrier materials, cover system configurations, and identify cost-effective materials for further consideration.

Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

P. Dixon

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Market barriers to energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such market barriers'' suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

Howarth, R.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Andersson, B. (Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Market barriers to energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such ``market barriers`` suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

Howarth, R.B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Andersson, B. [Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

94E 94E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J. Granderson, D. Watson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory P. Haugen, C. Romero Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory February 2009 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

88

Where radiant barriers really shine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufactures of radiant barrier materials claim their products significantly cut cooling costs by reducing summertime radiant heat gain through attics and ceilings. A new study confirms that radiant barriers can indeed conserve cooling energy. However, the study`s authors found that radiant barriers are much more effective at reducing energy losses from attic air conditioner duct runs than at directly lowering heat transfer through the attic floor into conditioned living space. Furthermore the study demonstrated that radiant barrier savings can be significant even in a new well-weatherized house and that these saving may justify specifying smaller capacity cooling systems. This article discusses the findings of the study.

Engel, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance Henrik Vibeenergy stored in plant biomass. The papers in this volumefeedstocks development and biomass deconstruction. Keywords

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JD (2009) Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases.JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomassthe next-generation of biofuels liquid fuels derived from

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

Making Buildings Part of the Climate Solution by Overcoming Information Gaps through Benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the impact of benchmarking the energy performance of U.S. commercial buildings by requiring utilities to submit energy data to a uniform database accessible to building owners and tenants. Understanding how a commercial building uses energy has many benefits; in particular, it helps building owners and tenants focus on poor-performing buildings and subsystems, and enables highperforming buildings to participate in various certification programs that can lead to higher occupancy rates, rents, and property values. Through analysis chiefly utilizing the Georgia Tech version of the National Energy Modeling System (GT-NEMS), updating input discount rates and the impact of benchmarking shows a reduction in energy consumption of 5.6 % in 2035 relative to the Reference case projection of the Annual Energy Outlook 2011. It is estimated that the benefits of a national benchmarking policy would outweigh the costs, both to the private sector and society broadly. However, its geographical impact would vary substantially, with the South Atlantic and New England regions benefiting the most. By reducing the discount rates used to evaluate energy-efficiency investments, benchmarking would increase the purchase of energy-efficient equipment thereby reducing energy bills, CO2 emissions, and conventional air pollution. *Corresponding author:

Matt Cox; Marilyn A. Brown; Xiaojing Sun; Dr. Marilyn; A. Brown; D. M. Smith Building

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER  

SciTech Connect

In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations, indicating some loss of reductive capacity within the aquifer. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) was requested to perform the following activities: (1) evaluate the most probable condition(s) that has led to the presence of Cr(VI) in 12 different barrier wells (i.e. premature loss of reductive capacity), (2) recommend methods for determining the cause of the problem, (3) recommend methods for evaluating the magnitude of the problem, (4) recommend practicable method(s) for mending the barrier that involves a long-term solution, and (5) recommend methods for extending the barrier to the northeast (e.g., changing injection procedure, changing or augmenting the injected material). Since the March 2004 workshop, a decision has been made to place a hold on the barrier extension until more is known about the cause of the problem. However, the report complies with the original request for information on all of the above activities, but focuses on determining the cause of the problem and mending of the existing barrier.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nontechnical Barriers to Solar Energy Use: Review of Recent Literature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the nontechnical barriers to solar energy use, drawing on recent literature to help identify key barriers that must be addressed as part of the Technology Acceptance efforts under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America Initiative. A broad literature search yielded more than 400 references, which were narrowed to 19 recent documents on nontechnical barriers to the use of solar energy and other energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) technologies. Some of the most frequently identified barriers included lack of government policy supporting EE/RE, lack of information dissemination and consumer awareness about energy and EE/RE, high cost of solar and other EE/RE technologies compared with conventional energy, and inadequate financing options for EE/RE projects.

Margolis, R.; Zuboy, J.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

G.H. Nieder-Westermann

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consumers regularly forgo purchases of high efficiency appliances that appear to be cost effective at a reasonable rate of return. While some argue that this is a true revelation of preferences for appliance features, this 'efficiency gap' can be largely explained by a combination of market and behavioral failures that reduce consumers ability to evaluate the relative value of appliances and skew preferences toward initial cost savings, undervaluing future reductions in operating costs. These failures and barriers include externalities of energy use, imperfect competition between manufacturers, asymmetric information, bounded rationality, split incentives, and transaction costs (Golove 1996). Recognizing the social benefit of energy conservation, several major methods are used by policymakers to ensure that efficient appliances are purchased: minimum efficiency standards, Energy Star labeling, and rebates and tax credits. There is no single market for energy services; there are hundreds of uses, thousands of intermediaries, and millions of users, and likewise, no single appropriate government intervention (Golove 1996). Complementary approaches must be implemented, considering policy and institutional limitations. In this paper, I first lay out the rationale for government intervention by addressing the market and behavioral failures and barriers that arise in the context of residential energy efficiency. I then consider the ways in which some of these failures and barriers are addressed through major federal programs and state and utility level programs that leverage them, as well as identifying barriers that are not addressed by currently implemented programs. Heterogeneity of consumers, lack of financing options, and split incentives of landlords and tenants contribute significantly to the under-adoption of efficient appliances. To quantify the size of the market most affected by these barriers, I estimate the number of appliances, and in particular the number of outdated appliances, in California rental housing. Appliances in rental housing are on average older than those in owner occupied housing. More importantly, a substantial proportion of very old appliances are in rental housing. Having established that a very old stock of appliances exists in California rental housing, I discuss tariff financing as a policy option to reduce the impact of the remaining market and behavioral barriers. In a tariff financing program, the utility pays the initial cost of an appliance, and is repaid through subsequent utility bills. By eliminating upfront costs, tying repayment to the gas or electric meter, requiring a detailed energy audit, and relying upon utility bill payment history rather than credit score in determining participant eligibility, tariff financing largely overcomes many barriers to energy efficiency. Using California as a case study, I evaluate the feasibility of implementing tariff financing. For water heaters in particular, this appears to be a cost-effective strategy. Tariff financing from utilities is particularly valuable because it improves the ability of low-income renters to lower their utility bills, without burdening landlords with unrecoverable capital costs. To implement tariff financing country-wide, regulations in many states defining private loan-making institutions or the allowable use of public benefit funds may need to be modified. Tariff financing is relatively new and in most locations is only available as a pilot program or has only recently exited pilot phase. This preliminary evaluation suggests that tariff financing is a valuable future addition to the toolkit of policymakers who aim to increase the diffusion of efficient appliances. While regulatory approval is necessary in states that wish to pursue tariff financing, at this point, the major barrier to further implementation appears to be the newness of the financing mechanism.

Fujita, K. Sydny

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes ... successfully tested as a replacement for barrier bricks in several reduction cell technology types...

98

Hurdling barriers through market uncertainty: Case studies ininnovative technology adoption  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The crisis atmosphere surrounding electricity availability in California during the summer of 2001 produced two distinct phenomena in commercial energy consumption decision-making: desires to guarantee energy availability while blackouts were still widely anticipated, and desires to avoid or mitigate significant price increases when higher commercial electricity tariffs took effect. The climate of increased consideration of these factors seems to have led, in some cases, to greater willingness on the part of business decision-makers to consider highly innovative technologies. This paper examines three case studies of innovative technology adoption: retrofit of time-and-temperature signs on an office building; installation of fuel cells to supply power, heating, and cooling to the same building; and installation of a gas-fired heat pump at a microbrewery. We examine the decision process that led to adoption of these technologies. In each case, specific constraints had made more conventional energy-efficient technologies inapplicable. We examine how these barriers to technology adoption developed over time, how the California energy decision-making climate combined with the characteristics of these innovative technologies to overcome the barriers, and what the implications of hurdling these barriers are for future energy decisions within the firms.

Payne, Christopher T.; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Payne, Jack

2002-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

ORNL Radiant Barrier - ETSD Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Zone 2), radiant barriers could reduce your utility bills by as much as 150 per year using average residential electricity prices. If you're able to participate in one of...

100

Information Request Yucca Mountain Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Request Yucca Mountain Site Information Request Yucca Mountain Site The Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site and the Issue of Natural Barriers as the Principal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology development  

SciTech Connect

An important component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier is the use of a two-layer composite asphalt system, which provides backup water diversion capabilities if the primary capillary barrier fails to meet infiltration goals. Because of asphalt`s potential to perform to specification over the 1000-year design life criterion, a composite asphalt barrier (HMAC/fluid-applied polymer-modified asphalt) is being considered as an alternative to the bentonite clay/high density poly(ethylene) barriers for the low-permeability component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier. The feasibility of using asphalt as a long-term barrier is currently being studied. Information that must be known is the ability of asphalt to retain desirable physical properties over a period of 1000 years. This paper presents the approach for performing accelerated aging tests and evaluating the performance of samples under accelerated conditions. The results of these tests will be compared with asphalt artifact analogs and the results of modeling the degradation of the selected asphalt composite to make life-cycle predictions.

Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup crews at the Idaho site recently disposed of a hot cell as heavy as nine fully loaded Boeing 737s. Unlike the aircrafts, the 1-million-pound concrete structure moved about two miles per hour on a trailer with 224 tires towed by a semi-truck. Workers safely transported the cell from the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATR-C) to an onsite landfill two miles away. Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters CX-001627: Categorical Exclusion Determination Occupational Safety Performance Trends

104

Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup crews at the Idaho site recently disposed of a hot cell as heavy as nine fully loaded Boeing 737s. Unlike the aircrafts, the 1-million-pound concrete structure moved about two miles per hour on a trailer with 224 tires towed by a semi-truck. Workers safely transported the cell from the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATR-C) to an onsite landfill two miles away. Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters CX-002327: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001627: Categorical Exclusion Determination

105

SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lowering Barriers to someone by Lowering Barriers to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Lowering Barriers DOE is working to improve solar market conditions in order to create green jobs and increase the availability of clean, renewable energy for Americans. Efforts to promote favorable policies and encourage easier

106

Clean Cities: Information Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Information Resources to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Information Resources on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Information Resources on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Information Resources on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Information Resources on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Information Resources on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Information Resources on AddThis.com... Publications Technical Assistance Information Resources Learn about Clean Cities by exploring these information resources. Publications View Clean Cities-branded publications or search for publications about alternative fuels and vehicles. Technical Assistance Learn about technical assistance available to help organizations overcome

107

Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA); Jackaway, Adam D. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

Waldrop, James R. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Cohen, Marshall J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Simulated Attic Radiant Barrier Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent EPRI evaluation determined that attic radiant barriers installed under roof decks are increasingly effective in reducing cooling energy use as insolation increases and ceiling insulation thickness decreases. A savings worksheet included in this report allows rapid estimation of these energy cost impacts.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

112

Barriers and Opportunities: A Review of Selected Successful Energy-Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In industry, barriers may exist at various points in the decision making process, and in the implementation and management of measures to improve energy efficiency. Barriers may take many forms, and are determined by the business environment and include decision-making processes, energy prices, lack of information, a lack of confidence in the information, or high transaction costs for obtaining reliable information, as well as limited capital availability. Other barriers are the "invisibility" of energy efficiency measures and the difficulty of quantifying the impacts, and slow diffusion of innovative technology into markets while firms typically under-invest in R&D, despite the high pay-backs. Various programs try to reduce the barriers to improve the uptake of innovative technologies. A wide array of policies has been used and tested in the industrial sector in industrialized countries, with varying success rates. We review some new approaches to industrial energy efficiency improvement in industrialized countries, focusing on voluntary agreements.

Worrell, E.; Price, L.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Barriers and opportunities: A review of selected successful energy-efficiency programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In industry, barriers may exist at various points in the decision making process, and in the implementation and management of measures to improve energy efficiency. Barriers may take many forms, and are determined by the business environment and include decision-making processes, energy prices, lack of information, a lack of confidence in the information, or high transaction costs for obtaining reliable information, as well as limited capital availability. Other barriers are the ''invisibility'' of energy efficiency measures and the difficulty of quantifying the impacts, and slow diffusion of innovative technology into markets while firms typically under-invest in R and D, despite the high pay-backs. Various programs try to reduce the barriers to improve the uptake of innovative technologies. A wide array of policies has been used and tested in the industrial sector in industrialized countries, with varying success rates. We review some new approaches to industrial energy efficiency improvement in industrialized countries, focusing on voluntary agreements.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Electrical Calcium Test for Measuring Barrier Permeability ...  

Energy Analysis; Energy Storage ... Technology Marketing Summary Moisture or water vapor barriers are important in ... Software techniques for data an ...

115

NERSC's Hopper Breaks Petaflops Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC's Hopper Breaks NERSC's Hopper Breaks Petaflops Barrier NERSC's Hopper Breaks Petaflops Barrier Ranks 5th in the World November 14, 2010 Media Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 hopper1.jpg NERSC's Cray XE6-Hopper BERKELEY, Calif.-The Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), already one of the world's leading centers for scientific productivity, is now home to the fifth most powerful supercomputer in the world and the second most powerful in the United States, according to the latest edition of the TOP500 list, the definitive ranking of the world's top computers NERSC's newest supercomputer, a 153,408 processor-core Cray XE6 system, posted a performance of 1.05 petaflops (quadrillions of calculations per second) running the Linpack benchmark. In keeping with NERSC's tradition of

116

Overcoming the Efficiency-Limiting Mechanisms in Commercial Si Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review of performance-limiting processes in a commercial solar cell fabricated on low-cost substrate is given. Higher efficiencies require effective gettering of precipitated impurities present at the defect clusters, and improved cell and process designs. Overcoming these limitations is expected to lead to 18%-20% cell efficiencies.

Sopori, B.; Chen, W. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Tan, T.; Plekhanov, P. (Duke University, Raleigh, NC)

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

118

State Barriers to CHP Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every year, ACEEE collects data on regulatory policies in each state that theoretically serve to promote and discourage combined heat and power (CHP) development. In our annual State Energy Efficiency Scorecard (5), we assess the regulatory environment for CHP in each state and score states based on the favorability of their policies for CHP. As part of an effort to make this Scorecard more robust, ACEEE is conducting research to determine the practical realities of CHP development in each state from the perspective of CHP developers and technical assistance agencies. Preliminary research has shown that while certain regulations-and lack of regulations-can greatly influence the attractiveness or success of a project, there are market barriers outside the realm of policy that deserve a great deal of exploration and attention. Traditional regulatory barriers to CHP, such as interconnection procedures, air emissions regulations, and utility standby rates, do pose challenges for development in many states. However, discussions with CHP developers have revealed that many of these issues are overshadowed by economic and financial barriers, as well as other hidden market hurdles. Among these hurdles are the availability of natural gas at reasonable prices, the spark spread in a given region, the effectiveness of CHP developers, the presence of a devoted CHP champion at a host site, and the availability of financing mechanisms to mitigate the upfront capital burden on new projects. This paper will examine each region of the country and each state to determine specific barriers and outline a state-by-state market overview for CHP.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

BARRIER SYSTEM FULL SCALE FIRE TESTING ADDRESSEES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All holders of operating licenses for nuclear power reactors, except those who have permanently ceased operations and have certified that fuel has been permanently removed from the reactor vessel, and fuel facilities licensees. PURPOSE The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing this information notice (IN) to inform addressees of the results of Hemyc electrical raceway fire barrier system (ERFBS) full-scale fire tests. The Hemyc ERFBS did not perform for one hour as designed because shrinkage of the Hemyc ERFBS occurred during the testing. It is expected that recipients will review the information for applicability to their facilities and consider actions as appropriate to avoid similar problems. However, suggestions contained in this information notice are not NRC requirements; therefore, no specific action or written response is required. BACKGROUND The Hemyc ERFBS, manufactured by Promatec, Inc., has been installed at nuclear power plants (NPPs) to protect circuits in accordance with regulatory requirements (Reference 1) and plant-specific commitments. As a result of fire protection inspections, unresolved items (URIs) were opened at some nuclear power stations due to questions raised regarding the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 2). The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) performed a review of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 3) and requested the NRCs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to perform confirmatory testing of this ERFBS. RES performed the testing at the Omega Point Laboratories in Elmendorf, Texas. DISCUSSION This information notice describes the results of the investigation of the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Attachment 1). The NRC performed two ASTM E 119 furnace tests on a number of cable raceway types that are protected by the Hemyc ERFBS (with and without air gaps) in accordance with the Hemyc ERFBS test plan (see ADAMS Accession No. ML043210141 for a preliminary version of the test plan). The test plan provides ML050890089 IN 2005-07

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Immobilization technology down-selection radiation barrier approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six immobilization technology projects variants, previously selected for evaluation during the PEIS/ROD process, have been evaluated with respect to the nine basic criteria for fissile materials disposition. Metrics for the criteria were developed to facilitate a comparative analysis of the technology variants. The six technology variants are grouped according to their radiation barrier approach. Information and data for the technology options were provided by limited experimental studies, definitions of process flowsheets, and preliminary evaluations of facility concepts and costs.

Gray, L.W.; Gould, T.H.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Double barrier system for an in situ conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier system for a subsurface treatment area is described. The barrier system includes a first barrier formed around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. The first barrier is configured to inhibit fluid from exiting or entering the subsurface treatment area. A second barrier is formed around at least a portion of the first barrier. A separation space exists between the first barrier and the second barrier.

McKinzie, Billy John [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Cowan, Kenneth Michael [Sugar land, TX; Deeg, Wolfgang Friedrich Johann [Houston, TX; Wong, Sau-Wai [Rijswijk, NL

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

122

Information Request  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 25, 2008 November 25, 2008 TO: Sue Tierney, Phil Niedzielski-Eichner, Skila Harris FROM: Chris Kouts SUBJECT: Information Request As requested, enclosed is the additional information you requested yesterday. 1. Testimony: * September 24, 2008 before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, * July 15, 2008 before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce * October 4, 2007 before the House Committee on the Budget and Chairman Spratt 2. Proposed Legislation "Nuclear Fuel Management and Disposal Act" submitted to Congress March 6, 2007 3. State-by-State Maps that outline each state's electricity generation mix, commercial spent nuclear fuel inventories, and payments into the Nuclear Waste Fund The additional information on the history of the use of engineered barriers will be

123

Open Energy Information Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OpenEIS (energy information OpenEIS (energy information systems) Jessica Granderson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory JGranderson@lbl.gov, 510.486.6792 April 3, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Advanced algorithms and analyses can enable 5-40% savings, yet are rarely adopted; 3 relevant barriers include: 1. Lack of awareness that simple analytics can be used to generate valuable insights and actionable information, without further training

124

Open Energy Information Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OpenEIS (energy information OpenEIS (energy information systems) Jessica Granderson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory JGranderson@lbl.gov, 510.486.6792 April 3, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Advanced algorithms and analyses can enable 5-40% savings, yet are rarely adopted; 3 relevant barriers include: 1. Lack of awareness that simple analytics can be used to generate valuable insights and actionable information, without further training

125

Interdiffusion between Zr Diffusion Barrier and U-Mo Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment uranium fuels under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Significant reactions have been observed between U-Mo fuels and Al or Al alloy matrix. Refractory metal Zr has been proposed as barrier material to reduce the interactions. In order to investigate the compatibility and barrier effects between U-Mo alloy and Zr, solid-to-solid U-10wt.%Mo vs. Zr diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 C for various times. The microstructures and concentration profiles due to interdiffusion and reactions were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. Intermetallic phase Mo2Zr was found at the interface and its population increased when annealing temperature decreased. Diffusion paths were also plotted on the U-Mo-Zr ternary phase diagrams with good consistency. The growth rate of interdiffusion zone between U-10wt.%Mo and Zr was also calculated under the assumption of parabolic diffusion, and was determined to be about 103 times lower than the growth rate of diffusional interaction layer found in diffusion couples U-10wt.%Mo vs. Al or Al-Si alloy. Other desirable physical properties of Zr as barrier material, such as neutron adsorption rate, melting point and thermal conductivity are presented as supplementary information to demonstrate the great potential of Zr as the diffusion barrier for U-Mo fuel systems in RERTR.

K. Huang; Y. Park; Y. H. Sohn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Analysis of annual energy savings due to radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiant barriers are receiving increasing attention as an energy conservation measure for residential buildings, especially for warmer climates. They are being actively promoted for use in residential attics, sometimes with exaggerated claims about savings in utility bills that will results from their installation. In order to provide consumers with factual information that would assist them in deciding upon an investment in a radiant barrier, the Department of Energy, along with an industry advisory panel, has developed a Radiant Barrier Fact Sheet. A major part of this fact sheet is estimates of energy savings that might be expected from radiant barriers in various climates. This paper presents the details of the methodology underlying the energy savings estimates, and gives a summary of values listed in the Fact Sheet. The energy savings estimates were obtained from calculations using a detailed attic thermal model coupled with DOE-2.1C. A life cycle cost analysis was performed to estimate the present value savings on utility fuel costs. The results show that the fuel cost savings vary significantly with the level of conventional insulation already in the attic and from one climate to another.

Wilkes, K.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Opportunities and barriers for sustainable international bioenergy trade and strategies to overcome them -A report prepared by IEA Bioenergy Task 40  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residue of the palm oil production process) from Malaysia to the Netherlands, and wood pellets from Canada households (who were replacing their expensive fossil fuels with wood pellets), higher demand from power can be immature and unstable, e.g. as in the case of the wood pellet market. During the winter of 2005

128

Low-income housing in Kampala, Uganda : a strategy package to overcome barriers for delivering housing opportunities affordable to the urban poor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The city of Kampala, Uganda, is struggling with a housing deficit that is compounding each year and creating market distortions that threaten to derail recent economic success and destabilize the social fabric of the ...

Mayer, Richard Campbell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Information Request Yucca Mountain Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2008 , 2008 TO: Sue Tierney, Phil Niedzielski-Eichner, Skila Harris FROM: Chris Kouts SUBJECT: Information Request As requested, enclosed is the additional information you requested last week regarding use of engineered barriers. Please let me know if you need additional information or have any questions. A,4- -/0 7 The Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site and the Issue of Natural Barriers as the Principal Barriers for Demonstrating Safety This paper addresses two issues that are frequently raised concerning the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for development as a repository. The first issue is that the Yucca Mountain site is technically unsound and that an engineered barrier system is required because the site is not capable of protecting public health and safety. The second issue is

130

Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed.

Smith, M.J.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and dusting potential. (6) Evaluate drift conditions and configurations to determine the suitability of Richards Barrier installation methodology. (7) Perform cost assessment of barrier material placement. (8) Evaluate the feature with criteria that will be supplied by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) Team. (9) Comment on the use of depleted uranium as a Richards Barrier material.

N.E. Kramer

1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and remedial time required by the electrician and end user. (3) Minimize ongoing perceived overhead costs and inconvenience to the end user, or in other words, systems should be simple to understand and use. In addition, we believe that no lighting controls solution is effective or acceptable unless it contributes to, or does not compromise, the following goals: (1) Productivity--Planning, installation, commissioning, maintenance, and use of controls should not decrease business productivity; (2) Energy savings--Lighting controls should save significant amounts of energy and money in relation to the expense involved in using them (acceptable payback period); and/or (3) Reduced power demand--Society as a whole should benefit from the lowered demand for expensive power and for more natural resources. Discussions of technology barriers and developments are insufficient by themselves to achieve higher penetration of lighting controls in the market place. Technology transfer efforts must play a key role in gaining market acceptance. The LRC developed a technology transfer model to better understand what actions are required and by whom to move any technology toward full market acceptance.

Peter Morante

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Radiant Barrier Performance during the Heating Season  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of winter experiments conducted in Central Texas are presented. The experiments were side-by-side tests using two identical 144 ft2 houses which responded similarly to weather variations prior to any retrofits. Two radiant barrier orientations were tested, horizontal barrier and barrier against the rafters, in vented and non-vented attics. The results compiled in this paper are for attics with R-19 fiberglass insulation. The data showed that radiant barriers were still effective during the winter season. During a typical day radiant barriers prevented approximately 9-17 percent of the indoor heat from escaping into the attic. No significant difference in moisture accumulation was detected in the attic with the radiant barrier.

Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

135

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barriers to Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings. Preparedbuilding standards were proposed (which have since been implemented). Neighborhood planning and solar heating

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Testing for the technology barrier: Applets - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 24, 1998 ... Testing for the technology barrier: Applets. The first stage was to support the creation of a set of focussed resources by a model teacher.

137

SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lowering Barriers DOE is working to improve solar market conditions in order to create green jobs and increase the availability of clean, renewable energy for Americans. Efforts to...

138

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tax incentives to promote solar energy; state and localstate government can promote energy conservation and surmount institutional barriers through utilities regulation, land use control, tax incentives,

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Natural gas vehicles : Status, barriers, and opportunities.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, recent shale gas discoveries have generated renewed interest in using natural gas as a vehicular fuel, primarily in fleet applications, while outside the United States, natural gas vehicle use has expanded significantly in the past decade. In this report for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program - a public-private partnership that advances the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions that reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector - we have examined the state of natural gas vehicle technology, current market status, energy and environmental benefits, implications regarding advancements in European natural gas vehicle technologies, research and development efforts, and current market barriers and opportunities for greater market penetration. The authors contend that commercial intracity trucks are a prime area for advancement of this fuel. Therefore, we examined an aggressive future market penetration of natural gas heavy-duty vehicles that could be seen as a long-term goal. Under this scenario using Energy Information Administration projections and GREET life-cycle modeling of U.S. on-road heavy-duty use, natural gas vehicles would reduce petroleum consumption by approximately 1.2 million barrels of oil per day, while another 400,000 barrels of oil per day reduction could be achieved with significant use of natural gas off-road vehicles. This scenario would reduce daily oil consumption in the United States by about 8%.

Rood Werpy, M.; Santini, D.; Burnham, A.; Mintz, M.; Energy Systems

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Electrical imagining of engineered hydraulic barriers  

SciTech Connect

Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to image the full-scale test emplacement of a thin-wall grout barrier installed by high-pressure jetting and a thick-wall polymer barrier installed by low-pressure permeation injection. Both case studies compared images of electrical resistivity before and after barrier installation. Barrier materials were imaged as anomalies which were more electrically conducting than the native sandy soils at the test sites. Although the spatial resolution of the ERT was insufficient to resolve flaws smaller than a reconstruction voxel (50 cm on a side), the images did show the spatial extent of the barrier materials and therefore the general shape of the structures. To verify barrier performance, ERT was also used to monitor a flood test of a thin-wall grout barrier. Electrical resistivity changes were imaged as a saltwater tracer moved through the barrier at locations which were later found to be defects in a wall or the joining of two walls.

Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barrier Field Projects Durango, Colorado DOE installed a PRB in October 1995 to treat ground water from a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Durango, Colorado Read more Cañon City, Colorado ESL personnel conduct tests and help evaluate performance at other PRB sites, such as Cotter Corporation's Cañon City site in Colorado. Read more Monticello, Utah Installation of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello, Utah, millsite was completed June 30, 1999, as an Interim Remedial Action. Read more A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a zone of reactive material placed underground to intercept and react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils with reactive

142

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

143

Multi-layer waste containment barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for constructing an underground containment barrier for containing an in-situ portion of earth. The apparatus includes an excavating device for simultaneously (i) excavating earthen material from beside the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming an open side trench defined by opposing earthen sidewalls, and (ii) excavating earthen material from beneath the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming a generally horizontal underground trench beneath the in-situ portion defined by opposing earthen sidewalls. The apparatus further includes a barrier-forming device attached to the excavating device for simultaneously forming a side barrier within the open trench and a generally horizontal, multi-layer barrier within the generally horizontal trench. The multi-layer barrier includes at least a first layer and a second layer.

Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nickelson, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

Staller, George E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wemple, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

146

Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds in Acyclic Tertiary Diamines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Search of a Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in Proton Bridgedand J.A. Gerlt, The Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in EnzymaticShow That Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds do not Offer a

Khodagholian, Sevana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Radiant barrier applications: Symposium and workshop proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities and their customers are continually looking for ways to improve the thermal integrity of buildings. Radiant barrier systems can reduce summer air conditioning loads by reducing radiant heat transfer in attics. EPRI conducted two programs to help utilities with radiant barriers. A Symposium and Workshop were conducted in April 1988. The Symposium reviewed the state of the art in radiant barriers. The Workshop brought industry experts together to identify research needs for radiant barriers. The Workshop found that research is needed in six major areas. Listed in order of importance these are: (1) Field and laboratory testing, (2) Materials research, (3) Modeling, (4) Materials standards, (5) Economic issues, and (6) Installation methods. The leading research topics within these six major areas in order of importance include:(1) Modeling to fill voids in existing field data and aid in the development of performance standards, (2) Calculation of energy savings for various configurations, (3) Analysis of existing data to better understand radiant barrier performance, (4) Assessment of the effect of dust accumulation on performance, (5) Development of standard testing procedures, (6) Development of systems standards, (7) Measurement of changes in the emissivity of radiant barrier materials with time, (8) Determination of the possibility of moisture accumulation under horizontal radiant barriers during heating season operation, (9) Ventilation effects, (10) Configuration testing, (11) Costs of new and retrofit applications, and (12) Characterization of side effects. 34 refs., 5 figs.

Isaksen, L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TVA has conducted a study to determine the effects of radiant barriers (RBI (i.e., material with a low emissivity surface facing an air space), when used with fiberglass, on attic heat transfer during summer and winter. This study employed five small test cells exposed to ambient conditions and having attics with gable and soffit vents. Three different RB configurations were tested and compared to the non-RR configuration. Heat flux transducers determined the heat transfer between the attic and conditioned space. The results showed that all RB con figurations significantly reduced heat gain through the ceiling during the summer. Reductions in heat gain during daylight and peak electric load hours were especially attractive. Roof temperatures for the RB configurations were only slightly higher than for the non-RB case. Heat transfer reductions for the RB configurations in the winter were smaller than those for the summer but were still significant in many, but not all, situations. Savings during night and peak electric load hours were especially attractive.

Hall, J. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Permanent isolation surface barrier development plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exhumation and treatment of wastes may not always be the preferred alternative in the remediation of a waste site. In-place disposal alternatives, under certain circumstances, may be the most desirable alternatives to use in the protection of human health and the environment. The implementation of an in-place disposal alternative will likely require some type of protective covering that will provide long-term isolation of the wastes from the accessible environment. Even if the wastes are exhumed and treated, a long-term barrier may still be needed to adequately dispose of the treated wastes or any remaining waste residuals. Currently, no {open_quotes}proven{close_quotes} long-term barrier is available. The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site. The permanent isolation barrier technology also could be used at other sites. Permanent isolation barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with redundant protective features. Drawings of conceptual permanent isolation surface barriers are shown. The natural construction materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity. The objective of current designs is to use natural materials to develop a maintenance-free permanent isolation surface barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1,000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling the exhalation of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion-related problems.

Wing, N.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Disposal barriers that release contaminants only by molecular diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered barriers can slow the movement of pollutants out of land disposal facilities in several ways. If the advective velocity is low, release will be primarily by molecular diffusion. Attenuation processes also work to slow the transport of many contaminants. Barriers that cause pollutants to be released almost entirely by molecular diffusion represent the best barriers achievable. Use of thick barrier materials will maximize the breakthrough time of contaminants that diffuse through the barrier. Thin barriers with exceedingly low permeabilities will not necessarily outperform thicker, more permeable liners. In fact, if diffusion is the dominant mechanism of release, the thicker, more permeable barrier may actually outperform the thinner barrier with lower permeability.

Daniel, D.E.; Shackelford, C.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

153

User-Centered Adaptive Information Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information retrieval systems are critical for overcoming information overload. A major deficiency of existing retrieval systems is that they generally lack user modeling and are not adaptive to individual users; information about the actual user and search context is largely ignored. For example, a tourist and a programmer may use the same word "java" to search for different information, but the current retrieval systems would return the same results. In the proposed

Xuehua Shen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Transport Properties for Triangular Barriers in Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically study the electronic transport properties of Dirac fermions through one and double triangular barriers in graphene. Using the transfer matrix method, we determine the transmission, conductance and Fano factor. They are obtained to be various parameters dependent such as well width, barrier height and barrier width. Therefore, different discussions are given and comparison with the previous significant works is done. In particular, it is shown that at Dirac point the Dirac fermions always own a minimum conductance associated with a maximum Fano factor and change their behaviors in an oscillatory way (irregularly periodical tunneling peaks) when the potential of applied voltage is increased.

Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

155

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neighborhood planning and solar heating and cooling in DavisLegal Barriers to Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings.the interaction of solar energy heating/cooling/hot water

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Surprising attractive potential barriers and repulsive wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental fact is revealed that in the old good quantum mechanics there is possible such unexpected inversion: potential barriers can drag in wave-particles and wells can push them off.

B. N. Zakhariev

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

157

Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic ...

Sheikh, J. A.

159

Photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic devices with quantum barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic or thermophotovoltaic device includes a diode formed by p-type material and n-type material joined at a p-n junction and including a depletion region adjacent to said p-n junction, and a quantum barrier disposed near or in the depletion region of the p-n junction so as to decrease device reverse saturation current density while maintaining device short circuit current density. In one embodiment, the quantum barrier is disposed on the n-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to electrons while in another, the barrier is disposed on the p-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to holes. In another embodiment, both types of quantum barriers are used.

Wernsman, Bernard R. (Jefferson Hills, PA)

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

TRIBAL LEADER FORUM SERIES ENERGY TAXATION FORUM: RENEWABLE ENERGY TAX POLICY & OVERCOMING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENERGY TAXATION FORUM: ENERGY TAXATION FORUM: RENEWABLE ENERGY TAX POLICY & OVERCOMING INTER-JURISDICTIONAL CHALLENGES TRAVEL FACT SHEET March 22, 2012 THE ROOSEVELT HOTEL 123 BARONNE STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 (504) 648-1200 MEETING ROOM-CHAMBERS 1 & 2 MEETING DETAILS The fourth of a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum will provide an opportunity for Tribal leaders and federal agencies to get real-time market snapshots of: renewable energy investment challenges, alternative energy tribal ownership opportunities, and tax policy and inter-jurisdictional challenges. This Forum will also provide a venue for Tribal leaders to directly converse with each other regarding best practices in renewable energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Liquid junction schottky barrier solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixture of ceric ions (Ce.sup.+4) and cerous ions (Ce.sup.+3) in an aqueous electrolyte solution forms a Schottky barrier at the interface between an active region of silicon and the electrolyte solution. The barrier height obtained for hydrogenated amorphous silicon using the Ce.sup.+4 /Ce.sup.+3 redox couple is about 1.7 eV.

Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Evaluation Criteria. Organizational Barriers to MSW Ener.gy Organizational Barriers to Wind Energy

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they pertain to this report; the current procedures are addressed in Section 2. This revision also addresses updates to the technical basis in supporting analysis and model reports and corroborative documentation, as presented in Sections 4 and 6 of this report. Finally, Sections 4, 5, and 6 of this report provide additional information pertaining to the relevant FEPs-related Acceptance Criteria presented in ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (YMRP) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274], Sections 2.2.1.2.1.3 and 2.2.1.3.3.3).

Jaros, W.

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

ELECTROSTATICALLY ENHANCED BARRIER FILTER COLLECTION  

SciTech Connect

This work was performed through the University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department with assistance from UND's Energy & Environmental Research Center. This research was undertaken in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Technology Center Program Solicitation No. DE-PS26-99FT40479, Support of Advanced Coal Research at U.S. Universities and Colleges. Specifically, this research was in support of the UCR Core Program and addressees Topic 1, Improved Hot-Gas Contaminant and Particulate Removal Techniques, introducing an advanced design for particulate removal. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offers the potential for very high efficiency and clean electric generation. In IGCC, the product gas from the gasifier needs to be cleaned of particulate matter to avoid erosion and high-temperature corrosion difficulties arising with the turbine blades. Current methods involve cooling the gases to {approx}100 C to condense alkalis and remove sulfur and particulates using conventional scrubber technology. This ''cool'' gas is then directed to a turbine for electric generation. While IGCC has the potential to reach efficiencies of over 50%, the current need to cool the product gas for cleaning prior to firing it in a turbine is keeping IGCC from reaching its full potential. The objective of the current project was to develop a highly reliable particulate collector system that can meet the most stringent turbine requirements and emission standards, can operate at temperatures above 1500 F, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, is compatible with various sorbent injection schemes for sulfur and alkali control, can be integrated into a variety of configurations for both pressurized gasification and combustion, increases allowable face velocity to reduce filter system capital cost, and is cost-competitive with existing technologies. The collector being developed is a new concept in particulate control called electrostatically enhanced barrier filter collection (EBFC). This concept combines electrostatic precipitation (ESP) with candle filters in a single unit. Similar technology has been recently proven on a commercial scale for atmospheric applications, but needed to be tested at high temperatures and pressures. The synergy obtained by combining the two control technologies into a single system should actually reduce filter system capital and operating costs and make the system more reliable. More specifically, the ESP is expected to significantly reduce candle filter load and also to limit ash reintrainment, allowing for full recovery of baseline pressure drop during backpulsing of the filters.

John Erjavec; Michael D. Mann; Ryan Z. Knutson; Michael L. Swanson; Michael E. Collings

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Language barrier broken with Multilingual WorldWideScience.org BETA | OSTI,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Language barrier broken with Multilingual WorldWideScience.org BETA Language barrier broken with Multilingual WorldWideScience.org BETA Multilingual WordWideScience Officials at the June 11 launch of Multilingual WorldWideScience.org BETA at the International Council for Scientific and Technical Information (ICSTI) annual conference held in Helsinki, Finland. Pictured, from left, Dr. Walter Warnick, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) Director; Yuri Arskiy, All-Russian Institute of Scientific and Technical Information (VINITI) Director; Tony Hey, Microsoft Research Corporate Vice-President; Richard Boulderstone of the British Library and the WorldWideScience Alliance Chairman; and Wu Yishan, Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (ISTIC) Chief Engineer OSTI Homepage

166

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support January 2004 Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

167

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

168

Market barriers to energy efficiency: A critical reappraisal of the rationale for public policies to promote energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews current perspectives on market barriers to energy efficiency. Ratepayer-funded utility energy-efficiency programs are likely to change in scope, size, and nature as the deregulation process proceeds; the authors research focuses on understanding to what extent some form of future intervention may be warranted and how they might judge the success of particular interventions, especially those funded by ratepayers. They find that challenges to the existence of market barriers have, for the most part, failed to provide a testable alternative explanation for evidence suggesting that there is a substantial ``efficiency gap`` between a consumer`s actual investments in energy efficiency and those that appear to be in the consumer`s own interest. They then suggest that differences of opinion about the appropriateness of public policies stem not from disputes about whether market barriers exist, but from different perceptions of the magnitude of the barriers, and the efficacy and (possibly unintended) consequences of policies designed to overcome them. They conclude that there are compelling justifications for future energy-efficiency policies. Nevertheless, in order to succeed, they must be based on a sound understanding of the market problems they seek to correct and a realistic assessment of their likely efficacy. This understanding can only emerge from detailed investigations of the current operation of individual markets.

Golove, W.H.; Eto, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE and its predecessors released nearly 2 trillion liters (450 billion gallons) of contaminated liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Some of the contaminants currently reside in the deeper parts of the vadose zone where they are much less accessible to characterization, monitoring, and typical remediation activities. The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) prepared a treatability test plan in 2008 to examine remediation options for addressing contaminants in the deep vadose zone; one of the technologies identified was surface barriers (also known as engineered barriers, covers, and caps). In the typical configuration, the contaminants are located relatively close to the surface, generally within 15 m, and thus they are close to the base of the surface barrier. The proximity of the surface barrier under these conditions yielded few concerns about the effectiveness of the barrier at depth, particularly for cases in which the contaminants were in a lined facility. At Hanford, however, some unlined sites have contaminants located well below depths of 15 m. The issue raised about these sites is the degree of effectiveness of a surface barrier in isolating contaminants in the deep vadose zone. Previous studies by Hanford Site and PNNL researchers suggest that surface barriers have the potential to provide a significant degree of isolation of deep vadose zone contaminants. The studies show that the actual degree of isolation is site-specific and depends on many factors, including recharge rates, barrier size, depth of contaminants, geohydrologic properties ofthe sediments, and the geochemical interactions between the contaminants and the sediments. After the DOE-RL treatability test plan was published, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted to review the information available to support surface barrier evaluation for the deep vadose zone, identify gaps in the information and outcomes necessary to fill the data gaps, and outline tasks to achieve those outcomes. Full understanding of contaminant behavior in the deep vadose zone is constrained by four key data gaps: limited access; limited data; limited time; and the lack of an accepted predictive capability for determining whether surface barriers can effectively isolate deep vadose zone contaminants. Activities designed to fill these data gaps need to have these outcomes: (1) common evaluation methodology that provides a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination; (2) deep vadose zone data that characterize the lithology, the spatial distribution of moisture and contaminants, the physical, chemical, and biological process that affect the mobility of each contaminant, and the impacts to the contaminants following placement of a surface barrier; (3) subsurface monitoring to provide subsurface characterization of initial conditions and changes that occur during and following remediation activities; and (4) field observations that span years to decades to validate the evaluation methodology. A set of six proposed tasks was identified to provide information needed to address the above outcomes. The proposed tasks are: (1) Evaluation Methodology - Develop common evaluation methodology that will provide a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination. (2) Case Studies - Conduct case studies to demonstrate the applicability ofthe common evaluation methodology and provide templates for subsequent use elsewhere. Three sites expected to have conditions that would yield valuable information and experience pertinent to deep vadose zone contamination were chosen to cover a range of conditions. The sites are BC Cribs and Trenches, U Plant Cribs, and the T Farm Interim Cover. (3) Subsurface Monitoring Technologies - Evaluate minimally invasive geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. DOE and its predecessors released nearly 2 trillion liters (450 billion gallons) of contaminated liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Some of the contaminants currently reside in the deeper parts of the vadose zone where they are much less accessible to characterization, monitoring, and typical remediation activities. The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) prepared a treatability test plan in 2008 to examine remediation options for addressing contaminants in the deep vadose zone; one of the technologies identified was surface barriers (also known as engineered barriers, covers, and caps). In the typical configuration, the contaminants are located relatively close to the surface, generally within 15 m, and thus they are close to the base of the surface barrier. The proximity of the surface barrier under these conditions yielded few concerns about the effectiveness of the barrier at depth, particularly for cases in which the contaminants were in a lined facility. At Hanford, however, some unlined sites have contaminants located well below depths of 15 m. The issue raised about these sites is the degree of effectiveness of a surface barrier in isolating contaminants in the deep vadose zone. Previous studies by Hanford Site and PNNL researchers suggest that surface barriers have the potential to provide a significant degree of isolation of deep vadose zone contaminants. The studies show that the actual degree of isolation is site-specific and depends on many factors, including recharge rates, barrier size, depth of contaminants, geohydrologic properties ofthe sediments, and the geochemical interactions between the contaminants and the sediments. After the DOE-RL treatability test plan was published, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted to review the information available to support surface barrier evaluation for the deep vadose zone, identify gaps in the information and outcomes necessary to fill the data gaps, and outline tasks to achieve those outcomes. Full understanding of contaminant behavior in the deep vadose zone is constrained by four key data gaps: limited access; limited data; limited time; and the lack of an accepted predictive capability for determining whether surface barriers can effectively isolate deep vadose zone contaminants. Activities designed to fill these data gaps need to have these outcomes: (1) common evaluation methodology that provides a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination; (2) deep vadose zone data that characterize the lithology, the spatial distribution of moisture and contaminants, the physical, chemical, and biological process that affect the mobility of each contaminant, and the impacts to the contaminants following placement of a surface barrier; (3) subsurface monitoring to provide subsurface characterization of initial conditions and changes that occur during and following remediation activities; and (4) field observations that span years to decades to validate the evaluation methodology. A set of six proposed tasks was identified to provide information needed to address the above outcomes. The proposed tasks are: (1) Evaluation Methodology - Develop common evaluation methodology that will provide a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination. (2) Case Studies - Conduct case studies to demonstrate the applicability ofthe common evaluation methodology and provide templates for subsequent use elsewhere. Three sites expected to have conditions that would yield valuable information and experience pertinent to deep vadose zone contamination were chosen to cover a range of conditions. The sites are BC Cribs and Trenches, U Plant Cribs, and the T Farm Interim Cover. (3) Subsurface Monitoring Technologies - Evaluate minimally invasive geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

Information to iteration : using information and communication technologies [ICT] in design for remote regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote design comes with significant challenges. A major barrier to designing in remote regions is the lack of communication between designers and users. As a result, the lack of information flow leads to assumptions about ...

Griffith, Kenfield A. (Kenfield Allistair)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Can a Workspace Help to Overcome the Query Formulation Problem in Image Retrieval?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban,J. Jose,J.M. Proceedings of the 28th European Conference on Information Retrieval (ECIR'06) pp 385??396 Springer Verlag

Urban, J.

173

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R&D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo- transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Beller, John Michael; Geesey, Gill Gregroy; Glenn, David Frankie; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Martian, Pete; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Porro, Indrek; Southworth, Finis Hio; Steffler, Eric Darwin; Stormberg, Angelica Isabel; Stormberg, Gregory John; Versteeg, Roelof Jan; White, Gregory J

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The relationship between isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. For nuclei around $^{278}$112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy as compared to the nuclei around $^{292}$114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and saddle-point temperatures. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied.

J. C. Pei; W. Nazarewicz; J. A. Sheikh; A. K. Kerman

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

Carver, D.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

179

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed. 7 figures.

Carver, D.W.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder's making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

Carver, Don W. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

183

Market Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Market Analysis Toolkit Market Analysis Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Search Resources Resource Type Training Materials Climate Technology Initiative Training Courses GHG Management Institute curriculum Supporting Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit Add Guides Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up Supporting Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit The Climate Investment Funds-Business Guide UNEP-Bioenergy Decision Support Tool Add Lessons Learned and Best Practices Brazil LULUCF Modeling Supporting Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Add Datasets Africa-Economic Development Report 2010

184

Fusion and Direct Reactions of Halo Nuclei at Energies around the Coulomb Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present understanding of reaction processes involving light unstable nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier is reviewed. The effect of coupling to direct reaction channels on elastic scattering and fusion is investigated, with the focus on halo nuclei. A list of definitions of processes is given, followed by a review of the experimental and theoretical tools and information presently available. The effect of couplings on elastic scattering and fusion is studied with a series of model calculations within the coupled-channels framework. The experimental data on fusion are compared to "bare" no-coupling one-dimensional barrier penetration model calculations. On the basis of these calculations and comparisons with experimental data, conclusions are drawn from the observation of recurring features. The total fusion cross sections for halo nuclei show a suppression with respect to the "bare" calculations at energies just above the barrier that is probably due to single neutron transfer reactions. The data for total fusion are also consistent with a possible sub-barrier enhancement; however, this observation is not conclusive and other couplings besides the single-neutron channels would be needed in order to explain any actual enhancement. We find that a characteristic feature of halo nuclei is the dominance of direct reactions over fusion at near and sub-barrier energies; the main part of the cross section is related to neutron transfers, while calculations indicate only a modest contribution from the breakup process.

N. Keeley; R. Raabe; N. Alamanos; J. L. Sida

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

Glovebox characterization and barrier integrity testing using fluorescent powder  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method for characterizing the spread of contamination and testing the barrier integrity of a new glovebox during material transfer operations and glove change-outs using fluorescent powder. Argonne National Laboratory-West has performed this test on several new gloveboxes prior to putting them into service. The test is performed after the glovebox has been leak tested and all systems have been verified to be operational. The purpose of the test is to show that bag-in/bag-out operations and glove change-outs can be accomplished without spreading the actual contaminated material to non-contaminated areas. The characterization test also provides information as to where contamination might be expected to build-up during actual operations. The fluorescent powder is used because it is easily detectable using an ultra-violet light and disperses in a similar fashion to radioactive material. The characterization and barrier integrity test of a glovebox using fluorescent powder provides a visual method of determining areas of potential contamination accumulation and helps evaluate the ability to perform clean transfer operations and glove change-outs.

Wahlquist, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Modeling of Residential Attics with Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a summary of the efforts at ORNL in modeling residential attics with radiant barriers. Analytical models based on a system of macroscopic heat balances have been developed. Separate models have been developed for horizontal radiant barriers laid on top of the insulation, and for radiant barriers attached to the bottom of the top chords of the attic trusses. The models include features such as a radiation interchange analysis within the attic space, convective coupling with the ventilation air, and sorption/desorption of moisture at surfaces facing the attic enclosure. The paper gives details of the models and the engineering assumptions that were made in their development. The paper also reports on the status of efforts that are underway to verify the models by comparing their predictions with the results of laboratory and field tests on residential attics and test cells, both with and without radiant barriers. Comparisons are given for a number of selected sets of experimental data. Suggestions are given for needed model refinements and additional experimental data. Plans for utilization of the models for extrapolation to seasonal and annual performance in a variety of climatic conditions are also described.

Wilkes, K. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Overcoming Degradation Mechanisms in CdTe Solar Cells: Final Report, July 1998--September 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the stability of CdTe solar cells, with special focus on possible effects of diffusion from the contact to the absorber towards other cell components. Both whole cells and test systems containing only the ohmic contact and the absorber or only the window were used. We found that NiTe2 is a promising back-contact material. We also found that Cu as such is not the dominant factor in the most common and quickest type of degradation of these cells. An additional factor appears to be the formation of an oxide film on CdTe grains, which can be associated with the formation of the additional back-contact barrier that has been deduced from electrical characterization. Further observations were: Cell degradation appears to be promoted by H2O, O2, and illumination, in that order; less efficient cells are less stable than more efficient ones; some cells have been stabilized by heating in ultra-dry and O2-free inert atmosphere (N2 was used by us) before use, against subsequent degradation; and cells can recover by heating in dry N2 or by sitting on the shelf in ambient atmosphere.

Cahen, D.; Hodes, G.; Gartsman, K.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA); Wronski, Christopher R. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Free Energy Surfaces from Single-Distance Information Philipp Schuetz,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Surfaces from Single-Distance Information Philipp Schuetz, Rene´ Wuttke, Benjamin We propose a network-based method for determining basins and barriers of complex free energy surfaces for the iterative determination of individual basins by the minimum-cut-based free energy profile, a barrier

Caflisch, Amedeo

191

The efficacy of wearing barrier cream under gloves in health care oroviders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulations has resulted in increased hand skin problems in health care providers (HCPs).2@6 Hand skin problems related to wearing gloves include red, chapped skin; non-specific irritant dermatitis; and allergic reactions to rubber products, cornstarch powder, or production chemicals (inhibitors, accelerators, crosslinkers) in gloves. This experimental longitudinal study examined the effects of an intervention (applying barrier cream before donning gloves) to reduce hand skin problems in glove-wearing HCPS. The hypotheses of this study were: (1) HCPs who wear barrier cream under their gloves will experience a decrease in hand skin problems and (2) HCPs who wear barrier cream under their gloves will report an improvement in perceived skin condition. Using self-report questionnaires, data were collected on demographic information, glove usage, and hand condition. Information on incidence and severity of hand skin problems, perceived hand skin condition, gloving practices, and hand care routines, including use of the barrier cream in the intervention group, was requested every three weeks after enrollment, until the subject had been in the study for a total of twelve weeks. Both the control group (n=34) and intervention group (n=40) showed a statistically significant decrease in the incidence of hand skin problems; however, there were no significant differences between groups. Intervention subjects who completed 12 weeks of the study showed a statistically significant improvement in their perceived hand skin condition, but the improvement in perceived hand skin condition was not statistically significant in the 6 week subjects.

Lambden, Jennifer Lyn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Transmission of Rossby Waves through Basin Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of a basin with a topographic barrier to spatially localized and time periodic forcing is considered. The barrier, which almost completely divides the full basin into two adjacent subbasins, is offered as a model of either a ...

Joseph Pedlosky

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Sensitivity of Global Mixing and Fluxes to Isolated Transport Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of isolated transport barriers on the global mixing and fluxes of a tracer are investigated, where a barrier is defined as a local minimum in effective diffusivity. An idealized 1D model with a prescribed diffusivity profile, with or ...

Noboru Nakamura

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Climatology of Wintertime Barrier Winds off Southeast Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatology of barrier winds along the southeastern coast of Greenland is presented based on 20 yr of winter months (19892008) from the ECMWF Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim). Barrier wind events occur predominantly at two locations: Denmark ...

B. E. Harden; I. A. Renfrew; G. N. Petersen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

196

Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings ...  

... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings - Energy Innovation Portal on Delicious ...

197

Decision Support for Retirement Portfolio Management: Overcoming Myopic Loss Aversion via Technology Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As firms continue to abandon pensions in favor of employee-managed retirement plans, tremendous demands are being placed on the decision-making proficiency of future retirees. As reflected in the equity premium puzzle, individual investors tend to hold ... Keywords: decision support systems, decisional guidance, equity premium puzzle, field experiment, human-computer interaction, information horizon, myopic loss aversion, retirement planning, system restrictiveness

Clayton Arlen Looney; Andrew M. Hardin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biological barrier composition and method of use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a composition for use as barrier to the growth of biological organisms such as roots, insects and small burrowing animals. It comprises a mixture of an effective amount of a chemical substance that thwarts the movement of the biological organisms, the substance diffused in a sufficient quality of a medium so that the physical and chemical characteristics of the medium rather than adjacent soil determine the rate of diffusion of the chemical substance. In one embodiment, trifluralin, a root growth inhibitor, is mixed with bentonite clay to provide a water-impermeable, root growth inhibiting barrier for a disposal site. The amount of clay and trifluralin is determined independent of the physical characteristics of the soil of the site thus avoiding the need for engineering the trifluralin for each set of soil characteristics.

Corey, J.C.; Murphy, C.E.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pratt and Whitney thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. They are used in aircraft engines and have accumulated millions upon millions of reliable hours. Differences in the duty cycles of the aircraft and industrial gas turbines are recognized as is the marked differences in environmental operational envelope. At the completion of this program the TBCs best suited to meet the needs of the ATS program will have been identified, tested, and confirmed.

Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, East Hartford, CT (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Plastic Schottky-barrier solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a metallic area electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates a magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film. With the proper selection and location of elements a photovoltaic cell structure and solar cell are obtained.

Waldrop, J.R.; Cohen, M.J.

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fission barriers and half-lives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We briefly review the development of theoretical models for the calculation of fission barriers and half-lives. We focus on how results of actual calculations in a unified macroscopic-microscopic approach provide an interpretation of the mechanisms behind some of the large number of phenomena observed in fission. As instructive examples we choose studies of the rapidly varying fission properties of elements at the end of the periodic system. 31 refs., 10 figs.

Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Plasma measurements with surface barrier detectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A surface barrier detector system for measuring the loss rate of protons from a hydrogen plasma and their energy spectrum is described. A full width at half maximum (FWHM) resolution of 1.4 keV for 15-keV hydrogen atoms was obtained using a selected detector having a sensitive area of 3 mm/sup 2/ and a depletion depth of 700 microns.

Futch, A.H. Jr.; Bradley, A.E.

1969-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Advanced Thermal Barrier Coating System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the program are to provide an improved Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase I: Program Planning - Complete; Phase II: Development; and Phase III: Selected Specimen - Bench Test Work is being performed in Phase II and III of the program.

NONE

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Overcoming Obstacles to Mobility for Apprentices and Other Young People in Vocational Education and Training Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document acts as the final report of the Study on the obstacles to transnational mobility faced apprentices and other young people in initial vocational training and on ways of overcoming them also referred to as the MoVE-iT project. The report was financed and prepared for the use of the European Commission, Directorate-General for Education and Culture under contract nr 2005-4579/001 PIL-PILOTP.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Title Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-2294e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., Girish Ghatikar, Jessica Granderson, Paul Haugen, Carlos Romero, and David S. Watson Keywords technologies Abstract Various wireless technologies were field-tested in a six-story laboratory building to identify wireless technologies that can scale for future DR applications through very low node density power consumption, and unit cost. Data analysis included analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), packet loss, and link quality at varying power levels and node densities. The narrowband technologies performed well, penetrating the floors of the building with little loss and exhibiting better range than the wideband technology. 900 MHz provided full coverage at 1 watt and substantially complete coverage at 500 mW at the test site. 900 MHz was able to provide full coverage at 100 mW with only one additional relay transmitter, and was the highest-performing technology in the study. 2.4 GHz could not provide full coverage with only a single transmitter at the highest power level tested (63 mW). However, substantially complete coverage was provided at 2.4 GHz at 63 mW with the addition of one repeater node.

208

Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dielectric thin-film barrier and adhesion-promoting layers consisting of silicon oxynitride materials (SiOxNy, with various stoichiometry) were investigated. For process development, films were applied to glass (TCO, conductive SnO2:F; or soda-lime), polymer (PET, polyethylene terephthalate), aluminized soda-lime glass, or PV cell (a-Si, CIGS) substrates. Design strategy employed de-minimus hazard criteria to facilitate industrial adoption and reduce implementation costs for PV manufacturers or suppliers. A restricted process window was explored using dilute compressed gases (3% silane, 14% nitrous oxide, 23% oxygen) in nitrogen (or former mixtures, and 11.45% oxygen mix in helium and/or 99.999% helium dilution) with a worst-case flammable and non-corrosive hazard classification. Method employed low radio frequency (RF) power, less than or equal to 3 milliwatts per cm2, and low substrate temperatures, less than or equal to 100 deg C, over deposition areas less than or equal to 1000 cm2. Select material properties for barrier film thickness (profilometer), composition (XPS/FTIR), optical (refractive index, %T and %R), mechanical peel strength and WVTR barrier performance are presented.

Glick, S. H.; delCueto, J. A.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys  

SciTech Connect

In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Determining the Energy Barrier for Decay out of Superdeformed Bands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An asymptotically exact quantum mechanical calculation of the matrix elements for tunneling through an asymmetric barrier is combined with the two-state statistical model for decay out of superdeformed bands to determine the energy barrier (as a function of spin) separating the superdeformed and normal-deformed wells for several nuclei in the 190 and 150 mass regions. The spin-dependence of the barrier leading to sudden decay out is shown to be consistent with the decrease of a centrifugal barrier with decreasing angular momentum. Values of the barrier frequency in the two mass regions are predicted.

B. R. Barrett; J. Brki; D. M. Cardamone; C. A. Stafford; D. L. Stein

2008-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

211

Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M. [Ebasco Environmental, Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Phillips, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Cooling Energy Measurements of Houses with Attics Containing Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft paper faced nominal R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicated that the most effective way of installing the foil was to lay it on top of the fiberglass batt insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to house by approximately 30-35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W. P.; Karnitz, M. A.; Knight, D. K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hydrogen Technical Analysis -- Dissemination of Information  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SENTECH is a small energy and environmental consulting firm providing technical, analytical, and communications solutions to technology management issues. The activities proposed by SENTECH focused on gathering and developing communications materials and information, and various dissemination activities to present the benefits of hydrogen energy to a broad audience while at the same time establishing permanent communications channels to enable continued two-way dialog with these audiences in future years. Effective communications and information dissemination is critical to the acceptance of new technology. Hydrogen technologies face the additional challenge of safety preconceptions formed primarily as a result of the crash of the Hindenburg. Effective communications play a key role in all aspects of human interaction, and will help to overcome the perceptual barriers, whether of safety, economics, or benefits. As originally proposed SENTECH identified three distinct information dissemination activities to address three distinct but important audiences; these formed the basis for the task structure used in phases 1 and 2. The tasks were: (1) Print information--Brochures that target the certain segment of the population and will be distributed via relevant technical conferences and traditional distribution channels. (2) Face-to-face meetings--With industries identified to have a stake in hydrogen energy. The three industry audiences are architect/engineering firms, renewable energy firms, and energy companies that have not made a commitment to hydrogen (3) Educational Forums--The final audience is students--the future engineers, technicians, and energy consumers. SENTECH will expand on its previous educational work in this area. The communications activities proposed by SENTECH and completed as a result of this cooperative agreement was designed to compliment the research and development work funded by the DOE by presenting the technical achievements and validations of hydrogen energy technologies to non-traditional audiences. These activities were also designed to raise the visibility of the DOE Hydrogen Program to new audiences and to help the program continue to advance its mission and vision. We believe that the work conducted under this cooperative agreement was successful at meeting the objectives presented and funded over the period of performance. During Phase 1, SENTECHs activities resulted in the development and distribution of two glossy brochures that target the on-site distributed generation and public transit markets for hydrogen energy technologies; face-to-face industry outreach meetings with various firms with an interest in hydrogen energy, but who may not have made a commitment to be involved; and implementation of two educational forums on hydrogen for students - the future engineers, technicians, and energy consumers. The educational forums were conducted with in-kind cost-shared contributions from NHA and Dr. Robert Reeves, Professor Emeritus, Rensealler During Phase 2, SENTECH activities initially were focused on the development of additional brochures and the development of a series of training modules. This set of information dissemination activities built on the experience demonstrated in our phase one activities, and focused the effort within two critical issue areas facing the development of hydrogen as an energy carrier--effective communications and information dissemination on codes and standards. SENTECH joined with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to scope out the training modules and identified a series of 12 that could be used to train a variety of audiences. The NFPA is an international nonprofit corporation, which has developed a reputation as a worldwide leader in providing fire, electrical, and life safety to the public since 1896. Its membership totals more than 75,000 individuals from around the world and in more than 80 national trade and professional organizations.

George Kervitsky, Jr.

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In molecular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating. 1 tab.

Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1987-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Wind energy: legal issues and institutional barriers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before the potential of wind energy can be realized, large-scale commercialization will have to occur. Standing in the way of commercial development are various institutional and legal barriers. These include (1) possible conflicts with existing zoning and other land-use planning schemes, (2) the question of guaranteeing access to the wind, (3) possible tort and environmental law issues raised by WECS operation, and (4) the critical problem of creating financial incentives. The implications of each of these issues and solutions where practicable are presented.

Coit, L.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Pricing and hedging a barrier option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barrier options are options where the payoff depends on whether the underlying asset's price reaches a certain level during a certain period of time. This path-dependency makes these options difficult to manage in practice. In this work, general methods of pricing and hedging are proposed. General properties of the Black - Scholes model are studied. Three methods of pricing are discussed and compared. Hedging issues are analyzed. Finally an improvement of the Black - Scholes model for the stock's price is proposed to take into account the stochastic aspect of the stock price volatility.

Bogossian, Alan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

DOE Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers DOE Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management Jack Surash speaks during the session on barriers small businesses face competing for prime contracts. EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management Jack Surash speaks during the session on barriers small businesses face competing for prime contracts. Pictured at the session on barriers in small business contracting, left to right, are Jim Fiore of Fiore Consulting; John Coffman of DeNuke Contracting Services, Inc.; John Hale III of the DOE Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization; Jack Surash of EM; and Matt Moeller of Dade Moeller.

219

Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment.

Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Hanson, Richard W. (Spokane, WA); Hodges, Richard T. (Deer Park, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cooling energy measurements of houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.; Knight, D.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

Dovichi, Norman J. (Edmonton, CA); Zhang, Jian Z. (Edmonton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quantum calculation of Coulomb reorientation and near-barrier fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the role of deformation on the fusion probability around the barrier using the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock theory with a full Skyrme force. We obtain a distribution of fusion probabilities around the nominal barrier due to the different contributions of the various orientations of the deformed nucleus at the touching point. It is also shown that the long range Coulomb reorientation reduces the fusion probability around the barrier.

Cdric Simenel; Michael Bender; Philippe Chomaz; Thomas Duguet; Gilles De France

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

225

REVIEW OF MECHANISTIC UNDERSTANDING AND MODELING AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS METHODS FOR PREDICTING CEMENTITIOUS BARRIER PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

Cementitious barriers for nuclear applications are one of the primary controls for preventing or limiting radionuclide release into the environment. At the present time, performance and risk assessments do not fully incorporate the effectiveness of engineered barriers because the processes that influence performance are coupled and complicated. Better understanding the behavior of cementitious barriers is necessary to evaluate and improve the design of materials and structures used for radioactive waste containment, life extension of current nuclear facilities, and design of future nuclear facilities, including those needed for nuclear fuel storage and processing, nuclear power production and waste management. The focus of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) literature review is to document the current level of knowledge with respect to: (1) mechanisms and processes that directly influence the performance of cementitious materials (2) methodologies for modeling the performance of these mechanisms and processes and (3) approaches to addressing and quantifying uncertainties associated with performance predictions. This will serve as an important reference document for the professional community responsible for the design and performance assessment of cementitious materials in nuclear applications. This review also provides a multi-disciplinary foundation for identification, research, development and demonstration of improvements in conceptual understanding, measurements and performance modeling that would be lead to significant reductions in the uncertainties and improved confidence in the estimating the long-term performance of cementitious materials in nuclear applications. This report identifies: (1) technology gaps that may be filled by the CBP project and also (2) information and computational methods that are in currently being applied in related fields but have not yet been incorporated into performance assessments of cementitious barriers. The various chapters contain both a description of the mechanism or and a discussion of the current approaches to modeling the phenomena.

Langton, C.; Kosson, D.

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations...

227

Research utilisation in nursing practice : Barriers and facilitators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research utilisation in nursing practice - barriers and facilitators To improve and develop nursing practice it is important that research findings are utilised by the (more)

Nilsson Kajermo, Kerstin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

TEST DEVICE FOR MEASURING PERMEABILITY OF A BARRIER ...  

A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed ...

229

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation-The Ohio State University Background When coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) is used in place of natural...

230

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash Ingested...

231

Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.orgwebinar-drivers-and-barriers-current-csp-marke...

232

Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in Lycopersicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study employs Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii as model systems to study the interspecific reproductive barriers unilateral incongruity (UI), hybrid breakdown and interspecific aberrant ratio syndrome (IARS).

Mutschler, M.A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); McCormick, S. (Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA (United States). Plant Gene Expression Center)

1993-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

Inform Editors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inform editorial board Inform Editors inform Magazine algae algal AOCS biomass business chemistry cottonseed date detergents fats filing first history inform inform Magazine international inventor law magazine member members monthly news oil oils

234

Subscription Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inform subscription rates. Subscription Information inform Magazine algae algal AOCS biomass business chemistry cottonseed date detergents fats filing first history inform inform Magazine international inventor law magazine member members monthly

235

Overcoming Constraints to High-Yield Plantation-Grown Hardwoods in the Southeastern United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was comprised of the following four inter-related tasks: Task 1 Plantation Maintenance and Measurement--Data on dry weight productivity per tree and/or growth as measured by individual tree height and diameter at a specified height on the stem was determined at the end of each of five years corresponding to ages 2 through 6. Measurements of height and diameter were recorded once a month during the growing season on a subsample of four trees per clone per species per treatment combination. Dry biomass in the leaf litter traps during the growing season once the canopy has closed was periodically collected and measured. Foliar nutrient levels were determined once a month by removing LPI 8 on each subsampled measurement tree and completing nutrient analyses. Weather data, including precipitation, minimum and maximum temperature and photosynthetically active radiation on an hourly basis were recorded daily. Information on irrigation rates and fertilization levels were collected. Task 2 Intra- And Interspecific Variation In Osmotic Potential--The specific objectives of this task were: (1) to determine whether limitation in water availability constrains productivity and influences leaf osmotic potential of cottonwood, sycamore, and/or sweetgum growing under short-rotation field conditions, (2) to document the occurrence of osmotic adjustment under varying levels of water availability levels, and (3) to determine the effect of nitrogen fertilization on osmotic potential and response to irrigation. Task 3 Leaf Gas Exchange And Water-Use Efficiency--The specific objectives of this task were: (1) to quantify the contribution of photosynthesis, respiration, and water-use efficiency to the productivity of individual cottonwood, sycamore, and sweetgum trees grown under various levels of water and/or nutrient availability, and (2) to quantify intra- and interspecific variability for photosynthesis, respiration, and water-use efficiency for cottonwood, sycamore, and/or sweetgum. Task 4 Whole-Plant Carbon Budgets--The specific objectives of this task were: (1) to evaluate foliar and non-foliar dry matter allocation with respect to water and/or nutrient availability; (2) to test the impacts of water and/or nutrient availability on tissue-specific respiration rates, and (3) to evaluate whole-plant carbon budgets for individual clones or species as a means of determining the relative limitations placed on above-ground production by respiratory processes in branches, stems, and roots.

None

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-voltage electrical insulator for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall of a heat exchanger filled with liquid lithium while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl[sub 2]O[sub 3], sapphire) with a niobium foil layer bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal facing the heat exchanger wall, and a molybdenum layer bonded to the niobium layer to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface. 3 figures.

Van Der Beck, R.R.; Bond, J.A.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-voltage electrical insulator (21) for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module (17) in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall (11) of a heat exchanger (13) filled with liquid lithium (16) while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator (21) has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl.sub.2 O.sub.3, sapphire) with a niobium foil layer (32) bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal (26) facing the heat exchanger wall (11), and a molybdenum layer (31) bonded to the niobium layer (32) to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface.

Van Der Beck, Roland R. (Lansdale, PA); Bond, James A. (Exton, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/2011 9/2011 1 BASF Fuel Cell, Inc. Manufacturing Barriers to high temperature PEM commercialization 39 Veronica Ave Somerset , NJ 08873 Tel : (732) 545-5100 9/9/2011 2 Background on BASF Fuel Cell  BASF Fuel Cell was established in 2007, formerly PEMEAS Fuel Cells (including E-TEK)  Product line is high temperature MEAs (Celtec ® P made from PBI-phosphoric acid)  Dedicated a new advanced pilot manufacturing facility in Somerset NJ May 2009. Ribbon-cutting hosted by Dr. Kreimeyer (BASF BoD, right) and attended by various US pubic officials including former NJ Governor Jon Corzine (left) 9/9/2011 3 Multi-layer product of membrane (polybenzimidazole and phosphoric acid), gas diffusion material and catalysts Unique characteristics:  High operating temperature

239

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and post-burn to determine changes in the gravel content of the surface layer so as to quantify inflationary or deflationary responses to fire and to reveal the ability of the surface to resist post-fire erosive stresses. Measures of bulk density, water repellency, water retention, and hydraulic conductivity will be used to characterize changes in infiltration rates and water storage capacity following the fire. Samples will also be analyzed to quantify geochemical changes including changes in soil pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, and the concentration of macro nutrients (e.g. N, P, K) and other elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, that are critical to the post-fire recovery revegetation. Soil CO2 emissions will be measured monthly for one year following the burn to document post-fire stimulation of carbon turnover and soil biogenic emissions. Surface and subsurface temperature measurements at and near monitoring installations will be used to document fire effects on electronic equipment. The results of this study will be used to bridge the gaps in knowledge on the effects of fire on engineered ecosystems (e.g. surface barriers), particularly the hydrologic and biotic characteristics that govern the water and energy balance. These results will also support the development of practical fire management techniques for barriers that are compatible with wildfire suppression strategies. Furthermore, lessons learned will be use to develop installation strategies needed to protect electronic monitoring equipment from the intense heat of fire and the potential damaging effects of smoke and fire extinguishing agents. Such information is needed to better understand long-term barrier performance under extreme conditions, especially if site maintenance and operational funding is lost for activities such as barrier revegetation.

Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Exploring the multi-humped fission barrier of 238U via sub-barrier photofission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photofission cross-section of 238U was measured at sub-barrier energies as a function of the gamma-ray energy using, for the first time, a monochromatic, high-brilliance, Compton-backscattered gamma-ray beam. The experiment was performed at the High Intensity gamma-ray Source (HIgS) facility at beam energies between E=4.7 MeV and 6.0 MeV and with ~3% energy resolution. Indications of transmission resonances have been observed at gamma-ray beam energies of E=5.1 MeV and 5.6 MeV with moderate amplitudes. The triple-humped fission barrier parameters of 238U have been determined by fitting EMPIRE-3.1 nuclear reaction code calculations to the experimental photofission cross section.

L. Csige; D. M. Filipescu; T. Glodariu; J. Gulys; M. M. Gnther; D. Habs; H. J. Karwowski; A. Krasznahorkay; G. C. Rich; M. Sin; L. Stroe; O. Tesileanu; P. G. Thirolf

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Reaction Barrier Transparency for Cold Fusion with Deuterium and Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An improved parametric representation of Coulomb barrier penetration is presented. These detailed calculations are improvements upon the conventionally used Gamow tunneling coefficient. This analysis yields a reaction barrier transparency (RBT) which may have singular ramifications for cold fusion, as well as significant consequences in a wide variety of fusion settings. 1.

Yeong E. Kim; Jin-hee Yoon; Alexander L. Zubarev; Mario Rabinowitz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Stability and Schottky barrier of silicides: First-principles study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using first-principles calculations, we explain why some metal atoms such as Ni produce bulk silicides and the others like Au never produce silicides, why silicides with some stoichiometry are difficult to grow on Si substrate, and why Schottky barrier ... Keywords: First-principles calculation, Schottky barrier, Silicide, Silicide/Si interfaces, Stability

T. Nakayama; S. Sotome; S. Shinji

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

SERN Policy and Regulation Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SERN Policy and Regulation Database SERN Policy and Regulation Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: SERN Policy and Regulation Database Agency/Company /Organization: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset References: REEEP SERN Policy and Regulation Database[1] "The SERN Policy database will allow project developers to understand the existing energy mix within a country and the regulatory barriers which they may have to overcome in implementing a renewable energy and/or energy efficiency project. The policy database is available online." References ↑ "REEEP SERN Policy and Regulation Database"

246

Barriers to energy conservation. Conservation paper Number 55  

SciTech Connect

This study's aim is to provide policy guidance to the FEA in its efforts to break down barriers to the efficient usage of finite energy sources. Such efforts may involve mechanisms to promote the more-efficient usage of current energy sources or to break down the barriers which presently inhibit the introduction of alternative energy sources. Only the energy used by finished products is considered and not energy used in the production process itself. The majority of barriers that can be easily and/or directly affected involve the marketplace. This is true even where the barriers are technolgical; for, in many cases, the problem is not the absence of adequate technology, but its cost. For this reason, considerable time was spent developing an understanding of the various ways in which economic barriers affect efficient energy usage.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Inform App  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Access INFORM anytime with our free app available on iPad, iPhone, Android and Kindle. Inform App Inform App

248

CONTAINMENT EVALUATION OF PU-METAL TRANSPORT USING MULTIPLE BARRIERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology was developed previously by SRNL to show that Al-SNF with cladding breaches can be directly transported in standard casks and maintained within the allowable release rates. This novel approach may be extended to other nuclear material systems. Utilizing an adaptation to the methodology, a containment analysis has been performed for the scenario of non-routine transfer of a damaged 9975 package containing plutonium metal from K-area monitored storage to F-area on the Savannah River Site. A multiple barrier system with each barrier having a defined leakage rate of less than 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at Standard Temperature and Pressure was analyzed to determine the number of barriers needed to transport the package under normal transportation conditions to meet transportation requirements for containment. The barrier system was analyzed parametrically to achieve a composite system that met the federal requirements for the maximum permissible release rate. The multiple barrier system acts to retard the release of radioactivity. That is, a build-up in the radioactivity release rate occurs with time. For example, a system with three barriers (e.g., sealed plastic barrier) with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for a total time of up to approximately 10 days with a release rate within the permissible rate. Additional number of barriers, or volume of the barriers, or both, would extend to this period of time. For example, a system with seven barriers with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for up to 100 days. Plastic bags are one type of barrier used in movement of radioactive materials and capable of achieving a leak rate of 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at STP. Low-density polyethylene bags can withstand high temperature (up to 180 C); a barrier thickness of 10 mils should be suitable for the barrier system.

Vinson, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

249

The concept of the world environmental constitution and information science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deepening crisis phenomena of our epoch is forcing mankind to seek a solution to this critical situation. Appropriate interaction between society and nature is the crucial axis of the problem. The on-going search for ways to overcome the global environmental ... Keywords: Noosphere, World Environmental Constitution, climate change, ecologic economics, global environmental crisis, globalization, information science, sustained development

E. P. Semenyuk

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Exploiting atomic operations for barrier on cray XE/XK systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Barrier is a collective operation used by many scientific applications and parallel libraries for synchronization. Typically, a Barrier operation is implemented by exchanging a short data message that requires demultiplexing, thereby adding ... Keywords: MPI, atomic operations, barrier, collectives, cray, gemini

Manjunath Gorentla Venkata; Richard L. Graham; Joshua S. Ladd; Pavel Shamis; Nathan T. Hjelm; Samuel K. Gutierrez

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). This report provides information on the phase stability of Alloy 22, the current waste package outer barrier material. The goal of this model is to determine whether the single-phase solid solution is stable under repository conditions and, if not, how fast other phases may precipitate. The aging and phase stability model, which is based on fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic concepts and principles, will be used to provide predictive insight into the long-term metallurgical stability of Alloy 22 under relevant repository conditions. The results of this model are used by ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' as reference-only information. These phase stability studies are currently divided into three general areas: Tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) phase and carbide precipitation in the base metal; TCP and carbide precipitation in welded samples; and Long-range ordering reactions. TCP-phase and carbide precipitates that form in Alloy 22 are generally rich in chromium (Cr) and/or molybdenum (Mo) (Raghavan et al. 1984 [DIRS 154707]). Because these elements are responsible for the high corrosion resistance of Alloy 22, precipitation of TCP phases and carbides, especially at grain boundaries, can lead to an increased susceptibility to localized corrosion in the alloy. These phases are brittle and also tend to embrittle the alloy (Summers et al. 1999 [DIRS 146915]). They are known to form in Alloy 22 at temperatures greater than approximately 600 C. Whether these phases also form at the lower temperatures expected in the repository during the 10,000-year regulatory period must be determined. The kinetics of this precipitation will be determined for both the base metal and the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The TCP phases (P, {mu}, and {sigma}) are present in the weld metal in the as-welded condition. It may be possible to eliminate these phases through a solution anneal heat treatment, but that may not be possible for the closure weld because the spent nuclear fuel cladding cannot be heated to more than 350 C. The effects of any stress mitigation techniques (such as laser peening or solution heat treating) that may be used to reduce the tensile stresses on the closure welds must also be determined. Cold-work will cause an increase in dislocation density, and such an increase in dislocation density may cause an increase in diffusion rates that control precipitation kinetics (Porter et al. 1992 [DIRS 161265]; Tawancy et al. 1983 [DIRS 104991]). Long-range order (LRO) occurs in nickel (Ni)-Cr-Mo alloys (such as Alloy 22) at temperatures less than approximately 600 C. This ordering has been linked to an increased susceptibility of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement (Tawancy et al. 1983 [DIRS 104991]). These analyses provide information on the rate at which LRO may occur in Alloy 22 under repository conditions. Determination of the kinetics of transformations through experimental techniques requires that the transformations being investigated be accelerated due to the fact that the expected service life is at least 10,000 years. Phase transformations are typically accelerated through an increase in temperature. The rate of transformation is determined at the higher temperature and is extrapolated to the lower temperatures of interest.

F. Wong

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

252

Dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

Skotheim, Terje A. (Berkeley, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Overcoming the EPR paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EPR paradox has a local realist solution. Quantum theory does not require action at a distance, because entanglement can be derived from quantum superposition. If two identical or symmetrical populations are governed by uncertainty (locally, in each group), non-factorizable mixtures emerge. Quantum superposition, in turn, can be interpreted as a classical process whenever multiple components act as an ensemble. The net state of a Schrodinger's Cat system is a well-defined vector. The key is to assume individual quanta adapt to their context and always switch to the net state, instead of moving in several directions at the same time. Existing observations are compatible with such a scenario. Self-interference is not a verifiable principle, even though it fits the data. In this new approach, formal predictions remain unchanged. Only the interpretation is different.

Ghenadie N. Mardari

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Property:UNRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNRegion UNRegion Jump to: navigation, search Property Name UNRegion Property Type String Description UN Region for a country. Source: http://unstats.un.org/unsd/methods/m49/m49regin.htm Allows Values Eastern Africa;Middle Africa;Northern Africa;Southern Africa;Western Africa;Caribbean;Central America;South America;Northern America;Central Asia;Eastern Asia;Southern Asia;South-Eastern Asia;Western Asia;Eastern Europe;Northern Europe;Southern Europe;Western Europe;Australia and New Zealand;Melanesia;Micronesia;Polynesia;Latin America and the Caribbean This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 65 subproperties: A A Guide to Millennium Challenge Corporation Indicators and the Selection Process Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up

255

Microsoft Word - IG-0741 Y-12 Barrier Final 101006.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Concerns With Security Barriers at the Y-12 National Security Complex DOE/IG-0741 October 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries CONCERNS WITH SECURITY BARRIERS AT THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objective 1 Observations and Conclusions 1 DETAILS OF FINDINGS Weapon Ports 2 Observations 2 RECOMMENDATIONS 5 MANAGEMENT COMMENTS 5 INSPECTOR COMMENTS 5 APPENDICES A. Scope and Methodology 8 B. Management Comments 9 Overview Page 1 Concerns with Security Barriers at the Y-12 National Security Complex INTRODUCTION The DOE Office of Inspector General received an allegation that

256

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross median crashes have become a serious problem in recent years. Most of the median cross sections used for divided highways have terrains with steep slopes. Traffic barriers, frequently used on slopes, are generally designed based on the findings obtained from crash tests performed on flat terrain. For barriers placed on roadside and median slopes, vehicle impact height varies depending on the trajectory of the vehicle along the ditch section and lateral offset of the barrier. Thus depending on the placement location on a relatively steep slope, a barrier can be impacted by an errant vehicle at height and orientation more critical compared to those considered during its design. Hence, detailed study of performance of barriers on roadside and median slopes is needed to achieve acceptable safety performance. In this study, performances of modified G4(1S) W-beam, Midwest Guardrail System (MGS), modified Thrie-beam, modified weak post W-beam, and box-beam guardrail systems on sloped terrains are investigated using numerical simulations. A procedure is developed that provide guidance for their placement on roadside and median slopes. The research approach consists of nonlinear finite element analyses and multi-rigid-body dynamic analyses approach. Detailed finite element representation for each of the barriers is developed using LS-DYNA. Model fidelity is assessed through comparison of simulated and measured responses reported in full scale crash test studies conducted on flat terrain. LS-DYNA simulations of vehicle impacts on barriers placed on flat terrain at different impact heights are performed to identify performance limits of the barriers in terms of acceptable vehicle impact heights. The performances of the barriers are evaluated following the guidelines provided in NCHRP Report 350. Multi-rigid-body dynamic analysis code, CARSIM, is used to identify trajectories of the vehicles traversing various roadside and median cross-slopes. After analyzing vehicle trajectories and barrier performance limits, a guideline has been prepared with recommendations for the placement of barriers along roadside and median slopes. This guideline is then verified and refined using the responses obtained from full-scale LS-DYNA simulations. These simulations capture the full encroachment event from departure of the vehicle off the traveled way through impact with the barrier.

Ferdous, Md Rubiat

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Transmission of electron through monolayer graphene laser barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present theoretical model deals with the transmission property of the Dirac fermions in the Floquet sidebands for the laser radiated graphene nanostructure. The laser assisted structure behaves as a tunneling barrier that leads to asymmetric transmission around the normal to the interface and is capable to confine the massless Dirac particles in a monolayer graphene strip. The absence of the Klein tunneling and the presence of a large number of controlling parameters would make the time dependent vector potential barrier superior over the electrostatic and magnetic barriers towards the opto-electronic device fabrication.

Sinha, C. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Biswas, R. [Department of Physics, P. K. College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal 721401 (India)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effects of weakly coupled channels on quasielastic barrier distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy-ion collisions often produce fusion barrier distributions with structures displaying a fingerprint of couplings to highly collective excitations. Similar distributions can be obtained from large-angle quasielastic scattering, although in this case, the role of the many weak direct-reaction channels is unclear. For {sup 20}Ne+{sup 90}Zr, we have observed the barrier structures expected for the highly deformed neon projectile; however, for {sup 20}Ne+{sup 92}Zr, we find significant extra absorption into a large number of noncollective inelastic channels. This leads to smearing of the barrier distribution and a consequent reduction in the ''resolving power'' of the quasielastic method.

Piasecki, E.; Kisielinski, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Swiderski, L.; Keeley, N.; Rusek, K.; Strojek, I. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Gawlikowicz, W.; JastrzePbski, J.; Kordyasz, A.; Trzcinska, A. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Kliczewski, S. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Kowalczyk, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Khlebnikov, S. [Khloplin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Koshchiy, E. [Kharkiv University, Kharkiv (Ukraine); Kozulin, E.; Loktev, T.; Smirnov, S. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Krogulski, T. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Bialystok (Poland); Mutterer, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Piasecki, K. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland)] (and others)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Influence of Dust on the Absorptivity of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to model and quantify the increase of the absorptivity of radiant barriers caused by the accumulation of dust on the surface of radiant barriers. This research was the continuation of a previous work by the author at Texas A&M University in which a radiation energy balance inside the attic enclosure was developed. The particles were considered as flat, circular planes, all having the same radii. That early model showed that there was a linear relationship between the fraction of area of the foil covered by dust and the mean absorptivity of the dusty radiant barrier. In the present work, it was found that the assumption of treating the dust particles as plane circles, underestimated the effective area of the particles by about 20%. Experimental measurements indicated that dust particles achieved the same temperature as the radiant barrier. The new model used the linear relationship just described, and simulated the dust particles as flat circular planes having random radii and laying in random locations within the radiant barrier surface. The new model calculated the fraction of radiant barrier area covered by particles using a digital array in which the clean barrier was represented as zeroes and the dust particles were represented as a set of ones appropriately dimensioned inside the array. The experimentation used natural dust and Arizona Road Test Dust. Using an infrared emissometer, the emissivities (absorptivities) of the clean and dusty barriers were measured and using an electronic scale, the dust loading was measured. An electron microscope was used to experimentally find the fraction of radiant barrier covered by the dust particles to correlate the experimentally found absorptivity with the experimentally found fraction of dust coverage. The limited experimental data available were also used to correlate the absorptivity of the dusty radiant barrier with the time of dust accumulation and the location of the barrier inside the attic. A linear relationship between the absorptivity and the time of dust accumulation was found that can be applied to predict future barrier effectiveness based upon the rate of dust accumulation for a given location.

Noboa, Homero L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of $^{16}$O with $^{154,}$$^{144}$Sm,$^{186}$W and $^{208}$Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two $^{64}$Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

F. Muhammad Zamrun; K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Evaluation of engineered barriers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface Disposal (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex serves as the low level waste burial ground at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The low level wastes are buried in trenches, pits, and soil vaults in surficial sediments. A closure/post-closure plan must be written prior to closure of the SDA. The closure plan for the facility must include a design for an engineered barrier closure cover that will meet all applicable regulatory requirements. This paper describes the approach being followed at the INEEL to choose an appropriate cover design for the SDA closure. Regulatory requirements and performance objectives potentially applicable to closure of the SDA were identified. Technical issues related to SDA closure were identified from a literature search of previous arid site engineered barrier studies and from previous SDA closure cover evaluations. Five engineered barrier conceptual design alternatives were identified: (1) a bio/capillary barrier cover, (2) a thin soil cover, (3) a thick soil cover, (4) a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act cover, and (5) a concrete sealed surface cover. Two of these designs were chosen for in situ hydraulic testing, rather than all five, in order to maximize the amount of information generated relative to projected project costs. Testing of these two cover designs provides data to quantify hydrologic model input parameters and for verification of site specific hydrologic models for long term closure cover performance evaluation and detailed analysis of closure cover alternatives. The specific objectives of the field tests are to determine the water balance for the two covers over several years and to determine cover soil physical and hydraulic properties.

Bhatt, R.N.; Porro, I.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Opportunities and Barriers in the Implementation of Energy Efficiency Measures in Plastic Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The plastic industry in the U.S. employs approximately 9% [1] of the manufacturing work force and consumes approximately 6% [1] of the total energy used by the U.S. industries. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), manufacturers of plastic and other resins are consuming nearly 1,070 trillion Btu [1] of energy in their operations every year, valued at $6.0[1] billion. As escalating energy prices continue to be a concern for industry, many plastic manufacturers are striving to reduce their energy consumption to stay competitive. An alternative to reduced energy consumption is to put in place an energy efficiency strategy. However, while most plastic manufactures are aware of the energy efficiency opportunities in their facilities, the implementation of these opportunities face certain market barriers. These barriers are identified as customers lack the information about energy efficiency technologies, and have limited capital funding to implement the energy efficiency measures. Additionally, it is hard to identify the energy savings opportunities and difficult to quantify their impacts. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the various energy efficiency opportunities in plastic manufacturing and address the market barriers in implementing them. We will identify the energy savings opportunities in plastic manufacturing that can be introduced to reduce energy consumption and decrease production costs, thus giving the customers more competitive edge in both the regional and global markets. We will also discuss various popular energy efficiency measures, the energy savings associated with each measure and their projected simple payback. In terms of policy implication, this paper will discuss various strategies of mitigating potential market barriers in implementing energy efficiency measures on plastic manufacturing industries.

Kanunho, A; Yong, J. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Technical Barriers, Gaps, and Opportunities Related to Home Energy Upgrade Market Delivery  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the technical barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program. The objective of this report is to outline the technical1 barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program. This information will be used to provide guidance for new research necessary to enable the success of the approaches. Investigation for this report was conducted via publications related to home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, and a series of interviews with subject matter experts (contractors, consultants, program managers, manufacturers, trade organization representatives, and real estate agents). These experts specified technical barriers and gaps, and offered suggestions for how the technical community might address them. The potential benefits of home energy upgrades are many and varied: reduced energy use and costs; improved comfort, durability, and safety; increased property value; and job creation. Nevertheless, home energy upgrades do not comprise a large part of the overall home improvement market. Residential energy efficiency is the most complex climate intervention option to deliver because the market failures are many and transaction costs are high (Climate Change Capital 2009). The key reasons that energy efficiency investment is not being delivered are: (1) The opportunity is highly fragmented; and (2) The energy efficiency assets are nonstatus, low-visibility investments that are not properly valued. There are significant barriers to mobilizing the investment in home energy upgrades, including the 'hassle factor' (the time and effort required to identify and secure improvement works), access to financing, and the opportunity cost of capital and split incentives.

Bianchi, M. V. A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Technical Barriers, Gaps, and Opportunities Related to Home Energy Upgrade Market Delivery  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the technical barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program. The objective of this report is to outline the technical1 barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program. This information will be used to provide guidance for new research necessary to enable the success of the approaches. Investigation for this report was conducted via publications related to home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, and a series of interviews with subject matter experts (contractors, consultants, program managers, manufacturers, trade organization representatives, and real estate agents). These experts specified technical barriers and gaps, and offered suggestions for how the technical community might address them. The potential benefits of home energy upgrades are many and varied: reduced energy use and costs; improved comfort, durability, and safety; increased property value; and job creation. Nevertheless, home energy upgrades do not comprise a large part of the overall home improvement market. Residential energy efficiency is the most complex climate intervention option to deliver because the market failures are many and transaction costs are high (Climate Change Capital 2009). The key reasons that energy efficiency investment is not being delivered are: (1) The opportunity is highly fragmented; and (2) The energy efficiency assets are nonstatus, low-visibility investments that are not properly valued. There are significant barriers to mobilizing the investment in home energy upgrades, including the 'hassle factor' (the time and effort required to identify and secure improvement works), access to financing, and the opportunity cost of capital and split incentives.

Bianchi, M. V. A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Commercial Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code requires openings in the building envelope to be sealed to prevent air leakage into and out of the space, including an air barrier at insulation installations. Publication Date: Wednesday, June 22, 2011 cn_commercial_air_barrier_requirements_for_insulated_ceilings.pdf Document Details Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 2009 IECC Document type: Code Notes Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 17:25

267

Determine Employee Commuting Incentives and Barriers for Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determine Employee Commuting Incentives and Barriers for Greenhouse Determine Employee Commuting Incentives and Barriers for Greenhouse Gas Profile Determine Employee Commuting Incentives and Barriers for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 2:23pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Finally, when evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, it is important to consider what specific incentives would most influence an employee's decision to adopt an alternative to single-occupancy vehicle commuting and what employees perceive as major barriers to using certain alternatives. Agencies must determine whether they can influence commute behavior changes with the strategies described in the following section. To illustrate, survey data from Worksite B2 in Figure 1 below summarize the reasons why employees drive alone and factors that would motivate them to

268

Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Wideband Radio-Wave Communications and ..... Speaker(s): Farid Dowla Date: June 1, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette (Complete seminar title is: Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Wideband Radio-Wave Communications and Radar Imaging, Radio-Frequency (RF) Tags and Tera-Hertz (THz) Standoff Detection Spectroscopy) In many remote sensing problems there is a critical need to detect and image objects through barriers, such as buildings, with high reliability and resolution and at long ranges. A related problem is the wireless communication and geolocation of transceivers in harsh RF environments, such as in urban areas and underground caves, where

269

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Title Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6155E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Cappers, Peter, Jason MacDonald, and Charles A. Goldman Date Published 03/2013 Keywords advanced metering infrastructure, aggregators of retail customers, ancillary services, demand response, electric utility regulation, electricity market rules, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, institutional barriers, market and value, operating reserves, retail electricity providers, retail electricity tariffs, smart grid Attachment Size

270

Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers.

Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Household Preferences for Supporting Renewable Energy, and Barriers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Household Preferences for Supporting Renewable Energy, and Barriers to Green Power Demand Speaker(s): Ryan Wiser Date: May 9, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Nearly 40% of the...

272

Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas-Turbine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

070103 (36 Months Duration) 546,000 Total Contract Value (546,000 DOE) Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas-Turbine Engines Using a Novel Solution-Precursor...

273

TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

HOLM MJ

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

Moisture Measurements in Residential Attics Containing Radiant Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal radiant barriers, rigorously tested during a typical Tennessee winter, allowed moisture to dissipate on a diurnal cycle and caused no structural, wet insulation, or stained-ceiling problems.

1989-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fusion dynamics of symmetric systems near barrier energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections was explained as the lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model. The numbers of nucleon transfer in the neck region are appreciably dependent on the incident energies, but strongly on the reaction systems. A comparison of the neck dynamics is performed for the symmetric reactions $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. An increase of the ratios of neutron to proton in the neck region at initial collision stage is observed and obvious for neutron-rich systems, which can reduce the interaction potential of two colliding nuclei. The distribution of the dynamical fusion barriers and the fusion excitation functions are calculated and compared them with the available experimental data.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Altered Cross-Linking of HSP27 by Zerumbone as a Novel Strategy for Overcoming HSP27-Mediated Radioresistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: HSP27 or HSP25 negatively regulates apoptosis pathways after radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. Abrogation of HSP27 function may be a candidate target for overcoming radio- and chemoresistance. Methods and Materials: Zerumbone (ZER), a cytotoxic component isolated from Zingiber zerumbet smith. Clonogenic survival assay and flow cytometry after Annexin V staining were performed to determine in vitro sensitization effects of ZER with ionizing radiation. A nude mouse xenografting system was also applied to detect in vivo radiosensitizing effects of ZER. Results: ZER produced cross-linking of HSP27, which was dependent on inhibition of the monomeric form of HSP27. ZER was directly inserted between the disulfide bond in the HSP27 dimer and modified normal HSP27 dimerization. Pretreatment with ZER before radiation inhibited the binding affinity between HSP27 and apoptotic molecules, such as cytochrome c and PKC{delta}, and induced sensitization in vitro and in an in vivo xenografted nude mouse system. Structural analogs lacking only the carbonyl group in ZER, such as {alpha}-humulene (HUM) and 8-hydroxy-humulen (8-OH-HUM), did not affect normal cross-linking of HSP27 and did not induce radiosensitization. Conclusions: We suggest that altered cross-linking of HSP27 by ZER is a good strategy for abolishing HSP27-mediated resistance.

Choi, Seo-Hyun [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Woo Duck [Department of Functional Crop, National Institute of Crop Science, Rural Development Administration, Miryang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae-June [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Joo-Won; Lee, Yoo Jin [College of Pharmacy and Division of Life Science and Pharmaceuticals, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Eun-Kyoung [College of Pharmacy and Division of Life Science and Pharmaceuticals, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil, E-mail: yslee0425@ewha.ac.k [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy and Division of Life Science and Pharmaceuticals, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Overcoming Visibility Issues in a Small-to-Medium Retailer Using Automatic Identification and Data Capture Technology: An Evolutionary Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors the inventory control practices of a small-to-medium retailer to identify common challenges this type of organization experiences with respect to automated data capture ADC and the implementation of an enterprise wide information ... Keywords: Automatic Identification and Data Capture AIDC, Barcode, Business Process, Information Systems, Inventory Control, Radio-Frequency Identification RFID, Small-to-Medium Retailer

Dane Hamilton; Katina Michael; Samuel Fosso Wamba

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification  

SciTech Connect

Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

279

Information Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Science Information Science1354608000000Information ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.NoQuestions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov...

280

User Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Information User Information Print User Guide A step-by-step guide for users about how to apply and prepare for beam time at the ALS. Includes information about submitting a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Informed Traders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is introduced in which there is a small agent who is more susceptible to the flow of information in the market than the general market participant, and who tries to implement strategies based on the additional information. In this model market participants have access to a stream of noisy information concerning the future return of an asset, whereas the informed trader has access to a further information source which is obscured by an additional noise that may be correlated with the market noise. The informed trader uses the extraneous information source to seek statistical arbitrage opportunities, while at the same time accommodating the additional risk. The amount of information available to the general market participant concerning the asset return is measured by the mutual information of the asset price and the associated cash flow. The worth of the additional information source is then measured in terms of the difference of mutual information between the general market participant and the informe...

Brody, Dorje C; Friedman, Robyn L; Hughston, Lane P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

About Inform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS member magazine that provide international news on fats, oils, surfactants, detergents, and related material. inform About Inform Publications aocs articles book books cdrom cdroms detergents echapters fats inform international journal journ

283

General Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at the Embassy Suites Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. For more information on this location, check out the travel information and destination highlights page.

284

Peering Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peering Information Network Overview Tools Peering Information Interactive Network Map Network Maps Connected Sites Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US)...

285

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Stephens, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah

287

Influence of Dust on the Emissivity of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of the radiant heat transfer in attics containing dusty radiant barriers was developed. The geometrical model was a triangular enclosure in which the temperatures of the enclosing surfaces were known. The dust particles were simulated as areas of diameter equal to the mean diameter of the real dust to be analyzed and an emissivity substantially larger than the emissivity of the radiant barrier. Several shape factors were calculated using shape factor algebra, including a procedure to find the shape factor between a small rectangle and a triangular surface perpendicular to the rectangular plane. The thermal model was developed using the "Net Radiation Method" in which the net heat exchange between the surfaces surrounding the enclosure was found by solving a system of equations that has as many equations as the number of surfaces involved in the calculations. This led to the necessity of solving a very large system of equations in order to account for the dust particles in a representative amount. The solution of the system of equations provided the heat flux for each element of the enclosure. Finally, replacing the radiant barrier and the dust particles for an equivalent surface corresponding to the dusty radiant barrier provided the means to calculate the emissivity of this dusty radiant barrier. The theoretical model was tested to assess its validity. The experimentation was carried out using a reflection emissometer to measure the increase of the emissivity of aluminum radiant barrier when known quantities of dust were artificially applied to it. The experimental results showed good agreement with the theoretical model. A linear relationship between the emissivity and the area of dust coverage was found. The simple relation developed can be used in future research which still has to deal with the determination of the area of dust coverage by using the geometrical model of dust superposition or other statistical model to simulate the random location of random size dust particles over the radiant barrier.

Noboa, Homero L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Employment Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Employment Information. The CNST technical staff includes Project Leaders, Postdoctoral and Student Researchers, Visiting ...

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

Overcoming the Range Limitation of Medium-Duty Battery Electric Vehicles through the use of Hydrogen Fuel-Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery electric vehicles possess great potential for decreasing lifecycle costs in medium-duty applications, a market segment currently dominated by internal combustion technology. Characterized by frequent repetition of similar routes and daily return to a central depot, medium-duty vocations are well positioned to leverage the low operating costs of battery electric vehicles. Unfortunately, the range limitation of commercially available battery electric vehicles acts as a barrier to widespread adoption. This paper describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy and industry partners to analyze the use of small hydrogen fuel-cell stacks to extend the range of battery electric vehicles as a means of improving utility, and presumably, increasing market adoption. This analysis employs real-world vocational data and near-term economic assumptions to (1) identify optimal component configurations for minimizing lifecycle costs, (2) benchmark economic performance relative to both battery electric and conventional powertrains, and (3) understand how the optimal design and its competitiveness change with respect to duty cycle and economic climate. It is found that small fuel-cell power units provide extended range at significantly lower capital and lifecycle costs than additional battery capacity alone. And while fuel-cell range-extended vehicles are not deemed economically competitive with conventional vehicles given present-day economic conditions, this paper identifies potential future scenarios where cost equivalency is achieved.

Wood, E.; Wang, L.; Gonder, J.; Ulsh, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Technology Characterizations. Environmental Information Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Handbook Series is designed to overcome the deficiency of information utility and transfer. Each of the works in this series brings together information in an area and format that is useful to both public and private sector needs. It is meant to serve as a basic reference document that will stand for a period of time and help to enrich decisionmaking and research in the interface of energy and the environment. This particular handbook deals with environmental characterization data for the energy technologies and presents the data in a format for use by DOE policy analysts. This treatment includes not only the actual information base, but also a preface which explains the present concept, the historical growth of the program, and the new direction for improved utility. The information base, itself, is constantly being enhanced and is republished periodically as necessary. The specific energy systems for which environmental/technology characterization information is provided are grouped as follows: nuclear energy; coal; petroleum; gas; synthetic fuels; solar energy; geothermal energy; and hydroelectricity.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Processing and Gas Barrier Behavior of Multilayer Thin Nanocomposite Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin films with the ability to impart oxygen and other types of gas barrier are crucial to commercial packaging applications. Commodity polymers, such as polyethylene (PE), polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), have insufficient barrier for goods requiring long shelf life. Current gas barrier technologies like plasma-enhanced vapor deposition (PECVD) often create high barrier metal oxide films, which are prone to cracking when flexed. Bulk composites composed of polymer and impermeable nanoparticles show improved barrier, but particle aggregation limits their practical utility for applications requiring high barrier and transparency. Layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies allow polymers and nanoparticles to be mixed with high particle loadings, creating super gas barrier thin films on substrates normally exhibiting high gas permeability. Branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) were deposited using LbL to create gas barrier films with varying pH combinations. Film thickness and mass fraction of each component was controlled by their combined charge. With lower charge density (PEI at pH 10 and PAA at pH 4), PEI/PAA assemblies exhibit the best oxygen barrier relative to other pH combinations. An 8 BL PEI/PAA film, with a thickness of 451 nm, has an oxygen permeability lower than 4.8 x 10^-21 cm^3 * cm/cm^2 * s * Pa, which is comparable to a 100 nm SiOx nanocoating. Crosslinking these films with glutaraldehyde (GA), 1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-3-ethylcarbodiimide methiodide (EDC) or heating forms covalent bonds between PEI and/or PAA. Oxygen transmission rates (OTR) of 8 BL films crosslinked with 0.1M GA or 0.01M EDC show the best oxygen barrier at 100% RH. Graphene oxide (GO) sheets and PEI were deposited via LbL with varying GO concentration. The resulting thin films have an average bilayer thickness from 4.3 to 5.0 nm and a GO mass fraction from 88 to 91wt%. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images reveal a highly-oriented nanobrick wall structure. A 10 BL PEI/GO film that is 91 nm thick, made with a 0.2 wt% GO suspension, exhibits an oxygen permeability of 2.5 x 10^-20 cm^3 * cm/cm^2 * s * Pa. Finally, the influence of deposition time on thin film assembly was examined by depositing montmorillonite (MMT) or laponite (LAP) clays paired with PEI. Film growth and microstructure suggests that smaller aspect ratio LAP clay is more dip-time dependent than MMT and larger aspect ratio MMT has better oxygen barrier. A 30 BL PEI/MMT film made with 10 second dips in PEI has the same undetectable OTR as a film with 5 minute dips (with dips in MMT held at 5 minutes in both cases), indicating LbL gas barrier can be made more quickly than initially thought. These high barrier recipes, with simple and efficient processing conditions, are good candidates for a variety of packaging applications.

Yang, You-Hao

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Comparison Test for Infection Control Barriers for Construction in Healthcare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the extent of infection control measures to be taken to protect immunosuppressed and other types of patients from airborne infection agents during construction is crucial knowledge for both healthcare and construction professionals. The number of aspergillosis-related fatalities due to dust transmission during construction activity has decreased with the improvement of antifungal therapy, however the illness is particularly debilitating and the treatment is not always successful. This experimental work is the first stage in a research program to develop better dust controls for construction at existing medical facilities to reduce the incidence of dust borne fungi, such as Aspergillus spp. To better protect at-risk patients from exposure to Aspergillus spp. and other airborne fungal infections, an experiment was conducted to determine what materials can be used to create a barrier for infection control to moderate particle transmission from the construction area to the treatment area. This study investigated the relationship between construction barriers and particle transmission. A new experimental procedure and equipment simulates the transmission of disturbed dust from construction activity across a barrier. The effective of the barrier is determined from measured particle count on filter. The results show that an effective barrier manufactured from simple and readily available building supplies stops the transmission of 12-micron dust particles under a standard set of conditions. The test provides a simple and cost effective method to compare transmission rates for dust.

Bassett, Aimee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effect of attic ventilation on the performance of radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the experiments was to quantify how attic ventilation would affect the performance of a radiant barrier. Ceiling heat flux and space cooling load were both measured. Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 13.38 m[sup 2] (nominal) test houses are presented in this paper. The test houses responded similarly to weather variations. Indoor temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.2 [degrees] C. Ceiling heat fluxes and space cooling load were within a 2.5 percent difference between both test houses. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate of 1.3 (1/sec)/m[sup 2] of the attic floor existed after which the percentage reduction in ceiling heat fluxes produced by the radiant barriers did not change with increasing attic airflow rates. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barriers were between 25 and 35 percent, with 28 percent being the percent reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. The space-cooling load reductions observed were between two to four percent. All results compiled in this paper were for attics with unfaced fiberglass insulation with a resistance level of 3.35 m[sup 2]K/W (nominal) and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities (less than 0.05) on both sides.

Medina, M.A.; O'Neal, D.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Turner, W.D. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Systematic study of projectile structure effect on fusion barrier distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasielastic excitation function measurement has been carried out for the $^{4}$He + $^{232}$Th system at $\\theta_{lab}$=160$^\\circ$ with respect to the beam direction, to obtain a representation of the fusion barrier distribution. Using the present data along with previously measured barrier distribution results on $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O, and $^{19}$F + $^{232}$Th systems a systematic analysis has been carried out to investigate the role of target and/or projectile structures on fusion barrier distribution. It is observed that for $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, and $^{16}$O + $^{232}$Th, reactions the couplings due to target states only are required in coupled channel fusion calculations to explain the experimental data, whereas for the $^{19}$F+ $^{232}$Th system along with the coupling of target states, inelastic states of $^{19}$F are also required to explain the experimental results on fusion-barrier distribution. The width of the barrier distribution shows interesting transition behavior when plotted with respect to the target-projectile charge product for the above systems.

Pratap Roy; A. Saxena; B. K. Nayak; E. T. Mirgule; B. John; Y. K. Gupta; L. S. Danu; R. P. Vind; Ashok Kumar; R. K. Choudhury

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection (PRA), & Records CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection (PRA), & Records Name Contact...

296

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation The engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a key role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. This report focuses on the progress made in the evaluation of EBS design concepts, assessment of clay phase stability at repository-relevant conditions, thermodynamic database development for cement and clay phases, and THMC coupled phenomena along with the development of tools and methods to examine these processes. This report also documents the advancements of the Disposal System Evaluation Framework (DSEF) for the development of

297

Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier June 25, 2010 - 12:16pm Addthis EnerNex Corporation is developing documentation and validating generic wind turbine and plant models that test reliability. | File photo EnerNex Corporation is developing documentation and validating generic wind turbine and plant models that test reliability. | File photo Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE The steady increase of wind power on the grid presents new challenges for power system operators charged with making sure the grid stays up and running. "We need to ensure that we are going down a path that will lead to better reliability [with wind power]," said Bob Zavadil, an executive vice

298

Energy Department Announces New Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiative to Remove Barriers for Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry to Work with National Labs, Commercialize Technology Energy Department Announces New Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry to Work with National Labs, Commercialize Technology December 8, 2011 - 12:30pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of President Obama's commitment to helping U.S businesses create jobs and strengthen their competitiveness by speeding up the transfer of federal research and development from the laboratory to the marketplace, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman today announced a new pilot initiative to reduce some of the hurdles that prevent innovative companies from working with the Department of Energy's national laboratories. The new Agreements for Commercializing Technology

299

In Situ Formation Of Reactive Barriers For Pollution Control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating soil contamination by forming one or more zones of oxidized material in the path of percolating groundwater is disclosed. The zone or barrier region is formed by delivering an oxidizing agent into the ground for reaction with an existing soil component. The oxidizing agent modifies the existing soil component creating the oxidized zone. Subsequently when soil contaminates migrate into the zone, the oxidized material is available to react with the contaminates and degrade them into benign products. The existing soil component can be an oxidizable mineral such as manganese, and the oxidizing agent can be ozone gas or hydrogen peroxide. Soil contaminates can be volatile organic compounds. Oxidized barriers can be used single or in combination with other barriers.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Riley, Robert G. (West Richland, WA)

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

300

Sub-barrier fusion enhancement with radioactive 134Te  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections of radioactive $^{134}$Te + $^{40}$Ca were measured at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The evaporation residues produced in the reaction were detected in a zero-degree ionization chamber providing high efficiency for inverse kinematics. Both coupled-channel calculations and comparison with similar Sn+Ca systems indicate an increased sub-barrier fusion probability that is correlated with the presence of positive Q-value neutron transfer channels. In comparison, the measured fusion excitation functions of $^{130}$Te + $^{58,64}$Ni, which have positive Q-value neutron transfer channels, were accurately reproduced by coupled-channel calculations including only inelastic excitations. The results demonstrate that the coupling of transfer channels can lead to enhanced sub-barrier fusion but this is not directly correlated with positive Q-value neutron transfer channels in all cases.

Z. Kohley; J. F. Liang; D. Shapira; C. J. Gross; R. L. Varner; J. M. Allmond; J. J. Kolata; P. E. Mueller; A. Roberts

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Sub-barrier fusion enhancement with radioactive 134Te  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections of radioactive 134Te + 40Ca were measured at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The evaporation residues produced in the reaction were detected in a zero-degree ionization chamber providing high efficiency for inverse kinematics. Both coupled-channel calculations and comparison with similar Sn + Ca systems indicate an increased sub-barrier fusion probability that is correlated with the presence of positive Q-value neutron transfer channels. In comparison, the measured fusion excitation functions of 130Te + 58,64Ni, which have positive Q-value neutron transfer channels, were accurately reproduced by coupled-channel calculations including only inelastic excitations. The results demonstrate that the coupling of transfer channels can lead to enhanced sub-barrier fusion but this is not directly correlated with positive Q-value neutron transfer channels in all cases.

Kohley, Zachary W [ORNL; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Allmond, James M [ORNL; Kolata, Jim J [University of Notre Dame, IN; Mueller, Paul Edward [ORNL; Roberts, Amy [University of Notre Dame, IN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Special Presentation: Key Findings from the Barrier Immune Radio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Presentation: Key Findings from the Barrier Immune Radio Special Presentation: Key Findings from the Barrier Immune Radio Communications Project Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Girish Ghatikar Peter Haugen Date: November 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Barrier Immune Radio Communications (BIRC) Project was established in January 2007 by the Demand Response Emerging Technologies Program (DRETD) to identify radio frequency technologies that could enable the widespread deployment of Demand Response strategies in buildings. Researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will present the key findings from this project in a one-hour presentation. Researchers found that several of the RF technologies tested at LBNL's Molecular Foundry building were able to provide sufficiently

303

Market and Policy Barriers to Deployment of Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

There has recently been resurgent interest in energy storage, due to a number of developments in the electricity industry. Despite this interest, very little storage, beyond some small demonstration projects, has been deployed recently. While technical issues, such as cost, device efficiency, and other technical characteristics are often listed as barriers to storage, there are a number of non-technical and policy-related issues. This paper surveys some of these main barriers and proposes some potential research and policy steps that can help address them. While the discussion is focused on the United States, a number of the findings and observations may be more broadly applicable.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.; Jenkin, T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Goos-Hanchen like Shifts in Graphene Double Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Goos-Hanchen like shifts for Dirac fermions in graphene scattered by double barrier structures. After obtaining the solution for the energy spectrum, we use the boundary conditions to explicitly determine the Goos-Hanchen like shifts and the associated transmission probability. We analyze these two quantities at resonances by studying their {main} characteristics as a function of the energy and electrostatic potential parameters. To check the validity of our computations we recover previous results obtained for a single barrier under appropriate limits.

Ahmed Jellal; Ilham Redouani; Youness Zahidi; Hocine Bahlouli

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

306

Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow  

SciTech Connect

Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Information Accountability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ease of information flow is both the boon and the bane of large-scale, decentralized systems like the World Wide Web. For all the benefits and opportunities brought by the information revolution, with that same revolution ...

Weitzner, Daniel J.

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Contractor Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vienna U.S. Vienna Vienna, Austria Other Information U.S. Dept. of State U.S. Dept. of Energy IAEA NRC CONTRACTOR INFORMATION Contractor Procurement Template SSTS Process...

309

Information Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...J.H. Westbrook, Sources of Materials Property Data and Information, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

310

General Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Business Small Business General Information General...

311

Information Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To encourage the exchange of information, NIST holds many workshops, seminars, tours and other events available to the public. ...

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Improved HEPA Filter Technology for Flexible and Rigid Containment Barriers  

SciTech Connect

Safety and reliability in glovebox operations can be significantly improved and waste packaging efficiencies can be increased by inserting flexible, lightweight, high capacity HEPA filters into the walls of plastic sheet barriers. This HEPA filter/barrier technology can be adapted to a wide variety of applications: disposable waste bags, protective environmental barriers for electronic equipment, single or multiple use glovebag assemblies, flexible glovebox wall elements, and room partitions. These reliable and inexpensive filtered barriers have many uses in fields such as radioactive waste processing, HVAC filter changeout, vapor or grit blasting, asbestos cleanup, pharmaceutical, medical, biological, and electronic equipment containment. The applications can result in significant cost savings, improved operational reliability and safety, and total waste volume reduction. This technology was developed at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in 1993 and has been used at ANL-W since then at the TRU Waste Characterization Chamber Gloveboxes. Another 1998 AGS Conference paper titled "TRU Waste Characterization Gloveboxes", presented by Mr. David Duncan of ANL-W, describes these boxes.

P. A. Pinson

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Geostrophic Pumping, Inflows and Upwelling in Barrier Reefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The communication between shallow and deep oceans via gaps in the separating barrier reefs is examined using a simplified two-layer analytical model. Attention is focused on the flow resulting from a sea-level difference between the ocean and the ...

Doron Nof; Jason H. Middleton

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fact Sheet Radiant barriers and interior radiation control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the insulation, the radiant barrier will lose most of its effectiveness in reducing heating and cooling loads in central Florida. Subsequent monitoring and data analysis showed cooling energy savings of 9%, peak load with air-conditioning ductwork in the attic in the deep south (such as in Miami in Zone 1 or Austin in Zone

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

316

A Theoretical Study of Mountain Barrier Jets over Sloping Valleys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow-water model is developed to examine the dynamics of mountain-barrier jets over a mesoscale sloping valley between two mountain ridges. In this model, the cold air trapped in the valley is represented by a shallow-water layer that is ...

Qin Xu; Ming Liu; Douglas L. Westphal

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers  

SciTech Connect

A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work to develop new thermal barrier coating systems, which will be essential to the operation of the ATS engine which is under development. Work is at the stage of process improvement and bond coat improvement, along with proof testing of the coatings under thermal conditions typical of what can be expected in the ATS engine.

NONE

1998-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualifies for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH.sub.2).sub.11 --COOH Which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces.

King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Czanderna, Alvin W. (Denver, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Microstructural Evolution and interfacial motion in systems with diffusion barriers  

SciTech Connect

This research program was designed to model and simulate phase transformations in systems containing diffusion barriers. The modeling work included mass flow, phase formation, and microstructural evolution in interdiffusing systems. Simulation work was done by developing Cahn-Hilliard and phase field equations governing both the temporal and spatial evolution of the composition and deformation fields and other important phase variables.

Perry H. Leo

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Temperature-Dependent Fission Barriers of Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. We study the temperature-dependent fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The equivalence of isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. For nuclei around $^{278}$112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with temperature as compared to the nuclei around $^{292}$114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and fission-barrier temperatures. Our calculations are consistent with the long survival probabilities of the superheavy elements produced in Dubna with th...

Pei, J C; Sheikh-Javid, A; Kerman, A K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND RELEVANCE TO THE DOE COMPLEX  

SciTech Connect

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was initiated to reduce risk and uncertainties in the performance assessments that directly impact U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup and closure programs. The CBP is supported by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and has been specifically addressing the following critical EM program needs: (i) the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities and (ii) increased understanding of contaminant transport behavior within cementitious barrier systems to support the development and deployment of adequate closure technologies. To accomplish this, the CBP has two initiatives: (1) an experimental initiative to increase understanding of changes in cementitious materials over long times (> 1000 years) over changing conditions and (2) a modeling initiative to enhance and integrate a set of computational tools validated by laboratory and field experimental data to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. In FY10, the CBP developed the initial phase of an integrated modeling tool that would serve as a screening tool which could help in making decisions concerning disposal and tank closure. The CBP experimental programs are underway to validate this tool and provide increased understanding of how CM changes over time and under changing conditions. These initial CBP products that will eventually be enhanced are anticipated to reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the DOE assessment process. These tools have application to low activity waste forms, high level waste tank closure, D&D and entombment of major nuclear facilities, landfill waste acceptance criteria, and in-situ grouting and immobilization of vadose zone contamination. This paper summarizes the recent work provided by the CBP to support DOE operations and regulatory compliance and the accomplishments over the past 2 years. Impacts of this work include: (1) a forum for DOE-NRC technical exchange, (2) material characterization to support PA predictions, (3) reducing uncertainty in PA predictions, (4) establishing base case performance to improve PA predictions, and (5) improving understanding and quantification of moisture and contaminant transport used in PAs. Additional CBP accomplishments include: sponsorship of a national test bed workshop to obtain collaboration in establishing the path forward in obtaining actual data to support future predictions on cementitious barrier performance evaluations, and participation in an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Cooperative Research Project on the use of cementitious barriers for low-level radioactive waste treatment and disposal.

Burns, H.; Langton, C.; Flach, G.; Kosson, D.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiant barriers were tested in attics of three unoccupied research houses which are located near Knoxville, Tennessee. The prime purpose of the testing was to determine the interaction, if any, between two types of radiant barriers, horizontal (barrier laid on top of attic insulation) and truss (barrier attached to underside of roof trusses), and three levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation, R-11, R-19, and R-30. Testing of radiant barriers with R-19 fiberglass-batt attic insulation was done at the houses in the summer of 1985 and in the winter of 1985-86. The R-11 and R-30 testing was done in the summer of 1986. These results showed that horizontal barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing house cooling and heating loads. The summer of 1986 testing showed that increasing the attic insulation from R-11 to R-30 reduced the house cooling load (Btu) by approximately 16%. Adding a horizontal barrier to R-11 also reduced the cooling load compared to R-11 with no barrier by about 16%, while a truss barrier reduced it by 11%. A horizontal barrier with R-30 only reduced the cooling load by 2% compared to R-30 with no barrier, while an increase in the cooling load of 0.7% was measured with a truss barrier and R-30. Radiant barriers were not effective in reducing house cooling loads when R-30 attic insulation was present. The results from the summer of 1985 were integrated into the latest work through the use of a modeling effort using the building load simulation program, DOE-2.1B. This showed that R-19 insulation in conjunction with a horizontal barrier was (for Knoxville) the most effective barrier/insulation combination and could reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% compared to R-11 with no barrier.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

WIMS - Waste Information Management System  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Welcome To WIMS Welcome To WIMS Waste Information Management System WIMS new web address: http://www.emwims.org WIMS is developed to provide DOE Headquarters and site waste managers with the tools necessary to easily visualize, understand, and manage the vast volumes, categories, and problems of forecasted waste streams. WIMS meets this need by providing a user-friendly online system to gather, organize, and present waste forecast data from DOE sites. This system provides a method for identification of waste forecast volumes, material classes, disposition pathways, and potential choke points and barriers to final disposition. Disclaimer: Disposition facility information presented is for planning purposes only and does not represent DOE's decisions or commitments. Any selection of disposition facility will be made after technical, economic, and policy considerations.

325

Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gaps and Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies 2010 Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting Denver, Colorado - July 20 - 22, 2010 August 2010 Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory For the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

326

Information Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe Information Forests, an approach to classification that generalizes Random Forests by replacing the splitting criterion of non-leaf nodes from a discriminative one -- based on the entropy of the label distribution -- to a generative one -- based on maximizing the information divergence between the class-conditional distributions in the resulting partitions. The basic idea consists of deferring classification until a measure of "classification confidence" is sufficiently high, and instead breaking down the data so as to maximize this measure. In an alternative interpretation, Information Forests attempt to partition the data into subsets that are "as informative as possible" for the purpose of the task, which is to classify the data. Classification confidence, or informative content of the subsets, is quantified by the Information Divergence. Our approach relates to active learning, semi-supervised learning, mixed generative/discriminative learning.

Yi, Zhao; Dewan, Maneesh; Zhan, Yiqiang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and

328

Beyond parallax barriers: applying formal optimization methods to multilayer automultiscopic displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on resolving long-standing limitations of parallax barriers by applying formal optimization methods. We consider two generalizations of conventional parallax barriers. First, we consider general two-layer ...

Lanman, Douglas

329

Quantifying overwash flux in barrier systems : an example from Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal barriers are particularly susceptible to the predicted effects of accelerated of sea-level rise and the potential for increased impacts of intense storms. Over centennial scales, barriers are maintained via overtopping ...

Carruthers, Emily A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Information Repository  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Repository Index Permit Renewal Application (Parts A and B) Submissions, September 2009, Department of Energy CBFOWashington TRU Solutions Administrative Completeness...

331

Personal Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with a friend or relative. Personal Information Full name Home address Street City State Zip Home phone E-mail address Birthday SSN (MMDDYYYY) Passport number Driver's license...

332

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

333

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

334

Dust and Ventilation Effects on Radiant Barriers: Cooling Season Energy Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study on the effects of attic ventilation area and type and dust buildup on horizontal and truss radiant barriers in insulated homes can help utilities reduce cooling season electric energy requirements. Increasing the ventilation area ratio and changing ventilation types had little effect on radiant barrier performance. Dust did degrade performance, but insulated homes with radiant barriers still had lower energy requirements than those without radiant barriers.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizational Barriers to Cogeneration OrganizationTechnologies Cogeneration. MSW . Wind. ResidentialPage Industrial Cogeneration. Residential Photovoltaics.

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Financing Solar Energy Systems with Energy Savings Performance Contracts in the Federal Sector: Results of a Survey on Barriers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of an investigation into financing solar energy systems for the Federal sector. The objectives of the investigation were (1) to identify the barriers that impede companies from using Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) to develop solar energy projects for Federal facilities, and (2) to clarify the impacts of Federal contracting requirements on energy service companies' use of ESPCs. Twenty-four representatives of energy service companies agreed to be interviewed. Their responses indicate that these are the primary barriers to greater use of ESPCs: the relatively long payback periods for investments in solar technologies; the length of the ESPC process; the cost of certain contractual requirements regarding wages and financing; and a lack of knowledge about the actual cost and reliability of solar systems. The report proposes a number of actions the government could take to remove these barriers, including (1) streamlining and shortening the ESPC process and (2) doing more to inform both government agencies and energy service companies about the costs and benefits of solar systems.

Gee, R. C.; LaPorta, C.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Multiple-humped fission and fusion barriers of the heaviest elements and ellipsoidal deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leading possibly to superheavy elements, double-humped potential barriers appear for cold fusionMultiple-humped fission and fusion barriers of the heaviest elements and ellipsoidal deformations G barriers and the predicted half-lives of actinides follow the experimental results. In the fusion path

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Low temperature barriers with heat interceptor wells for in situ processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for reducing heat load applied to a frozen barrier by a heated formation is described. The system includes heat interceptor wells positioned between the heated formation and the frozen barrier. Fluid is positioned in the heat interceptor wells. Heat transfers from the formation to the fluid to reduce the heat load applied to the frozen barrier.

McKinzie, II, Billy John (Houston, TX)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

339

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

Laughlin, David E.

340

On the implementation of a log-barrier progressive hedging method for multistage stochastic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A progressive hedging method incorporated with self-concordant barrier for solving multistage stochastic programs is proposed recently by Zhao [G. Zhao, A Lagrangian dual method with self-concordant barrier for multistage stochastic convex nonlinear ... Keywords: Lagrangian dual, Log-barrier method, Multistage stochastic programs, Progressive hedging method

Xinwei Liu; Kim-Chuan Toh; Gongyun Zhao

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cooling season energy measurements of dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. Testing showed that increasing the attic ventilation area ratio from the minimum recommended of 1/300 (1 ft{sup 2} of effective ventilation area per 300 ft{sup 2} of attic area) to 1/150 had little if any effect on the house cooling load with either truss or horizontal barriers present in the attics. Radiant barriers, however, still reduced the house cooling load. 18 refs., 17 figs., 26 tabs.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hall, J.A. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

DHAI: dynamic hierarchical agent-based infrastructure for supporting large-scale distributed information processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emergence of Internet, Intranet, local area networks, and ad hoc wireless networks introduces a plethora of new problems in information processing. In order to overcome these problems, we combine the Grid and P2P technologies, and propose a dynamic ...

Jinlong Wang; Congfu Xu; Huifeng Shen; Zhaohui Wu; Yunhe Pan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE * OSTI * Go Mobile Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information FAQ * Widget...

344

Registration Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Registration Information Registration Information Registration Information Focusing on methods and computational tools used to help sequence, assemble, and finish genomes, including new sequencing technologies. Contact Chris Detter (505) 665-3024 Email Registration is limited to 150 participants so please register ASAP if you plan to attend. There is no deadline for registration. To register, please send an e-mail to Chris Detter with your contact information: Name Citizenship status. Institution information. Area(s) of specific interest. Do you plan to submit an abstract by March 30th? Within 48 hrs of registering you will be sent an e-mail confirmation number that you should include on your abstract if you are submitting one. To submit an abstract, please refer to the Abstract Submission guidelines.

345

Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level.

Brown, Ralph L. (Albuquerque, NM); Guilford, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stichman, John H. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level. 4 figs.

Brown, R.L.; Guilford, R.P.; Stichman, J.H.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Method and apparatus for constructing an underground barrier wall structure  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for constructing a underground barrier wall structure using a jet grout injector subassembly comprising a pair of primary nozzles and a plurality of secondary nozzles, the secondary nozzles having a smaller diameter than the primary nozzles, for injecting grout in directions other than the primary direction, which creates a barrier wall panel having a substantially uniform wall thickess. This invention addresses the problem of the weak "bow-tie" shape that is formed during conventional jet injection when using only a pair of primary nozzles. The improvement is accomplished by using at least four secondary nozzles, of smaller diameter, located on both sides of the primary nozzles. These additional secondary nozzles spray grout or permeable reactive materials in other directions optimized to fill in the thin regions of the bow-tie shape. The result is a panel with increased strength and substantially uniform wall thickness.

Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Willis E. (W. Richland, WA); Dwyer, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Houston We have a Solution: University Teams Tackle Efficiency's Barriers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Houston We have a Solution: University Teams Tackle Efficiency's Houston We have a Solution: University Teams Tackle Efficiency's Barriers Houston We have a Solution: University Teams Tackle Efficiency's Barriers March 5, 2012 - 11:00am Addthis Secretary Chu with students from MIT at the Better Buildings Case Competition finale, held in Washington D.C. | Photo by Ken Shipp. Secretary Chu with students from MIT at the Better Buildings Case Competition finale, held in Washington D.C. | Photo by Ken Shipp. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs On Friday, Secretary Chu joined a group of bright, ambitious university students for the finale of the Better Buildings Case Competition in Washington, DC. The initiative, part of the President's Better Buildings Challenge, taps into the innovative, out-of-the-box thinking of university energy

350

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

351

Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

In Situ Temporary Repair of Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on combustion turbine blades and vanes is a critical issue in the power generation industry. Degradation of TBCs occur by the spallation of the ceramic layer partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) that resides on the Al2O3-covered MCrAlY bondcoat. In the event of such local failures of the TBC, a quick in-situ technique to repair the coating would be desirable.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

An ultraviolet barrier-discharge OH molecular lamp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy and spectral parameters of a barrier discharge in a mixture of argon with hydroxyl {sup .}OH are studied experimentally. A sealed lamp with the radiation intensity maximum at {lambda} = 309.2 nm, an emitting surface area of {approx}700 cm{sup 2}, and a radiant excitance of 1.5 mW cm{sup -2} has been fabricated. The radiant power of the lamp is 1.1 W. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Sosnin, E A; Erofeev, M V; Avdeev, S M; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Panarin, V A; Skakun, V S; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Shitts, D V [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

In-situ chemical barrier and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical barrier is formed by injecting a suspension of solid particles or colloids into the subsurface. First, a stable colloid suspension is made including a surfactant and a non-Newtonian fluid. This stable colloid suspension is characterized by colloid concentration, colloid size, colloid material, solution ionic strength, and chemical composition. A second step involves injecting the optimized stable colloid suspension at a sufficiently high flow rate to move the colloids through the subsurface sediment, but not at such a high rate so as to induce resuspending indigenous soil particles in the aquifer. While injecting the stable colloid suspension, a withdrawal well may be used to draw the injected colloids in a direction perpendicular to the flow path of a contaminant plume. The withdrawal well, may then be used as an injection well, and a third well, in line with the first two wells, may then be used as a withdrawal well, thereby increasing the length of the colloid barrier. This process would continue until emplacement of the colloid barrier is complete. 7 figs.

Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

In-situ chemical barrier and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical barrier is formed by injecting a suspension of solid particles or colloids into the subsurface. First, a stable colloid suspension is made including a surfactant and a non-Newtonian fluid. This stable colloid suspension is characterized by colloid concentration, colloid size, colloid material, solution ionic strength, and chemical composition. A second step involves injecting the optimized stable colloid suspension at a sufficiently high flow rate to move the colloids through the subsurface sediment, but not at such a high rate so as to induce resuspending indigenous soil particles in the aquifer. While injecting the stable colloid suspension, a withdrawal well may be used to draw the injected colloids in a direction perpendicular to the flow path of a contaminant plume. The withdrawal well, may then be used as an injection well, and a third well, in line with the first two wells, may then be used as a withdrawal well, thereby increasing the length of the colloid barrier. This process would continue until emplacement of the colloid barrier is complete.

Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richland, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Water-retaining barrier and method of construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An agricultural barrier providing a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface, the barrier being disposed on native soil of the region, the barrier including: a first layer composed of pieces of basalt, the first layer being porous and being in contact with the native soil; a porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel, the second layer being less porous than, and overlying, the first layer; and a porous third layer containing soil which favors plant growth, the third layer being less porous than, and overlying, the second layer and having an exposed upper surface, wherein the porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer.

Adams, Melvin R. (Richland, WA); Field, Jim G. (Richland, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Systematic Study of Fission Barriers of Excited Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic study of fission-barrier dependence on excitation energy has been performed using the self-consistent finite-temperature Hartree-Fock+BCS (FT-HF+BCS) formalism with the SkM* Skyrme energy density functional. The calculations have been carried out for even-even superheavy nuclei with Z ranging between 110 and 124. For an accurate description of fission pathways, the effects of triaxial and reflection-asymmetric degrees of freedom have been fully incorporated. Our survey demonstrates that the dependence of isentropic fission barriers on excitation energy changes rapidly with particle number, pointing to the importance of shell effects even at large excitation energies characteristic of compound nuclei. The fastest decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy is predicted for deformed nuclei around N=164 and spherical nuclei around N=184 that are strongly stabilized by ground-state shell effects. For nuclei 240Pu and 256Fm, which exhibit asymmetric spontaneous fission, our calculations predict a transition to symmetric fission at high excitation energies due to the thermal quenching of static reflection asymmetric deformations.

J. A. Sheikh; W. Nazarewicz; J. C. Pei

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

Water-retaining barrier and method of construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An agricultural barrier is disclosed which provides a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface. The barrier is disposed on native soil of the region. The barrier includes a first porous layer composed of pieces of basalt, and is in contact with the native soil. There is a less porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel. The second layer overlies the first layer. A third layer, less porous than the second layer, contains soil which favors plant growth. The third layer overlies the second layer and has an exposed upper surface. The porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer. 2 figs.

Adams, M.R.; Field, J.G.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

360

Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Background analysis Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2010/bali_2_copenhagen_Chile_Jun2010.pdf Country: Chile UN Region: Latin America and the Caribbean Coordinates: -35.675147°, -71.542969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-35.675147,"lon":-71.542969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Process for preparing schottky diode contacts with predetermined barrier heights  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for producing a Schottky diode having a preselected barrier height .phi..sub.Bn. The substrate is preferably n-GaAs, the metallic contact is derived from a starting alloy of the Formula [.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ](Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x) wherein: .SIGMA.M is a moiety which consists of at least one M, and when more than one M is present, each M is different, M is a Group VIII metal selected from the group consisting of nickel, cobalt, ruthenium, rhodium, indium and platinum, .delta. is a stoichiometric coefficient whose total value in any given .SIGMA.M moiety is 1, and x is a positive number between 0 and 1 (that is, x ranges from greater than 0 to less than 1). Also, the starting alloy is capable of forming with the substrate a two phase equilibrium reciprocal system of the binary alloy mixture [.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ]Ga-[.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ]Al-AlAs-GaAs. When members of an alloy subclass within this Formula are each preliminarily correlated with the barrier height .phi..sub.Bn of a contact producable therewith, then Schottky diodes of predetermined barrier heights are producable by sputtering and annealing. Further provided are the product Schottky diodes that are produced according to this process.

Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Jan, Chia-Hong (Portland, OR); Chen, Chia-Ping (Madison, WI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

TRITIUM BARRIER MATERIALS AND SEPARATION SYSTEMS FOR THE NGNP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contamination of downstream hydrogen production plants or other users of high-temperature heat is a concern of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Due to the high operating temperatures of the NGNP (850-900 C outlet temperature), tritium produced in the nuclear reactor can permeate through heat exchangers to reach the hydrogen production plant, where it can become incorporated into process chemicals or the hydrogen product. The concentration limit for tritium in the hydrogen product has not been established, but it is expected that any future limit on tritium concentration will be no higher than the air and water effluent limits established by the NRC and the EPA. A literature survey of tritium permeation barriers, capture systems, and mitigation measures is presented and technologies are identified that may reduce the movement of tritium to the downstream plant. Among tritium permeation barriers, oxide layers produced in-situ may provide the most suitable barriers, though it may be possible to use aluminized surfaces also. For tritium capture systems, the use of getters is recommended, and high-temperature hydride forming materials such as Ti, Zr, and Y are suggested. Tritium may also be converted to HTO in order to capture it on molecular sieves or getter materials. Counter-flow of hydrogen may reduce the flux of tritium through heat exchangers. Recommendations for research and development work are provided.

Sherman, S; Thad Adams, T

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

LEDSGP/Agriculture Work Space/Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Agriculture Work Space/Tools < LEDSGP Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us About How We Work > Regional Platforms > Working Groups LEDS GP Members Steering Committee Guiding Structure Contacts How We Work > Work Streams and Working Groups > Agriculture > Tools Agriculture Tools Add an Impact Assessment Program Add an Agriculture Tool Guides Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up

364

Agriculture Work Space/Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Work Space/Tools Work Space/Tools < Agriculture Work Space Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us About How We Work > Regional Platforms > Working Groups LEDS GP Members Steering Committee Guiding Structure Contacts How We Work > Work Streams and Working Groups > Agriculture > Tools Agriculture Tools Add an Impact Assessment Program Add an Agriculture Tool Guides Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a

365

General Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASD General Information ASD General Information APS Resources & Information A list of useful links for APS staff and users. APS Technical Publications Links to APS technical publications. APS Publications Database The official and comprehensive source of references for APS-related journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, dissertations, abstracts, awards, invited talks, etc. Image Library A collection of APS images. Responsibilities & Interfaces for APS Technical Systems Descriptions of the responsibilities of APS technical groups and how they interface with one another. APS Procedures Operational procedures for the APS. APS Specifications Specifications and approvals for upgrades or changes to existing APS hardware and software. APS Radiation Safety Policy & Procedures Committee Minutes

366

Heating energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the heating energy savings achieved by installing attic radiant barriers. The radiant barriers used for the test consist of a material with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses operated by ORNL. Two variations in the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with a kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The winter test with the radiant barrier showed that the horizontal barrier was able to save space-heating electical energy in both the resistance and heat pump modes amounting to 10.1% and 8.5%, respectively. The roof truss radiant barrier increased consumption by 2.6% in the resistance mode and 4.0% in the heat pump mode. The horizontal orientation of the radiant barrier is the more energy-effective method of installation.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive

368

Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing

369

Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu; Enguang Zhao

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

370

Information Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automatic extraction of information from unstructured sources has opened up new avenues for querying, organizing, and analyzing data by drawing upon the clean semantics of structured databases and the abundance of unstructured data. The field of ...

Sunita Sarawagi

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Information Causality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the literature on Information Causality. Since it's for a book, we don't think an abstract will be needed at all, so we have written this one just for the sake of the arXiv.

Marcin Paw?owski; Valerio Scarani

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

372

Information engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Information Engineering thrust area develops information technology to support the programmatic needs of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Engineering Directorate. Progress in five programmatic areas are described in separate reports contained herein. These are entitled Three-dimensional Object Creation, Manipulation, and Transport, Zephyr:A Secure Internet-Based Process to Streamline Engineering Procurements, Subcarrier Multiplexing: Optical Network Demonstrations, Parallel Optical Interconnect Technology Demonstration, and Intelligent Automation Architecture.

Hunt, D.N.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Written Information Equipment TECHNOLOGY: Oral Information  

SCIENTIFIC OR TECHNOLOGICAL Equipment TECHNOLOGY: DEVELOPMENTAL RESOURCES Written Information Oral Information Hardware Facilities Data

374

Making Science Useful to Decision Makers: Climate Forecasts, Water Management, and Knowledge Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moving from climate science to adaptive action is an immense challenge, especially in highly institutionalized sectors such as water resources. Knowledge networks are valuable strategies to put climate information to use. They overcome barriers ...

David L. Feldman; Helen M. Ingram

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers: Cooling season energy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. Testing showed that increasing the attic ventilation area ratio from the minimum recommended of 1/300 to 1/150 had little if any effect on the house cooling load with either truss or horizontal barriers present in the attics. Radiant barriers, however, still reduced the house cooling load. There was essentially no difference in house cooling load reduction between either ridge/soffit or gable/soffit vent type with a truss radiant barrier, as both reduced cooling loads by about 8% when compared to no radiant barrier conditions. The attic-ventilation-type testing was done with a ventilation area ratio of 1/150.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hall, J.A. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cooling-energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test is a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The purpose of the radiant barrier is to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. The radiant barrier works as a system in conjunction with an air space and can theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. Two variations on the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption were 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicate that the most effective way of installing the foil is to lay it on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to the house by approximately 30 to 35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Radiant barriers in houses: Energy, comfort, and moisture considerations in a northern climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the conditions under which radiant barrier utilization in attics is appropriate technology in building construction for a northern climate in Utah. A sample of 12 appropriate houses with radiant barriers were selected using predetermined criteria. Another 12 houses without radiant barriers were selected as a control sample and paired with the first 12 houses using predetermined criteria. The research involved three different types of data and analyses. First, a questionnaire survey was completed by the occupants of the 12 sample houses, with radiant barriers. The survey included such factors as: (1) comfort, (2) energy, and (3) potential increased moisture content as perceived by the occupants. Second, a t-test was used to calculate the statistical comparison of utility usage between the 12 sample houses with radiant barriers and the 12 control houses without radiant barriers. Third, the moisture content of the wood framing above and below the radiant barriers was measured over a three month period during the winter months. Data analysis indicated: (1) occupants did perceive that more comfort resulted from the installation of radiant barriers, (2) occupants did not observe additional moisture artifacts after the installation of radiant barriers, (3) occupants did perceive cost savings from utility benefits resulting from the use of radiant barriers, especially in cooling the houses in summer, (4) there was no significant difference between utility usage of houses with radiant barriers and houses without radiant barriers, (5) the moisture content in the ceiling joists of all 24 houses, except one, had a moisture content measurement less than eight percent, and (6) houses with radiant barriers have higher humidity levels within the living space than houses without radiant barrier installation.

Mendenhall, R.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at 900 rpm. They are approximately 15 kW with 103 C coolant and 20 kW with 50 C coolant. To avoid this 25% drop1 in continuous power, design changes for improved heat dissipation and carefully managed changes in allowable thermal limits would be required in the hybrid subsystems. This study is designed to identify the technical barriers that potentially exist in moving to a high-temperature cooling loop prior to addressing the actual detailed design. For operation at a significantly higher coolant temperature, there were component-level issues that had to be addressed in this study. These issues generally pertained to the cost and reliability of existing or near-term components that would be suitable for use with the 105 C coolant. The assessed components include power electronic devices/modules such as diodes and insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs), inverter-grade high-temperature capacitors, permanent magnets (PM), and motor-grade wire insulation. The need for potentially modifying/resizing subassemblies such as inverters, motors, and heat exchangers was also addressed in the study. In order to obtain pertinent information to assist ORNL researchers address the thermal issues at the component, module, subassembly, and system levels, pre-existing laboratory test data conducted at varying temperatures was analyzed in conjunction with information obtained from technical literature searches and industry sources.

Staunton, Robert H [ORNL; Hsu, John S [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at 900 rpm. They are approximately 15 kW with 103 C coolant and 20 kW with 50 C coolant. To avoid this 25% drop1 in continuous power, design changes for improved heat dissipation and carefully managed changes in allowable thermal limits would be required in the hybrid subsystems. This study is designed to identify the technical barriers that potentially exist in moving to a high-temperature cooling loop prior to addressing the actual detailed design. For operation at a significantly higher coolant temperature, there were component-level issues that had to be addressed in this study. These issues generally pertained to the cost and reliability of existing or near term components that would be suitable for use with the 105 C coolant. The assessed components include power electronic devices/modules such as diodes and insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs), inverter-grade high-temperature capacitors, permanent magnets (PM), and motor-grade wire insulation. The need for potentially modifying/resizing subassemblies such as inverters, motors, and heat exchangers was also addressed in the study. In order to obtain pertinent information to assist ORNL researchers address the thermal issues at the component, module, subassembly, and system levels, pre-existing laboratory test data conducted at varying temperatures was analyzed in conjunction with information obtained from technical literature searches and industry sources.

Hsu, J.S.; Staunton, M.R.; Starke, M.R.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at 900 rpm. They are approximately 15 kW with 103 C coolant and 20 kW with 50 C coolant. To avoid this 25% drop1 in continuous power, design changes for improved heat dissipation and carefully managed changes in allowable thermal limits would be required in the hybrid subsystems. This study is designed to identify the technical barriers that potentially exist in moving to a high-temperature cooling loop prior to addressing the actual detailed design. For operation at a significantly higher coolant temperature, there were component-level issues that had to be addressed in this study. These issues generally pertained to the cost and reliability of existing or near term components that would be suitable for use with the 105 C coolant. The assessed components include power electronic devices/modules such as diodes and insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs), inverter-grade high-temperature capacitors, permanent magnets (PM), and motor-grade wire insulation. The need for potentially modifying/resizing subassemblies such as inverters, motors, and heat exchangers was also addressed in the study. In order to obtain pertinent information to assist ORNL researchers address the thermal issues at the component, module, subassembly, and system levels, pre-existing laboratory test data conducted at varying temperatures was analyzed in conjunction with information obtained from technical literature searches and industry sources.

Hsu, J.S.; Staunton, M.R.; Starke, M.R.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at 900 rpm. They are approximately 15 kW with 103 C coolant and 20 kW with 50 C coolant. To avoid this 25% drop1 in continuous power, design changes for improved heat dissipation and carefully managed changes in allowable thermal limits would be required in the hybrid subsystems. This study is designed to identify the technical barriers that potentially exist in moving to a high-temperature cooling loop prior to addressing the actual detailed design. For operation at a significantly higher coolant temperature, there were component-level issues that had to be addressed in this study. These issues generally pertained to the cost and reliability of existing or near-term components that would be suitable for use with the 105 C coolant. The assessed components include power electronic devices/modules such as diodes and insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs), inverter-grade high-temperature capacitors, permanent magnets (PM), and motor-grade wire insulation. The need for potentially modifying/resizing subassemblies such as inverters, motors, and heat exchangers was also addressed in the study. In order to obtain pertinent information to assist ORNL researchers address the thermal issues at the component, module, subassembly, and system levels, pre-existing laboratory test data conducted at varying temperatures was analyzed in conjunction with information obtained from technical literature searches and industry sources.

Staunton, Robert H [ORNL; Hsu, John S [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

SMART GRID Request for Information And Public Comments | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SMART GRID Request for Information And Public Comments SMART GRID Request for Information And Public Comments SMART GRID Request for Information And Public Comments July 20, 2011 - 2:46pm Addthis As part of its ongoing effort regarding the formation of smart grid policy, the Department of Energy issued a Request for Information in September of 2010 on the topic of "Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation." The purpose was to solicit comments from interested stakeholders on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, and recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges. The comments and recommendations will help inform the Department and the Administration's analysis of policy challenges and possible solutions being developed by the Smart Grid Subcommittee of the National Science and

383

Evaluation of a PECVD advanced barrier (k=3.7) for 32nm CMOS technology and below  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced dielectric barrier proposed for sub-45nm CMOS technology nodes is firstly characterized on 300mm full sheet wafers. The barrier is a bi-layer deposited by PECVD. The copper diffusion barrier property is ensured by a depositing dense initiation ... Keywords: Dielectric barrier, Dual damascene, Electromigration, Etch stop layer, RC delay

L. L. Chapelon; E. Petitprez; P. Brun; A. Farcy; J. Torres

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment : a study for the energy storage systems program.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.; Kirby, Brendan [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cooling season energy measurements of dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. 18 refs., 18 figs., 30 tabs.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hall, J.A. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Local Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local Information Local Information Local Information Welcome to Golden, Colorado, the location of the 2014 Electrical Safety Workshop. Visiting NREL The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has research facilities and offices at several locations in Golden, Colorado (near Boulder), and in Washington, D.C. In Golden, you'll find the NREL Education Center, along with many of our research laboratories and administrative offices. The National Wind Technology Center is a separate facility located about 5 miles south of Boulder. Read more » Transportation NREL is accessible via bus on the Regional Transportation District (RTD) Route 20 from Aurora and Denver. Route 20 travels along 20th Avenue and ends at the NREL Education Center. Visit the RTD Web site or call 303-299-6000 to plan your trip or for more

387

Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

Hoffman, W.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Tunneling through a parabolic barrier viewed from Wigner phase space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the tunneling of a particle through a repulsive potential resulting from an inverted harmonic oscillator in the quantum mechanical phase space described by the Wigner function. In particular, we solve the partial differential equations in phase space determining the Wigner function of an energy eigenstate of the inverted oscillator. The reflection or transmission coefficients $R$ or $T$ are then given by the total weight of all classical phase space trajectories corresponding to energies below, or above the top of the barrier given by the Wigner function.

D. M. Heim; W. P. Schleich; P. M. Alsing; J. P. Dahl; S. Varro

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Dielectric barrier plasma dynamics for active control of separated flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of separation mitigation with asymmetric dielectric barrier discharges is explored by considering the gas flow past a flat plate at an angle of attack. A self-consistent model utilizing motion of electrons, ions, and neutrals is employed to couple the electric force field to the momentum of the fluid. The charge separation and concomitant electric field yield a time-averaged body force which is oriented predominantly downstream, with a smaller transverse component towards the wall. This induces a wall-jet-like feature that effectively eliminates the separation bubble. The impact of several geometric and electrical operating parameters is elucidated.

Roy, Subrata; Singh, K.P.; Gaitonde, Datta V. [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States); Computational Sciences Branch, Air Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Breaking the Language Barrier: NIST Tests Afghan Language ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These included vehicle checkpoints; communication of key information, such as how long electricity will be available each day; facility inspections ...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

391

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information FAQ * Widget * Site Map Information Bridge Home * Basic Search * Fielded Search * Alerts * Help Bookmark and Share...

392

Plasma Surface Modification of Polymer Backsheets: Origins of Future Interfacial Barrier/Backsheet Failure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flexible polymer substrates coated with inorganic oxide moisture barriers are a potential replacement for glass backsheets in thin film PV modules. Silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) deposited by PECVD on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) represents one potential new backsheet candidate. Barrier deposition runs at NREL have typically included a nitrogen-rich plasma pretreatment prior to actual barrier deposition with the intention of cleaning the PET surface as well as enhancing adhesion of the SiOxNy barrier film to PET; however, test coupons of PET/barrier/EVA/TPE failed after damp heat exposure. PET substrates exposed to plasma conditions similar to those used in pre-treatment were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to reveal new low molecular weight PET fragments are created which are volatile upon heating and water soluble. Failure analysis of the coupons determined that the moisture barrier is, in fact, transferred to the encapsulant side.

Pankow, J. W.; Glick, S. H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Heat barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility is disclosed herein. Generally, the thermal barrier comprises a flexible, heat-resistant web mounted over the annular space between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel in order to prevent convection currents generated in the nitrogen atmosphere in this space from entering the relatively cooler atmosphere of the reactor cavity which surrounds these vessels. Preferably, the flexible web includes a blanket of heat-insulating material formed from fibers of a refractory material, such as alumina and silica, sandwiched between a heat-resistant, metallic cloth made from stainless steel wire. In use, the web is mounted between the upper edges of the guard vessel and the flange of a sealing ring which surrounds the reactor vessel with a sufficient enough slack to avoid being pulled taut as a result of thermal differential expansion between the two vessels. The flexible web replaces the rigid and relatively complicated structures employed in the prior art for insulating the reactor cavity from the convection currents generated between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel.

Keegan, Charles P. (South Huntingdon Twp., Westmoreland County, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry's SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry`s SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Thermochemistry and reaction barriers for the formation of levoglucosenone from cellobiose.  

SciTech Connect

Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Northwestern Univ.)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

397

In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Personal information - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personal information. ... Next: Academic information, Prizes and Up: Curriculum Vitae Previous: Curriculum Vitae. Personal information. Name: Jonathan...

399

Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in Integrated Gas Combined Cycle Turbine Engines. Author(s), Andrew D.

400

Modeling and Optimization of Seawater Intrusion Barriers in Southern California Coastal Plain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the locations of new injection wells that maximize thelocations for new injection wells are identified that resultannually through 43 injection wells along the barrier. The A

Yeh, William W-G.; Bray, Ben

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Strategies for and Barriers to Managing Weight When Eating at Restaurants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suggested citation for this article: Timmerman GM, Earvolino-Ramirez M. Strategies for and barriers to managing weight when eating at restaurants. Prev Chronic

Gayle M. Timmerman; Cns Marie Earvolino-ramirez; Peer Reviewed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Postponing the Choice of the Barrier Parameter in Mehrotra-Type ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2005 ... Postponing the Choice of the Barrier Parameter in Mehrotra-Type Predictor- Corrector Algorithms. Maziar Salahi (salahim ***at*** mcmaster.ca)

403

ENTREPRENEURSHIP ON THE FARM: KENTUCKY GROWERS PERCEPTIONS OF BENEFITS AND BARRIERS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study analyzed the perceptions of Kentucky Homebased Processors and Microprocessors of the benefits of and barriers to developing and selling value-added products. The final (more)

Camenisch, Amy L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

MICROSCOPIC CALCULATIONS OF FISSION BARRIERS AND CRITICAL ANGULAR MOMENTA FOR EXCITED HEAVY NUCLEAR SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics and Chemistry of Fission, Vienna 1969 (IAEA, ViennaDeformation energies along the fission path plotted againstMICROSCOPIC CALCULATIONS OF FISSION BARRIERS AND CRITICAL

Diebel, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Energy efficiency in the South Africa crude oil refining industry drivers, barriers and opportunities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Includes abstract. This study has explored a range of barriers, drivers and opportunities to improving energy performance in the South African crude oil refining industry, (more)

Bergh, Caitlin.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report -- October 28, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy's Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Technology Workshop, held October 28, 2010 in Denver, Colorado.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in Lycopersicon. Second yearly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study employs Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii as model systems to study the interspecific reproductive barriers unilateral incongruity (UI), hybrid breakdown and interspecific aberrant ratio syndrome (IARS).

Mutschler, M.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); McCormick, S. [Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA (United States). Plant Gene Expression Center

1993-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

408

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizational Barriers to Wind Energy Organizationalcapital financing of wind energy producers are four. Thesales without requiring the wind energy firm to meet all the

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Energy measurements of attic radiant barriers installed in single-family houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the energy savings attributable to radiant barriers installed in attics of unoccupied single-family houses. Three levels of fiberglass attic insulation (R-11 ,R-19, and R-30) were tested with two types of barrier installation (horizontal and truss). The results showed that horizontally installed radiant barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing heating and cooling loads. Measured cooling load reductions ranged form 0 to 22% (compared to same attic insulation insulation R-value with no radiant barrier) and heating load changes from /plus/4% to /minus/10% were measured (compared to same attic insulation R-value with no radiant barrier). Radiant barriers appeared to decrease the heating and cooling loads more when lesser amounts of insulation (R-11 and R-19) were present in an attic. Minimal changes were measured when R-30 was present in an attic. Long-term effects of dust on the performance of radiant barriers as well as the effects of moisture condensing on the surface of a radiant barrier during cold winter temperatures remain unanswered.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comparison of the systematics of fusion barrier with and without L-dependence has been presented.

S. V. S. Sastry; S. Kailas; A. K. Mohanty; A. Saxena

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

411

Information Repository  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Information Repository Documents 3 Information Repository Documents WIPP Annual Waste Minimization Report Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report, dated November 14, 2013 Class 1 Permit Modifications and NMED Responses Class 1 Modification, August 29, 2013 WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit EPA I.D. Number NM4890139088. (1. revise a course outline; 2. revise table and panel figures to include Panel 7; 3. update description related to Type B Packages; and 4. update TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT figures) JE Kieling, NMED dated October 13, 2013 Fee Assessment Class 1 Permit Modification WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit EPA I.D. Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Revise a Course Outline; Revise Table and Panel Figures to Include Panel 7; Update Descriptions Related to Type B Packages; and Update TRUPACT-ll and HalfPACT Figures) JM Kieling, NMED dated September 23, 2013

412

Informal Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W-^^ LA-8034-MS ^ - W-^^ LA-8034-MS ^ - - ^ / Informal Report "c o O o -*-* "co > Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity of Explosives, Mixtures, and Plastic-Bonded Explosives Determined Experimentally \mm ^ts\ LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY Post Office Box 1663 Los Alamos. New Mexico 87545 DISTR!DU7irM o r TdiS BGGbT.lENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

413

Effects of surface properties on barrier height and barrier inhomogeneities of platinum contacts to n-type 4H-SiC  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the Schottky barrier of Pt/4H-SiC contact as a function of 4H-SiC surface properties which effectively controlled by electronic cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma pretreatment for different periods and annealing. It is found that the effective barrier height monotonically increases with decreasing the degree of Fermi level pinning. Electrically homogeneous contacts are observed when the Fermi level (FL) is 'pinned (Bardeen limit)' and 'free-pinned (Schottky limit).' However, a partial pinning of FL leads to Gaussian distribution of inhomogeneous barrier height. These results could be correlated with changes in the magnitude and spatial distribution of surface state density after different pretreatments.

Huang Lingqin; Li Shijuan; Wang Dejun [School of Electronic Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Qin Fuwen [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Update Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC 20585This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIAs data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Smart Grid Request for Information and Public Comments | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Grid » Smart Grid Smart Grid » Smart Grid Request for Information and Public Comments Smart Grid Request for Information and Public Comments As part of its ongoing effort regarding the formation of smart grid policy, the Department of Energy issued a Request for Information in September of 2010 on the topic of "Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation." The purpose was to solicit comments from interested stakeholders on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, and recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges. The comments and recommendations will help inform the Department and the Administration's analysis of policy challenges and possible solutions being developed by the Smart Grid Subcommittee of the National Science and

416

A Case Study of NGO-Government Collaboration in Vietnam: Partnership Dynamics Explained through Contexts, Incentives, and Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaboration between international NGOs (INGOs) and governmental organizations (GOs) have contributed significantly to the goals of poverty alleviation and agricultural development in developing countries. Much of the literatures on NGO-GO partnerships have explored theoretically or empirically what motivate and hinder cross-sector collaboration. But not many have studied cross-sector collaboration from both analytical and descriptive perspectives. This study filled in this gap by drawing from previous studies a conceptual framework through which contexts, incentives, and barriers that influence INGO-GO partnerships were described and explained. The researcher adopted a qualitative case-study method with emergent design. Personal interviews were conducted with 20 key informants, including eight Vietnamese staff from one INGO and 12 government officials from six GOs who partnered with the INGO. All participating organizations were institutions serving agricultural and rural development in the south of Vietnam. The data were collected in 2010 and analyzed using the software package ATLAS.ti. The results showed four categories that interact to form a framework of a dynamic continuum of partnership development. The four categories included conditioning factors, incentives, barriers, and feedback loop. The categories held the following themes: 1) socio-political contexts and organizational natures for conditioning factors, 2) shared missions, resource mobilization, capacity building, and networking for incentives, 3) ideological conflicts, structural constraints, and operational hurdles for barriers, and 4) reflections and recommendations for feedback loop. The study contributed a theoretical- and empirical-based perspective on INGO-GO partnerships in post-reform countries. It provided a framework that comprehensively describes and explains partnership dynamics. The study also shared knowledge of the intricacies of INGO-GO partnerships in rural Vietnam. For institutions serving agricultural and rural development, the study could assist in strategic management to minimize constraints and maximize opportunities in collaborative environments.

Nguyen, Anh Thuc

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regenerative braking to capture cially in medium-sized trucks used for deliveries, and fuel-cell energy

Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

INTRODUCTION OVERCOMING OBSTACLES TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S.ENERGYCONSUMPTION (BTUX1015)** BYCONTRIBUTION Consumption Coal% Petroleum% NaturalGas% OilShale% Hydro&Geothermal% Nuclear

Columbia University

419

The benefits and barriers to GIS for M??ori.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A Geographic Information System visually communicates both spatial and temporal analyses and has been available for at least twenty years in New Zealand. Using a (more)

Pacey, H. A.

420

Language barrier broken with Multilingual WorldWideScience.org...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alliance Chairman; and Wu Yishan, Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (ISTIC) Chief Engineer OSTI Homepage Mobile Gallery Subscribe to RSS OSTI Blog Get...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "overcoming informational barriers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NETL: News Release - Fuel Cell Projects Address Barriers to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 1, 2006 June 1, 2006 Fuel Cell Projects Address Barriers to Commercialization Six Projects Focus on Improvements to Materials, Key Components WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development (R&D) projects expected to further enhance solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, moving it one step closer to commercialization. These projects, part of DOE's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), build upon earlier Phase I research to support the development of efficient, low-cost and near-zero emissions SOFC power systems. "The projects selected reflect yet another step forward in the President's Hydrogen and Climate Initiatives, which envision a key role for fuel cells," said Jeffrey Jarrett, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy. "These projects are expected to further push fuel cell technology toward the ultimate application of fuel cells in FutureGen, the zero-emissions coal-fired plant of the future."

422

Energy Savings Certificate Markets: Opportunities and Implementation Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6A2-45970 6A2-45970 July 2009 Energy Savings Certificate Markets: Opportunities and Implementation Barriers Barry Friedman and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Galen Barbose Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presented at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Third International Conference on Energy Sustainability San Francisco, California July 19-23, 2009 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

423

Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

Scharman, Alan J. (Hebron, CT); Yonushonis, Thomas M. (Columbus, IN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP FY2013 END-YEAR REPORT  

SciTech Connect

In FY2013, the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) demonstrated continued tangible progress toward fulfilling the objective of developing a set of software tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long?term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. In November 2012, the CBP released Version 1.0 of the CBP Software Toolbox, a suite of software for simulating reactive transport in cementitious materials and important degradation phenomena. In addition, the CBP completed development of new software for the Version 2.0 Toolbox to be released in early FY2014 and demonstrated use of the Version 1.0 Toolbox on DOE applications. The current primary software components in both Versions 1.0 and 2.0 are LeachXS/ORCHESTRA, STADIUM, and a GoldSim interface for probabilistic analysis of selected degradation scenarios. The CBP Software Toolbox Version 1.0 supports analysis of external sulfate attack (including damage mechanics), carbonation, and primary constituent leaching. Version 2.0 includes the additional analysis of chloride attack and dual regime flow and contaminant migration in fractured and non?fractured cementitious material. The LeachXS component embodies an extensive material property measurements database along with chemical speciation and reactive mass transport simulation cases with emphasis on leaching of major, trace and radionuclide constituents from cementitious materials used in DOE facilities, such as Saltstone (Savannah River) and Cast Stone (Hanford), tank closure grouts, and barrier concretes. STADIUM focuses on the physical and structural service life of materials and components based on chemical speciation and reactive mass transport of major cement constituents and aggressive species (e.g., chloride, sulfate, etc.). THAMES is a planned future CBP Toolbox component focused on simulation of the microstructure of cementitious materials and calculation of resultant hydraulic and constituent mass transfer parameters needed in modeling. Two CBP software demonstrations were conducted in FY2013, one to support the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at SRS and the other on a representative Hanford high?level waste tank. The CBP Toolbox demonstration on the SDF provided analysis on the most probable degradation mechanisms to the cementitious vault enclosure caused by sulfate and carbonation ingress. This analysis was documented and resulted in the issuance of a SDF Performance Assessment Special Analysis by Liquid Waste Operations this fiscal year. The two new software tools supporting chloride attack and dual?regime flow will provide additional degradation tools to better evaluate performance of DOE and commercial cementitious barriers. The CBP SRNL experimental program produced two patent applications and field data that will be used in the development and calibration of CBP software tools being developed in FY2014. The CBP software and simulation tools varies from other efforts in that all the tools are based upon specific and relevant experimental research of cementitious materials utilized in DOE applications. The CBP FY2013 program involved continuing research to improve and enhance the simulation tools as well as developing new tools that model other key degradation phenomena not addressed in Version 1.0. Also efforts to continue to verify the various simulation tools through laboratory experiments and analysis of field specimens are ongoing and will continue into FY2014 to quantify and reduce the uncertainty associated with performance assessments. This end?year report summarizes FY2013 software development efforts and the various experimental programs that are providing data for calibration and validation of the CBP developed software.

Flach, G.; Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Smith, F.; Kosson, D.; Brown, K.; Samson, E.; Meeussen, J.; van der Sloot, H.; Garboczi, E.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Nondestructive evaluation of environmental barrier coatings in CFCC combustor liners.  

SciTech Connect

Advanced combustor liners fabricated of SiC/SiC continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) and covered with environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been successfully tested in Solar Turbines Inc. field engines. The primary goal for the CFCC/EBC liners is to reach a 30,000-h lifetime. Because the EBCs, when applied on the hot surfaces of liners, protect the underlying CFCC from oxidation damage, their performance is critical in achieving the lifetime goal. To determine CFCC/EBC liner condition and assess operating damage, the liners were subjected to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) during various processing stages, as well as before and after the engine test. The NDE techniques included pulsed infrared thermal imaging, air-coupled ultrasonic scanning, and X-ray computerized tomography. It was found that EBC damage and spallation depend on the condition of the CFCC material. The NDE results and correlations with destructive examination are discussed.

Sun, J. G.; Benz, J.; Ellingson, W. A.; Kimmel, J. B.; Price, J. R.; Energy Technology; Solar Turbines, Inc

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Electron reflection from one-dimensional potential barriers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the relevant experimental evidence for electron reflectivity effects in TEC and describes the analytical effort to better understand electron reflectivity as a function of the potential configuration of the surface layer. The analyses consider rectangular and triangular barrier models with, and without, image potentials. The calculated results are presented and discussed. Details of the solutions are given in Appendices A, B, and C. The computer programs to obtain these results are listed in Appendix D. These analyses demonstrate that cesium-oxygen composites with potential discontinuities around one volt and 20 A thick can be expected to be highly reflective to thermal electrons. Consequently, such composites would be expected to have significant effects on TEC performance.

Balestra, C.L.; Huffman, F.N.; Yang, C.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Information for Travelers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information for Travelers. Background Notes of Countries and International Organizations; Centers for Disease Control Health Information; ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

Pervasive Information Technology Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pervasive Information Technology. Pervasive information technology is the trend towards increasingly ubiquitous connected ...

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Agriculture Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Agriculture Information at NIST. Agriculture Information at NIST. CCQM BAWG - P113, Relative Quantification ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

430

Information Retrieval Library (IRLIB)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information Retrieval Library (IRLIB). Carolyn ... Information Retrieval Experiment (1981), book by Karen Sparck Jones. The ...

431

INFORMAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

q?% q?% LA-5031 -MS INFORMAL REPORT krs $ 1 0 s N o t e on Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Strong E!ect:omGgnetic c;alPl I j a l a m o s scientific laboratory of the University of California LOS A L A M O S , NEW MEXICO 8 7 5 4 4 U N I T E D S T A T E S A T O M I C E N E R G Y C O M M I S S I O N a This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Atomic Energy Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contrac- tors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or im- plied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, com- pleteness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process dis- closed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

432

Status of integrated performance assessment of the waste packages and engineered barrier system  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessment of the engineered barrier system for a nuclear waste repository combines information from relevant disciplines and predicts the net long-term performance of the EBS in unites of regulatory goals for performance. The performance assessment models are specific to the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada site. Early assessments are used for project planning and feedback. The EBS scenarios activity develops the scenarios and the consequent event sequences. Initial model development for single waste packages indicates that the radionuclide release rate performance is sensitive to the water flux, element solubilities, and/or the mode of water contact with the waste. The latter in turn depends on local scale hydrology and the modes of corrosion for the container material. For the release rate summed over waste packages, variations among waste packages and their near-field environments are anticipated. These variations place demands on data acquisition and modeling, as well as modulate the impact of localized changes of conditions. Sampling in uncertainty assessment is a subsequent step in examining the reliability of predictions made in the performance assessments. Advances made in sampling methods are referenced. 14 refs., 6 figs.

O`Connell, W.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Research needs for strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies reservoir characterization and reservoir management research needs and IOR process and related research needs for the fourth geologic class, strandplain/barrier island reservoirs. The 330 Class 4 reservoirs in the DOE Tertiary OH Recovery Information System (TORIS) database contain about 30.8 billion barrels of oil or about 9% of the total original oil-in-place (OOIP) in all United States reservoirs. The current projection of Class 4 ultimate recovery with current operations is only 38% of the OOIP, leaving 19 billion barrels as the target for future IOR projects. Using the TORIS database and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (surfactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, California, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000, which emphasizes the urgent need for the development and demonstration of cost-effective recovery technologies.

Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.S.; Young, M.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission: Fission Barrier Heights of Even-Even Actinides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the performance of modern nuclear energy density functionals for predicting inner and outer fission barrier heights and energies of fission isomers of even-even actinides. For isomer energies and outer barrier heights, we find that the self-consistent theory at the HFB level is capable of providing quantitative agreement with empirical data.

J. McDonnell; N. Schunck; W. Nazarewicz

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Experimental observation of enhanced interaction of magnetic solitons with potential barriers and wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wells Vladislav E. Demidov,* Ulf-Hendrik Hansen, and Sergej O. Demokritov Institute for Applied Physics magnetic potential barriers and wells. We have found that the nonlinearity in the system causes of potential barriers the solitons demonstrate an enhanced tunnel- ing, whereas for potential wells they show

Demokritov, S.O.

436

Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission: Fission Barrier Heights of Even-Even Actinides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the performance of modern nuclear energy density functionals for predicting inner and outer fission barrier heights and energies of fission isomers of even-even actinides. For isomer energies and outer barrier heights, we find that the self-consistent theory at the HFB level is capable of providing quantitative agreement with empirical data.

McDonnell, J; Nazarewicz, W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. 109no. 31 12404-12407 On March 22nd 2012, the NHMFL ­ Pulsed Field Facility broke the 100T tesla barrier, setting a world record of 100.75 tesla for a non-destructive magnet. By using advanced

Weston, Ken

438

Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells incorporating a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells which incorporate a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer adjacent to the junction forming metal layer exhibit increased open circuit voltages compared to standard rectifying junction metal devices, i.e., Schottky barrier devices, and rectifying junction metal insulating silicon devices, i.e., MIS devices.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Rossby Wave-Induced Secondary Flows near Barriers, with Application to the Hawaiian Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We restudy the reflection of baroclinic Rossby waves from a nonzontal barrier. We add lateral friction to an earlier study by Mysak and Magaard to obtain a more realistic secondary flow near the barrier. Contrary to the earlier study, we not only ...

Im Sang Oh; Lorenz Magaard

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector.

Robert S. Bowman; Zhaohui Li; Stephen J. Roy; Todd Burt; Timothy L. Johnson; Richard L. Johnson

1999-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Modeling, simulation and design of the intrinsic protection using safety barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the modeling, simulation and design of an intrinsic protection using safety barrier is presented. It is presented a short introduction regarding the intrinsic protection and the terminology used in explosive areas. If a device wants to ... Keywords: intrinsic protection, mathematical model, safety barriers, simulation

Monica Leba; Emil Pop; Bogdan Sochirca; Petre Marian Vamvu

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Barriers and drivers for process innovation in the petrochemical industry: A case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process innovation and energy efficiency improvement are among the key options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in petrochemicals production. This case study presents some of the main drivers and barriers to activities aimed at improving existing processes ... Keywords: Barriers, Case study, Drivers, Energy efficiency, O31 Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives, Process innovation, Strategic innovation

Tao Ren

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Semi-analytical model for schottky-barrier carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a physics-based semi-analytical model for Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene nanoribbon (GNR) transistors. The model includes the treatment of (i) both tunneling and thermionic currents, (ii) ambipolar conduction, ... Keywords: carbon nanotubes, graphene nanoribbons, models, schottky-barrier

Xuebei Yang; Gianluca Fiori; Giuseppe Iannaccone; Kartik Mohanram

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Fission barriers for neutron-rich nuclei by means of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fission barrier height has been estimated by means of the constraint Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method. The potential energy surfaces obtained by the method are analyzed with the flooding method to find several saddle points. The results for U, Np, Bk isotopes are compared with the barrier derived from the extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky integral method.

Hashizume, K.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M. [Department of Physic, Konan University, Okamoto, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Samyn, M.; Goriely, S. [Institute d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, ULB-CP226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Study on CO2 Reforming of CH4 by Dielectric Barrier Discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article it is demonstrated that DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) is an effective tool to convert CH4 and CO2 to synthesis gas (syngas, H2/CO) at low temperature and ambient pressure. The DBD is performed in the co-axial quartz cube by using ... Keywords: methane, carbon dioxide, syngas, dielectric barrier discharge

Zhao Yuhan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Analysis of Annual Thermal and Moisture Performance of Radiant Barrier Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed thermal energy analysis model helps identify locations where radiant barriers are cost-effective while analyzing moisture performance to predict potential problem areas. The model described in this report estimates annual energy savings and moisture accumulation rates from horizontal radiant barrier applications in a variety of climates.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

Evidence of Ascent in a Sloped Barrier Jet and an Associated Heavy-Snow Band  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler radar data are used to identify alongstream slope of a barrier jet running parallel to the cast slope of the Front Range of the Colorado Rockies. The barrier jet was collocated with a narrow band of heavy snow embedded within a larger ...

Lawrence B. Dunn

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Qualitative risk assessment of subsurface barriers in applications supporting retrieval of SST waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a brief, qualitative assessment of risks associated with the potential use of impermeable surface barriers installed around and beneath Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) to support the retrieval of wastes from those tanks. These risks are compared to qualitative assessment of costs and risks associated with a case in which barriers are not used. A quantitative assessment of costs and risks associated with these two cases will be prepared and documented in a companion report. The companion report will compare quantitatively the costs and risks of several retrieval options with varying parameters, such as effectiveness of retrieval, effectiveness of subsurface barriers, and the use of surface barriers. For ease of comparison of qualitative risks, a case in which impermeable subsurface barriers are used in conjunction with another technology to remove tank waste is referred, to in this report as the Barrier Case. A case in which waste removal technologies are used without employing a subsurface barrier is referred to as the No Barrier Case. The technologies associated with each case are described in the following sections.

Treat, R.L. [ENSERCH Environmental Corp. (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Impacts from Deployment Barriers on the United States Wind Power Industry: Overview & Preliminary Findings (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regardless of cost and performance some wind projects are unable to proceed to commissioning as a result of deployment barriers. Principal deployment barriers in the industry today include: wildlife, public acceptance, access to transmission, and radar. To date, methods for understanding these non-technical barriers have failed to accurately characterize the costs imposed by deployment barriers and the degree of impact to the industry. Analytical challenges include limited data and modeling capabilities. Changes in policy and regulation, among other factors, also add complexity to analysis of impacts from deployment barriers. This presentation details preliminary results from new NREL analysis focused on quantifying the impact of deployment barriers on the wind resource of the United States, the installed cost of wind projects, and the total electric power system cost of a 20% wind energy future. In terms of impacts to wind project costs and developable land, preliminary findings suggest that deployment barriers are secondary to market drivers such as demand. Nevertheless, impacts to wind project costs are on the order of $100/kW and a substantial share of the potentially developable windy land in the United States is indeed affected by deployment barriers.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Heimiller, D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-drivers-and-barriers-current-csp-marke Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/drivers-and-barriers-current-concentr Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Mandates/Targets This video teaches users about the four major types of concentrating solar power technologies (CSP): parabolic trough, tower concentrators, linear Fresnel lenses and dish engine systems. It also provides an overview of the trends in the market and research that should be performed in order to make

451

Flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible barrier film has a thickness of from greater than zero to less than 5,000 nanometers and a water vapor transmission rate of no more than 1.times.10.sup.-2 g/m.sup.2/day at 22.degree. C. and 47% relative humidity. The flexible barrier film is formed from a composition, which comprises a multi-functional acrylate. The composition further comprises the reaction product of an alkoxy-functional organometallic compound and an alkoxy-functional organosilicon compound. A method of forming the flexible barrier film includes the steps of disposing the composition on a substrate and curing the composition to form the flexible barrier film. The flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

Blizzard, John; Tonge, James Steven; Weidner, William Kenneth

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z