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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuously vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level. 2 figs.

White, T.L.

1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

2

Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries  

SciTech Connect

A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti [Technical University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Reduction of NO[sub x] emissions coke oven gas combustion process  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes by-product processing at Clairton Works which uses a unique cryogenic technology. Modifications to the desulfurization facility, nitrogen oxide formation in combustion processes (both thermal and fuel NO[sub x]), and the boilers plants are described. Boilers were used to study the contribution of fuel NO[sub x] formation during the combustion of coke oven gas. Results are summarized. The modifications made to the desulfurization facility resulted in the overall H[sub 2]S emission being reduced by 2-4 grains/100scf and the NO[sub x] emission being reduced by 21-42% in the boiler stacks.

Terza, R.R. (USS Clairton Works, PA (United States)); Sardesai, U.V. (Westfield Engineering and Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Solar oven  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable, foldable solar oven is provided wherein the basic construction material is ordinary cardboard, some surfaces of which are coated with a reflective material. The portable oven doubles as an insulated container for keeping refrigerated foodstuffs cold while being transported to a distant site for cooking.

Golder, J.C.

1981-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Solar oven  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a solar oven. It comprises: an oven chamber having an open end and defining an interior cooking chamber; means providing a flat-back interior surface on the cooking chamber for absorbing sunlight and converting the absorbed sunlight into heat; an oven door hingedly mounted over the open end and movable between open and closed positions relative to the open end; means for pivotably supporting the oven chamber about a first substantially horizontal pivot axis; user-actuable latch means for selectively retaining the oven chamber in selected positions around the first horizontal axis, the user-actuable latch means including a user releasable ratchet mechanism including a plurality of ratchet teeth formed on the oven chamber and ratchet pawl pivoted to the support means in a position to engage selective ones of the ratchet teeth to retain the over chamber in selected orientations around the horizontal axis, the latch means further including means for pivoting the pawl into and out of the path of movement of the ratchet teeth to thereby achieve the selective positioning; a tray disposed within the interior cooking chamber for supporting foodstuffs during coking; pivot means for pivotally mounting the tray within the interior cooking chamber for movement around a second substantially horizontal pivot axis such that the tray can be positioned so as to maintain the foodstuffs in a substantially level position independently of the position of the oven chamber around the first pivot axis.

Burns, T.J.; Burns, C.L.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

7

Oven | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oven Oven Addthis Description Saving energy saves you money. Buy energy-saving light bulbs. (Ad Council PSA) Duration 0:33 Topic Energy Efficiency Heating & Cooling Home...

8

Solar oven  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a solar oven. It includes in combination: a rectangular cooking pan with a bottom and four side walls, open at the upper end, an exterior casing having a bottom and four side walls and having an outer coating to lower the heat absorption, a body of insulation in between the cooking pan and the exterior casing, the top edge of the insulation, casing, and cooking pan all being coplanar to provide a rectangular shelf, a glass-supporting frame enclosing and protecting a sheet of low-iron, heat-conductive glass, the glass having an iron content of only about 0.04% and a transmittance of heat about 83%, a mirror-supporting frame having a solid top portion and top sheet for supporting a mirror combination below the sheet, hinges connecting the mirror supporting frame to the casing, a support arm pivoted to the side of the glass frame and having a series of openings therethrough, and a mirror-support projection secured to the mirror-supporting frame for engaging one of the openings through the support arm for enabling the mirror to be supported at any of a plurality of positions at various angles relative to the shelf and the glass sheet. The glass and its glass-supporting frame being unattached to the cooking pan, casing, and body for free manipulation by hand.

Ghatak, R.N.

1989-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

Lesson 9 - Solar Ovens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lesson 9 - Solar Ovens Colorado Academic Standards: Standard 3: Earth Systems Science Kindergarten: Concepts and skills students master: 1. The Sun provides heat and light to...

10

Portable oven air circulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable air circulating apparatus for use in cooking ovens which is used to create air currents in the oven which transfer heat to cooking foodstuffs to promote more rapid and more uniform cooking or baking, the apparatus including a motor, fan blade and housing of metallic materials selected from a class of heat resistant materials.

Jorgensen, Jorgen A. (Bloomington, MN); Nygren, Donald W. (Minneapolis, MN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Flat plate solar oven  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

Parikh, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Demountable solar oven  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demountable solar oven includes a principal base upon which is mounted a secondary supporting base collar which contains the essential operating parts and which supports two removable arms at their base whose upper end form diametrically opposed pivots for receiving the appropriately disposed pivots of the cooking chamber. The food basket provided with similarly diametrically opposed pivots is disposed interiorly of the cooking chamber and by virtue of a weight disposed at the bottom thereof the wire basket always maintains a horizontal position irrespective of the angle of the oven itself. A transparent hemispherical cover including a shadow box indicator is disposed over the oven in the direction of the sun and a series of individual plate reflectors are hinged together by means of pins, a certain number of which pins are utilized to attach the reflectors to the oven rim. Adjustable feet are disposed at the bottom of the supporting base for adjusting the vertical position of the oven and a level indicator as well as rotationally directional indicators are provided for determining the position of the oven as desired. The disassembled parts occupy a minimum space and various of the parts can be disposed together for the disassembled unit to occupy a very small space.

Erwin, S.F.

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

13

Spiral track oven  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final report on development of a continuously operating oven system in which the parts are progressing automatically on a spiral track for in-line service installation for the production of electronic and/or other components to be heat cured or dried.

Drobilisch, Sandor

1998-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

14

Bake Oven Design and Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Electrode Technology for Aluminium Production: Bake Oven Design and ... from shaft calciners is recovered for heating coal tar pitch and power ...

15

Oven wall panel construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

1980-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

Speciation of inorganic and organometallic compounds in solid biological samples by thermal vaporization and plasma emission spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By means of thermal vaporization, inorganic, organic, and metallorganic species are separated and elemental emission in a microwave plasma is detected as a function of vaporization temperature. Solid samples of 250 mg or more are used to avoid problems with sample heterogeneity. The precision of characteristic appearance temperatures is +/-2/sup 0/C. The single electrode atmosphere pressure microwave plasma system is extremely tolerant to the introduction of water, organic solvents, and air. The measurement system contained a repetition wavelength scan device to allow background correction. The plasma temperature was 5500 K. The system was used to measure C, H, N, O, and Hg in orchard leaves and in tuna fish. 9 figures, 5 tables.

Hanamura, S.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oven, Take One: FAIL Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL June 22, 2011 - 11:45am Addthis Our homemade solar oven. | Courtesy of: Moon Choe Our homemade solar oven. | Courtesy of: Moon Choe...

18

One temperature model for effective ovens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most of the thermodynamic analysis of ovens are focused on efficiency, but they need to behaves under real-life conditions, then the effectiveness of the ovens plays a crucial role in their design. In this paper we present a thermodynamical model able to describe the temperature evolution in ovens, furnaces or kilns to harden, burn or dry different products and which provides a methodology to design these heating devices. We use the required temperature evolution for each product and process as main ingredient in the methodology and procedure to design ovens and we place in the right role the efficiency criteria. We use global energy balance equation for the oven under transient situation as the thermodynamic starting point for developing the model. Our approach is able to consider different configurations for these heating devices, or recirculating or open situations, etc.

Tapia, Saul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

New Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens to Save Consumers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens to Save Consumers on Energy Bills New Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens to Save Consumers on Energy Bills May 31,...

20

EETD Assists in Analysis of Microwave Oven Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD Assists in Analysis of Microwave Oven Energy Efficiency Standard June 2013 The Department of Energy recently announced new energy efficiency standards for microwave ovens....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bethlehem Steel announces plans to control coke oven air and water pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation and the Maryland Department of the Environment have announced an agreement under which Bethlehem will spend an estimated $92-million at its Sparrows Points, Md., plant for technologically-advanced controls to further reduce air and water pollution, mainly from the plant's coke ovens. The two major systems include one to treat by-product coke oven gas and chemicals, and another to upgrade existing pushing emission controls on two older coke oven batteries. One of the new systems will replace most of the existing equipment that cleans gas and treats chemicals created by the coking process at the plant's three coke oven batteries. Because this system has the potential to greatly reduce sulfur dioxide and other pollutants, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) in September announced that its installation qualified for funding as part of the nationwide Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Method for processing coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect

Coke oven gas is subjected, immediately after the discharge thereof from coke ovens, and without any preliminary cooling operation or any purification operation other than desulfurization, to a catalytic cracking operation to form a hot cracked gas which is rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The catalytic cracking reaction is carried out in the presence of a hydrogen-containing and/or CO2-containing gas, with a steam reforming catalyst.

Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

1980-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

23

Theoretical Modeling Approach for a Common Residential Electrically Heated Oven and Proposed Oven Design Modification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current research has developed a fully predictive model of an electrically heated common residential oven. This system was modeled using a fully explicit approach and,… (more)

Breen, Mark Allan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Reducing Energy Consumption on Process Ovens & Oxidation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the uncertain cost of energy, optimizing the use of air in process dryers, ovens and air pollution control systems is critical to your bottom line. The revived emphasis on air management through the entire process, from plant make-up air heating systems to pollution control system exhaust, provides many opportunities to save energy and cut operating costs. This presentation includes an overview of good air management practices used to optimize energy use in your process and plant. One of the most important benefits of the more stringent air pollution control regulations throughout the world is the focus on better use and conservation of our natural resources. Through the efforts of many of the world's finest engineers and scientists the world is now realizing the benefits of an environmentally friendly approach to manufacturing. These benefits, which include more efficient process operation, less waste generation and reduced emissions, have produced the unforeseen benefit of reduced production costs and higher quality products. Process dryers and ovens are used in the manufacture of a wide variety of products produced by the companies represented at the Industrial Energy Technology Conference. This equipment is installed and operating in facilities that produce printed materials, packaging materials, adhesive tapes, pharmaceutical diagnostic materials, coated papers & films, foil laminations, electronic media, and photographic & x-ray films. They are also used extensively in the food industry. The products manufactured include baked goods, cereals, pet food, tobacco, and many other products. Ovens are used to bake and cure surface coated materials. Such as building siding, window frames, window blinds, automotive parts, wood products, and miscellaneous metal parts. More stringent environmental regulations are also impacting the design and operation of coating and food processes. Today air pollution control devices are used on many of the above applications to control the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and odors. As emission limits have decreased, the use of permanent total enclosures PTE's are becoming a standard part of the process line design. These enclosures are used to obtain 100% capture of the solvents used in the process. In addition, concerns over solvent concentrations in ovens along with concerns over exposure limits to employees have combined to drive process exhaust flows ever higher. Increasing process exhaust flows has been the common approach to addressing process and environmental issues. This increase in exhaust flows has resulted in significant increases in energy use and operating costs.

Worachek, C.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The FlashBake oven: Lightwave oven delivers high-quality, quick cooking  

SciTech Connect

The FlashBake oven is a well-publicized new electrotechnology that over 40 utilities are promoting for commercial food service applications, but is it worth its high price? E Source research shows that this $5,000 to $8,500 lightwave oven can increase sales and profitability in a number of applications, thus paying for itself within months to a year or two. The FlashBake does so by cooking foods less than two inches thick in two minutes or less, as quickly as microwave ovens do, but with quality equal to or greater than that of conventional gas and electric ovens. The FlashBake makes sense for restaurants and kiosks that offer quick-order menus, as well as for full-menu restaurants that can use the FlashBake during slow periods (instead of larger ovens) and during busy periods (for extra capacity). In these target market applications, the FlashBake is likely to use less energy due to its extremely low idle energy use. It is not well suited to banquet and institutional kitchens that require large numbers of the same item to be cooked and ready simultaneously. The FlashBake has only one tray, so cooking large volumes may take longer, require more labor, and use more energy than a conventional oven that has multiple cooking racks. Energy use is rarely a major concern of those who buy FlashBake ovens, since energy for cooking represents a small fraction of a restaurant`s overall operating costs. The main selling point of the FlashBake is menu and productivity enhancement.

Gregerson, J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Open Ended Microwave Oven for Packaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel open waveguide cavity resonator is presented for the combined variable frequency microwave curing of bumps, underfills and encapsulants, as well as the alignment of devices for fast flip-chip assembly, direct chip attach (DCA) or wafer-scale level packaging (WSLP). This technology achieves radio frequency (RF) curing of adhesives used in microelectronics, optoelectronics and medical devices with potential simultaneous micron-scale alignment accuracy and bonding of devices. In principle, the open oven cavity can be fitted directly onto a flip-chip or wafer scale bonder and, as such, will allow for the bonding of devices through localised heating thus reducing the risk to thermally sensitive devices. Variable frequency microwave (VFM) heating and curing of an idealised polymer load is numerically simulated using a multi-physics approach. Electro-magnetic fields within a novel open ended microwave oven developed for use in micro-electronics manufacturing applications are solved using a de icated Yee sche...

Sinclair, K I; Desmulliez, M Y P; Goussetis, G; Bailey, C; Parrott, K; Sangster, A J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Final environmental information volume for the coke oven gas cleaning project at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Sparrows Point Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethelehem Steel Corporation (BSC) is planning to conduct a demonstration project involving an integrated system that can be retrofitted into coke oven gas handling systems to address a variety of environmental and operational factors in a more cost-effective manner. Successful application of this technology to existing US coke plants could: (1) reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, cyanide, and volatile organic compounds (including benzene) (2) reduce the cost and handling of processing feed chemicals, (3) disposal costs of nuisance by-products and (4) increase reliability and reduce operation/maintenance requirements for coke oven gas desulfurization systems. The proposed system will remove sulfur from the coke oven gas in the form of hydrogen sulfide using the ammonia indigenous to the gas as the primary reactive chemical. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide are also removed in this process. The hydrogen sulfide removed from the coke oven gas in routed to a modified Claus plant for conversion to a saleable sulfur by-product. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide will be catalytically converted to hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The tail gas from the sulfur recovery unit is recycled to the coke oven gas stream, upstream of the new gas cleaning system. The proposed demonstration project will be installed at the existing coke oven facilities at BSC's Sparrows Point Plant. This volume describes the proposed actions and the resulting environmental impacts. 21 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

28

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Volume 1, Public design report  

SciTech Connect

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design -information for the ``Innovative Coke Oven Gas Cleaning System for Retrofit Applications`` Demonstration Project at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s Sparrows Point, Maryland coke oven by-product facilities. This project demonstrates, for the first time in the United States, the feasibility of integrating four commercially available technologies (processes) for cleaning coke oven gas. The four technologies are: Secondary Gas Cooling, Hydrogen Sulfide and Ammonia Removal, Hydrogen Sulfide and Ammonia Recovery, and Ammonia Destruction and Sulfur Recovery. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project and the role of the US Department of,Energy are briefly discussed. Actual plant capital and projected operating costs are also presented. An overview of the integration (retrofit) of the processes into the existing plant is presented and is followed by detailed non-proprietary descriptions of the four technologies and their overall effect on reducing the emissions of ammonia, sulfur, and other pollutants from coke oven gas. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control monitoring, and safety considerations are also addressed for each process.

Not Available

1994-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

Multiple delivery cesium oven system for negative ion sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution of cesium in large negative ion beam sources to be operational in ITER, is presently based on the use of three or more cesium ovens, which operate simultaneously and are controlled remotely. However, use of multiple Cs ovens simultaneously is likely to pose difficulties in operation and maintenance of the ovens. An alternate method of Cs delivery, based on a single oven distribution system is proposed as one which could reduce the need of simultaneous operation of many ovens. A proof of principle experiment verifying the concept of a multinozzle distributor based Cs oven has been carried out at Institute for Plasma Research. It is also observed that the Cs flux is not controlled by Cs reservoir temperature after few hours of operation but by the temperature of the distributor which starts behaving as a Cs reservoir.

Bansal, G.; Bhartiya, S.; Pandya, K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, M. J.; Soni, J.; Gahlaut, A.; Parmar, K. G.; Chakraborty, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

A modified concentrating type solar oven for outdoor cooking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar cookers offer a partial solution to many problems for the poor developing areas of the world. In these regions energy used for cooking sometimes comprises four fifths of the total energy demand. Solar cookers are generally four catagories: direct focusing, oven, ovenfocusing and indirect types. The direct focusing types failed to boil water under windy conditions due to excessive convection losses from the bare cooking pot placed at the concentrator focus. The oven type cookers, such as Telkes oven, observe the rules of energy conservation and thus are more efficient and less affected by windy weather. However, this oven suffers from two major problems. First, tilting the oven could cause food spillage unless a hinged support is used for the pot. This adds complication to the design of Telkes oven. Second, the solar radiation is added to the pot from the top for high solar altitude angles. This leads to poor heat transfer to the food inside the pot. The advantages of concentrating and oven cookers can be obtained by widding of a point focus concentrator to a new oven type receiver. In this paper the concept and design details of such an oven are introduced. Theoretical and experimental analyses of the developed cooker are given.

Khalifa, A.M.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Design and operation of the coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel utilizes a combination of two technologies which had never been used together. These two technologies had proven effective separately and now in combination. However, it brought unique operational considerations which has never been considered previously. The front end of the facility is a Sulfiban process. This monoethanolamine (MEA) process effectively absorbs hydrogen sulfide and other acid gases from coke-oven gas. The final step in sulfur removal uses a Lo-Cat II. The Lo-Cat process absorbs and subsequently oxidizes H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. These two processes have been effective in reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coke-oven gas by 95%. Since the end of the start-up and optimization phase, emission rate has stayed below the 104.5 lb/hr limit of equivalent SO{sub 2} (based on a 24-hr average). In Jan. 1995, the emission rate from the sulfur removal facility averaged 86.7 lb/hr with less than 20 lb/hr from the Econobator exhaust. The challenges yet to be met are decreasing the operating expenses of the sulfur removal facility, notably chemical costs, and minimizing the impact of the heating system on unit reliability.

Havili, M.U.; Fraser-Smyth, L.L.; Wood, B.W. [Geneva Steel, Provo, UT (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL June 15, 2011 - 11:56am Addthis Our homemade solar oven. | Courtesy of Moon Choe Our homemade solar oven. | Courtesy of Moon Choe Moon Choe EERE Summer Intern The first time I ever saw solar cookers was on the news in the summer of 2009 (though that would make it their winter, as I was living in Chile at the time), as part of a development project in the north, which is mostly desert. I had no idea solar cookers were so markedly simple in all various facets, such as appearance, use, and construction, and ever since then, it always remained on my to-do list to make one of my own. Another added benefit that I was unaware of is that a solar cooker works at any time of year, so long as it's receiving direct sunlight (i.e. not

33

Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL Solar Oven, Take One: FAIL June 15, 2011 - 11:56am Addthis Our homemade solar oven. | Courtesy of Moon Choe Our homemade solar oven. | Courtesy of Moon Choe Moon Choe EERE Summer Intern The first time I ever saw solar cookers was on the news in the summer of 2009 (though that would make it their winter, as I was living in Chile at the time), as part of a development project in the north, which is mostly desert. I had no idea solar cookers were so markedly simple in all various facets, such as appearance, use, and construction, and ever since then, it always remained on my to-do list to make one of my own. Another added benefit that I was unaware of is that a solar cooker works at any time of year, so long as it's receiving direct sunlight (i.e. not

34

Problem of improving coke oven gas purification systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion of the problems of improving desulfurization processes of coke oven gas was presented. Of particular interest were control systems and increasing capacity of the coke ovens. Included in the discussion were the vacuum-carbonate and arsenic-soda sulfur removal systems. Problems involved with these systems were the number of treatment operations, the volume of the reagents used, and the operation of equipment for naphthalene and cyanide removal.

Goldin, I.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coke plant at the Sparrows Point Plant consist of three coke oven batteries and two coal chemical plants. The by-product coke oven gas (COG) consists primarily of hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and contaminants consisting of tars, light oils (benzene, toluene, and xylene) hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, water vapor and other hydrocarbons. This raw coke oven gas needs to be cleaned of most of its contaminants before it can be used as a fuel at other operations at the Sparrows Point Plant. In response to environmental concerns, BSC decided to replace much of the existing coke oven gas treatment facilities in the two coal chemical Plants (A and B) with a group of technologies consisting of: Secondary Cooling of the Coke oven Gas; Hydrogen Sulfide Removal; Ammonia Removal; Deacification of Acid Gases Removed; Ammonia Distillation and Destruction; and, Sulfur Recovery. This combination of technologies will replace the existing ammonia removal system, the final coolers, hydrogen sulfide removal system and the sulfur recovery system. The existing wastewater treatment, tar recovery and one of the three light oil recovery systems will continue to be used to support the new innovative combination of COG treatment technologies.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

36

A container for heat treating materials in microwave ovens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of a microwave oven of a conventional two-source configuration and energy level is increased by providing the oven with a container for housing a refractory material to be treated. The container is formed to top and bottom walls transparent to microwaves while the sidewalls, in a circular configuration, are formed of a nonmetallic material opaque to microwave radiation for reflecting the radiation penetrating the top and bottom walls radially inwardly into the center of the container wherein a casket of heat-insulating material is provided for housing the material to be heat treated. The reflection of the microwave radiation from the sidewalls increases the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the casket retains the heat to permit the heating of the material to a substantially higher temperature than achievable in the oven without the container.

Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Mills, J.E.

1988-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Container for heat treating materials in microwave ovens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of a microwave oven of a conventional two-source configuration and energy level is increased by providing the oven with a container for housing a refractory material to be treated. The container is formed of top and bottom walls transparent to microwaves while the sidewalls, in a circular configuration, are formed of a nonmetallic material opaque to microwave radiation reflecting the radiation penetrating the top and bottom walls radially inwardly into the center of the container wherein a casket of heat-insulating material is provided for housing the material to be heat treated. The reflection of the microwave radiation from the sidewalls increases the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the casket retains the heat to permit the heating of the material to a substantially higher temperature than achieveable in the oven without the container.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kimrey, Jr., Harold D. (Knoxville, TN); Mills, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

New process for coke-oven gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

With the EPA reclassifying spent iron oxide as a hazardous waste material in 1990, an alternative technology was sought for desulfurizing coke-oven gas. Vacasulf technology was adopted for reasons that included: producing of coke battery heating gas without further polishing and high-quality elemental sulfur; lowest operating cost in comparison with other methods; no waste products; and integrates with existing ammonia destruction facility. Vacasulf requires a single purchased material, potassium hydroxide, that reacts with carbon dioxide in coke-oven gas to form potassium carbonate which, in turn, absorbs hydrogen sulfide. Operation of the system has been successful following the resolution of relatively minor start-up problems.

Currey, J.H. [Citizens Gas and Coke Utility, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Testing of the Burns-Milwaukee`s Sun Oven  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Burns-Milwaukee Sun Oven was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 160{degrees}C (320{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperatures to 80{degrees}C, (175{degrees}F), in 75 minutes. Observations were also made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on operation of the solar oven was also noted.

Moss, T.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Polymer Surface Modification Using Microwave-Oven-Generated Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, diameter 160 mm) are from Fisher Scientific. Compressed oxygen and ethanol (100%) are from Air Products a Barnstead EASYpure UV unit. Plasma is generated with a 1100-W countertop microwave oven (Amana, ACM2160AB.Afterrinsing,thesamples are dried with compressed air and placed on a glass microscope slide. The slide is then positioned

Steinbock, Oliver

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

New packing in absorption systems for trapping benzene from coke-oven gas  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of benzene removal from coke-oven gas in absorption units OAO Alchevskkoks with new packing is assessed.

V.V. Grabko; V.M. Li; T.A. Shevchenko; M.A. Solov'ev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Testing of the Burns-Milwaukee's Sun Oven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Burns-Milwaukee Sun Oven was tested at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 160 o C (320 o F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80 o C, (175 o F), in 75 minutes. Observations were also made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on operation of the solar oven was also noted. ii 1 The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories evaluated a Sun Oven from Burns-Milwaukee at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque NM. It was designed for single family household cooking. It is targeting developing countries' alternative energy markets where conventional fuels are not available and wood is the primary fuel used for cooking. Because of the wide variety and types of solar...

Moss Solar Thermal; T. A. Moss

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Takahax-Hirohax process for coke oven gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Takahax-Hirohax process to desulfurize coke oven gas and to produce an ammonium sulfate end product. A review is also made of current operating experience and recent technical developments. The Takahax-Hirohax process is extremely useful when the COG contains a suitable ammonia to sulfur ratio and when ammonium sulfate is a desirable end product. No contaminated effluent streams are emitted from the process. The process is simple, reliable, flexible, and responds easily to COG variations. 4 figures, 3 tables. (DP)

Gastwirth, H.; Miner, R.; Stengle, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Testing of the Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove Solar Oven  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 115{degrees}C (240{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80{degrees}C (175{degrees}F) in about two hours. Observations were made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on the operation of the solar oven were also noted.

Moss, T.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Rapid determination of wood fuel moisture content using a microwave oven for drying  

SciTech Connect

A method of determining moisture content (MC) of wood fuel using a microwave oven for drying the wood was evaluated by drying paired samples of five different wood fuel types in a microwave oven and a conventional oven. When compared to the conventional oven drying method, the microwave technique produces consistently lower MC determinations, although the differences are less than 1 percent. The advantage of the microwave technique is the speed at which MC determinations can be determined (less than 15 minutes). Schedules for drying five wood fuel types are presented. (Refs. 7).

Harris, R.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Conjunctive management of groundwater and surface water resources in the Upper Ovens River Valley.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Regression analysis produced equations for relating Ovens River levels to groundwater levels with a high correlation. These equations can relate stream flow objectives to corresponding… (more)

Lovell, Daniel Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Desulphurization of coke oven gas by the Stretford Process  

SciTech Connect

The Stretford process is probably the most effective means available for removing hydrogen sulphide from gas streams. For streams which do not contain hydrogen cyanide or excessive oxygen it should be nearly ideal. However, the large volume of waste liquor generated by fixation of hydrogen cyanide has prevented its widespread adoption for coke oven gas treatment. Investigations of various proposals for treating the waste liquor indicate that the only practicable way of dealing with it is by reductive incineration. Although attempts to apply the Peabody-Holmes reductive incineration process have been disappointing, significant progress in overcoming some of its deficiencies has been made. The Zimpro wet oxidation process will provide a convenient method of treating the HCN scrubber effluent at No. 1 Plant. However, it will not treat the sodium based liquor from the Stretford plant. Its application to Stretford waste treatment is limited to situations where ammonium liquors and ammonium sulphate recovery facilities are available. Commissioning of this plant has been delayed while a defect in the air compressor supplied for the plant is being remedied. When the problem of liquid effluent disposal has been overcome, and if reagent chemicals continue to be available at reasonable prices, the Stretford process will be a good choice for coke oven gas desulphurization. 8 figures.

Plenderleith, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This project combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE is providing cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. This report is the third quarterly status report of the EMP. It covers the Environmental Monitoring Plan activities for the full year of 1991 from January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991, including the forth quarter. See Sections 2, 3 and 4 for status reports of the Project Installation and Commissioning, the Environmental Monitoring activities and the Compliance Monitoring results for the period. Section 5 contains a list of Compliance Reports submitted to regulatory agencies during the period. The EMP describes in detail the environmental monitoring activities to be performed during the project execution. The purpose of the EMP is to: (1) document the extent of compliance of monitoring activities, i.e. those monitoring required to meet permit requirements, (2) confirm the specific impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act documentation, and (3) establish an information base for the assessment of the environmental performance of the technology demonstrated by the project.

Not Available

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Model reference adaptive temperature control of the electromagnetic oven process in manufacturing process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, the electromagnetic ovens are used for heating the component assembly of electronic manufacturing. The control systems of the electromagnetic ovens are feedback control system and PID controller are used to control their temperature. This process ... Keywords: control theory, response optimization and model reference adaptive system

Jiraphon Srisertpol; Supot Phungphimai

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Organic Sulphur Transfers in Coke Oven Gas via Noncatalytic Partial Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organic sulfur transformation was studied during coke oven gas to produce syngas via noncatalytic partial oxidation. The concentration of CS2 and thiophene was examined in syngas by sulfide detector. For comparison, the sulfur transfer was also studied ... Keywords: Organic sulfur transfer, Coke oven gas, CS2, thiophene

Guojie Zhang; Yongfa Zhang; Xianglan Li; Hongcheng Cao

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Energy consumption for baking and characteristics of baked product in relation to type of oven and baking procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data were obtained and analyzed on 1) energy consumption when a test food was baked with four types of electric ovens (electric range oven, table model conventional oven, table model forced convection oven, and table model broiler/toaster oven) with three cooking procedures (participant's own procedure, preheated procedure, and cold start procedure); 2) patterns of energy consumption in 10-minute intervals; and 3) the characteristics of the finished food. Twenty participants from households in Columbus, Ohio, baked loaves of quick bread in a laboratory in the four types of ovens with three cooking procedures. Statistical analyses of data included analyses of variance, Tukey test, and Duncan's multiple range test. Significantly more energy was used with the participants' own procedures than with either the preheated or the cold start procedure (p < .01). There was no consistency in total energy consumption between the preheated and the cold start procedures in the four types of ovens. The electric range oven consumed significantly more energy than the other three types of ovens in the first 10-minute interval; however, the table model forced convection oven consumed significantly more energy than other ovens in the second and third 10-minute intervals. No consistent patterns were observed for volume and weight loss of breads baked with the three cooking procedures, but use of the table model forced convection oven always resulted in larger volume than with other ovens.

Nee, Y.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Coke oven gas desulphurization by the Carl Still process  

SciTech Connect

The Steubenville East Coke Plant need a desulfurization process that would desulfurize an eventual 95 million standard cubic feet per day of coke oven gas from an inlet of 450 gr/DSCF to an outlet of 45 gr/DSCF of hydrogen sulfide. The Dravo/Still plant process was selected, due to the use of ammonia which was available in the gas, as the absorbing agent. It was also a proven process. Dravo/Still also was capable of building a sulfuric acid plant. The desulfurization efficiency of the plant has consistently provided an average final gas sulfur loading below the guaranteed 45 gr/DSCF. This removal efficiency has enabled production of an average of 4615 tons per day of 66/sup 0/Be acid. Also SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 3/ conversion has averaged 98%. 3 figures. (DP)

Knight, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Method for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved sulfur-ammonia process is disclosed for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gases. In the improved process, a concentrator formerly used for standby operation is used at all normal times as an ammonia scrubber to improve the efficiency of gas separation during normal operation and is used as a concentrator for its intended standby functions during the alternative operations. In its normal function, the concentrator/scrubber functions as a scrubber to strip ammonia gas from recirculating liquid streams and to permit introduction of an ammonia-rich gas into a hydrogen sulfide scrubber to increase the separation efficiency of that unit. In the standby operation, the same concentrator/scrubber serves as a concentrator to concentrate hydrogen sulfide in a ''strong liquor'' stream for separate recovery as a strong liquor.

Ritter, H.

1982-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

54

A compact and efficient strontium oven for laser-cooling experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we describe a compact and efficient strontium oven well suited for laser-cooling experiments. Novel design solutions allowed us to produce a collimated strontium atomic beam with a flux of 1.0\\times10^13 s^-1 cm^-2 at the oven temperature of 450 {\\deg}C, reached with an electrical power consumption of 36 W. The oven is based on a stainless-steel reservoir, filled with 6 g of metallic strontium, electrically heated in a vacuum environment by a tantalum wire threaded through an alumina multi-bore tube. The oven can be hosted in a standard DN40CF cube and has an estimated continuous operation lifetime of 10 years. This oven can be used for other alkali and alkaline earth metals with essentially no modifications.

Marco Schioppo; Nicola Poli; Marco Prevedelli; Stephan Falke; Christian Lisdat; Uwe Sterr; Guglielmo Maria Tino

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

A compact and efficient strontium oven for laser-cooling experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we describe a compact and efficient strontium oven well suited for laser-cooling experiments. Novel design solutions allowed us to produce a collimated strontium atomic beam with a flux of 1.0\\times10^13 s^-1 cm^-2 at the oven temperature of 450 {\\deg}C, reached with an electrical power consumption of 36 W. The oven is based on a stainless-steel reservoir, filled with 6 g of metallic strontium, electrically heated in a vacuum environment by a tantalum wire threaded through an alumina multi-bore tube. The oven can be hosted in a standard DN40CF cube and has an estimated continuous operation lifetime of 10 years. This oven can be used for other alkali and alkaline earth metals with essentially no modifications.

Schioppo, Marco; Prevedelli, Marco; Falke, Stephan; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe; Tino, Guglielmo Maria

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Available Technologies: Modular Inorganic Nanocomposites  

... “Modular Inorganic Nanocomposites by Conversion of Nanocrystal Superlattices,” Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 2878–2882 (2010) ...

57

Supported inorganic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

Sehgal, Rakesh (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Developing indicators for the assessment and proper management of the different levels of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)s generally associated with coke-oven workers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coke ovens may occur in the aluminium, steel, graphite, electrical, and construction industries. In the work area coke-oven workers may be exposed to various chemical… (more)

Wang, Tianyuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Coke oven gas desulfurization: at Republic Steel's New Coking Facility, Warren, OH  

SciTech Connect

Our performance test indicates that the Sulfiban process is an effective method for removing H/sub 2/S from coke-oven gas. The process is able to handle variations in coke-oven gas flow and composition. Continuing efforts are underway to maintain optimum desulfurization conditions while trying to reduce waste production and MEA consumption. The problems which have prevented us from operating continuously have given us a better understanding of the process. This has contributed to better plant operations and greater equipment reliability for us to obtain continuous coke-oven gas desulfurization. 2 figures, 1 table.

Boak, S.C.; Prucha, D.G.; Turic, H.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Progressive Powder Coating: New Infrared Curing Oven at Metal Finishing Plant Increases Production by 50%  

SciTech Connect

Progressive Powder Coating in Mentor, Ohio, is a metal finishing plant that uses a convection oven in its manufacturing process. In an effort to save energy and improve production, the company installed an infrared oven in between the powder coating booth and the convection oven on its production line. This installation allowed the plant to increase its conveyor line speed and increase production by 50 percent. In addition, the plant reduced its natural gas consumption, yielding annual energy savings of approximately$54,000. With a total project cost of$136,000, the simple payback is 2.5 years.

Not Available

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Testing of the Sunstove Organization's Sunstove Solar Oven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Sunstove Organization's Sunstove was tested at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 115 o C (240 o F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80 o C (175 o F) in about two hours. Observations were made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on the operation of the solar oven were also noted. ii 1 The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories evaluated a Sunstove from the Sunstove Organization, at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque NM. It was designed for single family household cooking. It is targeting developing countries' alternative energy markets where conventional fuels are not available and wood is the primary fuel used for cooking. Because of the wide vari...

Moss Solar Thermal; T. A. Moss

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A modular phase change heat exchanger for a solar oven  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modular energy storing heat exchanger designed to use pentaerythritol for thermal storage (solid-solid phase change at 182 C) is tested in an oven by circulating heat transfer oil which is electrically heated in a manner to simulate a concentrating solar collector. Three efficiencies for heating the system under controlled and measured power input are determined - the heat exchanger efficiency, the efficiency of the heater with distribution lines, and the total system efficiency. Thermal energy retention times and cooking extraction times are determined, and along with the efficiencies, are compared with the results previously reported for a nonmodular heat exchanger. The modular configuration provides a highly improved extraction rate for cooking due to its wrap-around character and its increased surface-to-volume ratio. A full scale glass model of the copper tubing of the system is described and flow observations reported demonstrating how uniformly the parallel pumping branches perform and how trapped air pockets affect pumping power. A technique for measuring pumping power is described and its application to the system is quantified to show that less than 1 watt is required to circulate the heat transfer oil even when the system includes the solar collector and its longer connecting tubes.

Bushnell, D.L.; Sohi, M. (Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

New Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens to Save Consumers on  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens to Save Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens to Save Consumers on Energy Bills New Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens to Save Consumers on Energy Bills May 31, 2013 - 3:26pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced today that the Energy Department has finalized new energy efficiency standards for microwave ovens that will save consumers nearly $3 billion on their energy bills through 2030. Over the next 30 years, it will dramatically reduce harmful carbon pollution, equivalent to taking over 12 million new cars off the road for one year. "Appliance efficiency standards represent a huge opportunity to help families save money by saving energy, while still delivering high quality

64

Electromagnetic and Heat Transfer Modeling of Microwave Heating in Domestic Ovens.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Microwave (MW) ovens are used extensively for heating a variety of not-ready-to-eat food products. It is vital to achieve target temperature uniformly throughout the food… (more)

Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Modeling Infrared and Combination Infrared-Microwave Heating of Foods in an Oven .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A quantitative, model-based understanding of heat exchange in infrared and combined infrared-microwave heating of food inside an oven is developed. The research is divided into… (more)

Frangipani Almeida, Marialuci

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Additional Steam Traps Increase Production of a Drum Oven at a Petroleum Jelly Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional steam traps were installed on the drum oven at a petroleum jelly production facility at an ExxonMobil plant in Nigeria. The installation improved heat transfer and saved energy.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Created March 2009 Microwave ovens are located throughout Swinburne University campuses in both staff & students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as when sealed containers are heated they may explode and damage the oven rendering it unsafe. · Use glass containers designed for microwaves to cook high-fat foods, as additives from plastic are more likely

Liley, David

68

Process Parameters and Energy Use of Gas and Electric Ovens in Industrial Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study was conducted to evaluate the energy use of natural gas and electric ovens in the production of polymer bearings and components. Tests were conducted to evaluate and compare the performance of natural gas and electric ovens in the process of sintering billets which are made from a broad range of materials such as PTFE and other fluoropolymers, elastomers, themosets, themoplastics and composites. The purpose of this study was to compare the process parameters under similar conditions for industrial applications where electric ovens have predominant use. Tests were performed to obtain the process efficiency and examine cost savings potential in converting electric ovens to natural gas. Preliminary results show that, for the plat studied, cost savings of about $10,000 per oven can be achieved, with a simple payback period of less than two years. The results also show that additional energy savings will be realized if the oven size and exhaust flow are carefully selected. The data obtained from these experiments were used to calculate process efficiency. Design features and environmental issues are discussed.

Kosanovic, D.; Ambs, L.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Inorganic polymer engineering materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphazene-based, inorganic-polymer composites have been produced and evaluated as potential engineering materials. The thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of several different composites made from one polymer formulation have been measured. Measured properties are very good, and the composites show excellent promise for structural applications in harsh environments. Chopped fiberglass, mineral, cellulose, and woodflour filled composites were tested. Chopped fiberglass filled composites showed the best overall properties. The phosphazene composites are very hard and rigid. They have low dielectric constants and typical linear thermal expansion coefficients for polymers. In most cases, the phosphazene materials performed as well or better than analogous, commercially available, filled phenolic composites. After 3 to 5 weeks of exposure, both the phosphazene and phenolics were degraded to aqueous bases and acids. The glass filled phosphazene samples were least affected.

Stone, M.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

ARM - Measurement - Inorganic chemical composition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsInorganic chemical composition ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send...

71

The use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution showed the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be used in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

Marakhovskii, L.F.; Rezunenko, Y.I.; Popov, A.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect

The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution which show that the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be recovered in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

Marakhovskii, L.F.; Popov, A.A.; Rezunenko, Yu.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modeling of Microwave Ovens with Perforated Metal Walls Erin M. Kiley and Vadim V. Yakovlev  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineers developing new microwaveable products. This can be explained by the particularly complex nature, modeling. I. INTRODUCTION While historically, technological progress in microwave power engineering has microwave ovens - the most widespread microwave heating devices - have not yet been notably adopted by food

Yakovlev, Vadim

74

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Electric Combination Oven Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for an electric combination oven under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Gas Combination Oven Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a gas combination oven under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

WELL BEING WEDNESDAY Oven Baked Chicken Tandoori with Side Salad, Fresh Lime &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELL BEING WEDNESDAY Low Fat Oven Baked Chicken Tandoori with Side Salad, Fresh Lime & Homemade with a reduced Fat Tomato Sauce HM V £3.80 Jacket Potato Fillings Low Fat Cottage Cheese Deli Style Coleslaw with Low Fat Mayonnaise Lean Mince Chilli Con Carne Grated Welsh Cheddar Tuna Mayonnaise ­ (responsibly

Davies, Christopher

77

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications: Environmental Monitoring Program. Volume 3, Appendix sections 8--14: Baseline Sampling Program report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains no text. It consists entirely of numerical data: Coke oven wastewater treatment performance; Ammonia still effluents to equalization tank; Stack gas analysis of coke oven batteries; CoaL consumption; Coke production; Supplemental OSHA employee exposure monitoring(hydrocarbons,ammonia, hydrogen sulfide); operating data; chemical products and coke oven gas production.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues...

79

Hybrid Organic: Inorganic Materials for Alternative Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Hybrid Organic: Inorganic Materials for Alternative Energy. Sponsorship.

80

Build an oven, cook a meal: How solar energy empowered women in Costa Rica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot solar cooking project in the hot, northern province of Guanacaste promises to serve as a model for community groups wanting to build their own solar ovens. An $8,000 (US) grant has been awarded by the Canadian Embassy in Costa Rica to take the Guanacaste project into a second stage in 1990-91. Two construction workshops, with twelve participants in each, are planned in communities near Oriente. Three women from the Oriente group will have paid jobs as organizational facilitators and workshop supervisors. In popular education this is called the multiplier effect - the users of solar cookers construct the ovens themselves, and then instruct others to do the same. 3 refs.

Blankenship, J. (Canadian Univ. Service Organization, San Jose (Costa Rica))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Choosing a coke-oven gas desulfurization system: a review of current technology  

SciTech Connect

Installation of coke-oven gas desulphurizing systems is primarily the result of air pollution control regulations. Although not currently profitable, operating costs can be minimized by choosing the technology most suited to the particular application. The Stretford Holmes, Takahax/Hirohax, Koppers Vacuum Carbonate, Sulfiban and Dravo/Still processes are discussed, together with criteria for economic analysis based on technical and by-product market evaluations.

Lynch, P.A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Method of washing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas by the ammonium sulfide method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved coke oven gas washing process for removing hydrogen sulfide is proposed wherein the coke oven gas is treated in a hydrogen sulfide scrubber by counterflow with an aqueous ammonia wash water. A stream of aqueous weak ammonia liquor is cooled and sprayed through nozzles in the mid-region of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber. A quantity of aqueous ammonia liquor, corresponding to the quantity which is sprayed through the said nozzles, is withdrawn from the hydrogen sulfide scrubber at a level below the nozzles and is introduced into the top of the said hydrogen sulfide scrubber. Ammonia vapor released at the nozzles has a higher partial pressure than the ammonia partial pressure of the coke oven gas in the region of the nozzle. The aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is the source of the cooled aqueous ammonia liquor which is introduced through the nozzles. A portion of the aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is introduced directly into the top of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber as a portion of the required aqueous ammonia wash water.

Ritter, H.

1985-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

Utilizing secondary heat to heat wash oil in the coke-oven gas desulfurization division  

SciTech Connect

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from the coke-oven gas by the vacuum-carbonate method involves significant energy costs, comprising about 47% of the total costs of the process. This is explained by the significant demand of steam for regeneration of the wash oil, the cost of which exceeds 30% of the total operating costs. The boiling point of the saturated wash oil under vacuum does not exceed 70/sup 0/C, thus the wash oil entering the regenerator can be heated either by the direct coke-oven gas or by the tar supernatant from the gas collection cycle. Utilizing the secondary heat of the direct coke-oven gas and the tar supernatant liquor (the thermal effect is approximately the same) to heat the wash oil from the gas desulfurization shops significantly improves the industrial economic indices. Heating the wash oil from gas desulfurization shops using the vacuum-carbonate method by the heat of the tar supernatant liquor may be adopted at a number of coking plants which have a scarcity of thermal resources and which have primary coolers with vertical tubes.

Volkov, E.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Molecular Foundry - Inorganic Nanostructures - Staff - Delia...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and soluble inorganic clusters. Visit The Milliron Research Group Current projects Nanocrystal synthetic development Our research aims to manipulate the properties of...

85

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

86

Inorganic dual-layer microporous supported membranes  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides for a dual-layer inorganic microporous membrane capable of molecular sieving, and methods for production of the membranes. The inorganic microporous supported membrane includes a porous substrate which supports a first inorganic porous membrane having an average pore size of less than about 25 .ANG. and a second inorganic porous membrane coating the first inorganic membrane having an average pore size of less than about 6 .ANG.. The dual-layered membrane is produced by contacting the porous substrate with a surfactant-template polymeric sol, resulting in a surfactant sol coated membrane support. The surfactant sol coated membrane support is dried, producing a surfactant-templated polymer-coated substrate which is calcined to produce an intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane. The intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane is then contacted with a second polymeric sol producing a polymeric sol coated substrate which is dried producing an inorganic polymeric coated substrate. The inorganic polymeric coated substrate is then calcined producing an inorganic dual-layered microporous supported membrane in accordance with the present invention.

Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Tsai, Chung-Yi (6 Mount Vernon Dr., Apt. C, Vernon, CT 06066); Lu, Yungfeng (1055 N. Capital Ave., #20, San Jose, CA 95133)

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

87

Problem of sludge formation in benzol division solar oil and ''carbonization'' in coke oven gas compressor systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion is presented on the problem and possible causes of sludge formation in the return solar oil in benzene recovery units and on the problem of deposits in the pipe systems after coke oven gas compressors. The possible entrainment of fine particles of coal charge in the solar oil was also discussed. Sedimentation of the sludge was recommended with daily removal of the settled sludge. A chemical analysis of the deposits in the piping system of the coke oven gas and the coal charge revealed that the deposits were not caused by entrained coal particles. (JMT)

Rezunenko, Y.I.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Inorganic Materials Chemistry Desk Reference, Second Edition - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 23, 2006 ... The book begins with an introduction to various inorganic materials processes, followed by a glossary of terms commonly found in inorganic ...

89

Method of recovering sulfur from the hydrogen sulfide contained in coke oven gases  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are washed out of the coke oven gas and stripped from the wash liquor in the form of gases and fumes or vapors. The ammonia is decomposed in a nickel catalyzer and a small part of the decomposition gases is supplied directly to a combustion furnace, while the larger part of the combustion gases is first cooled and freed from condensate, and only then supplied to the combustion furnace. In the combustion furnace, the proportion of H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/ needed for the Claus process is adjusted by a partial combustion of the decomposition gases. The gases from the combustion furnace are then processed in the Claus plant to sulfur.

Laufhutte, D.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Summing up of discussion on improvement trends in coke-oven gas purification flowsheets  

SciTech Connect

Reference is made to a previously published article that included flowsheets for purification of coke-oven gas. It is concluded that the flowsheets for a process using arsenic-soda and vacuum-carbonate methods of sulfur removal in which the gas is cooled to 303-308/sup 0/K are seriously in error. Schemes involving minor refrigeration, sulfur removal by the circulating ammonia method and ammonia recovery as ammonia liquor are seen as promising but in need of further improvement. One scheme discussed (the VUKhIN scheme) involves ammonia recovery by the circulating phosphate method and sulfur removal by the circulating ammonia method is seen as a replacement for the minor refrigeration method. Since liquid ammonia consumption in agriculture is continually increasing, schemes that result in production of liquid ammonia rather than ammonia liquor should be seriously considered.

Zemblevskii, K.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Abstract--The paper reviews solutions being explored to face the supply problems faced in the Chilean electricity market oven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas demand in Chile and Argentina, determining the expected behavior of natural gas producers in the Chilean electricity market oven recent years, given unexpected restrictions in natural gas transfers from Argentina. Investment in generation came to a stall, given uncertainties in natural gas supply and the risk

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

92

Application of Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane Technology to Cat Cracker Recycle Gas Hydrogen* FINAL REPORT DOE FEW FEAC324 June 2003 L.D. Trowbridge *AKA: Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology to Hydrogen-Hydrocarbon Separations ORNL/TM-2003/139 Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology To Hydrogen-hydrocarbon Separations June 2003 Prepared by L. D. Trowbridge DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847)

93

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Title Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wang, Yungang, Philip K. Hopke, X. Xia, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, and M. J. Source Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 55 Start Page 525 Pagination 525-532 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords source apportionment positive matrix factorization (pmf) particulate matter (pm) molecular markers (mm) aethalometer delta-c Abstract Source apportionment is typically performed on chemical composition data derived from particulate matter (PM) samples. However, many common sources no longer emit significant amounts of characteristic trace elements requiring the use of more comprehensive chemical characterization in order to fully resolve the PM sources. Positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF, version 4.1) was used to analyze 24-hr integrated molecular marker (MM), secondary inorganic ions, trace elements, carbonaceous species and light absorption data to investigate sources of PM2.5 in Rochester, New York between October 2009 and October 2010 to explore the role of specific MMs. An eight-factor solutionwas found for which the factors were identified as isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA), airborne soil, other SOA, diesel emissions, secondary sulfate, wood combustion, gasoline vehicle, and secondary nitrate contributing 6.9%, 12.8%, 3.7%, 7.8%, 45.5%, 9.1%, 7.9%, and 6.3% to the average PM2.5 concentration, respectively Concentrations of pentacosane, hexacosane, heptacosane, and octacosane in the gasoline vehicles factor were larger compared to diesel emissions. Aethalometer Delta-C was strongly associated with wood combustion. The compounds, n-heptacosanoic acid and n-octacosanoic acid, occasionally used in the past as tracers for road dust, were found to largely associate with SOA in this study. In comparison with a standard PMF analyses without MM, inclusion of themwas necessary to resolve SOA and wood combustion factors in urban areas.

94

SOLOX coke-oven gas desulfurization ppm levels -- No toxic waste  

SciTech Connect

For sulfur removal from coke-oven gas, the reduction/oxidation processes such as Stretford are the most effective, capable of removing the H[sub 2]S down to ppm levels. However, these processes have, in the past, suffered from ecological problems with secondary pollutant formation resulting from side reactions with HCN and O[sub 2]. The SOLOX gas desulfurization system is a development of the Stretford process in which the toxic effluent problems are eliminated by installing a salt decomposition process operating according to the liquid-phase hydrolysis principle. In this process, the gaseous hydrolysis products H[sub 2]S, NH[sub 3] and CO[sub 2] are returned to the untreated gas, and the regenerated solution is recycled to the absorption process. The blowdown from the absorption circuit is fed into a tube reactor where the hydrolysis process takes place. The toxic salts react with water, producing as reaction products the gases H[sub 2]S, NH[sub 3] and CO[sub 2], and the nontoxic salt Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. From the hydrolysis reactor the liquid stream flows into a fractionating crystallization plant. This plant produces a recycle stream of regenerated absorption solution and a second stream containing most of the Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. This second stream comprises the net plant waste and can be disposed of with the excess ammonia liquor or sprayed onto the coal.

Platts, M. (Thyssen Still Otto Technical Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tippmer, K. (Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik GmbH, Bochum (Germany))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A new technology for producing hydrogen and adjustable ratio syngas from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 15 billion Nm{sup 3} coke oven gas (COG) is emitted into the air in Shanxi Province in China as air pollutants. It is also a waste of precious chemical resources. In this study, COG was purified respectively by four methods including refrigeration, fiberglass, silica gel, and molecular sieve. Purified COG was separated by a prism membrane into two gas products. One consists mainly of H{sub 2} ({gt}90 vol %) and the other is rich in CH{sub 4} ({gt}60 vol %) with their exact compositions to vary with the membrane separation pressure and outlet gas flow ratio. The gas rich in CH{sub 4} was partially oxidized with oxygen in a high-temperature fixed-bed quartz reactor charged with coke particles of 10 mm size. At 1200-1300{sup o}C, a CH{sub 4} conversion of {gt}99% could be obtained. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the synthesis product gas can be adjusted in the range 0.3-1.4, very favorable for further C1 synthesis. 10 refs., 17 figs., 1t ab.

Jun Shen; Zhi-zhong Wang; Huai-wang Yang; Run-sheng Yao [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas by using oxygen-permeable ceramics  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas (HCOG) was investigated in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BCFNO) membrane reactor combined with a Ni/Mg(Al)O catalyst by the partial oxidation with toluene as a model tar compound under atmospheric pressure. The reaction results indicated that toluene was completely converted to H{sub 2} and CO in the catalytic reforming of the simulated HCOG in the temperature range from 825 to 875{sup o}C. Both thermodynamically predicated values and experimental data showed that the selective oxidation of toluene took precedence over that of CH{sub 4} in the reforming reaction. At optimized reaction conditions, the dense oxygen-permeable membrane has an oxygen permeation flux around 12.3 mL cm{sup -2} min{sup -1}, and a CH{sub 4} conversion of 86%, a CO{sub 2} conversion of 99%, a H{sub 2} yield of 88%, and a CO yield of 87% have been achieved. When the toluene and methane were reformed, the amount of H{sub 2} in the reaction effluent gas was about 2 times more than that of original H{sub 2} in simulated HCOG. The results reveal that it is feasible for hydrogen production from HCOG by reforming hydrocarbon compounds in a ceramic oxygen-permeable membrane reactor. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 abs.

Hongwei Cheng; Yuwen Zhang; Xionggang Lu; Weizhong Ding; Qian Li [Shanghai University, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

NETL: Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0007632 Ohio State University is developing a cost-effective design and manufacturing process for new membrane modules that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas. The membranes consist of a thin, selective inorganic layer, embedded in a polymer structure so that it can be made in a continuous manufacturing process. They will be incorporated in spiral-wound modules for bench-scale tests using coal-fired flue gas. Preliminary cost calculations show that a single-stage membrane process is economically unfavorable, primarily because of the low concentration of CO2 (~14 percent) in the flue gas stream. A two-stage process is more economical, but requires plant operation with a CO2-enriched recycle stream.

98

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

99

Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Conditions from Oven-Dry to Full Saturation  

SciTech Connect

Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to the capillary force only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which the water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified measurements. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but underestimate the conductivity. The extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

Zhang, Z. F.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

100

Studies on the Effects of Inorganic Salts on Biochemical Treatment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of two inorganic salts (sodium chloride and sodium sulphate) on biochemical ... Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer Characteristics in Microwave ...

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101

Electric Cell-impedance Spectroscopy at the Biological-inorganic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Electric Cell-impedance Spectroscopy at the Biological- inorganic Interface, Shewanella Oneidensis - Gold, for Microbial Fuel Cell ...

102

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. Iron and Steel sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constant heating of the coke ovens ensures optimization ofProgrammed heating Variable speed drive coke oven gasheating Eccentric bottom tapping (EBT) Variable speed drive on coke oven

Worrell, Ernst; Martin, N.; Price, L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Trials and Tribulations of Ancient Starch Research: An Investigation of Contamination and Earth Ovens at Fort Hood, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, earth ovens have been used to provide direct evidence of ancient plant use through the recovery of charred macrobotanical remains and indirectly by means of experimental archaeology and the ethnographic record. Experiments suggest that direct evidence of ancient starch-rich plant use can be obtained through the recovery of starch granules deposited on fire-cracked-rock (FCR) during cooking episodes even in regions where macrobotanical remains are scarcely preserved. Starch contamination, however, can enter into the archaeological record providing “background noise.” Therefore, this study analyzes the results of the Paluxy Sand Geophyte Project to determine if archaeological starch (starch that is both cultural and ancient in origin) can be differentiated from contamination using FCR recovered from heating elements in well-preserved earth ovens at Fort Hood, Texas. FCR, non-cultural rock control samples (RCS), and air control samples (ACS) were processed and analyzed from 27 earth ovens at 6 sites. Contamination control measures were used, including the use of a clean bench, powder-free latex gloves, washing samples prior to processing, spot sampling, and comparisons between starch granule assemblages recovered from FCR and control samples. Laboratory and field equipment were processed and analyzed for contamination. Only one feature (Feature 4 from 41CV984) yielded starch granules that are unambiguously archaeological in origin, rather than the result of contamination, whereas starch assemblages from the other sites could be archaeological or contamination in origin. Small sample sizes, differential preservation, and/or the cooking of non-starch-rich plants could account for the lack of differences between FCR and RCS samples. Finally, maize (Zea mays) starch granules were recovered from all sample types suggesting that maize starch, most likely from “powder-free” gloves and air-fall is a significant source of starch contamination.

Laurence, Andrew

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Inorganic Functional Materials for Environmental Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques · Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission ...

105

Inorganic rechargeable non-aqueous cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A totally inorganic non-aqueous rechargeable cell having an alkali or alkaline earth metal anode such as of lithium, a sulfur dioxide containing electrolyte and a discharging metal halide cathode, such as of CuCl.sub.2, CuBr.sub.2 and the like with said metal halide being substantially totally insoluble in SO.sub.2 and admixed with a conductive carbon material.

Bowden, William L. (Nashua, NH); Dey, Arabinda N. (Needham, MA)

1985-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

Walker, Jr., Robert D. (Gainesville, FL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 1, January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coke plant at the Sparrows Point Plant consist of three coke oven batteries and two coal chemical plants. The by-product coke oven gas (COG) consists primarily of hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and contaminants consisting of tars, light oils (benzene, toluene, and xylene) hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, water vapor and other hydrocarbons. This raw coke oven gas needs to be cleaned of most of its contaminants before it can be used as a fuel at other operations at the Sparrows Point Plant. In response to environmental concerns, BSC decided to replace much of the existing coke oven gas treatment facilities in the two coal chemical Plants (A and B) with a group of technologies consisting of: Secondary Cooling of the Coke oven Gas; Hydrogen Sulfide Removal; Ammonia Removal; Deacification of Acid Gases Removed; Ammonia Distillation and Destruction; and, Sulfur Recovery. This combination of technologies will replace the existing ammonia removal system, the final coolers, hydrogen sulfide removal system and the sulfur recovery system. The existing wastewater treatment, tar recovery and one of the three light oil recovery systems will continue to be used to support the new innovative combination of COG treatment technologies.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nanoporous Metal-Inorganic Materials for Storage and Capture ...  

Nanoporous Metal-Inorganic Materials for Storage and Capture of Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Other Gases Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

109

Development of Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents information and data relative to recent advances in the development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory of porous inorganic membranes for high-temperature hydrogen separation. The Inorganic Membrane Technology Laboratory, which was formerly an organizational element of Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, was formally transferred to Oak Ridge National Laboratory on August 1, 2002, as a result of agreements reached between Bechtel Jacobs Company, the management and integration contractor at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant or Oak Ridge K-25 Site); UT-Battelle, the management and operating contractor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office. Research emphasis during the last year has been directed toward the development of high-permeance (high-flux) and high-separation-factor metal-supported membranes. Performance data for these membranes are presented and are compared with performance data for membranes previously produced under this program and for membranes produced by other researchers. New insights into diffusion mechanisms are included in the discussion. Fifteen products, many of which are the results of research sponsored by the DOE Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program, have been declared unclassified and have been approved for commercial production.

Bischoff, B.L.; Judkins, R.R.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

Development of Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to improve the method of fabricating tubular metal supported microporous inorganic membranes. Earlier work focused on the original development of inorganic membranes for the purification of hydrogen. These membranes are now being scaled up for demonstration in a coal gasification plant for the separation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas for a project funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's Gasification and Coal Fuels programs [1]. This project is part of FutureGen, an initiative to build the world's first integrated sequestration and hydrogen production research power plant. Although previous work in the Advanced Research Materials Program project led to development of a tubular metal supported microporous membrane which was approved by the Department of Energy for testing, the membranes generally have lower than desired selectivities for hydrogen over other gases common in synthesis gas including carbon dioxide. The work on this project over three years will lead to general improvements in fabrication techniques that will result in membranes having higher separation factors and higher fluxes. Scanning electron microscopy and profilometry data will be presented to show qualitatively and quantitatively the surface roughness of the support tubes. We will discuss how the roughness affects membrane quality and methods to improve the quality of the support tube surface.

Bischoff, Brian L [ORNL; Adcock, Kenneth Dale [ORNL; Powell, Lawrence E [ORNL; Sutton, Theodore G [ORNL; Miller, Curtis Jack [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Influence of technological factors on statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the ammonia process  

SciTech Connect

The basic technological factors that determine the effectiveness of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the cyclic ammonia process are the initial H/sub 2/S content of the gas, the degree of purification, the absorption temperature and the NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/ contents of the absorbent solution. The effects of these factors on the statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption are studied. The investigation is based on the phase-equilibrium distributions of components in the absorption-desorption gas-cleaning cycle. The mathematical model is presented which includes the solution of a system of chemical equilibrium equations for reactions in the solution, material balances, and electrical neutrality. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

Nazarov, V.G.; Kamennykh, B.M.; Rus'yanov, N.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Microporous Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Purification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microporous Microporous Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Purification Brian L. Bischoff, Roddie R. Judkins, and Timothy R. Armstrong Oak Ridge National Laboratory Presented at: DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies Arlington, Virginia September 8, 2004 2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen Separation Membranes * Non-Porous - Palladium based films - Ion transport membranes * Porous - Ordered microporous membranes (IUPAC Recommendations 2001), e.g. zeolite membranes - Microporous membranes 3 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Microporous Membranes * IUPAC defines micropores as pores smaller than 2nm in diameter * Generally a microporous membrane is made by applying 1 to 3 thin layers to a porous support * Porous support can be ceramic or metallic

113

Development of inorganic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen for commercial coal liquefaction processes may be provided by a coal gasification plant operated to maximize hydrogen production. Hydrogen is a major chemical requirement for coal liquefaction, and the use of liquefaction by-products such as mineral ash residue as feed to the gasifier can improve the overall process efficiency and economics. Also, recovery of hydrogen from gaseous streams in the coal liquefaction plant can have a significant impact on coal liquefaction process economics. In these hydrogen production scenarios, there is a need to improve the quality of the hydrogen produced by separating the other impurity gases from it. The DOE-Fossil Energy AR TD Materials Program is presently developing inorganic membranes for gas separation, including the recovery of valuable resources such as hydrogen from hot-gas streams. A summary of efforts to produce alumina membranes with mean pore radii <5 {angstrom} is presented as well as a status report on declassification of this important technology. 2 refs., 7 figs.

Egan, B.Z.; Fain, D.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers relative to job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking  

SciTech Connect

1-Hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) is a biomarker of recent exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We investigated whether urinary 1-OHP concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers (COWs) are modulated by job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking. The present cross-sectional study measured urinary 1-OHP concentrations in 197 COWs from Coking plant I and 250 COWs from Coking plant II, as well as 220 unexposed referents from Control plant I and 56 referents from Control plant II. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations (geometric mean, {mu}mol/mol creatinine) were 5.18 and 4.21 in workers from Coking plants I and II, respectively. The highest 1-OHP levels in urine were found among topside workers including lidmen, tar chasers, and whistlers. Benchmen had higher 1-OHP levels than other workers at the sideoven. Above 75% of the COWs exceeded the recommended occupational exposure limit of 2.3 {mu}mol/mol creatinine. Respirator usage and increased body mass index (BMI) slightly reduced 1-OHP levels in COWs. Cigarette smoking significantly increased urinary 1-OHP levels in unexposed referents but had no effect in COWs. Chinese COWs, especially topside workers and benchmen, are exposed to high levels of PAHs. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations appear to be modulated by respirator usage and BMI in COWs, as well as by smoking in unexposed referents.

Bo Chen; Yunping Hu; Lixing Zheng; Qiangyi Wang; Yuanfen Zhou; Taiyi Jin [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). School of Public Health

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Polyelectrolyte multilayers as nanostructured templates for inorganic synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin film nanocomposites consisting of inorganic matter embedded within a soft polymeric matrix on the nanometer length scale are an important class of materials with potential application in optoelectronics and photonics, ...

Wang, Tom Chih-Hung, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Argonne CNM News: Graphene Decoupling of Organic/Inorganic Interfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphene Decoupling of OrganicInorganic Interfaces C60 monolayer STM three-dimensional rendered image of a C60 self-assembled monolayer at a domain boundary of graphene and bare...

117

Argonne CNM Highlight: Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructures Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructures Lee Makowski A number of potential methods might be useful in guiding the assembly of inorganic nanostructures. A key objective in this effort is the ability to specify the exact locations of different nanoparticles within a nanostructure, a capability that will be critical in designing and producing future nanodevices. Nanoparticles One technique discussed involves the possibility of using proteins to create a framework on which nanoparticles could then be attached at specified points. Some type of chemical processing could then be used to remove the organics after assembly. Attaching the inorganic particles to a protein framework might be accomplished using binding sites identified via "phage display" techniques where phage-displaying proteins with randomized surfaces are selected for an affinity to a desired inorganic material. The advantages of this method include the ability to isolate a single binding phage and then grow large quantities of it for characterization. A particularly advantageous type of protein for these constructs are diabodies, constructed from fragments of antibodies. These can incorporate binding sites identified through phage display and then be used to attach inorganic materials at preselected places on the protein framework.

118

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

119

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CHEMILUMINESCENT CHEMI-IONIZATION: Ar* + Ca AND THE CaAr+ EMISSION SPECTRUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oven which was radiatively heated to temperatures as high as 1000°C by tantalum sheet heatingother, resistively heating both. inner sheet. The oven was

Hartman, Dennis C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Oven | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Solar PV Sec. Chu Online Town Hall Energy 101: Cool Roofs Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps Why Cool Roofs? Chu at COP-16: Building a Sustainable Energy Future...

123

Oven | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix Investing in Clean, Safe Nuclear Energy Secretary Chu Speaks at the 2010...

124

Oven | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Transforming the American Economy Through Innovation Linac Coherent Light Source Overview Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power...

125

Oven | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pledge? Conversation on the Future of the Wind Industry Science Lecture: Talking the Higgs Boson with Dr. Joseph Incandela Bill Gates and Deputy Secretary Poneman Discuss the...

126

Oven | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of Biofuels The Climate Challenge... and What's at Stake Sec. Chu Announces the First Auto Loans for Advanced Technologies...

127

Oven | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security & Safety -Emergency Response & Procedures or Search Energy.gov Search Clear Filters All Videos ARPA-E 2011 Keynote: Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy Electrofuels:...

128

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of each oven temperature setting (initial heating to 350°F towels.  Ovens were additionally cleaned by heating to  the with the heating cycle used to precondition each oven prior 

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors for production of coal products -- patent fuel, cokeoven coke,coke oven gas, blast furnace gas and briquettes (BKB) --

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mouse skin tumor initiation-promotion and complete carcinogenesis bioassays: mechanisms and biological activities of emission samples. Environ. Health Perspect. 47  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil shale soot, and gasoline vehicle exhaust materials have been examined by this method. The studies reported here have been constructed to compare the carcinogenic and tumorigenic potency of extracts from various particulate emissions: coke ovens, diesel and gasoline vehicles and a roofing tar pot. Automobile emission samples were obtained by collecting the diluted and cooled exhaust on Teflon-coated glass fiber filters. Coke oven and roofing tar samples were particulate emission samples collected by impaction and filtration. The organic components associated with each of the particles were extracted with dichloromethane and dermally applied to SENCAR mice. All agents were applied as tumor initiators by using a five-dose protocol. Selected extracts were also applied as complete carcinogens and as tumor promotors. Statistical analyses of the resulting tumor data were performed by using nonlinear Poisson and probit models. The results from these experiments provide a suitable data base for comparative potency estimation of complex mixtures.

S. Nesnow; L. L. Triplettt; T. J. Slagat

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Photosynthesis and coccolith formation: Inorganic carbon sources and net inorganic reaction of deposition, Limnol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept that the formation ofCnC0, coccoliths functions as a photosynthetic adaptation for the use of bicarbonate is evaluated in the coccolithophorids Coccoliths hudeyi and Cricosphneru carterae by two new methods. In the first, carbon fixation is measured at 10-s intervals in the first 2 min after addition of “CO, and II’“CO,- to buffered cultures; this method exploits the relatively long half-time for the hydration or dehydration of dissolved COP. In the second, shifts in pH and alkalinity resulting from carbon fixation by cells growing in liqllid culture are assessed to indicate fluxes of COz and HC03- into cells and these values compared to measurements of l”C incorporation in photosynthesis and carbonate deposition. The data are interpreted in terms of one of several net inorganic reactions of deposition considered. In this reaction, CO, is the substrate of photosynthesis and HCO,- is the form of carbon supplied to the calcification site. CO, resulting from carbonate deposition supplements the COz from the medium that diffuses into cells as a source of carbon for photosynthesis. The relationship between photosynthesis and calcification has received considerable attention (see Darlcy 1974; Borowitzka and Larkum 1976; Pentecost 1978). Although calcification is clearly stimulated by light, a direct link to photosynthesis has been difficult to establish. An early hypothesis held that both processes depended on a common supply of IICO13- from the medium (Lewin 1962):

C. Stewn Sikes; Robert D. Row; Karl M. Wilbur

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Thermal/chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Specific objectives of this program are to (1) quantify the extent of the degradation process for the three most detrimental mechanisms by performing laboratory-scale experiments, and (2) develop a predictive model for membrane degradation under operating conditions. At present, no inorganic membranes are commercially available for application in the high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas environments encountered in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC), and direct coal fired turbine (DCFT) applications. Most of the inorganic membrane development efforts have focused on hydrogen separation membranes which may be used in an IGCC system for maximizing hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition of these contaminants. The candidate inorganic membranes may be grouped as follows: dense metallic membranes; silica based membranes; alumina based membranes; and carbon based membranes. Results are reported for membrane characterization done so far.

Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Damle, A.S.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Integration of the SAPRC Chemical Mechanism in the SMOKE Emissions Processor for the CMAQ/Models- 3 Airshed Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Processes; Primary Metal Production; By-product Coke Manufacturing; OvenIndustrial Processes; Primary Metal Production; By-product Coke Manufacturing; Oven

Adelman, Z; Vukovich, J; Carter, W P L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Inorganic lead (Pb)- and mercury (Hg)-induced neuronal cell death involves cytoskeletal reorganization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inorganic lead and mercury are widely spread xenobiotic neurotoxicants threatening public health. The exposure to inorganic lead and mercury results in adverse effects of poisoning including IQ deficit and peripheral neuropathy. Additionally, inorganic neurotoxicants have even more serious impact on earlier stages of embryonic development. This study was therefore initiated in order to determine the cytotoxic effects of lead and mercury in earlier developmental stages of chick embryo. Administration of inorganic lead and mercury into the chick embryo resulted in the prolonged accumulation of inorganics in the neonatal brain, with detrimental cytotoxicity on neuronal cells. Subsequent studies demonstrated that exposure of chick embryo to inorganic lead and mercury resulted in the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins in the neonatal brain. These results therefore suggest that inorganics-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization of the structural proteins, resulting in neurocytotoxicity, is one of the underlying mechanisms by which inorganics transfer deleterious effects on central nervous system.

Woo-sung Choi; Su-jin Kim; Jin Suk Kim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this thesis is the design and development of a system for rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating. The Rapid Extraction of Dissolved Inorganic ...

Gospodinova, Kalina Doneva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 3, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This project combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE is providing cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. This report is the third quarterly status report of the EMP. It covers the Environmental Monitoring Plan activities for the full year of 1991 from January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991, including the forth quarter. See Sections 2, 3 and 4 for status reports of the Project Installation and Commissioning, the Environmental Monitoring activities and the Compliance Monitoring results for the period. Section 5 contains a list of Compliance Reports submitted to regulatory agencies during the period. The EMP describes in detail the environmental monitoring activities to be performed during the project execution. The purpose of the EMP is to: (1) document the extent of compliance of monitoring activities, i.e. those monitoring required to meet permit requirements, (2) confirm the specific impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act documentation, and (3) establish an information base for the assessment of the environmental performance of the technology demonstrated by the project.

Not Available

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

7th International Symposium on Inorganic Phosphate Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISIPM7 Home ISIPM7 Home About ISIPM7 Conference Brochure Organizers Scientific Committee Proceedings Sponsors Speakers Exhibitors Program Call for Abstracts & Posters Registration Hotels Maps Bus Schedule Contact Us isipm7 header About the Conference It is a great pleasure for the organizing committee of the 7th International Symposium on Inorganic Phosphate Materials (ISIPM7) to invite all who are interested in the design and development of inorganic phosphate materials with applications in various domains of modern technology including energy storage, biomaterials, storage of waste, catalysis, and optics. Read more » Dates to Remember July 18 - Abstracts due (new) July 18 - Registration opens July 25 - Paper and poster acceptance (new) October 17 - Final registration and payment due

138

Identifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomateirals for Hybrid Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a newly developed photovoltaic technology, organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells have attracted great interest because of the combined advantages from both components. An ideal inorganic acceptor should have a band gap of about 1.5 eV and energy levels of frontier orbitals matching those of the organic polymer in hybrid solar cells. Hybrid density functional calculations are performed to search for optimal inorganic nanomaterials for hybrid solar sells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Our results demonstrate that InSb quantum dots or quantum wires can have a band gap of about 1.5 eV and highest occupied molecular orbital level about 0.4 eV lower than P3HT, indicating that they are good candidates for use in hybrid solar cells. In addition, we predict that chalcopyrite MgSnSb{sub 2} quantum wire could be a low-cost material for realizing high-efficiency hybrid solar cells.

Xiang, H.; Wei, S. H.; Gong, X. G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Study of nonproportionality in the light yield of inorganic scintillators  

SciTech Connect

Using a phenomenological approach, the light yield is derived for inorganic scintillators as a function of the rates of linear, bimolecular, and Auger processes occurring in the electron track initiated by an x ray or a {gamma}-ray photon. A relation between the track length and incident energy is also derived. It is found that the nonproportionality in the light yield can be eliminated if either nonlinear processes of interaction among the excited electrons, holes, and excitons can be eliminated from occurring or the high density situation can be relieved by diffusion of carriers from the track at a faster rate than the rate of activation of nonlinear processes. The influence of the track length and radius on the yield nonproportionality is discussed in view of the known experimental results. Inventing new inorganic scintillating materials with high carrier mobility can lead to a class of proportional inorganic scintillators. Results agree qualitatively with experimental results for the dependence of light yield on the incident energy.

Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory 0909 (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Adv. Low-NOx Burner Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Fine Particulate Emissions using Subcritical Water Characterization of Fine Particulate Emissions using Subcritical Water As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. One of the primary activities of this effort is the development of a procedure using subcritical water to fractionate organics in air particulates, and test the toxicity of the fractionated organics using various tests. In contrast to inorganic aerosols, which are often well characterized, only ca. 15%–50% of the organic carbonaceous (OC) particulate mass has been characterized. The characterized compounds are almost exclusively nonpolar. The limited knowledge on OC fractions is due to the use of organic solvents which are able to extract only nonpolar or slightly polar organics. Subcritical water has not previously been used to fractionate OC from air particulates, but should have the ability to extract a broad range of polar to low-polarity OC, as well as to provide extracts in a solvent (water) which is directly useful for biological tests. Earlier studies have shown that compounds of different polarities, such as phenols, PAHs, and alkanes, can be sequentially extracted from a petroleum waste sludge by increases in subcritical water temperature.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

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Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...

142

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mozambique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mozambique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mozambique image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mozambique...

143

CO2 Emissions - Macau  

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Far East Macau CO2 Emissions from Macau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macau...

144

CO2 Emissions - Guadeloupe  

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Guadeloupe Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guadeloupe...

145

CO2 Emissions - Ghana  

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Africa Ghana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Ghana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ghana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ghana...

146

CO2 Emissions - Ireland  

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Ireland CO2 Emissions from Ireland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ireland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ireland...

147

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

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Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

148

CO2 Emissions - Kyrgyzstan  

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Centrally Planned Europe Kyrgyzstan CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kyrgyzstan...

149

CO2 Emissions - Mali  

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Africa Mali Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mali Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mali image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mali...

150

CO2 Emissions - Portugal  

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Western Europe Portugal CO2 Emissions from Portugal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Portugal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Portugal...

151

CO2 Emissions - Paraguay  

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Paraguay Graphics CO2 Emissions from Paraguay Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Paraguay image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Paraguay...

152

CO2 Emissions - Macedonia  

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Western Europe Macedonia CO2 Emissions from Macedonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macedonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macedonia...

153

CO2 Emissions - Malawi  

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Malawi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Malawi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malawi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malawi...

154

CO2 Emissions - Gabon  

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Africa Gabon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gabon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gabon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gabon...

155

CO2 Emissions - Grenada  

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Grenada Graphics CO2 Emissions from Grenada Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Grenada image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Grenada...

156

CO2 Emissions - Kiribati  

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Oceania Kiribati Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kiribati Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kiribati image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kiribati...

157

CO2 Emissions - Israel  

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Israel Graphics CO2 Emissions from Israel Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Israel image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Israel...

158

CO2 Emissions - Phillippines  

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Far East Phillippines CO2 Emissions from Phillippines Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Phillippines image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Phillippines...

159

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

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Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

160

CO2 Emissions - Mauritius  

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Africa Mauritius Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritius Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritius image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritius...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CO2 Emissions - Malaysia  

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Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malaysia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malaysia...

162

CO2 Emissions - Reunion  

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Reunion Graphics CO2 Emissions from Reunion Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Reunion image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Reunion...

163

CO2 Emissions - Guatemala  

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Guatemala Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guatemala Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guatemala image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guatemala...

164

CO2 Emissions - Iceland  

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Iceland CO2 Emissions from Iceland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iceland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iceland...

165

CO2 Emissions - Mongolia  

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Asia Mongolia CO2 Emissions from Mongolia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mongolia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mongolia...

166

CO2 Emissions - Romania  

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Centrally Planned Europe Romania CO2 Emissions from Romania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Romania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Romania...

167

CO2 Emissions - Panama  

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Panama Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Panama...

168

CO2 Emissions - Madagascar  

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Madagascar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Madagascar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Madagascar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Madagascar...

169

CO2 Emissions - Netherlands  

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Netherlands CO2 Emissions from Netherlands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherlands image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Netherlands...

170

CO2 Emissions - Greenland  

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Greenland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Greenland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greenland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greenland...

171

CO2 Emissions - Norway  

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Norway CO2 Emissions from Norway Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Norway image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Norway...

172

CO2 Emissions - Guyana  

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173

CO2 Emissions - Mauritania  

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Africa Mauritania Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritania...

174

CO2 Emissions - Lithuania  

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Centrally Planned Europe Lithuania CO2 Emissions from Lithuania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lithuania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lithuania...

175

CO2 Emissions - Kenya  

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Africa Kenya Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kenya Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kenya image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kenya...

176

CO2 Emissions - Latvia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Latvia CO2 Emissions from Latvia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Latvia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Latvia...

177

CO2 Emissions - Georgia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Georgia CO2 Emissions from Georgia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Georgia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Georgia...

178

CO2 Emissions - Gambia  

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Gambia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gambia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gambia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gambia...

179

CO2 Emissions - Montenegro  

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Centrally Planned Europe Montenegro CO2 Emissions from Montenegro Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montenegro image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Montenegro...

180

CO2 Emissions - Oman  

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Middle East Oman Graphics CO2 Emissions from Oman Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Oman image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Oman...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait  

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Middle East Kuwait Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kuwait Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kuwait image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kuwait...

182

CO2 Emissions - Lebanon  

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Middle East Lebanon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Lebanon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lebanon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lebanon...

183

CO2 Emissions - Nigeria  

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Africa Nigeria Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nigeria Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nigeria image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nigeria...

184

CO2 Emissions - Maldives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Maldives CO2 Emissions from Maldives Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Maldives image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Maldives...

185

CO2 Emissions - Morocco  

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Morocco Graphics CO2 Emissions from Morocco Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Morocco image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Morocco...

186

CO2 Emissions - Pakistan  

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Far East Pakistan CO2 Emissions from Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Pakistan...

187

CO2 Emissions - Palau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Palau CO2 Emissions from Palau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Palau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Palau...

188

CO2 Emissions - Qatar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Qatar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Qatar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Qatar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Qatar...

189

CO2 Emissions - Guam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Guam Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guam image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guam...

190

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Rwanda Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda...

191

CO2 Emissions - Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea...

192

CO2 Emissions - Luxembourg  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Luxembourg CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Luxembourg...

193

CO2 Emissions - Liberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Liberia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Liberia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Liberia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Liberia...

194

CO2 Emissions - Haiti  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Haiti Graphics CO2 Emissions from Haiti Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Haiti image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Haiti...

195

CO2 Emissions - Iraq  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iraq Graphics CO2 Emissions from Iraq Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iraq image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iraq...

196

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

197

CO2 Emissions - Nepal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Nepal CO2 Emissions from Nepal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nepal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nepal...

198

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

199

CO2 Emissions - Myanmar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Myanmar CO2 Emissions from Myanmar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Myanmar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Myanmar...

200

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January – December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

CO2 Emissions - Greece  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Greece CO2 Emissions from Greece Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greece image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greece...

203

Glossary Term - Neutron Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Previous Term (Neutron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Niobe) Niobe Neutron Emission After neutron emission, an atom contains one less neutron. Neutron emission is one...

204

Glossary Term - Proton Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Previous Term (Proton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Quark) Quark Proton Emission After proton emission, an atom contains one less proton. Proton emission is one process...

205

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

206

Numerical Modelling of Light Emission and Propagation in (Organic) LEDs with the Green's Tensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light emitting diodes, light emission, light extraction, dipole radiation, stratified media, layered surpasses incandescent sources by a factor of 2 and with further improvements light emitting diodes could on light extraction techniques from inorganic light emitting diodes we recommend chapter 5 in 1 . Organic

Floreano, Dario

207

Process for separating, especially in multiple stages, acid components such as CO/sub 2/, HCN and specifically H/sub 2/S, from gases, especially from coke oven gases, by means of ammonia recirculation scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

A process of separating in multiple stages acid components in coke oven gas such as CO/sub 2/, HCN and particularly H/sub 2/S by ammonia scrubbing wherein the ammonia used in scrubbing is deacidified to remove the acid components and is recirculated to the scrubbing process at least in part as substantially pure liquid ammonia.

Bauer, H.K.; Otte, E.A.W.

1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

208

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

209

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organic aerosol (SOA), airborne soil, other SOA, diesel emissions, secondary sulfate, wood combustion, gasoline vehicle, and secondary nitrate contributing 6.9%, 12.8%, 3.7%,...

210

Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Brosseau, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Solid state radioluminescent sources: Mixed organic/inorganic hybrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This concept brings a condensed source of tritium into close proximity with an inorganic phosphor. That source may thus become the equivalent of many atmospheres of tritium gas pressure. If both phosphor and tritium source material are optically clear, then a lamp's brightness may be made to scale with optical path length. Proof of principle of this concept has been demonstrated and will be described. A theoretical treatment is presented for the results here and for results from aerogel experiments. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Gill, J.T. (EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (USA)); Renschler, C.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Shepodd, T.J. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Smith, H.M. (Allied-Signal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Coal liquefaction in an inorganic-organic medium  

SciTech Connect

Improved process for liquefaction of coal by contacting pulverized coal in an inorganic-organic medium solvent system containing a ZnCl.sub.2 catalyst, a polar solvent with the structure RX where X is one of the elements O, N, S or P, and R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon radical; the solvent system can contain a hydrogen donor solvent (and must when RX is water) which is immiscible in the ZnCl.sub.2 and is a hydroaromatic hydrocarbon, selected from tetralin, dihydrophenanthrene, dihydroanthracene or a hydrogenated coal derived hydroaromatic hydrocarbon distillate fraction.

Vermeulen, Theodore (Berkeley, CA); Grens, II, Edward A. (Danville, CA); Holten, Ronald R. (El Cerrito, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

Thorn, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

214

Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process. 4 figs.

Schweighardt, F.K.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

215

Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Carbons for battery anodes prepared using inorganic templates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unique carbons with demonstrated utility as anodes for lithium secondary batteries have been prepared by heating hydrocarbons within an inorganic template. Disordered carbons with novel and desirable molecular porosity were synthesized by the pyrolysis of pyrene at 700 C within a pillared clay. The clay was removed by treatment with acid, leaving behind carbons with 15 to 50 {angstrom} holes. These holey carbons, when converted into electrodes, allow rapid diffusion of the lithium into and out of a carbon. Favorable results have been obtained in several tests, for example, a reversible capacity of 825 mAh/g has been achieved, about four times greater than commercial batteries using convention pyrolytic carbon.

Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.; Sandi, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Argonne CNM News: New inorganic semiconductor layers hold promise for solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New inorganic semiconductor layers hold promise for solar energy New inorganic semiconductor layers hold promise for solar energy Inorganic surface ligands Inorganic surface ligands enable facile electron transport between quantum dots and opened novel opportunities for using nanostructures in solar cells. Inorganic dot array Arrays of quantum dots allow fabrication of solar cells by printing and other inexpensive techniques. A team of users from the University of Chicago, working with the NanoBio Interfaces Group, has demonstrated a method that could produce cheaper semiconductor layers for solar cells. The inorganic nanocrystal arrays, created by spraying a new type of colloidal "ink," have excellent electron mobility and could be a step toward addressing fundamental problems with current solar technology.

218

Environmental Legislation 1.0 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, inorganic arsenic, and coke oven emissions. This was a fraction of the total, and EPA's inability to list.obtaining additional allowances; 3.installing "scrubbers" (Flue gas desulfurization is a post combustion in the form of acid rain. About 66% produced by coal-fired power plants (natural gas combustion emits no SO2

McCalley, James D.

219

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 3, Inorganic instrumental methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methods cover: C in solutions, F (electrode), elements by atomic emission spectrometry, inorganic anions by ion chromatography, Hg in water/solids/sludges, As, Se, Bi, Pb, data calculations for SST (single shell tank?) samples, Sb, Tl, Ag, Pu, O/M ratio, ignition weight loss, pH value, ammonia (N), Cr(VI), alkalinity, U, C sepn. from soil/sediment/sludge, Pu purif., total N, water, C and S, surface Cl/F, leachable Cl/F, outgassing of Ge detector dewars, gas mixing, gas isotopic analysis, XRF of metals/alloys/compounds, H in Zircaloy, H/O in metals, inpurity extraction, reduced/total Fe in glass, free acid in U/Pu solns, density of solns, Kr/Xe isotopes in FFTF cover gas, H by combustion, MS of Li and Cs isotopes, MS of lanthanide isotopes, GC operation, total Na on filters, XRF spectroscopy QC, multichannel analyzer operation, total cyanide in water/solid/sludge, free cyanide in water/leachate, hydrazine conc., ICP-MS, {sup 99}Tc, U conc./isotopes, microprobe analysis of solids, gas analysis, total cyanide, H/N{sub 2}O in air, and pH in soil.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Study on Heteropolyacids/Ti/Zr Mixed in the Inorganic Composites ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells. Presentation Title, Study on Heteropolyacids/Ti/Zr Mixed in the Inorganic Composites for Fuel Cell Electrolytes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for some fuels, such as coke oven gas and other gas, NBSby Fuel Fuel Type Raw Coal Cleaned Coal Washed Coal CokeCoke Oven Gas Other Gas Other Coking Products Crude Oil

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

223

Inorganic nanotubes and electro-fluidic devices fabricated therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanofluidic devices incorporating inorganic nanotubes fluidly coupled to channels or nanopores for supplying a fluid containing chemical or bio-chemical species are described. In one aspect, two channels are fluidly interconnected with a nanotube. Electrodes on opposing sides of the nanotube establish electrical contact with the fluid therein. A bias current is passed between the electrodes through the fluid, and current changes are detected to ascertain the passage of select molecules, such as DNA, through the nanotube. In another aspect, a gate electrode is located proximal the nanotube between the two electrodes thus forming a nanofluidic transistor. The voltage applied to the gate controls the passage of ionic species through the nanotube selected as either or both ionic polarities. In either of these aspects the nanotube can be modified, or functionalized, to control the selectivity of detection or passage.

Yang, Peidong (Kensington, CA); Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Fan, Rong (Pasadena, CA); Karnik, Rohit (Cambridge, MA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Photocurable Inorganic-Organic Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are two primary objectives of this dissertation research. The first objective was to prepare a library of inorganic-organic hydrogels from methacrylated star polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSstar-MA) and diacrylated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-DA) with tunable chemical and physical properties for use as tissue engineering scaffolds. These inorganic-organic hydrogels provide a useful platform to study the effect of scaffold properties on cell behavior in tissue culture. Twenty compositionally unique hydrogels were prepared by photo-crosslinking varing molecular weights (Mn) of PEO-DA (Mn = 3.4k and 6k g/mol) and PDMSstar-MA (Mn = 1.8k, 5k and 7k g/mol) at varying weight ratios (up to 20 wt% PDMSstar-MA). Introduction of PDMSstar-MA caused formation of discrete PDMS-enriched "microparticles" dispersed within the PEO hydrogel matrix. The swelling ratio, mechanical properties in tension and compression, non-specific protein adhesion and cytotoxicity of hydrogels were studied. The second objective was to prepare thermoresponsive nanocomposite hydrogels, which are mechanically robust and can remove adhered cells via thermal modulation. Such hydrogels may be useful as "self-cleaning" membranes for implanted biosensors to extend their lifetime and efficiency. These hydrogels are comprised of a poly(Nisopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogel matrix and polysiloxane colloidal nanoparticles (~220 nm and 50 nm ave. diameter). Due to the low preparation temperature, the nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited a homogeneous morphology by SEM analysis. The volume phase transition temperature (VPTT, ~33 degrees C) of the nanocomposite hydrogels was not altered versus the pure PNIPAAm hydrogel, which is near body temperature. Generally, nanoparticles led to improve mechanical properties versus pure PNIPAAm hydrogels. When these nanocomposite hydrogels are heated above the VPTT, they become more hydrophobic. When they are reversibly switched from a water-swollen to a deswollen state, the change in surface properties, as well as swelling-deswelling, was effective upon the removal of adhered cells.

Hou, Yaping

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology to Hydrogen-hydrocarbon Separations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separation efficiency for hydrogen/light hydrocarbon mixtures was examined for three inorganic membranes. Five binary gas mixtures were used in this study: H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} , H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, H{sub 2}/C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, He/CO{sub 2}, and He/Ar. The membranes examined were produced during a development program at the Inorganic Membrane Technology Laboratory in Oak Ridge and provided to us for this testing. One membrane was a (relatively) large-pore-diameter Knudsen membrane, and the other two had much smaller pore sizes. Observed separation efficiencies were generally lower than Knudsen separation but, for the small-pore membranes, were strongly dependent on temperature, pressure, and gas mixture, with the most condensable gases showing the strongest effect. This finding suggests that the separation is strongly influenced by surface effects (i.e., adsorption and diffusion), which enhance the transport of the heavier and more adsorption-prone component and may also physically impede flow of the other component. In one series of experiments, separation reversal was observed (the heavier component preferentially separating to the low-pressure side of the membrane). Trends showing increased separation factors at higher temperatures as well as observations of some separation efficiencies in excess of that expected for Knudsen flow suggest that at higher temperatures, molecular screening effects were observed. For most of the experiments, surface effects were stronger and thus apparently overshadow molecular sieving effects.

Trowbridge, L.D.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

229

CO2 Emissions - Bolivia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Bolivia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Bolivia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Bolivia image Per capita CO2 Emission...

230

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

231

CO2 Emissions - Peru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Peru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Peru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

232

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

233

Hydrogen Selective Inorganic membranes for Gas Separations under High Pressure Intermediate Temperature Hydrocarbonic Envrionment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project, we have successfully developed a full scale commercially ready carbon molecular sieve (CMS) based membrane for applications in H{sub 2} recovery from refinery waste and other aggressive gas streams. Field tests at a refinery pilot plant and a coal gasification facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to recovery hydrogen from hydrotreating and raw syngas respectively. High purity H{sub 2} and excellent stability of the membrane permeance and selectivity were obtained in testing conducted over >500 hours at each site. The results from these field tests as well as laboratory testing conclude that the membranes can be operated at high pressures (up to 1,000 psig) and temperatures (up to 300 C) in presence of aggressive contaminants, such as sulfur and nitrogen containing species (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, etc), condensable hydrocarbons, tar-like species, heavy metals, etc. with no observable effect on membrane performance. By comparison, similar operating conditions and/or environments would rapidly destroy competing membranes, such as polymeric, palladium, zeolitic, etc. Significant cost savings can be achieved through recovering H{sub 2} from refinery waste gas using this newly developed CMS membrane. Annual savings of $2 to 4MM/year (per 20,000 scfd of waste gas) can be realized by recovering the H{sub 2} for reuse (versus fuel). Projecting these values over the entire US market, potential H{sub 2} savings from refinery waste gases on the order of 750 to 1,000MM scfd and $750 to $1,000MM per year are possible. In addition to the cost savings, potential energy savings are projected to be ca. 150 to 220 tBTU/yr and CO{sub 2} gas emission reductions are projected to be ca. 5,000 to 6,500MMtons/year. The full scale membrane bundle developed as part of this project, i.e., 85 x 30 inch ceramic membrane tubes packaged into a full ceramic potting, is an important accomplishment. No comparable commercial scale product exists in the inorganic membrane field. Further, this newly developed full scale bundle concept can be extended to other thin film inorganic membrane technology (Pd, zeolite, etc), providing a potential commercialization pathway for these membrane materials that demonstrate high potential in a variety of separation applications yet remain a laboratory 'novelty' for lack of a full scale support. Overall, the project has been highly successful and all of the project objectives have been met. We have developed the first of its kind commercial scale carbon molecular sieve membrane and demonstrated its performance in field testing under aggressive operating conditions and in the presence of chemical contaminants that would rapidly destroy alternative organic and inorganic membranes. This innovative membrane permits H{sub 2} recovery from gas streams that up until now have not been successfully treated with membrane or conventional technology. Our end user participant is currently pursuing the field demonstration of this membrane for hydrogen recovery at its refinery site.

Rich Ciora; Paul KT Liu

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Trends Online Methane Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Introduction Annual Estimates of Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions: 1860-1994 - D.I. Stern and R.K. Kaufmann Contents-Trends | CDIAC Home 102001...

235

CO2 Emissions - Montserrat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Montserrat Graphics CO2 Emissions from Montserrat Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montserrat image Per capita CO2...

236

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

237

CO2 Emissions - Honduras  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Honduras Graphics CO2 Emissions from Honduras Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Honduras image Per capita CO2...

238

CO2 Emissions - Nicaragua  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Nicaragua Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua image Per capita CO2...

239

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

240

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controlling NOx emissions from lean engines is challenging. Traditionally, for the stoichiometric gasoline engine vehicles that dominate the U.S. passenger car market, a three-way...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PHOTOELECTROCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOCATALYSIS IN NANOSCALE INORGANIC CHEMICAL SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the use of solid state materials as organizing media for, and as active components of, artificial photosynthetic systems. In this work we strive to understand how photoinduced electron and energy transfer reactions occur in the solid state, and to elucidate design principles for using nanoscale inorganic materials in photochemical energy conversion schemes. A unifying theme in this project has been to move beyond the study of simple transient charge separation to integrated chemical systems that can effect permanent charge separation in the form of energy-rich chemicals. This project explored the use of zeolites as organizing media for electron donor-acceptor systems and artificial photosynthetic assemblies. Layer-by-layer synthetic methods were developed using lamellar semiconductors, and multi-step, visible light driven energy/electron transfer cascades were studied by transient specroscopic techniques. By combining molecular photosensitizers with lamellar semiconductors and intercalated catalyst particles, the first non-sacrificial systems for visible light driven hydrogen evolution were developed and studied. Oxygen evolving catalyst particles and semiconductor nanowires were also studied with the goal of achieving photocatalytic water splitting using visible light.

Thomas E. Mallouk

2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

242

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

243

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

244

Assembly and detection of viruses and biological molecules on inorganic surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is composed of three distinct, albeit related, projects. Each project is an exploration of the ways in which interactions between inorganic surfaces and biological molecules can be advantageously exploited. The ...

Sinensky, Asher Keeling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

First principles study of structure and lithium storage in inorganic nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exact structure of layered inorganic nanotubes is difficult to determine, but this information is vital to using atomistic calculations to predict nanotube properties. A multi-walled nanotube with a circular cross ...

Tibbetts, Kevin (Kevin Joseph)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Formation of semivolatile inorganic aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most challenging tasks for chemical transport models (CTMs) is the prediction of the formation and partitioning of the major semi-volatile inorganic aerosol components (nitrate, chloride, ammonium) between the ...

Karydis, V. A.

247

Diffusion of inorganic chemical wastes in compacted clay  

SciTech Connect

The factors that were investigated included the water content/dry unit weight, the method of compaction, the mineralogy of the soil, and the concentration of the ions. The effective diffusion coefficients (D{asterisk}) of three anions (Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, and I{sup {minus}}) and three cations (K{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+}) in a simulated waste leachate were measured. Two clay soils (kaolinite and Lufkin clay) and a sand were used in the study. The clay samples were compacted and pre-soaked to minimize hydraulic gradients due to negative pore pressures. Mass balance calculations were performed to indicate possible sinks/sources in the diffusion system. The results of the diffusion tests were analyzed using two analytical solutions to Fick's second law and a commercially available semi-analytical solution. The D{asterisk} values for tests using high-concentration (0.04 N) leachate generally fell in the narrow range of about 4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s, and were relatively insensitive to compaction water content/dry unit weight and to compaction method. The variability in the results from the tests with low-concentration (0.013 N) leachate precluded any definite conclusions from these tests. The values of D{asterisk} measured in this study were compared to values from previous studies, and the D{asterisk} values from this study were found to be slightly conservative (i.e., high). However, the results of the tests may be affected by several chemical and physical factors, and care should be taken to ensure that the soils used in the tests are representative of those used in the application of the test results. Recommendations are made for estimating D{asterisk} values for use in the design of compacted clay barriers for the containment of inorganic chemical wastes.

Shackelford, C.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26-29, 1979 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INLBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INl·. LBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN

Gullberg, G.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

250

Excess Emissions (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

251

CO2 Emissions - Guinea Bissau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guinea Bissau Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea Bissau...

252

CO2 Emissions - Peninsular Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Far East Peninsular Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia image Per...

253

CO2 Emissions - New Caledonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Caledonia Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Caledonia...

254

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

255

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

256

Selective Recovery of Enriched Uranium from Inorganic Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Uranium as U(IV) and U(VI) can be selectively recovered from liquids and sludge containing metal precipitates, inorganic salts, sand and silt fines, debris, other contaminants, and slimes, which are very difficult to de-water. Chemical processes such as fuel manufacturing and uranium mining generate enriched and natural uranium-bearing wastes. This patented Framatome ANP (FANP) uranium recovery process reduces uranium losses, significantly offsets waste disposal costs, produces a solid waste that meets mixed-waste disposal requirements, and does not generate metal-contaminated liquids. At the head end of the process is a floating dredge that retrieves liquids, sludge, and slimes in the form of a slurry directly from the floor of a lined surface impoundment (lagoon). The slurry is transferred to and mixed in a feed tank with a turbine mixer and re-circulated to further break down the particles and enhance dissolution of uranium. This process uses direct steam injection and sodium hypochlorite addition to oxidize and dissolves any U(IV). Cellulose is added as a non-reactive filter aid to help filter slimes by giving body to the slurry. The slurry is pumped into a large recessed-chamber filter press then de-watered by a pressure cycle-controlled double-diaphragm pump. U(VI) captured in the filtrate from this process is then precipitated by conversion to U(IV) in another Framatome ANP-patented process which uses a strong reducing agent to crystallize and settle the U(IV) product. The product is then dewatered in a small filter press. To-date, over 3,000 Kgs of U at 3% U-235 enrichment were recovered from a 8100 m2 hypalon-lined surface impoundment which contained about 10,220 m3 of liquids and about 757 m3 of sludge. A total of 2,175 drums (0.208 m3 or 55 gallon each) of solid mixed-wastes have been packaged, shipped, and disposed. In addition, 9463 m3 of low-U liquids at <0.001 KgU/m3 were also further processed and disposed.

Kimura, R. T.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants by zero valent iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduction of trichloroethylene (TCE), chromium (VI), and 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by zero valent iron and palladized iron under anaerobic conditions was investigated. Reduction experiments of the contaminants were carried out individually and in combination. All three target contaminants were effectively reduced by both iron (Feo) and palladized iron (Pd/Fe'). However, the rate of reduction by Pd/Fe' was found to be much faster than that by Feo. The reduction of all the contaminants in mixed waste was found to be slower than in the individual experiments, but the difference was most significant in the 2,4-DNT reduction. This observation indicates that there may be a possibility of competition for reactive sites among the contaminants and precipitation resulting from CR(VI) reduction may coat iron surfaces, which may ultimately slow the whole zero valent metals (ZVMS) treatment process in remediating mixed waste sites. The 20 mg/L of CR(VI) was reduced below detection limits in 10 hours by Fe' and in 1.5 hours by the same amount of Pd/Fe' in individual experiment. An initial concentration of 20 mg/L of TCE was reduced below detection limits in 72 hours by Pd/Fe' whereas only 62% of TCE was reduced by the same amount of Fe' in 144 hours in individual experiment. The reaction orders of 1.84 and 2.04 for total TCE loss alone and in mixed waste by Fe' indicates that the reaction mechanisms are complex. The reduction of 72 mg/L of 2,4-DNT proceeded to below detection limits within 3 hours by both Fe' and Pd/Feo. The only product observed in the reduction of 2,4-DNT was 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT). The 2,4-DAT produced accounted for 83-100% and only 42-54% of the initial mass of 2@4.DNT under anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. Since no degradation of 2,4-DAT alone occurred, these results indicate the possibility of other intermediates or products formation under aerobic conditions. Overall, the results demonstrated the potential application of ZVMs in reducing mixed wastes containing both inorganic and organic contaminant interactions before implementing a ZVMs treatment system, which may help in designing a proper remedial system.

Malla, Deepak Babu

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY MILLENNIUM INORGANIC CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MILLENNIUM INORGANIC CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE MILLENNIUM INORGANIC CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-04GO14153; W(A)-04-084; CH-1263 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE patent counsel, Millennium Inorganic Chemicals, Inc. (Millennium) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above- identified cooperative agreement by its employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories. Millennium is leading a teaming arrangement including Exxon Mobil Research and Engineering and Sandia National

264

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

265

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

266

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

267

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

268

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

269

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

270

Mercury Emissions Data Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the visual materials included in presentations given at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on April 3, 2002. Participants included representatives from EPRI, DOE, RMB Consulting & Research, and EERC. The MACT Working Group gave a presentation on "Variability in Hg Emissions Based on SCEM Data." The visuals in the report are a set of graphs documenting results of mercury emissions over time, using semi-continuous emissions monitor (SCEM) data. The EPA Utility Working Group gave a ...

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

SF6 Emissions Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emissions Overview Joanna Eckstein and Penny Avery Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned...

273

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

274

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

275

Air stable all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the true AM1.5G solar emission spectrum. Details on solarEQE data with the true AM1.5G solar emission spectrum.

Gur, Ilan; Fromer, Neil A.; Geier, Michael L.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Inorganic and Radiochemical Analysis of AW-101 and AN-107 Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the inorganic and radiochemical analytical results for AW-101 and AN-107 as received materials. The analyses were conducted in support of the BNFL Proposal No. 30406/29274 Task 5.0. The inorganic and radiochemical analysis results obtained from the as received materials are used to provide initial characterization information for subsequent process testing and to provide data to support permit application activities. Quality Assurance (QA) Plan MCS-033 provides the operational and quality control protocols for the analytical activities, and whenever possible, analyses were performed to SW-846 equivalent methods and protocols.

MW Urie; JJ Wagner; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; SK Fiskum; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

277

Comparison of emissions from selected commercial kitchen appliances and food products  

SciTech Connect

Effluents have been measured from various grease-producing cooking processes in an attempt to quantify the emissions that enter typical commercial kitchen exhaust hoods. The appliances tested include gas and electric versions of single-sided griddles, open-vat deep fat fryers, under-fired broilers, full size convection ovens, and six burner ranges. Food products include hamburger, chicken breast, fries, sausage pizza, and a spaghetti meal. Emission data were obtained for particles, grease vapor, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. Velocity and temperature fields were measured in the plume above each appliance. Results show that a large fraction of the grease emission is typically in vapor form. The broilers emit significantly more particles less than 2.5 {micro}m in size (PM 2.5) than the other appliances tested. Combustion by-products were measured for all gas appliances. Both the gas and electric broilers emitted significant amounts of CO when hamburgers were cooked. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were below detectable limits in all tests.

Kuehn, T.H.; Gerstler, W.D.; Pui, D.Y.H.; Ramsey, J.W.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for controlling NOx from lean engines are studied in great detail at FEERC. Lean NOx Traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are two catalyst technologies of interest. Catalysts are studied from the nanoscale to full scale. On the nanoscale, catalyst powders are analyzed with chemisorptions techniques to determine the active metal surface area where catalysis occurs. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is used to observe the chemical reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during catalyst operation. Both powder and coated catalyst samples are analyzed on bench flow reactors in controlled simulated exhaust environments to better characterize the chemical

279

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

282

Effects of molecular interface modification in hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of molecular interface modification in hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic cells Chiatzun in hybrid TiO2/regioregular poly 3-hexylthiophene P3HT photovoltaic cells. By employing a series of para in the field of organic photovoltaic PV cells1­7 and dye-sensitized solar cells DSSCs Refs. 7­10 as part

McGehee, Michael

283

Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on CO{sub 2} Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is commonly measured in water and is an important parameter for understanding carbonate equilibrium, carbon cycling, and water-rock interaction. While accurate measurements can be made in the analytical laboratory, we have developed a rapid, portable technique that can be used to obtain accurate and precise data in the field as well.

VESPER, DJ, Edenborn, Harry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Inorganic and Organic Constituents in Fossil Fuel Combustion Residues, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate prediction of groundwater contamination from solid-waste disposal sites requires leaching rates for fossil fuel combustion waste chemicals. In a wide-ranging literature review, this study obtained data on 28 inorganic constituents and identified the need for new data to improve leachate composition prediction models.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Bioengineering Aspects of Inorganic Carbon Supply to Mass Algal Cultures: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regardless of the application, the basic biotechnology of large-scale outdoor cultures involves many common features, particularly in the requirement for adequate nutrients such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus to ensure that light is the sole limiting yield determinant. Whereas the required quantities of nitrogen and phosphorus are fairly simple, to estimate, those for inorganic carbon are far more complex.

Goldman, J. C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nano Res (2010) 3: 170173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano Res (2010) 3: 170­173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes]. Folding and bonding of edge atoms on the periphery of the quasi two-dimensional planar nano- structure this nanotubular structure is suitable for capillary filling using molten metal halides. Nano Res (2010) 3: 170

Davis, Ben G.

287

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kerosene other kerosene shale oil gas/diesel oil residualshale other petroleum products (China 2008 weighted average) coke oven/gas

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

SciTech Connect

The effect of liquefied natural gas on pollutant emissions was evaluated experimentally with used and new appliances in the laboratory and with appliances installed in residences, targeting information gaps from previous studies. Burner selection targeted available technologies that are projected to comprise the majority of installed appliances over the next decade. Experiments were conducted on 13 cooktop sets, 12 ovens, 5 broiler burners, 5 storage water heaters, 4 forced air furnaces, 1 wall furnace, and 6 tankless water heaters. Air-free concentrations and fuel-based emission factors were determined for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide, and the number of (predominantly ultrafine) particles over complete burns?including transient effects (device warm-up and intermittent firing of burners) following ignition--and during more stable end-of-burn conditions. Formaldehyde was measured over multi-burn cycles. The baseline fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number (a measure of fuel energy delivery rate) of 1320-1340; test fuels had Wobbe numbers of roughly 1390 and 1420, and in some cases 1360. No ignition or operational problems were observed during test fuel use. Baseline emissions varied widely across and within burner groups and with burner operational mode. Statistically significant emissions changes were observed for some pollutants on some burners.

Singer, Brett C.; Apte, Michael G.; Black, Douglas R.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Lucas, Donald; Lunden, Melissa M.; Mirer, Anna G.; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

290

CO2 Emissions - New Zealand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania New Zealand Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Zealand Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Zealand image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Zealand...

291

CO2 Emissions - Hong Kong  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Hong Kong CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hong Kong...

292

CO2 Emissions - Wake Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Wake Island Graphics CO2 Emissions from Wake Island Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Wake Island image Per capita CO2...

293

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

294

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

295

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles Graphics CO2 Emissions from Netherland Antilles Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherland...

296

CO2 Emissions - Ryukyu Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Ryukyu Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands image...

297

CO2 Emissions - Leeward Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Leeward Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands image...

298

carbon emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity carbon emissions energy demand Energy Generation fossil fuels GHG emissions UK Data applicationvnd.openxmlformats-office...

299

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Advanced NOx Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Advanced NOx Emissions Control Adv....

300

Engines - Emissions Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are attractive options for increasing vehicle fuel economy and reducing emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases. Two automobile manufacturers have already introduced HEVs, and other manufacturers are planning to introduce their own models. One available HEV combines mass reduction (also applicable to conventional vehicles) with idle-stop, regenerative braking, and electric-drive assist to achieve a fuel economy more than 2.5 times the current Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard. The second HEV combines idle-stop, regenerative braking, electric assist acceleration, and continuously variable transmission (CVT) to achieve a fuel economy of more than twice the current CAFÉ standard, qualifying as a super ultra-low emissions vehicle (SULEV).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

China Energy and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2 nd Edition) David Fridley, Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou, Jing Ke, Ali Hasanbeigi, Bill Morrow, and Lynn Price China Energy Group, Energy...

302

Pulsar Emission Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission spectrum is calculated for a weak axisymmetric pulsar. Also calculated are the observed spectrum, efficiency, and the observed efficiency. The underlying flow of electrons and positrons turns out to be curiously intricate.

Gruzinov, Andrei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Emission Control and Elimination Through The Use Of Condensation and Heat Recovery Technologies- A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing regulatory air requirements have created potential restrictions on current and future plant operations. Any process design that allows for the elimination of discharge points and the reduction of emissions at a major source can affect the strategic planning for the facility. This can provide critical flexibility, especially in fast-paced markets. Such a process design and implementation were undertaken at a ceramic capacitor manufacturing facility. This facility utilizes multiple small-scale solvent drying processes that emit volatile organic compounds (VOC's). These exhausts could be recirculated for the purposes of emission point elimination, heat recovery and solvent reuse. The aim was to create an environmental control process which would pay for itself within two to three years. An assessment of the alternatives was completed and standard HVAC-type condensation was selected. The unit operations for the proposed process consisted of a high efficiency air-to-air heat exchanger, cooling coil and a chiller. The air passing across the heat exchanger and coil would begin to dehumidify. In addition, solvents contained in the air stream would begin to condense to some equilibrium level and would be absorbed in the condensing water. Eventually, since there would be no addition of water in the process, the level of water in the condensate would fall off dramatically. A prototype unit capable of handling three ovens with a total air flow of 1200 ft3/min (cfm) was installed. The unit performed as expected with the exception that condensate concentrations remained low. Product testing was undertaken to ensure that returning air containing a low level of solvent would not adversely affect drying operations or product qualities. No adverse effects were found. Monitoring of the air stream verified solvent levels well below 5% of the lower explosive limit. Finally, a large-scale unit was constructed capable of handling up to 171 ovens at up to 68,000 cfm at a cost of $1.2M. At current levels of integration, cost avoidance (savings) performance is within 2% of predicted values. Projected payback is 18 months. Estimated volatile organic compound emission reduction is 100 tons per year.

Madewell, A. E.; Bullock, W. N.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N{sub 2}O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N{sub 2}O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N[sub 2]O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N[sub 2]O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies are getting a better grasp of emissions, but there are still problem areas, particularly CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The lag in data has resulted in the imposition of a CO reactor as BACT for the gas turbine. With the renewed concern about the environment, air permits will have a high profile with offsets being the next fix beyond BACT. 'The manner in which technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry....' (1) Therefore, it becomes increasingly important that the proponents of gas turbine-based facilities establish more reliable data on their proposed emissions. This paper addresses the gas turbine emissions experiences of eight cogeneration plants utilizing: 1) steam injection for both NOx control and power augmentation, 2) CO reactors, 3) selective catalytic reduction units. It also looks at possible regulatory actions.

Frederick, J. D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Questions and Answers - Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atoms make up sugar? atoms make up sugar? Previous Question (What atoms make up sugar?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (In the equation for methane, why is there more hydrogen than carbon?) In the equation for methane, why isthere more hydrogen than carbon? Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic matter? The answer is yes and no. Yes, carbon IS found in all organic matter, but NOT in inorganic matter. Although there are many definitions of "organic," in the scientific disciplines, the basic definition comes from chemistry. In chemistry, organic means chemical compounds with carbon in them. In a more general sense, organic refers to living things. And this is connected to the idea of organic chemistry being based on carbon compounds. Organic

309

Empirical MOdels for the Uptake of Inorganic Chemicals from Soil by Plants (BJC/OR-133)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

33 33 Empirical Models for the Uptake of Inorganic Chemicals from Soil by Plants This document has received the appropriate reviews for release to the public. Date: 9/23/98 BJC/OR-133 Empirical Models for the Uptake of Inorganic Chemicals from Soil by Plants Date Issued-September 1998 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management BECHTEL JACOBS COMPANY LLC managing the Environmental Management Activities at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant under contract DE-AC05-98OR22700 for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY iii CONTENTS FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

310

Laboratory illustrations of the transformations and deposition of inorganic material in biomass boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boilers fired with certain woody biomass fuels have proven to be a viable, reliable means of generating electrical power. The behavior of the inorganic material in the fuels is one of the greatest challenges to burning the large variety of fuels available to biomass combustors. Unmanageable ash deposits and interactions between ash and bed material cause loss in boiler availability and significant increase in maintenance costs. The problems related to the behavior of inorganic material now exceed all other combustion-related challenges in biomass-fired boilers. This paper reviews the mechanisms of ash deposit formation, the relationship between fuel properties and ash deposit properties, and a series of laboratory tests in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor designed to illustrate how fuel type, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions impact ash deposit properties.

Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological and Argicultural Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Method for reducing CO2, CO, NOX, and SOx emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Industrial combustion facilities are integrated with greenhouse gas-solidifying fertilizer production reactions so that CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions can be converted prior to emission into carbonate-containing fertilizers, mainly NH.sub.4 HCO.sub.3 and/or (NH.sub.2).sub.2 CO, plus a small fraction of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3 and (NH.sub.4).sub.2 SO.sub.4. The invention enhances sequestration of CO.sub.2 into soil and the earth subsurface, reduces N0.sub.3.sup.- contamination of surface and groundwater, and stimulates photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere. The method for converting CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions into fertilizers includes the step of collecting these materials from the emissions of industrial combustion facilities such as fossil fuel-powered energy sources and transporting the emissions to a reactor. In the reactor, the CO.sub.2, CO, N.sub.2, SO.sub.x, and/or NO.sub.x are converted into carbonate-containing fertilizers using H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, or NH.sub.3. The carbonate-containing fertilizers are then applied to soil and green plants to (1) sequester inorganic carbon into soil and subsoil earth layers by enhanced carbonation of groundwater and the earth minerals, (2) reduce the environmental problem of NO.sub.3.sup.- runoff by substituting for ammonium nitrate fertilizer, and (3) stimulate photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere by the fertilization effect of the carbonate-containing fertilizers.

Lee, James Weifu (Oak Ridge, TN); Li, Rongfu (Zhejiang, CH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Carbons for lithium ion cells prepared using sepiolite as an inorganic template.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon anodes for Li ion cells have been prepared by the in situ polymerization of olefins such as propylene and ethylene in the channels of sepiolite clay mineral. Upon dissolution of the inorganic framework, a disordered carbon was obtained. The carbon was tested as anode in coin cells, yielding a reversible capacity of 633 mAh/g, 1.70 times higher than the capacity delivered by graphitic carbon, assuming 100% efficiency. The coulombic efficiency was higher than 90%.

Sandi, G.

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

Biomethylation of inorganic arsenic by the rat and some laboratory animals  

SciTech Connect

This article concerns the distribution (in the liver, kidney and blood) and excretion (in the urine, feces and bile) of arsenic metabolites such as dimethylated, monomethylated and inorganic arsenic in rats following a single oral and intravenous (iv) administration of arsenic acid. This paper also describes studies on the species difference in the arsenic methylation between the rats and some other laboratory animals as mice, hamsters, rabbits and cats.

Odanaka, Y.; Matano, O.; Goto, S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Organic and Inorganic Hazardous Waste Stabilization Using Coal Combustion By-Product Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a laboratory investigation of four clean-coal by-products to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous waste stream materials. The wastes included API separator sludge, metal oxide-hydroxide waste, metal plating sludge, and creosote-contaminated soil. Overall, the investigation showed that the high alkalinity of the by-products may cost-effectively stabilize the acidic components of hazardous waste.

1994-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

316

GHG emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG emissions GHG emissions Dataset Summary Description These datasets include GHG and CO2 emissions statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2 Emissions for EU (xls, 853.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions by Sector, all member countries (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions from Transport, all member countries (xls, 1.3 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by sector, all member countries (xls, 2.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by transport, all member countries (xls, 1.5 MiB)

317

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

319

CO2 Emissions - Puerto Rico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Puerto Rico Graphics CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico image Per capita...

320

BPA SF6 Emission Info  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPA SF 6 Emission Info Steve Lowder - 2012.12 slide 1 Discovering Emission Locations slide 2 BPA uses a FLIR leak detection camera (other methods available) Allows leaks to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Reducing SF6 Emissions @ PPPL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

96.4 88.4 Fuel Consumption Emissions 2015 1823.8 Fugitive Emissions Refrigerant 160 241.2 SF6 38360 21042.8 Scope 2 -Indirect Electricity Purchase 13816 13855 Scope 3 -...

322

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Diesel hybridization and emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

325

CO2 Emissions - Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Graphics CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah image Per capita CO2 Emission...

326

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the public from airborne radionuclide emissions. We requestfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-470E-20Ì1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Single-Enzyme Nanoparticles Armored by a Nanometer-Scale Organic/Inorganic Network  

SciTech Connect

We have developed armored single-enzyme nanoparticles (SENs), which dramatically stabilize a protease (a-chymotrypsin, CT) by surrounding each enzyme molecule with a porous composite organic/inorganic shell of less than a few nanometers thick. The armored enzymes show no decrease in CT activity at 30C for four days while free CT activity is rapidly reduced by orders of magnitude. The armored shell around CT is sufficiently thin and porous that it does not place any serious mass-transfer limitation on substrates. This unique approach will have a great impact in using enzymes in various fields.

Kim, Jungbae; Grate, Jay W.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

Sheng Wu

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

Trace element emissions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

334

FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2), forms the ubiquitous oil source matrix in shales. Thus~Oil Shale Retort and Process Water s Inorganic Arsenic and Organoarsenic compounds were purchased from commercial sources

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

336

Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m[sup 3] internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h[sup [minus]1] was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO[sub 2], and NO[sub x]. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. (Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. (Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Labs., Karachi (Pakistan))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m{sup 3} internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h{sup {minus}1} was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. [Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Labs., Karachi (Pakistan)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

THE SCENARIOS APPROACH TO ATTENUATION-BASED REMEDIES FOR INORGANIC AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS  

SciTech Connect

Guidance materials based on use of conceptual model scenarios were developed to assist evaluation and implementation of attenuation-based remedies for groundwater and vadose zones contaminated with inorganic and radionuclide contaminants. The Scenarios approach is intended to complement the comprehensive information provided in the US EPA's Technical Protocol for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) of Inorganic Contaminants by providing additional information on site conceptual models and extending the evaluation to consideration of Enhanced Attenuation approaches. The conceptual models incorporate the notion of reactive facies, defined as units with hydrogeochemical properties that are different from surrounding units and that react with contaminants in distinct ways. The conceptual models also incorporate consideration of biogeochemical gradients, defined as boundaries between different geochemical conditions that have been induced by waste disposal or other natural phenomena. Gradients can change over time when geochemical conditions from one area migrate into another, potentially affecting contaminant mobility. A recognition of gradients allows the attenuation-affecting conditions of a site to be projected into the future. The Scenarios approach provides a stepwise process to identify an appropriate category of conceptual model and refine it for a specific site. Scenario materials provide links to pertinent sections in the EPA technical protocol and present information about contaminant mobility and important controlling mechanism for attenuation-based remedies based on the categories of conceptual models.

Vangelas, K.; Rysz, M.; Truex, M.; Brady, P.; Newell, C.; Denham, M.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

339

Conducting Polymer-Inorganic\tNanoparticle (CPIN) Nanoarrays for Battery Applications - Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our objective was to develop new, self-assembling conducting polymer-inorganic nanoparticle nanoarrays (CPIN nanoarrays) comprised of nanoparticles of inorganic Li+ insertion compounds that are “wired” together with oligomeric chains of derivatives of polythiophene. Using these nanoarrays, we developed an understanding of the relationship between structure and electrochemical function for nanostructured materials. Such nanoarrays are expected to have extremely high specific energy and specific power for battery applications due to the unique structural characteristics that derive from the nanoarray. Under this award we developed several synthetic approaches to producing manganese dioxide nanoparticles (NPs). We also developed a layer-by-layer approach for immobilizing these NPs so they could be examined electrochemically. We also developed new synthetic procedures for encapsulating manganese dioxide nanoparticles within spheres of polyethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT), a conducting polymer with excellent charge-discharge stability. These have a unique manganese dioxide core-PEDOT shell structure. We examined the structures of these systems using transmission electron microscopy, various scanning probe microscopies, and electrochemical measurements. Various technical reports have been submitted that describe the work, including conference presentations, publications and patent applications. These reports are available through http://www.osti.gov, the DOE Energy Link System.

Buttry, Daniel A.

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

340

Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Environmental software systems for emission inventories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric emission inventories are important tools for environmental decision making. The need to include transparency and reproducibility in emission calculation also fostered the development of environmental software systems for emission inventories. ... Keywords: Emission inventory theory, Model validation, Upper Austria

Wilfried Winiwarter; Gerald Schimak

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

THE EFFECTS OF BIODIESEL BLENDS AND ARCO EC-DIESEL ON EMISSIONS from LIGHT HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chassis dynamometer tests were performed on 7 light heavy-duty diesel trucks comparing the emissions of a California diesel fuel with emissions from 4 other fuels: ARCO EC-diesel (EC-D) and three 20% biodiesel blends (1 yellow grease and 2 soy-based). The EC-D and the yellow grease biodiesel blend both showed significant reductions in THC and CO emissions over the test vehicle fleet. EC-D also showed reductions in PM emission rates. NOx emissions were comparable for the different fuel types over the range of vehicles tested. The soy-based biodiesel blends did not show significant or consistent emissions differences over all test vehicles. Total carbon accounted for more than 70% of the PM mass for 4 of the 5 sampled vehicles. Elemental and organic carbon ratios varied significantly from vehicle-to-vehicle but showed very little fuel dependence. Inorganic species represented a smaller portion of the composite total, ranging from 0.2 to 3.3% of the total PM. Total PAH emissions ranged from approximately 1.8 mg/mi to 67.8 mg/mi over the different vehicle/fuel combinations representing between 1.6 and 3.8% of the total PM mass.

Durbin, Thomas

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

343

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Organic and Inorganic Solid Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries - Nader Hagh, NEI Corporation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organic and Inorganic Solid Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Organic and Inorganic Solid Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Background & Objectives * Lithium ion batteries widely used in consumer applications Solvent leakage and flammability of conventional liquid electrolytes * Current solid state electrolytes suffer from low ionic conductivity, inferior rate capability, and interfacial instability * Objective of the program is to develop solid state organic and inorganic electrolyte that has enhanced ionic conductivity * PEO based polymer electrolyte has poor room ionic conductivity due to crystallinity * The current program develops a PEO based hybrid copolymer that disrupts crystallization and at the same time provides mechanical integrity Abstract: The use of a solid polymer electrolyte instead of the conventional liquid or gel electrolyte can drastically improve the safety

344

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

345

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

346

Zero emission coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

348

Development of nanostructured and surface modified semiconductors for hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar energy conversion is increasingly being recognized as one of the principal ways to meet future energy needs without causing detrimental environmental impact. Hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells (SCs) are attracting particular interest due to the potential for low cost manufacturing and for use in new applications, such as consumer electronics, architectural integration and light-weight sensors. Key materials advantages of these next generation SCs over conventional semiconductor SCs are in design opportunities--since the different functions of the SCs are carried out by different materials, there are greater materials choices for producing optimized structures. In this project, we explore the hybrid organic-inorganic solar cell system that consists of oxide, primarily ZnO, nanostructures as the electron transporter and poly-(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the light-absorber and hole transporter. It builds on our capabilities in the solution synthesis of nanostructured semiconducting oxide arrays to this photovoltaic (PV) technology. The three challenges in this hybrid material system for solar applications are (1) achieving inorganic nanostructures with critical spacing that matches the exciton diffusion in the polymer, {approx} 10 nm, (2) infiltrating the polymer completely into the dense nanostructure arrays, and (3) optimizing the interfacial properties to facilitate efficient charge transfer. We have gained an understanding and control over growing oriented ZnO nanorods with sub-50 nm diameters and the required rod-to-rod spacing on various substrates. We have developed novel approaches to infiltrate commercially available P3HT in the narrow spacing between ZnO nanorods. Also, we have begun to explore ways to modify the interfacial properties. In addition, we have established device fabrication and testing capabilities at Sandia for prototype devices. Moreover, the control synthesis of ZnO nanorod arrays lead to the development of an efficient anti-reflection coating for multicrystalline Si solar cells. An important component of this project is the collaboration with Dr. Dave Ginley's group at NREL. The NREL efforts, which are funded by NREL's LDRD program, focus on measuring device performance, external quantum efficiency, photoconductance through highly specialized non-contact time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements, and vapor phase deposition of oxide materials. The close collaboration with NREL enables us to enter this competitive field in such short time. Joint publications and presentations have resulted from this fruitful collaboration. To this date, 5 referred journal papers have resulted from this project, with 2 more in preparation. Several invited talks and numerous contributed presentations in international conferences are also noted. Sandia has gained the reputation of being one of forefront research groups on nanostructured hybrid solar cells.

Hsu, Julia, W. P.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

350

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Petroleum and Coal Products Industry, 1994. Petroleum refining is by far the largest component of the petroleum and ...

351

Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

353

Emissions trading and technological change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Emissions trading programmes have grown in number and scope over the last forty years, and in the last decade they have become a centrepiece of… (more)

Calel, Raphael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EPA Revises Emissions Estimation Methodology  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The changes to the historical emission estimates are the result of revisions to the data and estimation ... b K.D . Smythe, RAND ... RAND Environmental Science and ...

355

Low emission combustor  

SciTech Connect

A low emission combustor assembly particularly suited for an automotive gas turbine engine has an inlet plenum supplied with regenerated compressor discharge, an exhaust plenum, a diffusion flame combustion chamber disposed between the inlet and exhaust plenums, and a catalytic combustion chamber also disposed between the inlet and exhaust plenums so that parallel flow paths are established between the inlet and exhaust plenums. During engine start-up, fuel is supplied only to the diffusion flame combustion chamber and regenerated compressor discharge simultaneously flowing through the catalytic combustion chamber heats the catalyst to operating temperature and cools and dilutes exhaust from the diffusion flame combustion chamber. When the catalyst reaches operating temperature fuel is directed only to the catalytic combustion chamber wherein an ultra lean air/fuel ratio mixture is catalytically oxidized, the exhaust from this reaction being cooled and diluted by regenerated compressor discharge simultaneously flowing through the diffusion flame combustion chamber.

Cornelius, W.; Klomp, E.D.; Kosek, T.P.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Source Emissions and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation Source Emissions and Transport Investigators conduct research here to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment. This research includes studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential human health effects. Contacts Randy Maddalena RLMaddalena@lbl.gov (510) 486-4924 Mark Mendell MJMendell@lbl.gov (510) 486-5762 Links Pollutant Sources, Dynamics and Chemistry Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy Technologies Environmental Impacts

357

Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Colvin, Vicki L. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed. 10 figs.

Alivisatos, A.P.; Colvin, V.L.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

359

"All-Inorganic, Efficient Photovoltaic Solid State Devices Utilizing Semiconducting Colloidal Nanocrystal Quantum Dots"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We demonstrated robust colloidal quantum dot (QD) photovoltaics with high internal quantum efficiencies. In our structures, device durability is derived from use of all-inorganic atmospherically-stable semiconducting metal-oxide films together with QD photoreceptors. We have shown that both QD and metal-oxide semiconducting films and contacts are amenable to room temperature processing under minimal vacuum conditions, enabling large area processing of PV structures of high internal efficiency. We generated the state of the art devices with power conversion efficiency of more than 4%, and have shown that efficiencies as high as 9% are achievable in the near-term, and as high as 17% in the long-term.

Vladimir Bulovic and Moungi Bawendi

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Supercomputers Take a Cue From Microwave Ovens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to accomplishing this," says Shalf. "Today we look at the motherboard as a canvas for building a supercomputer, but in the embedded market the canvas is the chip." He notes that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method for reducing coke oven carbonization pressure  

SciTech Connect

A method of reducing the carbonization pressure in the coking of coal is provided which comprises randomly dispersing flakes through the coal, said flakes formed of a material that does not pass through a plastic phase such as pressed sawdust wherein the flakes have a thickness of between about 1/8 '' and about 3/4 '' and a length and width of between about 1'' and about 5''.

Perch, M.

1981-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM AGROECOSYSTEMS: SIMULATING MANAGEMENT EFFECTS ON DAIRY FARM EMISSIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How does agriculture contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and what farm management scenarios decrease net emissions from agroecosystems? The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is… (more)

Sedorovich, Dawn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Transition Paths CO2 Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aantal van hen hier niet onvermeld laten. Het proefschrift heeft zijn oorsprong in het MATTER-project (Materials Technologies for CO2-reduction). Het project werd gecoördineerd vanuit het ECN door Dolf Gielen en costs 72 4.4.2 System emissions 72 4.4.3 Parameters 73 4.5 Costs and emissions, technical and economic

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

364

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raw Coal Cleaned Coal Other Washed Coal Briquettes CokeCoke Oven Gas Other Gas Other Coking Products Petroleumbase oil n/a n/a Petroleum Coke Naphtha Paraffin Solvent oil

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Update on CO2 emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

Friedingstein, P. [University of Exeter, Devon, England; Houghton, R.A. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hackler, J. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Canadell, J.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Raupach, Mike [GCP, Canberra, Australia; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Le Quere, Corrine [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

367

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute (2009), Reducing Emissions from Deforestation andbenefits of reducing carbon emissions from deforestation andreference levels for reducing emissions from deforestation’,

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Adv. Low-NOx Burner Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization The goal of this work is to develop a comprehensive, high-quality database characterizing PM2.5 emissions from utility plants firing high sulfur coals. The specific objectives are to: 1) develop and test an ultra low-NOx pulverized coal burner for plug-in retrofit applications without boiler wall tube modifications, 2) assess the impact of low-NOx PC burner operation on NOx and PM2.5 emissions, and 3) provide high-quality data to ensure that future PM2.5 regulations are based on good scientific information. The work will be performed in the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF), a 100 million Btu/hr near-full-scale facility located at the Alliance Research Center. Related Papers and Publications:

370

CO2 Emissions - the Republic of Moldova  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe the Republic of Moldova CO2 Emissions from the Republic of Moldova Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Republic of Moldova image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

371

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda-Urundi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rwanda-Urundi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda-Urundi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda-Urundi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda-Urundi...

372

CO2 Emissions - Republic of Cameroon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Republic of Cameroon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Republic of Cameroon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Republic of Cameroon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

373

CO2 Emissions - East and West Pakistan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East East and West Pakistan CO2 Emissions from East and West Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from East and West Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

374

CO2 Emissions - Rhodesia-Nyasaland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhodesia-Nyasaland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rhodesia-Nyasaland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rhodesia-Nyasaland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

375

CO2 Emissions - Papua New Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Papua New Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Papua New Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Papua New Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Papua New...

376

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions - Niue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Niue Graphics Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Niue Data graphic Data Total Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Niue image Per Capita...

377

APPENDIX X: PATHWAY DIAGRAMS An Appendix to the Report "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions Centralized electrolytic H2 transmission Electrolysis Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions Electrolytic H2 Nuclear power plant Electrolysis Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions

Delucchi, Mark

378

High energy photon emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this work was to initiate the use of BaF2 arrays for detection of high energy photon emission from nuclear reactions. A beam from the Texas A&M University K-500 Superconducting Cyclotron, and a variety of detectors for hard photons, neutrons, charged particles, and fission fragments were used to study the reaction 160 + 238 U at a projectile energy of 50 MeV/u. Inverse slope values of the photon spectra were extracted for inclusive data and data of higher multiplicities at angles of 90' and 135'. Two 19-element barium fluoride (BaF2) arrays, an array of liquid scintillation fast neutron detectors and plastic scintillation charged-particle veto detectors, together with a silicon-cesium iodide (Si-CsI) telescope and a silicon fission fragment detector allowed the possibility of impact parameter selection through neutron and charged particle multiplicities. The associated multiplicity distributions of photon and fast neutron triggers were compared at 30' and 90' angles. The hardware and electronics layout of the experimental set up are described. Fundamental properties of the various detectors are explained and typical spectra are shown as examples for each detector system. The data acquisition and data compression is described in Chap. III, and followed by the calibration methods used for the BaF2 and Nal(TI) detectors. A description of a dynamic pedestal (zero level) correction mechanism, is followed by a description of several cosmic ray background reduction methods, including the highly effective centrality condition. A summary is given to compare the various methods. After a description of the other types of detectors used in the experiment, an example is given how the final photon spectra were produced. In Chap. IV the measured results are presented and compared to those in the literature. The last chapter provides the conclusions of this work.

Jabs, Harry

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

carbon dioxide emissions, total greenhouse gas emissions, sector-specific emissions, and emissions by fuel type. Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels, principally petroleum,

380

CO2 Emissions - Lao People's Democratic Republic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Lao People's Democratic Republic CO2 Emissions from Lao People's Democratic Republic Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lao People's Democratic Republic image Per...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CO2 Emissions - Republic of South Vietnam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Republic of South Vietnam CO2 Emissions from Republic of South Vietnam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Republic of South Vietnam...

382

CO2 Emissions - Panama Canal Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Canal Zone Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone...

383

CO2 Emissions - Occupied Palestinian Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Occupied Palestinian Territory CO2 Emissions from the Occupied Palestinian Territory Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Occupied Palestinian Territory image...

384

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles and Aruba  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles and Aruba Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Netherland...

385

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during pulse excimer laser interaction with materials Title Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...

386

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait Oil Fires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Middle East Kuwait Oil Fires Graphics CO2 Emissions from the 1991 Kuwait Oil Fires Data graphic Data...

387

Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines -- 2002 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2002 update to the "Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines" reflects information learned from current utility continuous emission monitoring (CEM) system (CEMS) installations and practices.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Emissions and Fuel Consumption Impacts of IntelligentTravel Time, Fuel Consumption and Weigh Station Efficiency.EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION - Sustainable Approaches for

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

FEWG beyond SF6: Managing Halocarbon Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEWG beyond SF6: Managing Halocarbon Emissions Corrie Clark, Ph.D. Environmental Science Division Fugitive Emissions Working Group November 15, 2011 Review of Progress to Date ...

390

SF6 Emissions Management at Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emissions Management at Jefferson Lab Kevin Jordan PE Jefferson Lab November 16, 2010 Emissions Management Overview * SF 6 Gas Usage * SF 6 Transfer System * Remote Cesiator *...

391

Fugitive Emissions in 2010 Site Sustainability Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fugitive Emissions in 2010 Site Sustainability Plans Josh Silverman Chair, Fugitive Emissions Working Group Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (HS-22) April 14, 2011 2...

392

Progress Report on SF6 Emissions Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Report on SF 6 Emissions Management Greg Barrett Environmental Engineer Argonne National Laboratory October 14, 2010 Fugitive Emissions Working Group Assessment of SF 6...

393

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces Title China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and...

394

Treatment of Gas Emissions in Potrooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the solutions developed by Fives to eliminate two of the main sources of HF emissions in the potrooms: - Emissions from pots, when they ...

395

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Emissions Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Analysis Photo of researcher weighing a clean particulate filter. Emissions that result in pollution from engines are strictly regulated. The next generation of...

396

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited)...

397

CO2 emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data applicationvnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2...

398

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

Information Center

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EMISS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three types of emission factors are currently included: carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide. Emissions factors are specified separately for six different end-use...

400

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. urban trees, yard trimmings, and food scraps : 35: Emissions of carbon dioxide from biofuel/bioenergy use by sector and fuel

402

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Emissions Control - Program Goals and Targets The Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) is currently pursuing the demonstration of 1st-Generation Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)...

403

The Value of Emissions Trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing attention on a here-to-fore neglected component: its value as a hedge against uncertainty. Much analysis has been done of the Kyoto Protocol and ...

Webster, Mort David.

404

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

405

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

406

Methane Emissions - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent; Estimated 2003 ... for about 8.7 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions when weighted by methane’s global warming potential factor.

407

Physicochemical phenomena of electro-kinetic extraction of inorganic contaminants from kaolinite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments investigating the use of electro-kinetics for removal of inorganic chemicals from kaolinite clay were performed. Kaolinite was homogeneously saturated with a NaCl solution and consolidated to the desired void ratio. Fluid reservoir chambers, a power supply and data acquisition instrument were connected to the consolidated sample. A voltage difference was applied to electrodes at each end of the sample to induce electro-osmotic fluid flow and ionic migration of NaCl. After electro-kinetic treatment the sample was disconnected from the reservoirs, power supply and data acquisition system, then sectioned to allow water content, sodium and chloride concentration, and pH analyses of each section. The data obtained was reduced and prepared in graph form for analysis of results. Energy for electrolysis, total energy expended, and removal efficiency were calculated and graphed for selected experiments. It was concluded that the voltage gradient became non-linear during experimentation, contaminant distribution was dependent on initial concentration, and zones of altered pH and ion removal did correspond in some experiments. Also, the removal efficiency decreased with time during experimentation and increased with intial contaminant concentration. Comparisons to a predictive model suggested that ionic mobility and dissusivity values varied between experiments and the model.

Scott, Travis Brooks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ordered Layered Organic-Inorganic of 4-Chlorophenoxyacetate-Zinc Layered Hydroxide Nanohybrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordered layered organic-inorganic nanostructure composed of zinc layered hydroxide-4-chlorophenoxy acetate (ZLH-4CPA) was prepared by reaction of an organic anion, 4-chlorophenoxy acetate (4CPA) with ZnO under aqueous environment. The concentration of 4CPA was found to be a controlling factor in determining the formation of phase pure, well ordered nanolayered hybrid material. At lower concentration of 4CPA (0.05 M), a mixed phase was observed in which ZnO co-existed with the nanohybrid. At 0.01 M, a pure phase is obtained with high crystallinity but a well ordered nanolayered structure is lacking. A pure phase, well ordered nanolayered hybrid can be clearly observed at 0.2 M 4CPA. ZnO shows well defined grain structure of various sizes at nanometer scale range. Direct reaction between ZnO and 4CPA under aqueous environment resulted in the formation of 4CPA-ZLH nanohybrid with flake-like fibrous structure. On heating at 500 deg. C for 5 h under atmospheric condition, the nanohybrid was transformed back to well defined grain structure, as previously observed for the starting materials, ZnO. This shows that the nanohybrid has ''memory effect'' property. Well ordered nanolayered hybrid with up to 5 harmonics, from which the average basal spacing of 19.03 A of the material was deduced, showing long range order of the layer packing.

Hussein, Mohd Zobir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Nazarudin, Nor Farhana binti [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sarijo, Siti Halimah [Faculty of Applied Science, Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Yarmo, Mohd Ambar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Credits Any state mobile emissions reduction credits program must allow credits for emissions reductions achieved by converting a vehicle to operate on an

410

Leaching of Inorganic Constituents From Coal Combustion By-Products Under Field and Laboratory Conditions: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last two decades, EPRI has sponsored research to develop technical insights into leaching and attenuation processes and the migration of inorganic waste constituents under actual disposal conditions. This report provides an in-depth analysis of leaching data collected from several EPRI field and laboratory studies. These studies can help utilities accurately assess risks from leachate release and migration and determine the need for engineering controls to protect the environment in the vicinity...

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Sequestration ..... 199 62 Halogenated Substances ..... 22 18 Other Emissions Reductions ..... 59 45 Total ...

412

Implementation of SB 1368 Emission Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................... 8 Chapter 4: Emissions Performance Standard .....................13 Coal................................................................................................ 16 Renewables/Non-Renewables Blended Contracts................................................. 17

413

Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington, DC). 31. US Environmental Protection Agency (2007) EGRID Emission Data for 2005 (Clean Energy

Michalek, Jeremy J.

414

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

M. J. Holmes

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Vehicle Ethanol Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Ethanol Vehicle Emissions When blended with gasoline for use as a vehicle fuel, ethanol can offer some emissions benefits over gasoline, depending on vehicle type, engine

416

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Control Emissions Control Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Control Requirement Heavy-duty diesel vehicles used to perform federally funded state public works contracts must be powered by engines with Level 3 emissions control

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Vehicle Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions When used as a vehicle fuel, biodiesel offers some tailpipe and considerable greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions benefits over conventional

418

Supplementary Information1 Characterization of the Sources and Processes of Organic and Inorganic2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., diesel and gasoline emissions. 4 3.85 HOA, COA, SV-OOA, and LV-OOA factors resolved, but the physically of (A) DEC fixed site, (B) Parking Lot6, and (C) Parking30 Lot15; (b) wind roses for the entire study.31 225 270 315 0 - 1 1 - 2 2 - 3 3 - 4 4 - 5 5 - 6 6+ Wind Speed (m/s) (b) Traffic #12;4 32 Fig. S2. Q

Meskhidze, Nicholas

419

On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH{sub 3} adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Bronsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air.

Bandosz, T.J.; Petit, C. [CUNY City College, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, S.K.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

S. K. Zohner

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Low emission internal combustion engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

Karaba, Albert M. (Muskegon, MI)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report {number_sign}4, July 1--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the US Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B and W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

Farthing, G.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicles » Propane Vehicles » Propane Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Propane Vehicle Emissions

426

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

427

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

428

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reductions Emissions Reductions Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reductions Grants The Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program (Program) provides incentives to cover the incremental cost of purchasing engines and

429

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, although certain industrial processes (e.g., cement manufacture) also emit carbon dioxide. The estimates of energy-related carbon emissions require both data on the energy use and carbon emissions coefficients relating energy use to the amount of carbon emitted. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the main source of data on U.S. energy use. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 used annual data provided by energy suppliers. However, to obtain more detail on how different sectors use energy, the emissions estimates in Energy and GHG Analysis rely data from on surveys of energy users, such as manufacturing establishments and commercial buildings.

430

Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA); Olsen, Khris B. (West Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.geiacenter.org/ References: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA)[1] "The GEIA /ACCENT data portal provides gridded emission data; emission data are usually separated into three main categories : anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning emissions, and natural emissions: anthropogenic emissions include emissions from fossil fuel and biofuel consumption, industry and agricultural sources. biomass burning emissions include emissions from forest fires, savannah fires, and sometimes large croplands fires.

432

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during experimentation.

Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Inc.] [Terrafore Inc.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

Design, optimization, and selectivity of inorganic ion-exchangers for radioactive waste remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The processes of development of nuclear weapons resulted in accumulation of thousands of curies of high-level radioactive waste. Liquid waste produced in the US has been stored in carbon steel tanks in highly alkaline (1-3 M NaOH, 6 M sodium salts) media for fifty years and leakage has occurred. One of the approaches to the solution of the problem of radioactive waste is to adsorb the nuclides on highly selective ion-exchange material, solidify in a glass matrix and dispose in a geological formation. The use of the ion-exchange technology is limited by the time of the sorbent-solution contact required to reduce the activity of the streams to acceptable levels. Inorganic ion-exchangers are promising materials due to their high radiation stability, extreme selectivity, and compatibility with the glass matrix. The contact time can be reduced by improving selectivities, kinetics, and capacities of the materials towards the target ions. This can be accomplished in part through understanding of the origin of ion-exchange selectivity. Crystalline zeotypes with minerals sitinakite (ideal formula Na2Ti2O3SiO4??2H2O) and pharmacosiderite (HM3(TO)4(GeO4)x(SiO4)3-x M = Cs+, Na+, K+, T=Nb5+, Ge4+, Ti4+) structures are excellent candidates for selectivity studies because of their ion-exchange properties tunable by alterations of synthetic procedures, and isomorphous framework substitution. The Nb-substitution in titanium sites reduces the framework charge, whereas Ge substitution decreases the unit cell size if in titanium sites and increases if it in silicon sites. The compounds were hydrothermally synthesized in Ti/Si, Ti/Nb/Si, Ti/Ge/Si forms and characterized by structural and ion-exchange studies. The 25% Nb substitution in titanosilicate sitinakite resulted in enhanced selectivity for cesium and additional bond formation of cesium within the channel. The selectivity for cesium in germanium substituted pharmacosiderite also was correlated with the coordination environment within the channel. In the advanced stages of this study semi-crystalline (sodium nonatitanate) and amorphous (monosodium titanate) materials also were considered because of their remarkable strontium selectivity. In situ X-ray diffraction techniques revealed that the sodium nonatitanate precedes the formation of the TS phase in hydrothermal synthesis. This knowledge allowed us to design and synthesize material for combined cesium and strontium removal.

Medvedev, Dmitry Gennadievich

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Two inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on polyoxometalate anions and methylene blue: Preparations, crystal structures and properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two novel inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on an organic dye cation methylene blue (MB) and Lindqvist-type POM polyanions, [C{sub 22}H{sub 18}N{sub 3}S]{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 19} 2DMF (1) and [C{sub 22}H{sub 18}N{sub 3}S]{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} 2DMF (2) were synthesized under ambient conditions and characterized by CV, IR spectroscopy, solid diffuse reflectance spectrum, UV-vis spectra in DMF solution, luminescent spectrum and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic data reveal that compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural and both crystallize in the triclinic space group P1-bar . Their crystal structures present that the layers of organic molecules and inorganic anions array alternatively, and there exist strong {pi}...{pi} stacking interactions between dimeric MB cations and near distance interactions among organic dye cations, Lindqvist-type POM polyanions and DMF molecules. The solid diffuse reflectance spectra and UV-vis spectra in DMF solution appear new absorption bands ascribed to the charge-transfer transition between the cationic MB donor and the POM acceptors. Studies of the photoluminescent properties show that the formation of 1 and 2 lead to the fluorescence quenching of starting materials. -- Graphical abstract: Their crystal structures present that the layers of organic molecules and inorganic anions array alternatively, and there exist strong {pi}...{pi} stacking interactions between dimeric MB cations. Display Omitted

Nie Shanshan; Zhang Yaobin; Liu Bin; Li Zuoxi; Hu Huaiming [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry (Ministry of Education), Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Physico-Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); Xue Ganglin, E-mail: xglin707@163.co [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry (Ministry of Education), Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Physico-Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); Fu Feng; Wang Jiwu [Department of Chemistry, Yanan University, Yan'an 716000 (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

ATOMISTIC MODELING OF OIL SHALE KEROGENS AND ASPHALTENES ALONG WITH THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE INORGANIC MINERAL MATRIX  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to obtain and validate three dimensional atomistic models for the organic matter in both oil shales and oil sands. In the case of oil shales the modeling was completed for kerogen, the insoluble portion of the organic matter; for oil sands it was for asphaltenes, a class of molecules found in crude oil. The three dimensional models discussed in this report were developed starting from existing literature two dimensional models. The models developed included one kerogen, based on experimental data on a kerogen isolated from a Green River oil shale, and a set of six representative asphaltenes. Subsequently, the interactions between these organic models and an inorganic matrix was explored in order to gain insight into the chemical nature of this interaction, which could provide vital information in developing efficient methods to remove the organic material from inorganic mineral substrate. The inorganic substrate used to model the interaction was illite, an aluminum silicate oxide clay. In order to obtain the feedback necessary to validate the models, it is necessary to be able to calculate different observable quantities and to show that these observables both reproduce the results of experimental measurements on actual samples as well as that the observables are sensitive to structural differences between models. The observables that were calculated using the models include 13C NMR spectra, the IR vibrational spectra, and the atomic pair wise distribution function; these were chosen as they are among the methods for which both experimental and calculated values can be readily obtained. Where available, comparison was made to experiment results. Finally, molecular dynamic simulations of pyrolysis were completed on the models to gain an understanding into the nature of the decomposition of these materials when heated.

Facelli, Julio; Pugmire, Ronald; Pimienta, Ian

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Low Carbon Electricity Investment: The Limitations of Traditional Approaches and a Radical Alternative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

 smelter relocates to a country where the electricity is  predominantly  from  coal  (India,  China  or  Australia  for  example),  then  there  would be leakage of emissions.   Aluminium production Industrial gases Other inorganic basic chemicals Paper and Paperboard Coke Oven Cement Basic Iron and Steel...  a vital part of our energy system.  It  is a high?grade energy carrier  that is used in buildings, across industry and increasingly in transportation. It is  both a final good that consumers buy ? to power light bulbs, computers, fridges  etc  ?  and  also  an  input  into  almost  all...

Laing, Tim; Grubb, Michael

437

Health Impacts Research - Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Impacts Research Health Impacts Research Another aspect of the emissions research at ORNL focuses on Health Impacts. This effort concentrates on analyzing exhaust for Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) or other unregulated exhaust species that have the potential to harm human health. MSATs are a group of chemical species defined by the U.S. EPA that may pose risk to humans; formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene are some example species. Engines operated with new combustion modes and alternative fuels are studied for MSAT emissions to determine insure that the advanced technologies being developed pose no additional risk to humans. A large part of the Health Impacts research effort at ORNL focuses on particulate matter (PM) which is also defined as an MSAT by the U.S. EPA.

438

Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - NOx Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions from Multi-Burners Emissions from Multi-Burners The University of Utah working with Reaction Engineering International and Brigham Young University is investigating a project that consists of integrated experimental, theoretical and computational modeling efforts. The primary objective is to evaluate NOx formation/destruction processes as they occur in multi-burner arrays, a geometry almost always utilized in utility practice. Most controlled experimental work examining NOx has been conducted on single burners. The range of potential intra-burner interactions are likely to provide added degrees of freedom for reducing NOx. The resultant findings may allow existing utilities to arrange fuel and air distribution to minimize NOx. In new applications, orientation of individual burners within an array may also be altered to reduce NOx. Comprehensive combustion codes will be modified to incorporate the latest submodels of nitrogen release and heterogeneous chemistry. Comparison of pilot scale experiments and simulations will be utilized to validate/develop theory.

440

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensity of coal- 89 based corn ethanol in gCO2e/liter GHGintensity of gas- 61 based corn ethanol in gCO2e/liter PriceIf a megajoule of corn ethanol reduces GHG emissions 18%

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Emissions Data IGES GHG Emissions Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES GHG Emissions Data Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_kyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data[1] Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at providing comprehensive, organised information on the GHG emissions from Annex I countries to the UNFCCC in an easy-to-understand way. All information is extracted from the publicly available sources on the UNFCCC web-site and this data will be updated regularly. " References ↑ "IGES GHG Emissions Data" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IGES_GHG_Emissions_Data&oldid=383109"

442

Smoke and Visible Emissions (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes controls on smoke and visible emissions from certain sources.  This rule is not intended to preempt any more stringent controls on smoke and visible emissions provided in any...

443

Quantifying avoided emissions from renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying the reduced emissions due to renewable power integration and providing increasingly accurate emissions analysis has become more important for policy makers in the age of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and ...

Gomez, Gabriel R. (Gabriel Rodriguez)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

CO2 Emissions - Pacific Islands (Palau)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Pacific Islands (Palau) Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Pacific Islands (Palau) Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Pacific Islands (Palau) image Per capita CO2...

445

Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and must take immediate or reasonable steps to...

446

Global Mortality Attributable to Aircraft Cruise Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft ...

Britter, Rex E.

447

Emission Factors from Brazilian Deforestation Fires Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of emission factors from 19 deforestation fires in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil. LBA-ECO TG-10 Fire Emission Factors in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil: 2004...

448

China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030 Title China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030 Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4866E Year of Publication 2013 Authors...

449

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

450

Slashing Greenhouse Emissions from Magnesium Production - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... Topic Title: Slashing Greenhouse Emissions from Magnesium Production Topic Summary: CSIRO, an Australia's national science agency ...

451

Fluoride Emissions Management Guide (FEMG) for Aluminium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Aluminum Reduction Technology. Presentation Title, Fluoride Emissions ...

452

World Carbon Emissions, 1990, 2010, and 2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

•Even if the Annex I countries were to reach the emissions levels specified under the Kyoto Climate Change Protocol, ...

453

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

454

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Contacts Staff from the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) prepared this report. General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to Mark Rodekohr (Mark.Rodekohr@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-1130), Director of EMCID; or Lowell Feld (Lowell.Feld@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9502), Leader of the Contingency Information Team. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Nathan Wilson (Nathan.Wilson@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9883). 1 Table of Contents CONTACTS .......................................................................................................................

455

Spectral Emission of Moving Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2006-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

456

Infrared emission from interplanetary dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard models of the interplanetary dust emission fail to account satisfactorily for IR observations. A new model of the dust, based on very simple assumptions on the grain structure (spherical and homogeneous) and chemical composition (astronomical silicates, graphite, blackbodies) is developed. Updated values of the refractive indexes have been included in the analysis. The predictions of the model (absolute values of the fluxes, spectral shape, elongation dependence of the emission) have then been compared with all the available IR observations performed by the ARGO (balloon-borne experiment by University of Rome), AFGL and Zodiacal Infrared Project (ZIP) (rocket experiments by Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Bedford, Mass.), and IRAS satellite. Good agreement is found when homogeneous data sets from single experiments (e.g., ZIP and ARGO) are considered separately. 19 references.

Temi, P.; De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.; Salama, A.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

emissions | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142228914 Varnish cache server emissions Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 9 January, 2014 - 13:12 Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities carbon cities CO2 emissions OpenEI suburbs US New research from the University of California-Berkeley shows that those who live in cities in the United States have significantly smaller per-capita carbon footprints than their suburban counterparts. The

458

Measuring and Modeling Emissions from Extremely Low-Emitting Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997. “Analysis of modal emissions from diverse in-useof a Comprehensive Modal Emissions Model”. Final reportof a Comprehensive Modal Emissions Model: Operating Under

Barth, M; Collins, J F; Scora, G; Davis, N; Norbeck, J N

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Forecasting US CO2 Emissions Using State-Level Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curve for air pollution emissions, Journal of EnvironmentalInformation Agency: 2004, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in1999, Controlling Carbon Emissions in China, Environment and

Steinhauser, Ralf; Auffhammer, Maximilian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Measuring and Modeling Emissions from Extremely Low Emitting Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997. “Analysis of modal emissions from diverse in-useof a Comprehensive Modal Emissions Model”. Final reportof a Comprehensive Modal Emissions Model: Operating Under

Barth, M; Collins, J F; Scora, G; Davis, N; Norbeck, J M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Estimation of Vehicular Emissions by Capturing Traffic Variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. , Ross, M. , 1996a. Modal Emissions Modeling: A PhysicalInstantaneous Pollutant Emissions. The Science of the TotalLoad on Motor Vehicle Emissions. Environmental Science &

Nesamani, K S; Chu, L Y; McNally, Michael G.; Jayakrishnan, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

each hour, equilibrium emissions and electricity prices areCalifornia Greenhouse Gas Emission and Sinks: 1990 to 2004 (estimates that CO 2 emissions from instate generationin 2004

Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions : costs associated with farm level mitigation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions within New Zealand account for 48 percent of all national greenhouse gas emissions. With the introduction of the emissions trading scheme… (more)

Wolken, Antony Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions index, we use conversion factors.into carbon dioxide emissions, we continue to use a factorappropriate factors to arrive at carbon dioxide emissions.

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Microsensors for Continuous Emission Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous emission monitors have evolved during the last fifteen years to include smaller and more compact units. The trend in miniaturizing detectors, as well as all electronic components, is the focus of this report. Micro- sensors, miniature spectrometers, and nano-sized sensors are only a few of the developments that are currently being incorporated into gas sensing instruments by industrial laboratories, research institutes and universities. This report focuses on the use of miniaturized sensors an...

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

Distribution of formaldehyde emission in particleboards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to study the distribution of formaldehyde emission determined by the flask method as a function of the samples pack configuration. The formaldehyde emission was determined on particleboards with the thicknesses of 8, 12 ... Keywords: distribution, flask method, formaldehyde emission, particleboards

Judith Kinga David; Valeriu Petrovici; Octavia Zeleniuc; Anne-Marie Loredana Badescu; Simona Nicoleta Urdea; Livia Sangeorzan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Continuous emission monitor for incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

Demirgian, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Continuous emission monitor for incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

Demirgian, J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Emission Factors Handbook: Guidelines for Estimating Trace Substance Emissions from Fossil Fuel Steam Electric Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Emission Factors Handbook" provides a tool for estimating trace substances emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants. The suggested emission factors are based on EPRI and Department of Energy (DOE) field measurements conducted at over 50 power plants using generally consistent sampling and analytical protocols. This information will help utility personnel estimate air toxic emissions for permitting purposes.

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

Greenhouse gas performance standards: From each according to his emission intensity or from each according to his emissions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From each according to his emission intensity or fromeach according to his emissions? D. RajagopalFrom each according to his emission intensity or from each

Rajagopal, Deepak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report  

SciTech Connect

The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

Fuehne, David P.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /  

SciTech Connect

The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

Fuehne, David P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Information about the Greenhouse Gas Emission Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources and Assumptions for the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Sources and Assumptions for the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Calculator To estimate your CO2 emissions rates and generate the bar graph, we used the following sources and assumptions. Your CO2 Emissions Rates Tailpipe (grams CO2/mile) This is the tailpipe CO2 emissions rate for combined city and highway driving that is shown on the fuel economy and environment label for the vehicle model you selected. It is the same regardless of where you live. Total (grams CO2/mile) This includes the vehicle's tailpipe emissions and emissions associated with the production of electricity used to charge the vehicle. For plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, it also includes emissions associated with the production of gasoline. It is estimated using the sources and assumptions below, and will vary based on where you live.

475

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

476

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels This calculator currently focuses on electricity for a number of reasons. The public's interest in vehicles fueled by electricity is high, and as a result consumers are interested in better understanding the emissions created when electricity is produced. For vehicles that are fueled solely by electricity, tailpipe emissions are zero, so electricity production accounts for all GHG emissions associated with such vehicles. Finally, GHG emissions from electricity production vary significantly by region, which makes a calculator like this one-which uses regional data instead of national averages-particularly useful. If you want to compare total tailpipe plus fuel production GHG emissions for an electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle to those for a gasoline

477

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

478

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

479

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel Paper Food Stone, clay and glass Methodological Details Estimation methods Glossary Return to: Energy and GHG Analysis Efficiency Page Energy Use in Manufacturing Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing Manufacturing, which accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy consumption, also accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy-related carbon emissions. (Agriculture, mining, forestry, and fisheries account for the remaining 20 percent.) In 1994, three industries, petroleum, chemicals, and primary metals, emitted almost 60 percent of the energy-related carbon in manufacturing. The next three largest emitters (paper, food, and the stone, glass, and clay products industry) produced an additional 22 percent of the energy-related manufacturing emissions (Figure 1).

480

High Energy Emission from Magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered soft gamma-ray emission from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045 has a luminosity L_g ~ 10^{36} ergs/s. This luminosity exceeds the spindown power by three orders of magnitude and must be fed by an alternative source of energy such as an ultrastrong magnetic field. A gradual release of energy in the stellar magnetosphere is expected if it is twisted and a strong electric current is induced on the closed field lines. We examine two mechanisms of gamma-ray emission associated with the gradual dissipation of this current. (1) A thin surface layer of the star is heated by the downward beam of current-carrying charges, which excite Langmuir turbulence in the layer. As a result, it can reach a temperature kT ~ 100 keV and emit bremsstrahlung photons up to this characteristic energy. (2) The magnetosphere is also a source of soft gamma rays at a distance of ~100 km from the star, where the electron cyclotron energy is in the keV range. A large electric field develops in this region in response to the outward drag force felt by the current-carrying electrons from the flux of keV photons leaving the star. A seed positron injected in this region undergoes a runaway acceleration and upscatters keV photons above the threshold for pair creation. The created pairs emit a synchrotron spectrum consistent with the observed 20-100 keV emission. This spectrum is predicted to extend to higher energies and reach a peak at ~1 MeV.

C. Thompson; A. M. Beloborodov

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oven emissions inorganic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

High-emission cold cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field-emission cathode having a multitude of field emission points for emitting a copious stream of electrons when subjected to a high field is described. The cathode is constructed by compressing a multitude of tungsten strips alternately arranged with molybdenum strips and copper ribbons or compressing alternately arranged copper plated tungsten and molybdenum strips, heating the arrangement to braze the tungsten and molybdenum strips together with the copper, machining and grinding the exposed strip edges of one side of the brazed arrangement to obtain a precisely planar surface, etching a portion of the molybdenum and copper to leave the edges of the tungsten strips protruding for electron emission, and subjecting the protruding edges of the tungsten strips to a high electric field to degas and roughen the surface to pnovide a large number of emitting points. The resulting structure is particularly useful as a cathode in a transversely excited gaseous laser where the cathode is mounted in a vacuum chamber for emitting electrons under the influence of a high electric field between the cathode and an extractor grid. The electrons pass through the extractor grid, a thin window in the wall of the laser chamber and into the laser chamber which is filled with a gaseous mixture of helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. A second grid is mounted on the gaseous side of the window. The electrons pass into the laser chamber under the influence of a second electric field between the second grid and an anode in the laser chamber to raise selected gas atoms of the gaseous mixture to appropriately excited states so that a subsequent coherent light beam passing through the mixture transversely to the electron stream through windows in opposite ends of the laser chamber stimulates the excited atoms to amplify the beam. (Official Gazette)

Mancebo, L.

1974-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

482

Nanotechnology Emission Assessment Technique (NEAT) used by NIOSH...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

number concentrations at concentrations at " " suspected suspected " " emission sources emission sources to to " " background background " " particle number concentrations....

483

High Energy Emission from Magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered soft gamma-ray emission from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045 has a luminosity L_g ~ 10^{36} ergs/s. This luminosity exceeds the spindown power by three orders of magnitude and must be fed by an alternative source of energy such as an ultrastrong magnetic field. A gradual release of energy in the stellar magnetosphere is expected if it is twisted and a strong electric current is induced on the closed field lines. We examine two mechanisms of gamma-ray emission associated with the gradual dissipation of this current. (1) A thin surface layer of the star is heated by the downward beam of current-carrying charges, which excite Langmuir turbulence in the layer. As a result, it can reach a temperature kT ~ 100 keV and emit bremsstrahlung photons up to this characteristic energy. (2) The magnetosphere is also a source of soft gamma rays at a distance of ~100 km from the star, where the electron cyclotron energy is in the keV range. A large electric field develops in this region in resp...

Thompson, C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Effects of pH and inorganic salts on the adsorption of phenol from aqueous systems on activated decolorizing charcoal  

SciTech Connect

An experimental investigation of the effects of pH and three inorganic salts (KCl, KI, and NaCl) on the adsorption isotherms of phenol (from a dilute aqueous solution) on activated charcoal was conducted. Each salt was studied at three different concentrations, i.e., 0.1, 0.01, and 0.005 M. The effect of pH (in the pH range 3 to 11) in the presence of KI, KCl, and NaCl was also investigated. The concentration of phenol in the aqueous systems studied ranged from 10 to 200 ppm. The temperature effect was also studied, and the resulting experimental equilibrium isotherms at 30, 40, and 55{degrees}C are well represented by Freundlich, Langmuir, and Redlich-Paterson isotherms. The relevant parameters for these isotherms are presented.

Halhouli, K.A.; Darwish, N.A.; Al-Dhoon, N.M. [Jordan Univ. of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

486

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

487

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

488

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

489

Monitoring the progress of emission inventories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue of EM contains three articles which focus on the latest improvements on the emissions inventory process. The first, 'Building the national emissions inventory: challenges and plans for improvements' by Doug Solomon and Martin Husk (pages 8-11), looks at the US national emissions inventory. The next, 'Greenhouse gas inventories - a historical perspective and assessment of improvements since 1990' by Bill Irving and Dina Kruger (pages 12-19) assesses improvements in national and international greenhouse gas emissions inventories over the last 15 years. The third article, 'The global mercury emissions inventory' by Leonard Levin (pages 20-25) gives an overview of the challenges associated with conducting a worldwide inventory of mercury emissions.

Levy, J.A. Jr.; Solomon, D.; Husk, M.; Irving, B.; Kruger, D.; Levin. L. [Exponent Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

Characterization of Dried and Torrefied Arundo Donax Biomass for Inorganic Species Prior to Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Portland General Electric (PGE) potentially plans to replace the coal with torrefied Arundo donax for their Boardman coal-fired power plant by 2020. Since there is only a limited amount of experience with this high yield energy crop, PGE would like to characterize raw and torrefied Arundo before a test burn and therefore avoid possible ash related operational problems such as slagging, deposit formation and corrosion. This report describes the results from characterization of ground and cross-sectioned samples of Arundo with a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, and also includes analytical results from a short water-leaching test for concentrations of Ca, Mg, K, Na, S, and Cl in the non-leached and leached Arundo and leachates. SEM-EDS analysis of torrefied Arundo revealed that condensation of volatile components during torrefaction can result in their undesirable re-deposition on the outside surfaces in the form of amorphous or crystallized clusters with a size from a few µm’s to as large as 100 µm. A short exposure of Arundo to water resulted in an efficient removal of volatile species from the raw and torrefied Arundo, e.g., ~ 98 wt% of total K and Cl, and ~75 wt% of total S were removed from raw Arundo, and more than 90 wt% of total K and Cl, and 70 wt% of S from torrefied Arundo, suggesting that water-leaching of Arundo before combustion can be an effective pre-treatment method because high concentrations of Cl increase emissions of HCl, and in combination with K can form large amounts of KCl deposits on boiler surfaces and in combination with H2O or SO3 cause corrosion.

Matyas, Josef; Johnson, Bradley R.; Cabe, James E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low emission boil systems. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first test run of the Toroidal Vortex Combustor (TVC) was completed on December 6. Riley was unable to witness or set up independent sampling equipment for NO{sub x} and precursor measurement for this run. A second run which we witnessed, but did not sample, was completed December 17. This was conducted almost entirely near SR = 1.0 while Textron investigated temperature-load relationships to address concerns from Run 1. A third run was completed over the December holiday break on Dorchester coal to address concerns Textron had about the Illinois test coal. All subsequent tests will use the Illinois coal. Boiler, firing system design. Elevation drawings were developed for dry wall-fired, conventional U-fired slagging, and TVC fired slagging units. We are investigating the feasibility of modifying a conventional U-fired design for low-NOx operation as an alternative to the TVC. The approach taken to I date for NOx reduction in existing U-fired units is to retrofit with delayed-mixing burners with staging air at various places, similar to the approach with dry fired units. The concept of staged fuel addition or reburning for the U-fired system is being examined as a potential combustion NOx control approach. This concept has high potential due to the high temperature and long residence time available in the stagger. Some field trials with coke oven gas reburn produced very low NOx results. Modeling of this concept was identified as a priority task. The model development will include matching field data for air staging on slagging units to the predictions. Emissions control. Selection of an SO2 control process continues to be a high priority task. Sargent & Lundy completed a cost comparison of several regenerable processes, most of which have NOx control potential as well: Active coke, NOXSO, copper oxide, SNOX, ammonia (for SO only, ammonium sulfate byproduct), and a limestone scrubber for comparison.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

492

Holistic Impacts of Combustion Modifications on Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operation, availability, and electricity generation costs for coal-fired boilers are strongly impacted by emissions rates and associated regulations. Many stand-alone control technologies are currently being utilized to insure that emissions limits are consistently met. However, boiler-specific operational parameters strongly impact emissions, and in turn affect the selection and operation of control technologies. As a result, boiler operation must be included in a holistic approach for meeting ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

493

Emissions Modeling for Electric Vehicles: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been considerable debate and numerous publications comparing the emissions from alternative fuel vehicles with those of internal combustion engine vehicles. Considering the highly competitive nature of the automotive industry, the size of the automotive fuels markets, and intense regulatory scrutiny of emissions, there is no easy method of establishing agreement on all of the analytical factors involved in emissions analysis from vehicles. However, agreement on many of the factual parameters sh...

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

494

Phosphors for flat panel emissive displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of emissive display technologies is presented. Display types briefly described include: cathode ray tubes (CRTs), field emission displays (FEDs), electroluminescent displays (ELDs), and plasma display panels (PDPs). The critical role of phosphors in further development of the latter three flat panel emissive display technologies is outlined. The need for stable, efficient red, green, and blue phosphors for RGB fall color displays is emphasized.

Anderson, M.T.; Walko, R.J.; Phillips, M.L.F.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Energy Efficiency in CO2 Emissions Trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update explores methods to account for carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reductions specifically associated with the implementation of energy efficiency programs into greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading or offset markets. It focuses on how to understand, account for, quantify, verify, and optimize how electricity savings may both reduce CO2 emissions and potentially be granted credits for CO2 savings that may be traded in cap-and-trade regimes.

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

496

Total atmospheric emissivities for a tropical climate  

SciTech Connect

The total atmospheric flux emissivities as a function of water vapor optical depth are reported for meteorological condtions in Thailand. The water vapor optical depth was first calculated as a function of height up to 12 km from the annual average upper air pressures, temperature, and dew points at Bangkok. The flux emissivity was then computed using tabulated data for the flux emissivities of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone at 20/sup 0/C. (SPH)

Exell, R.H.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Emission estimates for air pollution transport models.  

SciTech Connect

The results of studies of energy consumption and emission inventories in Asia are discussed. These data primarily reflect emissions from fuel combustion (both biofuels and fossil fuels) and were collected to determine emissions of acid-deposition precursors (SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}) and greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) appropriate to RAINS-Asia regions. Current work is focusing on black carbon (soot), volatile organic compounds, and ammonia.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

498

Estimating Emissions of Other Greenhouse Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimating Emissions of Other Greenhouse Gases Presentation to the Department of Energy Republic of the Philippines September 17, 1997 Arthur Rypinski Energy ...

499

REPORT: Characterization of Emissions and Occupational ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 23, 2007 ... carbon dioxide (CO2) and SF6 (both provided by Lunt ... under similar parameters to characterize emissions and byproducts as the cover gases ...

500

Eliminating CO2 Emissions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TiO2 pigment is primarily produced by the high temperature chloride process, resulting in considerable CO2 emissions. A novel hydrometallurgical process for  ...