National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for outsmarting flu viruses

  1. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Print Worldwide, influenza causes substantial deaths and yearly economic burdens, but the highly changeable nature of the flu virus...

  2. A Guide For Parents FLU INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Peter

    viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land of the flu? Symptoms of flu can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache

  3. SWINE FLU (H1N1) VIRUS RESPONSE PLAN Updated May 4, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Covering Cough. We are promoting the practice of covering coughing and sneezing. 3) Preparing for swine flu

  4. What is the flu? Influenza, "the flu" is a contagious respiratory infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    What is the flu? Influenza, "the flu" is a contagious respiratory infection caused by the influenza medications are used. How is flu spread? The influenza virus is very contagious and is spread by respiratory

  5. Avian Flu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckburg, Paul

    2006-11-06

    Since 2003, a severe form of H5N1 avian influenza has rapidly spread throughout Asia and Europe, infecting over 200 humans in 10 countries. The spread of H5N1 virus from person-to-person has been rare, thus preventing the emergence of a widespread pandemic. However, this ongoing epidemic continues to pose an important public health threat. Avian flu and its pandemic potential in humans will be discussed.

  6. Berkeley Lab Pandemic Flu Information - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it causes. When a new influenza flu emerges, a flu pandemic can occur. Because the virus is new, the human population has little to no immunity against it. The virus spreads...

  7. Swine Influenza (swine flu) Fact Sheet What is swine flu?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Stephen L.

    . An investigation into these cases is ongoing. Is this swine flu virus contagious? CDC has determined that this swine influenza A (H1N1) virus is contagious and is spreading from human to human. However, at this time

  8. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deaths and yearly economic burdens, but the highly changeable nature of the flu virus complicates the production of an effective vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control...

  9. Everyday Preventive Actions That Can Help Fight Germs, Like Flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    spread? Flu viruses are thought to spread mainly from person to person through the coughing, sneezing and mouth with a tissuey when you cough or sneeze. This will block the spread of droplets from your mouth

  10. Biophysics and bioinformatics of influenza virus reassortment The rapid evolution of influenza virus presents a significant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    Biophysics and bioinformatics of influenza virus reassortment The rapid evolution of influenza virus presents a significant threat to public health. Unlike many other pathogens, the flu virus has

  11. Winner Takes All: Competing Viruses or Ideas on fair-play Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenfeld, Roni

    . For example, in a biological virus set- ting, we have the common flu versus avian flu. In a computer virus setting, clever virus authors make sure that their code eliminates most other computer viruses fromWinner Takes All: Competing Viruses or Ideas on fair-play Networks B. Aditya Prakash Alex Beutel

  12. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 Worldwide, influenza causes substantial deaths and yearly...

  13. Pandemic Flu: What To Know and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    cough or sneeze Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it Ifor sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. If a tissue is unavailable, cough or sneeze into your shoulder or elbow instead sick children at home. ­ If you have flu-like symptoms (fever with cough or sore throat), stay home

  14. INFLUENZA 101 Symptoms of the flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    INFLUENZA 101 Symptoms of the flu Sudden onset of fever/chills, coughing, muscle aches, headache · Stay home and limit contact with others until coughing and/or sneezing subside (usually · If having difficulty breathing doing ordinary things, or are coughing up blood · If not improving by the end

  15. H1N1 (swine flu) Information for Students, Faculty & Staff There have been confirmed H1N1 cases and a death in Tennessee. The Center for Disease Control (CDC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    virus causing illness in people. This new virus was first detected in people in the United States, in the United States, on average 36,000 people die from flu-related complications and more than 200,000 people and a death in Tennessee. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that H1N1 is contagious

  16. Occ. Med. Offers Staff Flu Vaccines by Appointment | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occ. Med. Offers Staff Flu Vaccines by Appointment Occupational Medicine is now accepting appointments from Jefferson Lab staff for Influenza vaccinations. If you would like to be...

  17. PREPARE NOW TO BEAT THE FLU! (2010-2011) GET THE FLU VACCINE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    is ok) 5. Cough syrup (similar to Robitussin DM, generic is ok) 6. Tissues Students can purchase a "Flu, hand sanitizer, acetaminophen, cough syrup, and throat lozenges. You may also purchase the items above, cough, sore throat, and body aches. · Most individuals who get the flu who do not have a high risk

  18. Cold and Flu Prevention - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cold and Flu Prevention Hand Washing Healthy Sleep Heat Stress Radon Signs of a Heart Attack Signs of a Stroke Coping with Stress & Change Skin Cancer Awareness Choose My...

  19. Flu shots available beginning Oct. 5 | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battle the flu Wash hands regularly with soap and water, use hand sanitizer Sneeze and cough into a sleeve or tissue Stay home when sick Regularly sanitize work surfaces and...

  20. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure of the Fab section of CR9114 in complex with the HA segment of virus AVietnam12032004 (H5N1). The crystal structures showed how CR9114 likely accomplishes its...

  1. FLU ALERT SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    , in the dining halls and elsewhere on campus. The influenza virus is very contagious and spreads easily! Cough syrup if coughing interferes with sleep You are most contagious from the day before your symptoms

  2. City of Chicago won't sweat the flu with Argonne's help | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on their toes." This particular exercise followed the spread of an imaginary flu from Egypt. By the time the flu "arrived" in Chicago, more than 15,000 cases had been reported...

  3. Foiling the Flu Bug Global Partnerships for Nuclear Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1663 Foiling the Flu Bug Global Partnerships for Nuclear Energy Dark Universe Mysteries WILL NOT NEED TESTING Expanding Nuclear Energy the Right Way GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS AND AN ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE sense.The Laboratory is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy

  4. Swine Flu, Fiction or Reality Nabil A. NIMER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    symptoms, but can be deadly #12;H5N1 (avian flu) Can mutate rapidly Causes severe illness and can trigger a special inhaler used for five days. It can cause bronchospasm in some patients, thus not recommended for people with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Why do we need ANTIBIOTICS in a pandemic

  5. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print

  6. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

  7. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu

  8. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combined effects could allow the Viet04 virus to escape entrapment by mucins in the lungs and increase binding to susceptible human epithelial cells. These mutations therefore...

  9. Students experiencing flu-like symptoms, such as fever with cough and/or sore throat,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    Students experiencing flu-like symptoms, such as fever with cough and/or sore throat, should other difficulty breathing beyond a typical cough. Inform Undergraduates: Notify the director

  10. Understanding social amplification of risk : possible impact of an avian flu pandemic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundrani, Aamir (Aamir Sultan)

    2007-01-01

    Today, stakeholders expect organizations to be able to endure external shocks. Hence, the real potential of an avian flu pandemic has many corporations developing business continuity plans for the disruptions that a pandemic ...

  11. Treating Influenza(Flu) Do you have Asthma, Diabetes or Chronic Heart Disease?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    a high risk condition and you get flu symptoms. Symptoms can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny with the use of influenza antiviral drugs,including nausea,vomiting,dizziness, runny or stuffy nose,cough

  12. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5...

  13. What can you do to stop the flu? Cover your cough! Help stop the spread of germs by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Peter

    What can you do to stop the flu? · Cover your cough! Help stop the spread of germs by covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze with a tissue or with your upper sleeve. · Wash your hands surfaces. · Flu symptoms include: - Fever - Extreme tiredness - Headache - Cough - Muscle aches - Runny

  14. An Update on Avian Flu The virus continues to spread in wild birds and poultry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Myanmar, India, Afghanistan, India, Iraq, Iran, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey, Greece, Romania, Bulgaria-scale and statistically significant efficacy studies of anti-viral drugs like Tamiflu and Relenza against the H5N1 avian

  15. PREPARE NOW TO BEAT THE FLU! Updated for 2012-2013 Influenza Season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    is ok) 5. Cough syrup (similar to Robitussin DM, generic is ok) 6. Tissues 7. Contact numbers: Primary sanitizer, acetaminophen, cough syrup, and throat lozenges. These are also located at the Sandburg Emporium include: Fever over 100 degrees F, cough, sore throat, and body aches. · Most individuals who get the flu

  16. Worried about H1N1 SWINE FLU? What you should do.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    with severe illness like difficulty breathing AND YOU HAVE Fever (100.4) plus cough or sore throat Fever (100.4) plus cough or sore throat Fever (100.4) plus cough or sore throat YOU SHOULD Stay home until you. The illness can cause fever, cough, sore throat, tiredness, aches, chills and stuffy nose. H1N1 flu spreads

  17. Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swarup, Samarth

    Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu a policy that encourages healthy behaviors (such as covering your cough and using hand sanitizers) at four coughs, minimizing contact with potential fomites) at major tourist locations. We use a synthetic

  18. Worried about H1N1 SWINE FLU? What you should do.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    with severe illness like difficulty breathing AND YOU HAVE Fever (100.4) plus cough or sore throat Fever (100.4) plus cough or sore throat Fever (100.4) plus cough or sore throat YOU SHOULD Stay home until you fever, cough, sore throat, tiredness, aches, chills and stuffy nose. H1N1 flu spreads when a sick person

  19. What are the symptoms of flu? Symptoms include sudden onset of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    What are the symptoms of flu? · Symptoms include sudden onset of: o fever/chills o cough o muscle lasting 5 or more days (measured with a thermometer; 37.0 Celsius is normal) · Coughing up blood that improve but then return with fever and worse cough Those in high risk groups including pregnant women

  20. Difference? Seasonal Flu, Bird Flu, Pandemic Flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ).( Produces fever, tiredness, muscle aches, dry cough, sore throat, nasal( congestion, and headache. Children

  1. FluCaP: A Heuristic Search Planner for First-Order MDPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoelldobler, S; Skvortsova, O; 10.1613/jair.1965

    2011-01-01

    We present a heuristic search algorithm for solving first-order Markov Decision Processes (FOMDPs). Our approach combines first-order state abstraction that avoids evaluating states individually, and heuristic search that avoids evaluating all states. Firstly, in contrast to existing systems, which start with propositionalizing the FOMDP and then perform state abstraction on its propositionalized version we apply state abstraction directly on the FOMDP avoiding propositionalization. This kind of abstraction is referred to as first-order state abstraction. Secondly, guided by an admissible heuristic, the search is restricted to those states that are reachable from the initial state. We demonstrate the usefulness of the above techniques for solving FOMDPs with a system, referred to as FluCaP (formerly, FCPlanner), that entered the probabilistic track of the 2004 International Planning Competition (IPC2004) and demonstrated an advantage over other planners on the problems represented in first-order terms.

  2. Insights from investigating the interactions of adamantane-based drugs with the M2 proton channel from the H1N1 swine virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing-Fang [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)] [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wei, Dong-Qing, E-mail: dqwei@gordonlifescience.org [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China) [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gordon Life Science Institute, 13784 Torrey Del Mar Drive, San Diego, CA 92130 (United States); Chou, Kuo-Chen [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China) [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gordon Life Science Institute, 13784 Torrey Del Mar Drive, San Diego, CA 92130 (United States)

    2009-10-16

    The M2 proton channel is one of indispensable components for the influenza A virus that plays a vital role in its life cycle and hence is an important target for drug design against the virus. In view of this, the three-dimensional structure of the H1N1-M2 channel was developed based on the primary sequence taken from a patient recently infected by the H1N1 (swine flu) virus. With an explicit water-membrane environment, molecular docking studies were performed for amantadine and rimantadine, the two commercial drugs generally used to treat influenza A infection. It was found that their binding affinity to the H1N1-M2 channel is significantly lower than that to the H5N1-M2 channel, fully consistent with the recent report that the H1N1 swine virus was resistant to the two drugs. The findings and the relevant analysis reported here might provide useful structural insights for developing effective drugs against the new swine flu virus.

  3. Feline immunodeficiency virus latency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnel, Samantha J; Sparger, Ellen E; Murphy, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    A simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaque model toMC: A simian immunodeficiency virus macaque model of highlyIsolation of a T- lymphotropic virus from domestic cats with

  4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urges you to take the following steps to protect yourself and others from influenza (the flu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    , cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may also://WWW.FLU.GOV or call 800-CDC-INFO ·Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue-LIKE SYMPTOMS INCLUDE: fever cough sorethroat runnyorstuffynose bodyaches headache chills fatigue Some people

  5. Viruses and cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigby, P.W.J.; Wilkie, N.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 14 selections. Some of the titles are: Immortalising gene(s) encoded by Epstein-Barr Virus; Adenovirus genes involved in transformation. What determines the oncogenic phenotype.; Oncogenesis by mouse mammary tumour virus; and Transforming ras genes.

  6. Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon

    2005-01-26

    Extension Small Grains Specialist, College Station, TX Carl Patrick, Extension Entomologist, Amarillo, TX Karl Steddom and Charlie Rush, Plant Pathologists, Amarillo, TX W Overview of WSMV and HPV Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus First discovered in Nebraska... losses due to WSMV exceed $30 million in some years but are in- significant in others. High Plains Virus High Plains Virus (HPV), occasionally called High Plains Disease, is a relatively new virus identified in the Great Plains in 1993. HPV usually...

  7. Overview Gaming SciTech Fun BizWorld Downloads Mobile Minigames Search text in Everything Go!Submit News | RSS Feeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosselin, Frédéric

    Of Bird Flu Virus Superconductivity 'gridlock' Is Explained Cause Of Supervolcano Eruption Determined

  8. www.cnrs.fr Des virus mergents aux virus pandmiques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    2014 www.cnrs.fr Des virus émergents aux virus pandémiques: interaction entre écologie des hôtes et évolution virale From emerging to pandemic viruses: interplay between host ecology and viral evolution

  9. Generating electricity from viruses

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-06-23

    Berkeley Lab's Seung-Wuk Lee discusses "Generating electricity from viruses" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas.

  10. Generating electricity from viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Seung-Wuk Lee discusses "Generating electricity from viruses" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas.

  11. arXiv:0910.1775v2[physics.flu-dyn]13Jan2010 Self-consistent theory of capillary-gravity-wave generation by small moving objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    species (for example wiggling beetles) may take advantage of the generation of capillary-gravity wavesarXiv:0910.1775v2[physics.flu-dyn]13Jan2010 Self-consistent theory of capillary-gravity-wave generation by small moving objects A. D. Chepelianskii(a) , M. Schindler(b) , F. Chevy(c) , E. Rapha¨el(b) (a

  12. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

    1996-01-01

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

  13. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

    1996-12-10

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

  14. Winter Infections: Influenza, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    spread? Sick person can spread influenza by: ­ Touching ­ Sneezing ­ Coughing Picture: newbedfordguide Fever Cough Fatigue (feel "worn out") Headaches Body aches Runny nose #12;Influenza ("Flu") Treatments paralysis) #12;"MythBusters" Reported That: Sneezes can travel ~35 mph Cough/sneeze droplets can travel

  15. An introduction to computer viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    This report on computer viruses is based upon a thesis written for the Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Tennessee in December 1989 by David R. Brown. This thesis is entitled An Analysis of Computer Virus Construction, Proliferation, and Control and is available through the University of Tennessee Library. This paper contains an overview of the computer virus arena that can help the reader to evaluate the threat that computer viruses pose. The extent of this threat can only be determined by evaluating many different factors. These factors include the relative ease with which a computer virus can be written, the motivation involved in writing a computer virus, the damage and overhead incurred by infected systems, and the legal implications of computer viruses, among others. Based upon the research, the development of a computer virus seems to require more persistence than technical expertise. This is a frightening proclamation to the computing community. The education of computer professionals to the dangers that viruses pose to the welfare of the computing industry as a whole is stressed as a means of inhibiting the current proliferation of computer virus programs. Recommendations are made to assist computer users in preventing infection by computer viruses. These recommendations support solid general computer security practices as a means of combating computer viruses.

  16. CD8? T Cell Response to Influenza Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Daniel, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    The flu is an extremely prevalent and potentially devastating disease, especially dangerous to the very young, the elderly, and to people with compromised immune systems. Influenza has a characteristic course of infection, ...

  17. From Shakespeare to Viruses

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sung-Hou Kim

    2010-01-08

    Berkeley Lab scientists have created a unique new tool for analyzing and comparing long sets of data, be it the genomes of mammals or viruses, or the works of Shakespeare. The results of the Shakespeare analysis surprised scholars with their accuracy

  18. Cutaneous manifestations of the ebola virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blattner, Collin M; Mortazie, Michael B.; Murase, Jenny E

    2015-01-01

    Case fatality rate for Ebola virus disease in west Africa.by Marburg and Ebola viruses: guide for their diagnosis,of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation. J

  19. Capsid and Infectivity in Virus Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cliver, Dean O.

    2009-01-01

    S. U. (2007). Hepatitis A virus. In D. M. Knipe & P. M.PCR results with inactivated viruses. Journal of Virologicaland non-infectious hepatitis A virus. Journal of Virological

  20. Cell Transformation by RNA Viruses: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Hung

    2011-01-01

    Molecular biology and oncogenesis. Viruses 2010, 2, 2037-C. Insertional oncogenesis by non-acute retroviruses:molecular biology and oncogenesis. Viruses 2010, 2, Hofacre,

  1. Selecting a path against Hepatitis C Virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeon, Rudo Lyndon

    2013-12-12

    of the Flaviviridae family (1). HCV infection affects over 180 million people worldwide (2) and is the leading cause of liver transplantation developed countries (3). Until recently the only currently approved HCV therapy involved a 24-48 week regimen... of combination therapy involving pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin (4). Interferon alpha-ribavirin treatment is costly, time-consuming and riddled with serious and debilitating side effects such as depression, fatigue and flu-like symptoms (5, 6...

  2. Moloney murine leukemia virus glyco-gag facilitates xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus replication through human APOBEC3-independent mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitta, Takayuki; Lee, Sangouk; Ha, Dat; Arias, Maribel; Kozak, Christine A; Fan, Hung

    2012-01-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus: a multistep process. Trends82. 2. Miyazawa T: Infections of feline leukemia virus andfeline immunodeficiency virus. Front Biosci 2002, 7:d504–

  3. How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulshof, Joost

    How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus Maria Xiridou1 *, Barbara Borkent Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract Background: Hepatitis D (or hepatitis delta) virus is a defective virus that relies on hepatitis B virus (HBV) for transmission; infection

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Le Blanc Virus, a Third Caenorhabditis Nematode-Infecting Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, David

    Complete Genome Sequence of Le Blanc Virus, a Third Caenorhabditis Nematode-Infecting Virus Carl J,a and Institute of Biology of the Ecole Normale Supérieure (IBENS), Paris, Franceb Orsay virus and Santeuil virus, the first known viruses capable of naturally infecting the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans

  5. Modeling Computer Viruses MSc Thesis (Afstudeerscriptie)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, University of

    Modeling Computer Viruses MSc Thesis (Afstudeerscriptie) written by Luite Menno Pieter van Zelst About half a year ago, Alban Ponse, my thesis supervisor, suggested that the topic of `computer viruses indus- try and the creators of computer viruses. After all, the anti-virus industry stands to lose a lot

  6. Virus Evolution: Insights from an Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena, Santiago F.

    Virus Evolution: Insights from an Experimental Approach Santiago F. Elena and Rafael Sanju Viruses represent a serious problem faced by human and veterinary medicine and agronomy. New viruses indicates that the evolution of viruses is determined mainly by key features such as their small genomes

  7. Virus Versus Mankind Aviezri S. Fraenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virus Versus Mankind Aviezri S. Fraenkel Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics://www.wisdom.weizmann.ac.il/~fraenkel Humanity is but a passing episode in the eternal life of the virus Abstract. We define a two­player virus game played on a finite cyclic digraph G = (V; E). Each vertex is either occupied by a single virus

  8. Effects of ethanol and reactive species on Hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seronello, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    the mutation rate of hepatitis C virus RNA. Manuscript inreactive oxygen species during hepatitis C virus infection.2010) Ethanol enhances hepatitis C virus replication through

  9. Identification and evaluation of an isolate of sugarcane mosaic virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorda de Messina, Laura Maria

    1983-01-01

    isolate; SH, sugarcane mosa1c virus strain H; H, healthy sorghum sap; SA, sugarcane mosaic virus strain A; SB, sugarcane mosa1c virus strain B; SM, sugarcane mosa1c virus strain M; SD, sugarcane mosaic virus strain D; SI, sugarcane mosaic virus strain..., sugarcane mosaic virus strain I; H, healthy sorghum sap; SA, sugarcane mosaic virus strain A; SB, sugarcane mosaic virus strain 8; SM, sugarcane mosaic virus strain M; SD, sugarcane mosaic virus strain D; SH, sugarcane mosaic virus strain H; RH, Rio...

  10. High-Resolution Functional Profiling Hepatitis C Virus Genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QI, HANGFEI

    2012-01-01

    Rice, Flaviviridae: The viruses and Their Repliation, inS.M. , et al. , Hepatitis C Virus, in Fields of Virology,Transfusion-Transmitted Viruses Study Group. Intervirology,

  11. Disseminated varicella-zoster virus in an immunocompetent adult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrun, Branden; Williams, Victoria; Brice, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Arvin AM. Varicella-zoster virus. Clin Microbiol Rev. 1996Jr. JW. Varicella-zoster virus: atypical presentations andDisseminated varicella-zoster virus in an immunocompetent

  12. Cellular defenses and viral counterattacks during herpes simplex virus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaurushiya, Mira Suresh

    2011-01-01

    reactivation of herpes simplex virus latency. J Virol 63,by extracts of herpes simplex virus type 1-infected humanbetween herpes simplex virus type 1 regulatory protein ICP0,

  13. Miliary Tuberculosis Coinfection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esteve, Erika; Supervía, August; Pallàs, Oriol; Martínez, María T; Montero, María M; del Baño, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    human immunodeficiency virus, and foreign birth in Northwith Human Immunodeficiency Virus Erika Esteve, MD* Augusthuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV). 1 In the United States,

  14. Characterization of Transmitted/Founder Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cercillieux, Angelique Satoko

    2013-01-01

    by   the  quantity  of  virus  in   plasma.  Science,  human  immunodeficiency  virus  type  1  replication  by  in  simian  immunodeficiency  virus  infection  by   CD8+  

  15. Studies on Replication of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Satellite RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Soon Ho

    2011-01-01

    of the satellite of peanut stunt virus reveals structuralrepresenting two subgroups of peanut stunt virus strains:the satellite RNA of peanut stunt virus ( PSV) nucleotide

  16. Exploitation of skin innate immune defense by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Vaccinia Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLeod, Daniel Travis

    2012-01-01

    Selective killing of vaccinia virus by LL-37: implicationsV. 2008. Herpes simplex virus type 1 Us3 gene deletionimmune response to vaccinia virus. The Journal of Allergy

  17. The Cellular Protein La Functions in Enhancement of Virus Release through Lipid Rafts Facilitated by Murine Leukemia Virus Glycosylated Gag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitta, Takayuki; Tam, Raymond; Kim, Jung Woo; Fan, Hung

    2011-01-01

    1980. Murine leukemia virus proteins expressed on theby the murine leukemia virus. J. Mol. Biol. 205:363–372. 4.a neurovirulent murine leuke- mia virus: identification of

  18. The Development of Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus to RNA Interference Therapies: Understanding Mechanism and Developing Strategies to Overcome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Priya Shirish

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus, O’nyong nyong virus (ONNV), West Nile virus (WNV), and yellow fever virus (YFV). Priming mosquitoes

  19. Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezk, SA; Weiss, LM

    2007-01-01

    an aggressive Epstein-Barr virus–associated extramedullaryassociated herpes-type virus to infectious mononucleosis.Rickinson A. Epstein-Barr virus. Virus Res 2002;82:109-13 [

  20. Structure of the hepatitis E virus-like particle suggests mechanisms for virus assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Yizhi Jane

    Structure of the hepatitis E virus-like particle suggests mechanisms for virus assembly (received for review May 1, 2009) Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a small, non-enveloped RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae, is associated with endemic and epidemic acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. Our 3.5-Å

  1. Analysis of in vivo dynamics of influenza virus infection in mice using a GFP reporter virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of in vivo dynamics of influenza virus infection in mice using a GFP reporter virus Balaji for review December 30, 2009) Influenza A virus is being extensively studied because of its major impact on human and animal health. However, the dynamics of influenza virus infection and the cell types infected

  2. Evolution of Computer Virus Concealment and Anti-Virus Techniques: A Short Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rad, Babak Bashari; Ibrahim, Suhaimi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview on evolution of concealment methods in computer viruses and defensive techniques employed by anti-virus products. In order to stay far from the anti-virus scanners, computer viruses gradually improve their codes to make them invisible. On the other hand, anti-virus technologies continually follow the virus tricks and methodologies to overcome their threats. In this process, anti-virus experts design and develop new methodologies to make them stronger, more and more, every day. The purpose of this paper is to review these methodologies and outline their strengths and weaknesses to encourage those are interested in more investigation on these areas.

  3. LOUISIANA GUIDANCE FOR CLINICIANS ON THE NEED FOR MEDICAL EVALUATION, TESTING, AND TREATMENT OF POSSIBLE NOVEL H1N1 "SWINE"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    viruses spread by coughing, sneezing and touching contaminated surfaces. The symptoms of the H1N1 flu virus in people are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, runny that the child does not want to be held Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

  4. Immune System for Virus Detection and Elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consider the aspects of designing a computer immune system for virus detection and elimination using to modelling the biological immune system in a computer we design a computer immune system for virus detectionImmune System for Virus Detection and Elimination Rune Schmidt Jensen IMM-THESIS-2002-08-31 IMM #12

  5. Semester Thesis Virus Inoculation on Social Graphs -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    Semester Thesis Virus Inoculation on Social Graphs - The Friendship Factor Dominic Meier meierdo introduce friendship between neighbors while looking at a virus inoculation game which is played and in the star graph. #12;Virus Inoculation on Social Graphs - The Windfall of Friendship page 2 1 Introduction

  6. Influenza A Virus Infections in Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    Influenza A Virus Infections in Land Birds, People's Republic of China A. Townsend Peterson, Sarah for avian in- fluenza viruses. We examined this assumption by sampling and real-time reverse transcription migratory species. Surveillance programs for monitoring spread of these viruses need to be redesigned. Avian

  7. Molecular Analysis of Replication and Packaging Mechanism of Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    RH, Symons RH. Cucumber mosaic virus contains a functionallycowpea chlorotic mottle viruses exhibit neutral effects inof satellite tobacco mosaic virus and its helper virus in

  8. Should I Work Today? | Flu Information | DHMC Intranet http://intranet.hitchcock.org/hc/webpage.cfm?site_id=1&org_id=393&morg_id=0&gsec_id=36557&item_id=36570&printable=true[5/13/2013 2:25:34 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Lesions, rashes, and eye conditions may not apply to flu-like illness. COUGH If you have a cough and fever (>100 F or 38 C within the last 24 hours) NO If you have a new (cough, but no fever (, or aspirin) YES, but wear a mask that covers nose and mouth. If you have a prolonged cough of unknown cause

  9. Flu Shots For Faculty And Sta Get Your Flu Shot!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    contra la gripe! CLÍNICAS SIN CITA PARA EL PROFESORADO Y EL PERSONAL DE UW-MADISON Los Centros para el el fin de facilitarles el acceso a vacunarse contra la gripe al ocupado profesorado y al personal, UW thaum lub Cuaj Hli tim 29 txog lub Kaum Ib Hlis tim 6. Tsuas xaiv qhov chaw, caij thiab hnub zoo tshaj

  10. Is It A Cold Or The Flu? Symptoms Cold Flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Usual Sometimes Sore throat Common Sometimes Chest discomfort, cough Mild-moderate, hacking Common, can fever and cough with medicines you can buy at the store. 5. If you get very sick or are pregnant or have

  11. development StemcellsSmokingFlu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    and cancer 1957 British Medical Council announces a "direct causal connection" between smoking and lung such as the `Gremlins' TV campaign 1999 Sure Start Programme for pre-school children influenced by RCUK research showing

  12. Virus vector gene inserts are stabilized in the presence of satellite panicum mosaic virus coat protein 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, Anthany Laurence

    2009-05-15

    The coat protein of satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) was used to stabilize viral vector gene inserts in planta. A Potato virus X (PVX) vector carrying the SPMV capsid protein (CP) gene was successfully stabilized through three serial passages...

  13. Host-virus interactions in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, George Edwin Peter

    2014-11-28

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a rapidly evolving virus that has significant economic and welfare implications for the pig industry. Vaccination strategies have proved largely ineffective ...

  14. Eradicating Computer Viruses on Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jinyu

    2012-01-01

    Spread of computer viruses can be modeled as the SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) epidemic propagation. We show that in order to ensure the random immunization or the targeted immunization effectively prevent computer viruses propagation on homogeneous networks, we should install antivirus programs in every computer node and frequently update those programs. This may produce large work and cost to install and update antivirus programs. Then we propose a new policy called "network monitors" to tackle this problem. In this policy, we only install and update antivirus programs for small number of computer nodes, namely the "network monitors". Further, the "network monitors" can monitor their neighboring nodes' behavior. This mechanism incur relative small cost to install and update antivirus programs.We also indicate that the policy of the "network monitors" is efficient to protect the network's safety. Numerical simulations confirm our analysis.

  15. Detection of Metamorphic Computer Viruses Using Algebraic Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malcolm, Grant

    Detection of Metamorphic Computer Viruses Using Algebraic Specification Matt Webster and Grant Malcolm Abstract This paper describes a new approach towards the detection of metamorphic computer viruses through the algebraic specification of an assembly language. Metamorphic computer viruses are computer

  16. Studies on Immune Regulation of Epstein-Barr Virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAulay, Karen A

    2008-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a gammaherpes virus that infects >90% of the adult population worldwide. During childhood infection is generally sub-clinical, however if delayed until adolescence infectious mononucleosis (IM) may develop. The virus has...

  17. Integrated Nanosystems Templated by Self-assembled Virus Capsids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Harrison, S. C. “Principles of Virus Structure” in Virology,self-assembling spherical virus was modified on the interiorTemplated by Self-assembled Virus Capsids by Nicholas

  18. Sophos Anti-Virus for Windows, version 7 user manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophos Anti-Virus for Windows, version 7 user manual For Windows 2000 and later Document date: August 2008 #12;Contents 1 About Sophos Anti-Virus ........................................................................................................................3 2 Introduction to Sophos Anti-Virus

  19. Virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    Virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media Subir for virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media is presented. The model involves solution of the advection­dispersion equation, which additionally considers virus

  20. Towards More Effective Virus Detectors Raghunathan Srinivasan and Partha Dasgupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Partha

    Towards More Effective Virus Detectors Raghunathan Srinivasan and Partha Dasgupta Arizona State University 1. Introduction Viruses (or malware) are a scourge, with potentially unlimited fraudulent uses. Smart viruses can hide, mutate and disable detection methods. Computers are an important part

  1. Cholesteric Phase in Virus Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Dogic; S. Fraden

    2000-03-28

    We report measurements of the cholesteric pitch and twist elastic constant $(K_{22})$ in monodisperse suspensions of the rod-like virus filamentous bacteriophage {\\it fd}. Measurements were taken for concentrations spanning the entire cholesteric region at several ionic strengths and temperatures. In the limit of high ionic strength the cholesteric pitch $(P_0)$ scales with concentration (c) as $P_0 \\propto c^{-1.66}$. As the ionic strength decreases the scaling exponent systematically changes to lower values.

  2. Serology of a cotton virus in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darling, Dale Robert

    1962-01-01

    of the virus through two or more generations of healthy plants by, s. draft transmission from an infected plant, b. mechanical transfer of the sap of infected plants, c. insect transmission of the virus from infected planta, and by 2. serological...) found that inoculations smde with expressed leaf sap of virus-infected cotton to cotton, bean, cowpes, tobacco and hollyhock plants failed to result in symptoms. Approach drafts of diseased to healthy plants of the Empire variety of cotton were smde...

  3. A Fusion-Inhibiting Peptide against Rift Valley Fever Virus Inhibits Multiple, Diverse Viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Fusion-Inhibiting Peptide against Rift Valley Fever Virus Inhibits Multiple, Diverse Viruses of America Abstract For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins

  4. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Immunogenic compositions comprising...

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade M mosaic gag polypeptides...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade M mosaic gag polypeptides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade M mosaic gag...

  6. Hepatitis C Virus infection, type III cryoglobulinemia, and necrotizing vasculitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownell, Isaac; Fangman, William

    2007-01-01

    2a and ribavirin to treat his hepatitis C and its associatedD, Dammacco F. Hepatitis C virus, cryoglobulinaemia, andpatients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Arthritis

  7. Recombinant herpes simplex virus useful for treating neoplastic disease

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitley, Richard J.; Roizman, Bernard

    2010-06-29

    Recombinant herpes simplex viruses comprising DNA encoding cytokines and methods for treating neoplastic diseases using the inventive recombinant viruses are disclosed.

  8. Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer Print Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00 Immortality is...

  9. Cell-intrinsic Transforming Growth Factor-[beta] signaling mediates virus-specific CD8? T cell deletion and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus persistence in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinoco, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    clearance of persistent virus infection. J Exp Med 205:533-and M. B. Oldstone. 1995. Virus-induced immunosuppression:mediated destruction of virus- infected dendritic cells

  10. Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus Transmission and Disease among Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed in Culture Compared to Environmentally Relevant Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foott, J. Scott; Free, Dan; McDowell, Terry; Arkush, Kristen D.; Hedrick, Ronald P.

    2006-01-01

    tissues by infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and viralhemorrhagic septicemia virus. Journal of Aquatic Animalhematopoietic necrosis virus and other fish viruses by

  11. Varicella zoster virus encephalitis in a patient with disseminated herpes zoster: report and review of the literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dana Lee-Anne; Barsell, Alexandra; Riahi, Ryan R.; Stumpf, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    of varicella zoster virus infections. Curr Neurol Neuroscito acute varicella zoster virus- meningoencephalitis. Int Jdetecting herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus

  12. Predicting Risk of End-Stage Liver Disease in Antiretroviral-Treated Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus-Coinfected Patients.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    immunode?ciency virus-hepatitis C virus-coinfected patientsslower viral clearance in hepatitis C, genotype-1 patientsImmunode?ciency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus-Coinfected Patients

  13. On the Spread of Viruses on the Internet Noam Berger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saberi, Amin

    distribution [14], this work is relevant both in the context of the spread of computer viruses on the Internet of antivirus software. Computers with the software installed are not permanently immune from the virus, but they are regularly scanned for the presence of the virus, and the software removes the virus if the computer is found

  14. tchen@engr.smu.edu Viruses and Worms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Thomas M.

    attacks Prevalence % Organizations detected virus/worm attacks 82% 83% 90% 85% 94% *2003 CSI/FBI Computer. 1983 Fred Cohen ("father" of computer virus) thought of the idea of computer viruses as a graduateTom Chen SMU tchen@engr.smu.edu Viruses and Worms #12;TC/BUPT/8-7-04 SMU Engineering p. 2

  15. The Internet Protocol Journal Trends in Viruses and Worms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Thomas M.

    University he modern computer virus was conceived and demonstrated by Fred Cohen in 1983. Like biological viruses, computer viruses reproduce by attaching to a normal program or document and taking over control it easier for malicious programs to travel between computers by themselves. Recent virus and worm outbreaks

  16. Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

  17. Virus-PEDOT Nanowires for Biosensing Jessica A. Arter,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gregory A.

    Virus-PEDOT Nanowires for Biosensing Jessica A. Arter, David K. Taggart, Theresa M. Mc sensors and virus-based molecular recognition offer numerous advantages for biosensing. Grafting M13 of conducting polymers and viruses. The virus incorporation into the polymeric backbone of PEDOT occurs during

  18. Detecting Virus Mutations Via Dynamic Matching Min Feng Rajiv Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajiv

    Detecting Virus Mutations Via Dynamic Matching Min Feng Rajiv Gupta CSE Dept., University, the virus developers are employing obfuscation techniques to create mutating viruses. The current antivirus software can- not handle the obfuscated viruses well since its detection methods that are based upon static

  19. Sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus among monogamous heterosexual couples: The HCV partners study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus Among MonogamousM. The prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in theprevention and control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection

  20. Transsynaptic tracing by in situ complementation of a deletion mutant neurotropic virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickersham, Ian R.

    2006-01-01

    K.A. Mitrophanous, Rabies virus glycoprotein pseudotyping ofConzelmann, Infectious rabies viruses from cloned cDNA. Embotransfer of herpes virus from peripheral nerves to cortex

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Mutations and Associated Fitness Costs for Viral Replication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De La Cruz, Justin

    2012-01-01

    simian immunodeficiency virus infection by CD8+ lymphocytes.of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 during the naturalhuman immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. J Virol 79:

  2. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    maintenance of herpes simplex virus 1 latency,” Journal ofagainst herpes simplex virus infections? ” Microbes andM. C. Sirianni, “Herpes simplex virus vaccine in recurrent

  3. Increased burst size in multiply infected cells can alter basic virus dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Kara W; Levy, David N; Wodarz, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    cells can alter basic virus dynamics. Biology Direct 2012 7:References 1. Nowak MA, May RM: Virus dynamics. Mathematicalin Human- Immunodeficiency-Virus Type-1 Infection. Nature

  4. The Determinants of CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antiviral Activity Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Diana Yuhui

    2012-01-01

    HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1 GAG- SPECIFIC CYTOTOXICT lymphocyte response to virus infection. Proc Soc Exp BiolNef- M20A-containing viruses showed increased susceptibility

  5. Multi-Strain Virus-Host Dynamics from HIV to Phage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    simian immunodeficiency virus infection. J Virol 74, 11001-in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. Natureacquired resistance against viruses in prokaryotes. Science

  6. Study of Molecular and Biological Properties of Citrus exocortis viroid and Dweet mottle virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajeri, Subhas

    2010-01-01

    E, Holland JJ. 1997. RNA virus mutations and fitness fororganization of Dweet mottle virus and its relationship toMETHODS……………………………………. ………… xii Virus Source and

  7. Towards Breakthroughs in Protein Structure Calculation and Design...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lab at the University of Washington have computationally designed a novel protein (blue) that binds to the base of hemagglutinin and effectively neutralizes the flu virus....

  8. Transmission dynamics of Avian Influenza A virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Lu

    2015-06-29

    Influenza A virus (AIV) has an extremely high rate of mutation. Frequent exchanges of gene segments between different AIV (reassortment) have been responsible for major pandemics in recent human history. The presence of ...

  9. Bioterrorism Preparedness: Smallpox and Related Pox Viruses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawhorn, D. Bruce

    2002-04-24

    This publication discusses the risk of a bioterrorist attack involving smallpox and related viruses. It lists likely countermeasures and explains the disadvantages of vaccination. Also discussed are future needs for smallpox preparedness....

  10. Human adaptation of avian influenza viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Karunya

    2012-01-01

    Human adaptation of avian influenza viruses pose an enormous public health challenge as the human population is predominantly naive to avian influenza antigens. As such, constant surveillance is needed to monitor the ...

  11. Modelling the evolution of the influenza virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, David

    2008-06-27

    virus It is responsible for binding the virus, to the cell that is being infected, via sugars (sialic acid) on the surface of the cells. Haemagglutinin There are at least 16 different HA antigens. These subtypes are labelled H1 through H16. Only... Horton (& VLA) Ana Mosterin Eugene Skepner Yan Wong (& Leeds) Margaret Mackinnon (& KEMRI) David Wales (Chemistry) Chris Whittleston (Chemistry) Birgit Strodel (Chemistry) Mike Payne (Cavendish labs) Sebastian Ahnert (Cavendish...

  12. Molecular Models for the Assembly and Replication of Hepatitis B Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jehoon

    2015-01-01

    Bruss, V. , Hepatitis B virus morphogenesis. World Journalproteins of hepatitis-b virus containing the pre-s sequence.agent for hepatitis-B virus and Epstein-Barr- virus.

  13. Computer Viruses as Artificial Life Following papers by Eugene H. Spafford \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruppin, Eytan

    Computer Viruses as Artificial Life Following papers by Eugene H. Spafford \\Lambda A computer virus and the virus spreads further. Computer viruses flourish in the weaker security environment of the personal access, and this allows computer viruses to spread and flourish on those machines. Viruses have two major

  14. Plant Disease Note 2005 | First Report of Onion yellow dwarf virus, Leek ye... stripe virus, and Garlic common latent virus in Garlic in Washington State Overview Current Issue Past Issues Search PD Search APS Journals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    Plant Disease Note 2005 | First Report of Onion yellow dwarf virus, Leek ye... stripe virus, and Garlic common latent virus in Garlic in Washington State Overview Current Issue Past Issues Search PD-2006 The American Phytopathological Society First Report of Onion yellow dwarf virus, Leek yellow stripe virus

  15. Communication Secondary structure of dengue virus type 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanley, Kathryn A.

    Short Communication Secondary structure of dengue virus type 4 39 untranslated region: impact 26 June 2006 Several studies have generated computer-based predictions of secondary structure of the 39 untranslated region (UTR) of Dengue virus (DEN); however, experimental verification

  16. Field studies of virus transport in a heterogeneous sandy aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Jason Robert

    1997-01-01

    enteric viruses in ground water, however, has been well documented. Viral contamination of ground water from septic tank, sewer line, or waste disposal site failures has lead to increased efforts to quantify the transport of viruses through the ground...

  17. Marek’s disease virus pathogenesis and latency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Gillian

    2012-11-30

    Marek’s Disease virus (MDV) is a highly contagious, widespread and persistent neoplastic ?-herpesvirus causing extensive lymphoblastic tumours in chickens. The virus is shed in feather dust and spread through inhalation. ...

  18. Dimensionality reduction in immunology : from viruses to cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karthik Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Developing successful prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against infections of RNA viruses like HIV requires a combined understanding of the evolutionary constraints of the virus, as well as of the immunologic ...

  19. Theiler's virus-induced apoptosis in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Mamatha Somanath

    2004-09-30

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is classified as a Cardiovirus in the Picornaviridae family. An enteric virus, TMEV, spreads within the mouse population by the fecal-oral route. The neurovirulent GDVII ...

  20. Influenza virus infection in a compromised immune system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Gillian Mhairi

    2012-06-30

    Severe influenza virus infection, including human infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses is characterised by massive pulmonary inflammation, immunopathology and excessive cytokine production, a process in ...

  1. Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is infected by a virus it becomes an unwilling factory for the virus, which uses the cell machinery to produce ever more copies of itself. Eventually, if the cell doesn't die, it...

  2. Treatment of tumors with genetically engineered herpes virus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Roizman, Bernard; Whitley, Richard J

    2012-11-27

    Disclosed are methods for treating cancer by administering an effective amount of a modified Herpes simplex virus.

  3. The Evolution of Viruses and Worms Thomas M. Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Thomas M.

    -marc.robert@alcatel.com Abstract - Computer viruses and network worms have evolved through a continuous series of innovations and setting up denial of service networks. 1. Introduction Computer viruses and worms are characterized by their ability to self replicate. The modern computer virus was conceived and formalized by Fred Cohen as a USC

  4. Computer Viruses as Artificial Life Eugene H. Spafford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somayaji, Anil

    Computer Viruses as Artificial Life Eugene H. Spafford Department of Computer Sciences Purdue in computer viruses since they first appeared in 1981, and especially in the past few years as they have reached epidemic numbers in many per- sonal computer environments. Viruses have been written about

  5. On the Spread of Viruses on the Internet Noam Berger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chayes, Jennifer Tour

    , and the software removes the virus if the computer is found to be infected. A computer can be infected by the same. In this case, the antivirus software prevents any given computer from being reinfected with the same virusOn the Spread of Viruses on the Internet Noam Berger Christian Borgs Jennifer T. Chayes Amin

  6. Predators: Good Will Mobile Codes Combat against Computer Viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Predators: Good Will Mobile Codes Combat against Computer Viruses Hiroshi Toyoizumi Performance approach to fight against computer viruses through the use of their predators. Preda- tors are good will mobile co,des which, like viruses, travel over computer networks, and replicate and multipy themselves

  7. Data Mining on DNA Sequences of Hepatitis B Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Data Mining on DNA Sequences of Hepatitis B Virus Kwong-Sak Leung, Kin Hong Lee, Jin-Feng Wang in bioinformatics research. One of the challenges is to identify genomic markers in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV INTRODUCTION IN Asia, infection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major health problem. At least 10 percent

  8. Host Cell Responses Induced by Hepatitis C Virus Binding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmer, Jens

    Host Cell Responses Induced by Hepatitis C Virus Binding Xinhua Fang,1 Mirjam B. Zeisel,1 Jochen. Blum,1 and Thomas F. Baumert1,5 Initiation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is mediated by docking nitiation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is me- diated by docking of the viral envelope to the hepa

  9. ANALYSIS OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION MODELS WITH HEPATOCYTE HOMEOSTASIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reluga, Tim

    ANALYSIS OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION MODELS WITH HEPATOCYTE HOMEOSTASIS TIMOTHY C. RELUGA ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY LOS ALAMOS, NM 87545 Abstract. Recently, we developed a model for hepatitis C infections with hepatotropic viruses, such as hepatitis B virus. Key words. HCV, viral dynamics, bifurcation

  10. A framework for modelling trojans and computer virus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Paul

    A framework for modelling trojans and computer virus infection Harold Thimbleby1 , Stuart Anderson2 world, including the possibility of Trojan Horse programs and computer viruses, as simply a finite realisation of a Turing Machine. We consider the actions of Trojan Horses and viruses in real computer systems

  11. Mutation and Control of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stengel, Robert F.

    Mutation and Control of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Robert F. Stengel Princeton University of infection by the hu- man immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as therapies that minimize viral load the relative fitness of mutant strains. Index Terms ­ Human immunodeficiency virus, immune system dynamics

  12. Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    Chapter 17 m Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant? Alison G. Power about the effects of plant viruses despite their ubiquitous distribution in plants. Several recent studies have stressed the prevalence of viruses in natural plant populations (e.g., Power and Remold 1996

  13. Computer Virus Propagation Models Giuseppe Serazzi and Stefano Zanero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanero, Stefano

    Computer Virus Propagation Models Giuseppe Serazzi and Stefano Zanero Dipartimento di Elettronica e.zanero@polimi.it Abstract. The availability of reliable models of computer virus propa- gation would prove useful. In this pa- per, we review the most popular models of virus propagation, analyzing the underlying assumptions

  14. VIRUS: a hugely replicated integral field spectrograph for HETDEX 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grupp, Frank

    VIRUS: a hugely replicated integral field spectrograph for HETDEX 1 Gary J. Hill a,2 Phillip J. Mac Spectrograph (VIRUS), the basis of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX); a survey of a 5 Gpc3 volume at 1.8 VIRUS consists of 145

  15. Analyze Influenza Virus Sequences Using Binary Encoding Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boley, Daniel

    Analyze Influenza Virus Sequences Using Binary Encoding Approach Ham Ching Lam , Srinand Sreevatsan and Daniel Boley Abstract Capturing mutation patterns of each individual influenza virus sequence is often reduction technique, we were able to capture the intrinsic mutation pattern of the virus. Our approach looks

  16. A STOCHASTIC CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL OF EBOLA VIRUS DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkins, Jane M.

    A STOCHASTIC CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL OF EBOLA VIRUS DYNAMICS E. BURKHEAD AND J. HAWKINS Abstract. We construct a stochastic cellular automaton (SCA) model for the spread of the Ebola virus (EBOV). We of virus and the typical immune response to it, and the differences which reflect the drastically different

  17. Zika Virus Emergence in Mosquitoes in Southeastern Senegal, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanley, Kathryn A.

    Zika Virus Emergence in Mosquitoes in Southeastern Senegal, 2011 Diawo Diallo1 *, Amadou A. Sall2, Se´ne´gal, 2 Unite´ des Arbovirus et Virus des Fie`vres He´morragiques, Institut Pasteur de Dakar Abstract Background: Zika virus (ZIKV; genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae) is maintained in a zoonotic

  18. Building a Simulation of the Spread of a Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Repenning, Alexander

    Building a Simulation of the Spread of a Virus Using the AgentSheets simulation-authoring tool of how to use the AgentSheets® simulation-authoring tool to 1) create a simulation of a virus attack. Create a simulation of a virus attack To illustrate how an AgentSheets simulation is created from scratch

  19. A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE OF SALMON POSSIBLY OF VIRUS ORIGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE OF SALMON POSSIBLY OF VIRUS ORIGIN BY R. R. RUCKER, W. J. WHIPPLE, J. R A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE OF SALMON POSSIBLY OF VIRUS ORIGIN By R. R. Rucker, W. J. Whipple, J. R. Parvin and C. A #12;A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE OF SALMON, POSSIBLY OF VIRUS ORIGIN By R. R. Rucker,! Fishery Research

  20. Pathogenic Interactions Between Sorghum Yellow Banding Virus and Other Viruses Infecting Sorghum. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theu, M.P.K.J; Toler, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Microscope Operation. 6th ed. North-Holland., Amsterdam. 326 pp. 3 2. McClelen, C.E., and R.W. Toler. 1989. The ultra structural aspects of infection of Zea mays c.v. Silver Queen by sorghum yellow banding virus (SYBV). (ABSTR.) Phytopathology 79... of MDMV A 3 days before inoculation with SYBV resulted in a more severe disease and the resultant disease symp toms were different from those caused by either virus alone. Both viruses were serologically detected in a treatment in which MDMV...

  1. VIRUS BULLETIN www.virusbtn.com 77777APRIL 2005APRIL 2005APRIL 2005APRIL 2005APRIL 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhotia, Arun

    VIRUS BULLETIN www.virusbtn.com 77777APRIL 2005APRIL 2005APRIL 2005APRIL 2005APRIL 2005 DOC ­ ANSWERING THE HIDDEN `CALL`CALL`CALL`CALL`CALL' OF A VIRUS' OF A VIRUS' OF A VIRUS' OF A VIRUS' OF A VIRUS Ször and Peter Ferrie, Virus Bulletin Conference 2001). Doing this increases the difficulty

  2. GB Virus Type C (HGV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Co-Infection: Incidence and Impacts on Survival in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Transfusion Recipients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahidnia, Farnaz

    2011-01-01

    you need to know about GB virus C. Curr Gastroenterol Rep.of the hepatitis G virus. J Viral Hepat. 6. Simons JN,Stapleton JT, Chaloner K. GB virus C and survival in HIV-

  3. Advanced Review Viruses and the cellular RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Review Viruses and the cellular RNA decay machinery Marta Maria Gaglia and Britt A. Glaunsinger The ability to control cellular and viral gene expression, either globally or selectively evolve and fine- tune mechanisms to exploit the cellular machinery for their own replication, while

  4. Marine Viruses: Truth or Dare Mya Breitbart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Marine Viruses: Truth or Dare Mya Breitbart College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, Saint Petersburg, Florida 33701; email: mya@marine.usf.edu Annu. Rev. Mar. Sci. 2012. 4:425­48 First published online as a Review in Advance on August 29, 2011 The Annual Review of Marine Science is online

  5. October 2014 - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to be deaths in the Far East from infection with the Avian Influenza (bird flu) virus. So far, the virus has not mutated in a way that allows it to spread person-to-person;...

  6. December 2008 - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    still more deaths in the Far East from infection with the Avian Influenza (bird flu) virus. So far, the virus has not mutated in a way that allows it to spread person-to-person;...

  7. Crosstalk between HIV and Hepatitis C Virus during co-Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rider, Paul J; Liu, Fenyong

    2012-01-01

    MJ: A tale of two viruses: hepatitis C in the age of HAART.The natural history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.infection on the course of hepatitis C virus infection: a

  8. NMR studies of p7 protein from hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Gabriel A.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    studies of p7 protein from hepatitis C virus Gabriel A. CookAbstract The p7 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) plays anp7. Keywords Bicelles Hepatitis C virus Á p7 Á Solid-state

  9. Avian Roosting Behavior and Vector-Host Contact Rates for West Nile Virus Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, William M.

    2012-01-01

    amplification of West Nile virus: the role of hatch-yearDaszak, P. 2005. West Nile virus risk assessment and theof American Robins for West Nile Virus Transmission. Vector-

  10. Ascorbic acid inhibits replication and infectivity of avian RNA tumor virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BISSELL, MINA J

    2011-01-01

    of avian RNA tumor virus MINA J. BISSELL, CARROLL HATIE,ability of avian tumor viruses to replicate in both prmaryembryo fibroblasts. The virus-infected cultures appear to be

  11. Can A Virus Cause Cancer: A Look Into The History And Significance Of Oncoviruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rwazavian, Niema

    2011-01-01

    zur Hausen. Herald. 1991. Viruses in Human Cancers. Science.Deilson E. 2007. DNA Viruses in Human Cancer: An IntegratedRous: Father of the Tumor Virus. Journal of Experimental

  12. NMR studies of p7 protein from hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Gabriel A.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    p7 protein from hepatitis C virus Gabriel A. Cook Æ Stanleyprotein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) plays an important roleKeywords Bicelles Hepatitis C virus Á p7 Á Solid-state NMR Á

  13. Genomic Approaches to Virus Detection and Discovery in Acute Pediatric Illness in Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yozwiak, Nathan Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    of the enterovirus 3?-UTR. Virus Res 139:209-216. Zuker M.Metapneumovirus by Use of a Pan-Virus Microarray. J Clinmurine encephalomyelitis virus in human infections. Proc.

  14. Citrus tristeza virus strains present in New Zealand and the South Pacific.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Scott J.; Pearson, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    protecting Citrus tristeza virus strain GFMS12 in differentBrief Report Citrus tristeza virus strains present in NewMN. 2015. Citrus tristeza virus strains present in New

  15. Introduction Epidemic virus diffusion: models Epidemic algorithms Gossip algorithms Epidemic Information Diffusion on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Laura

    Introduction Epidemic virus diffusion: models Epidemic algorithms Gossip algorithms EpidemicD in Computer Science #12;Introduction Epidemic virus diffusion: models Epidemic algorithms Gossip algorithms Outline 1 Introduction 2 Epidemic virus diffusion: models 3 Epidemic algorithms 4 Gossip algorithms #12

  16. Studies into host macrophage transcriptional control by the African Swine Fever Virus protein A238L 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silk, Rhiannon Nicola

    2010-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus which causes a lethal haemorrhagic fever in domestic pigs. This virus primarily infects cells from the monocyte/macrophage lineage and its ability to ...

  17. Structure of the Triatoma virus capsid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squires, Gaëlle; Pous, Joan; Agirre, Jon; Rozas-Dennis, Gabriela S.; Costabel, Marcelo D.; Marti, Gerardo A.; Navaza, Jorge; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Guérin, Diego M. A.; Rey, Felix A.

    2013-06-01

    The crystallographic structure of TrV shows specific morphological and functional features that clearly distinguish it from the type species of the Cripavirus genus, CrPV. The members of the Dicistroviridae family are non-enveloped positive-sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses pathogenic to beneficial arthropods as well as insect pests of medical importance. Triatoma virus (TrV), a member of this family, infects several species of triatomine insects (popularly named kissing bugs), which are vectors for human trypanosomiasis, more commonly known as Chagas disease. The potential use of dicistroviruses as biological control agents has drawn considerable attention in the past decade, and several viruses of this family have been identified, with their targets covering honey bees, aphids and field crickets, among others. Here, the crystal structure of the TrV capsid at 2.5 Å resolution is reported, showing that as expected it is very similar to that of Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV). Nevertheless, a number of distinguishing structural features support the introduction of a new genus (Triatovirus; type species TrV) under the Dicistroviridae family. The most striking differences are the absence of icosahedrally ordered VP4 within the infectious particle and the presence of prominent projections that surround the fivefold axis. Furthermore, the structure identifies a second putative autoproteolytic DDF motif in protein VP3, in addition to the conserved one in VP1 which is believed to be responsible for VP0 cleavage during capsid maturation. The potential meaning of these new findings is discussed.

  18. tchen@engr.smu.edu Trends in Viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Thomas M.

    .1 B $1.0 B *estimated by Computer Economics 2001 #12;TC/IEEE/10-16-03 SMU Engineering p. 5 · Viruses virus/worm attacks 82% 83% 90% 85% 94% *2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey 85% 82% #12;TCTom Chen SMU tchen@engr.smu.edu Trends in Viruses and Worms #12;TC/IEEE/10-16-03 SMU Engineering p

  19. Structure and Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5Hemagglutinin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Stalk Domain Reveals a Four-Helix Bundle and the Role of the Stalk in Fusion Promotion Citation Details...

  20. Genomics-enabled sensor platform for rapid detection of viruses...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in goal 1. We generated and characterized suitable primers more for West Nile Virus RNA detection. Both optical and electrochemical transduction technologies were...

  1. Structure of the Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) ectodomain reveals a four-helix bundle stalk Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of the Newcastle...

  2. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lawrence, Robert M.; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Grant, Thomas D.; Liu, Haiguang; James, Daniel; Nelson, Garrett; Subramanian, Ganesh; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ~700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ~40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is a pertinent step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  3. Archaeal viruses from Yellowstone’s high temperature environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Young; B. Wiedenheft; J. Snyder; J. Spuhler; F. Roberto; T. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    In general, our understanding of Archaea lags far behind our knowledge of the other two domains of life—Bacteria and Eukarya. Unlike the other domains of life, very few viruses of Archaea have been characterized. Of the approximately 4000 viruses described to date, only 36 are associated with archaeal hosts--many of these from thermophilic Crenarchaeota. In this work we describe the discovery, isolation and preliminary characterization of viruses and novel virus-like particles isolated directly from diverse thermal environments in Yellowstone National Park.

  4. The identification and distribution of viruses infecting cucurbits in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harveson, Robert M

    1989-01-01

    Cucurbit viruses in Texas. 2 Counties surveyed for cucurbit viruses in Texas. 3 Types of cucubits tested for virus infection. . . . . 34 35 4 The incidence of cucurbit viruses throughout the 1988 growing season. 39 5 Seroactivity of infected tissue... (43, 83, 86, 95). The fourth segment, RNA-4, provides the protein coat for the viral particles. The fifth RNA segment, designated CARNA-5, or CMV-associated RNA, to clearly distinguish it from the genomic RNAs 1-3, has been placed in the category...

  5. HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIV and evolution studied through computer modeling HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling This approach distinguishes between susceptible and infected...

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezk, SA; Weiss, LM

    2007-01-01

    PG. Epstein-Barr virus and oncogenesis: from latent genes tothe key factor in the oncogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma [an essential role in the oncogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma [

  7. Cellular defenses and viral counterattacks during herpes simplex virus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaurushiya, Mira Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus oncogenesis and the ubiquitin-proteasomelymphoid tissue 1 promote oncogenesis. 2004. Proceedings ofGrowth Regulation and Oncogenesis Training Grant (NIH T32)

  8. ALS Capabilities Reveal Multiple Functions of Ebola Virus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Capabilities Reveal Multiple Functions of Ebola Virus Print A central dogma of molecular biology is that a protein's sequence dictates its fold, and the fold dictates its...

  9. Tobacco mosaic virus: A biological building block for micro/nano...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tobacco mosaic virus: A biological building block for micronanobio systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tobacco mosaic virus: A biological building block for micro...

  10. Redox modulation of the hepatitis C virus replication complex is calcium dependent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jinah; Forman, Henry Jay; Ou, Jing-hsiung; Lai, Michael M C; Seronello, Scott; Nandipati, Anna

    2006-01-01

    oxygen species suppress hepatitis C virus RNA replication inglutathione concentrations in chronic hepatitis C patientsrelated to the hepatitis C virus genotype. J Hepatol 30(5):

  11. Bacterial artificial chromosome derived simian varicella virus is pathogenic in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    E: Regulation of macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC, CCL22)artificial chromosome derived simian varicella virus isartificial chromosome derived simian varicella virus is

  12. flu preparations Wash your hands, cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    and audiology. Koop currently co-leads the three-year GenomicsinLiceandSalmonprojectusing advanced genomics in Genomics and Molecular Biology. He was also part of the world-wide team of scientists who mapped the human genome. Koop's team is

  13. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel:FebruaryEIA's Today8Topo II:LAr STours

  14. Battling bird flu by the numbers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock

  15. Better predicting flu outbreaks with Wikipedia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium and ChronicBest PracticesBetter

  16. Microsoft Word - 1918flu.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGES

  17. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 toDepartmentDo7.1Toward 300 Miles on

  18. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 toDepartmentDo7.1Toward 300 Miles

  19. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 toDepartmentDo7.1Toward 300 MilesToward

  20. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 toDepartmentDo7.1Toward 300

  1. Our view: Vaccinate now, prevent flu later

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams forOrhan Kizilkaya, Ph.D.Our Team Our Team OurOur

  2. Chimeric human parainfluenza virus bearing the Ebola virus glycoprotein as the sole surface protein is immunogenic and highly protective against Ebola virus challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukreyev, Alexander Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Zhang Liqun; Dorward, David W.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Feldmann, Heinz; Collins, Peter L.

    2009-01-20

    We generated a new live-attenuated vaccine against Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a chimeric virus HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP that contains the EBOV glycoprotein (GP) as the sole transmembrane envelope protein combined with the internal proteins of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3). Electron microscopy analysis of the virus particles showed that they have an envelope and surface spikes resembling those of EBOV and a particle size and shape resembling those of HPIV3. When HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP was inoculated via apical surface of an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium, the virus was released from the apical surface; when applied to basolateral surface, the virus infected basolateral cells but did not spread through the tissue. Following intranasal (IN) inoculation of guinea pigs, scattered infected cells were detected in the lungs by immunohistochemistry, but infectious HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP could not be recovered from the lungs, blood, or other tissues. Despite the attenuation, the virus was highly immunogenic, and a single IN dose completely protected the animals against a highly lethal intraperitoneal challenge of guinea pig-adapted EBOV.

  3. A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papaneri, Amy B.; Wirblich, Christoph; Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B.; Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 ; Schnell, Matthias J.; Blaney, Joseph E.

    2012-12-05

    We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

  4. 1 Phase behavior of rod-like viruses and virus/sphere mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    strength, and multiple quantitative and qualitative breakdowns of the theory of the smectic phase. And we concentrations that only two-body interactions were necessary in order to quantitatively explain the I-N phase of producing enough virus for a PhD thesis. Without an abundant source of TMV, studies of its phase behavior

  5. REGULAR ARTICLE Proteomic analysis of hepatitis B virus-associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    REGULAR ARTICLE Proteomic analysis of hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma) is a malignancy of both underdeveloped and developing countries. Proteomes of ten pairs of clinical hepatitis B associated hepatitis B virus / Mass spectrometry / Proteome / Tumor markers / Two-dimensional gel

  6. What college students should know about Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emshwiller, Eve

    What college students should know about Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) University Health Services | (608) 265-5600 | www.uhs.wisc.edu 4/11 WebPDF Q. What is hepatitis B? A. Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. About half the people who get hepatitis B infection develop

  7. FUTURE THREATS AYCOCK & MAURUSHAT 275VIRUS BULLETIN CONFERENCE SEPTEMBER 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aycock, John

    FUTURE THREATS AYCOCK & MAURUSHAT 275VIRUS BULLETIN CONFERENCE SEPTEMBER 2007 FUTURE THREATS John.maurushat@unsw.edu.au ABSTRACT `Aren't you just giving the virus writers ideas?' Research into future security threats begin to examine how far security research can go in terms of looking at future threats, particularly

  8. Single-particle kinetics of influenza virus membrane fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single-particle kinetics of influenza virus membrane fusion Daniel L. Floyd*, Justin R. Ragains for review July 24, 2008) Membrane fusion is an essential step during entry of enveloped viruses into cells. Conventional fusion assays are generally limited to observation of ensembles of multiple fusion events

  9. 98 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Genetic Variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    98 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Virology Genetic Variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus in the United States, T. D. 2013. Genetic variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus in the United States Pacific Northwest, is a widespread and damaging pathogen of wheat. WSMV is not a chronic problem of annual wheat in the United States

  10. Variation in insect pest and virus resistance among habanero peppers (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) in Yucatán, México  (Article) [Variación en resistencia a insectos herbívoros y virosis en líneas de Chile habanero (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) en Yucatán, México

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berny-Mier y Teran, Jorge C; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Durán-Yáñez, Antonio; Tut-Pech, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    2011. Quantification of virus syndrome in chili peppers.VARIATION IN INSECT PEST AND VIRUS RESISTANCE AMONG HABANERO2001. Pepper huasteco virus and Pepper golden mosaic virus

  11. Coping With the Macintosh nVIR Virus 1 Technical Report CS88/30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lawrie

    . 6/5/1999 Abstract Computer viruses are causing increasing concern amongst the computer community. #12; TR CS88/30 Coping With the Macintosh nVIR Virus Lawrence Brown 1. Introduction Computer viruses are causing increasing concern amongst the computer community. The concept of a virus was first propounded

  12. Quantifying the Effectiveness of Mobile Phone Virus Response Mechanisms Elizabeth Van Ruitenbeek,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, William H.

    @orange-ftgroup.com Abstract Viruses that infect smartphones are emerging as a new front in the fight against computer viruses the effectiveness of mobile phone virus response mech- anisms. 1. Introduction The enhanced computational measures can leverage existing antivirus efforts against traditional computer viruses

  13. Anatomy of a Macintosh nVIR Virus Technical Report CS88/29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lawrie

    . Restricted Distribution 6/5/1999 Abstract Computer viruses are causing increasing concern amongst of a Macintosh nVIR Virus Lawrence Brown 1. Introduction Computer viruses are causing increasing concern amongst the computer community. The concept of a virus was first propounded in Brunner's book "The Shockwave Rider

  14. Chancellor's Memorandum CM-25 LSUHSC Policy on AIDS (HIV) and Hepatitis Virus (HBV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chancellor's Memorandum CM-25 ­ LSUHSC Policy on AIDS (HIV) and Hepatitis Virus (HBV) To: Vice Orleans Chancellor May 15, 2002 Individuals Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)/Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) It is a policy of LSUHSC to encourage preventive and early care

  15. RNA replication kinetics, genetic polymorphism and selection in the case of the hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RNA replication kinetics, genetic polymorphism and selection in the case of the hepatitis C virus theoretical quasispecies model that the replication dynamics of hepatitis C virus and a related model et al. 1998), the hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been the most thoroughly screened human virus

  16. Cautious Virus Detection in the Extreme John Case and Samuel E. Moelius III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, John

    Cautious Virus Detection in the Extreme John Case and Samuel E. Moelius III University of Delaware {case,moelius}@cis.udel.edu Abstract It is well known that there exist viruses whose set of infected programs is undecidable. If a virus detector is to err on the side of caution with respect to such a virus

  17. Virus Research 160 (2011) 256263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Virus Research 160 (2011) 256­263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Virus Research journal Tombusvirus Ecogenomics Genomic sequence Fern host a b s t r a c t Viruses are most frequently discovered-associated viruses beyond these narrow constraints, non-cultivated plants of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage

  18. Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices James N. Culver a,b,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Review Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices James N. Culver a Accepted 2 March 2015 Available online 26 March 2015 Keywords: Nanotechnology Bio-materials Virus particles Virus assembly Virus-like particles a b s t r a c t Bottom-up self-assembly methods in which individual

  19. A Mathematical Model of RNA3 Recruitment in the Replication Cycle of Brome Mosaic Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Mathematical Model of RNA3 Recruitment in the Replication Cycle of Brome Mosaic Virus Tori Fabra, PRBB 08003 Barcelona, Spain October 22, 2013 Abstract Positive-strand RNA viruses, such as the brome mosaic virus (BMV) and hepatitis C virus, utilize a replication cycle which involves

  20. Virus Research 167 (2012) 3442 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Virus Research 167 (2012) 34­42 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Virus Research Accepted 24 March 2012 Available online 2 April 2012 Keywords: Plant virus Comovirinae Survey Polymorphism Phylogenetics a b s t r a c t Viruses are most frequently discovered because they cause disease. To expand

  1. Dahlia Mosaic Virus: A Pictorial Guide to Symptoms and Diagnosis Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    Dahlia Mosaic Virus: A Pictorial Guide to Symptoms and Diagnosis Prepared by Dr. Hanu R. Pappu a dozen viruses are known to infect dahlia. Dahlia mosaic virus (DMV) appears to be highly prevalent virus Dr. Hanu R. Pappu, Associate Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University

  2. Orientation Refinement of Virus Structures with Unknown Symmetry Yongchang Ji, Dan C. Marinescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Timothy S.

    Orientation Refinement of Virus Structures with Unknown Symmetry Yongchang Ji, Dan C. Marinescu, in particular the structure determina- tion of viruses and other large macromolecular complexes leads to data determina- tion of viruses, the orientation refinement. 1. Introduction and Motivation Viruses are large

  3. Virus Research 141 (2009) 169173 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Virus Research 141 (2009) 169­173 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Virus Research journal of northeastern Oklahoma frequently contain virus-like sequences in particulate fractions Vijay Muthukumara: Available online 17 January 2009 Keywords: Plant virus Metagenomics Biodiversity Retroelements Tymovirus a b

  4. Optimization of Virus Imprinting Methods To Improve Selectivity and Reduce Nonspecific Binding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Optimization of Virus Imprinting Methods To Improve Selectivity and Reduce Nonspecific Binding such as viruses are imprinted, special consideration must be taken to ensure the formation of complementary and release of the virus template after cross-linking. In this study, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was used

  5. The Transcriptional Response of Drosophila melanogaster to Infection with the Sigma Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiggins, Francis

    The Transcriptional Response of Drosophila melanogaster to Infection with the Sigma Virus that occur in response to infection with the sigma virus, a negative-stranded RNA virus (Rhabdoviridae overrepresented among the differentially expressed genes. We also found that the sigma virus alters the expression

  6. An Investigation into the Historical Distribution, Prevalence, and Host Community of Monkeypox Virus (MPXV) Among Funisciurus Museum Skin Specimens from Central Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiee, Madeline

    2015-01-01

    Z, Messinger D. Monkeypox virus: ecology and public healthK. Isolation of monkeypox virus from wild squirrel infectedin sustaining monkeypox virus transmission. Trop Geogr Med.

  7. Interaction of influenza virus proteins with nucleosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Robles, Inmaculada [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Akarsu, Hatice [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laboratoire de Virologie Moleculaire et Structurale, EA 2939, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Mueller, Christoph W. [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ruigrok, Rob W.H. [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laboratoire de Virologie Moleculaire et Structurale, EA 2939, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Baudin, Florence [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France) and Laboratoire de Virologie Moleculaire et Structurale, EA 2939, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France) and Institut de Biologie Structurale, UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF, 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France)]. E-mail: baudin@embl-grenoble.fr

    2005-02-05

    During influenza virus infection, transcription and replication of the viral RNA take place in the cell nucleus. Directly after entry in the nucleus the viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs, the viral subunits containing vRNA, nucleoprotein and the viral polymerase) are tightly associated with the nuclear matrix. Here, we have analysed the binding of RNPs, M1 and NS2/NEP proteins to purified nucleosomes, reconstituted histone octamers and purified single histones. RNPs and M1 both bind to the chromatin components but at two different sites, RNP to the histone tails and M1 to the globular domain of the histone octamer. NS2/NEP did not bind to nucleosomes at all. The possible consequences of these findings for nuclear release of newly made RNPs and for other processes during the infection cycle are discussed.

  8. Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James N Culver; Michael T Harris

    2011-08-31

    The goals of this project were directed at the identification and characterization of bio-mineralization processes and patterning methods for the development of nano scale materials and structures with novel energy and conductive traits. This project utilized a simple plant virus as a model template to investigate methods to attach and coat metals and other inorganic compounds onto biologically based nanotemplates. Accomplishments include: the development of robust biological nanotemplates with enhanced inorganic coating activities; novel coating strategies that allow for the deposition of a continuous inorganic layer onto a bio-nanotemplate even in the absence of a reducing agent; three-dimensional patterning methods for the assemble of nano-featured high aspect ratio surfaces and the demonstrated use of these surfaces in enhancing battery and energy storage applications. Combined results from this project have significantly advanced our understanding and ability to utilize the unique self-assembly properties of biologically based molecules to produce novel materials at the nanoscale level.

  9. Auxiliary metabolic genes in viruses infecting marine cyanobacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Luke Richard

    2010-01-01

    Marine viruses shape the diversity and biogeochemical role of their microbial hosts. Cyanophages that infect the cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus often carry metabolic genes not found in other bacteriophages. ...

  10. Structural Rearrangement in Ebola Virus Protein VP40 Creates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virus Protein VP40 Creates Multiple Functions Monday, March 31, 2014 Figure 1. Three structures of VP40. Top, a butterfly-shaped dimer structure critical for membrane trafficking....

  11. Studies on the nucleocapsid protein of infectious bronchitis virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Jyothi

    2005-08-29

    Because phosphorylation of the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) nucleocapsid (N) protein may regulate its multiple roles in viral replication, the dynamics of N phosphorylation were examined. In the infected cell, N was the only viral protein...

  12. Epidemiology and evolution of Marek’s Disease virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, Katherine E.

    2010-01-01

    Marek’s disease (MD) is an oncogenic disease affecting chickens and is estimated to cost the worldwide poultry industry $1-2 billion annually. The causative agent of MD, Marek’s disease virus (MDV), provides a ...

  13. Host/virus interactions in the marine cyanobacterium prochlorococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frois-Moniz, Katya

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial viruses shape the diversity, metabolic function, and community dynamics of their microbial hosts. As microbes drive many major biogeochemical cycles, viral infection is therefore a phenomenon of global significance. ...

  14. Taxonomy of rigid rod-shaped viruses transmitted by fungi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Taxonomy of rigid rod-shaped viruses transmitted by fungi Jianping Chen TMA Wilson Scottish Crop genus. taxonomy / transmission / fungi / epidemiology / genome organization Résumé — Taxonomie des représentant 3 sous-genres distincts du genre furovirus. taxonomie / transmission / champignon / épidémiologie

  15. Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    protein inhibitor of EBV-associated cancer, and can now be used to design proteins to fight other infectious agents and cancers. Some viruses plan for this, and produce proteins...

  16. High-Resolution Functional Profiling Hepatitis C Virus Genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QI, HANGFEI

    2012-01-01

    1101. Lemon, S.M. , et al. , Hepatitis C Virus, in Fields ofS.M. , et al. , Transfusion-Associated Hepatitis Not Dueto Viral Hepatitis Type A or B. New England Journal of

  17. Dihydropyridines Inhibit Translation and Early Replication of Hepatitis C Virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemashevich, Cory

    2013-05-09

    Up to 170 million people are infected with Hepatitis C Virus worldwide. Chronic HCV infection is the leading cause of fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. Treatment options are currently limited to interferon based therapies alone...

  18. Mammalian cell stress responses during Semliki Forest virus infection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Mhairi Catriona

    2013-07-06

    Virus infection of mammalian cells induces several stress mechanisms, including autophagy and type-I interferon (IFN). Autophagy, a cellular homeostatic mechanism in which intracellular materials are sequestered into ...

  19. Yaoundé-like virus in resident wild bird, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Richard A.J.; Vá zquez, Ana; Asamte, Ivy; Bonney, Kofi; Odoom, Shirley; Puplampu, Naiki; Ampofo, William; Sá nchez-Seco, Marí a Paz; Tenorio, Antonio; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2012-03-01

    Tissue and swab samples from 551 wild birds collected in Ghana (October-November 2007) were assayed for alphaviruses, flaviviruses, and influenza A viruses using polymerase chain (PCR) techniques. One pool sample tested positive for Flavivirus RNA...

  20. Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Designer Proteins Target Epstein-Barr-Virus-Associated Cancer Print Immortality is not a good thing for cells, and in fact, cells will destroy themselves in a process called...

  1. Social Stress Sensitizes Theiler's Virus-induced Cytokine Expresssion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazier, Mallory Ann

    2011-10-21

    Our laboratory has previously shown that exposure to social disruption (SDR) the week prior to Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection exacerbates disease course, resulting in increased infection-related ...

  2. Cellular defenses and viral counterattacks during herpes simplex virus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaurushiya, Mira Suresh

    2011-01-01

    ICP0 insufficient to affect cellular gene expression or cellor abusing: viruses and the cellular DNA damage response.interaction with a 135-kDa cellular protein. Virology 209,

  3. Nanomachines: How Viruses Work, and How We Can Stop Them

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    2010-01-08

    Nature's Nasty Nanomachines: How Viruses Work, and How We Can Stop Them. Carolyn Bertozzi, director of Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, discusses this topic at a Feb. 21, 2009 Nano*High talk.

  4. Mechanism of inactivation of influenza viruses by immobilized hydrophobic polycations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Bryan Boen

    N,N-Dodecyl,methyl-polyethylenimine coatings applied to solid surfaces have been shown by us to disinfect aqueous solutions of influenza viruses. Herein we elucidate the mechanism of this phenomenon. Infectivity-, protein-, ...

  5. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  6. Packaging of brome mosaic virus subgenomic RNA is functionally coupled to replication-dependent transcription and translation of coat protein.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annamalai, Padmanaban; Rao, A L N

    2006-01-01

    by spherical plant RNA viruses. Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. ,assembly of an icosahedral RNA virus. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.length cDNA clones of Kunjin virus. J. Virol. 75:4633–4640.

  7. The Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Latency-Associated Transcript Inhibits Phenotypic and Functional Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    MV, et al. : The herpes simplex virus 1 latency-associatedfunctional exhaustion of virus-specific CD8 + T cells ininfected with herpes simplex virus 1. J Virol 3. Goldwich A,

  8. ZASC1 knockout mice exhibit an early bone marrow-specific defect in murine leukemia virus replication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    similar differences in virus titer when we examined the bonenot associated with low virus titers in samples taken earlyfile 3: Figure S3. Virus titers (infectious centers/10 6

  9. Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2 Revised 05/09/2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    for the flu. What are flu symptoms? Fever (usually 100 degrees or greater) and cough and/or sore throat alcohol-based hand sanitizers after coughing, sneezing and wiping your nose to reduce the spread of the virus. Cover all coughs and sneezes with a disposable tissue and discard immediately into a trash can

  10. Avoid the Flu Healthy habits and simple actions will help reduce your risk of flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    illnesses. Wash your hands. Use soap and water often, especially after coughing or sneezing. Carry alcohol getting sick. Cover your cough. Use a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It can prevent the spread of germs. If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your arm above your hand. Don't contaminate. Try

  11. Is it a Cold or the Flu? -Know the Difference Signs & Symptoms Cold Flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Rare Usual; high (100.40 F to 1020 F) is typical; lasts 3-4 days Cough Hacking: mild Dry; can become discomfort Mild to moderate; hacking cough Common Treatment Antihistamines Decongestants Advil® (ibuprofen. Avoid close contact with anyone with a cold. Vaccination. Wash your hands. Cover your cough. Stay

  12. FLU ON CAMPUS! There are several confirmed cases of the flu on the HSC Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    -like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue: fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people

  13. Motivation HDFs Algorithms Cross Validation Predictions Combating Viruses by Targeting Host Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liqing

    Motivation HDFs Algorithms Cross Validation Predictions Combating Viruses by Targeting Host Combating Viruses by Targeting Host Proteins #12;Motivation HDFs Algorithms Cross Validation Predictions Proteins #12;Motivation HDFs Algorithms Cross Validation Predictions Pathogens are Becoming Drug

  14. RNA Interference-Based Approach to Combat Viral Infections: Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Group Prototype 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez Carvajal, Lisbeth

    2012-10-19

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is considered a prototype for studying non-segmented negative-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses. Livestock are naturally infected by VSV, causing severe economic impact due to lack ...

  15. Platforms for exploring host-pathogen interactions in hepatitis C virus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trehan, Kartik

    2012-01-01

    Afflicting almost 200 million worldwide, hepatitis C virus (HCV) mounts a chronic infection of liver hepatocytes that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. An understanding of host-virus interactions will drive the ...

  16. Functional analysis of a plant virus replication ‘factory’ using live cell imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linnik, Volha

    2010-01-01

    Plant viruses have developed a number of strategies that enable them to become obligate intracellular parasites of many agricultural crops. Potato virus X (PVX) belongs to a group of positive-sense, single-stranded plant ...

  17. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different corn hybrids (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lammoglia Villagomez, Agustin

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different agronomic and grain quality characteristics of 106 corn hybrids. A randomized split-plot design with 3 replications was used. The virus isolate obtained...

  18. Molecular Models for the Assembly and Replication of Hepatitis B Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jehoon

    2015-01-01

    5), 876-884. Bruss, V. , Hepatitis B virus morphogenesis.Large surface-proteins of hepatitis-b virus containing theD. I. ; Rowlands, D. J. , Hepatitis B small surface antigen

  19. Antigen-specific B-cell receptor sensitizes B cells to infection by influenza virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougan, Stephanie K.

    Influenza A virus-specific B lymphocytes and the antibodies they produce protect against infection. However, the outcome of interactions between an influenza haemagglutinin-specific B cell via its receptor (BCR) and virus ...

  20. Protein-DNA Interactions Determine the Shapes of DNA Toroids Condensed in Virus Capsids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    Protein-DNA Interactions Determine the Shapes of DNA Toroids Condensed in Virus Capsids Ame (13), or the virus capsid itself (14­16), either upon addition of spermine (Spm4þ ) or in a monovalent

  1. Complex Modulation of the Aedes aegypti Transcriptome in Response to Dengue Virus Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    and dengue fever using genetically modified mosquitoes. Jdengue viruses in the salivary glands of the yellow fever mosquito,

  2. Winner Takes All: Competing Viruses or Ideas on fair-play Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faloutsos, Christos

    virus authors make sure that their code eliminates most other computer viruses from the vic- tim's diskWinner Takes All: Competing Viruses or Ideas on fair-play Networks B. Aditya Prakash, Alex Beutel, Roni Rosenfeld, and Christos Faloutsos Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University

  3. Ever since the first appearance of computer viruses on the digital landscape, our under-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinberg, Jon

    Ever since the first appearance of computer viruses on the digital landscape, our under- standing- demiological models to track how a computer virus spreads. A crucial ingredient in these models the potential to infect whom. Traditionally, computer viruses have propagated on networks that bear little

  4. A Mathematical Model for Virus Infection in a System of Interacting Computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cipolatti, Rolci

    A Mathematical Model for Virus Infection in a System of Interacting Computers J. L´opez Gondar & R are explored and enlightened in this paper. 1. Introduction The infection of computers by virtual viruses of virtual viruses in a system of interacting computers could be compared with a disease transmitted

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Folding and Insertion of the Ebola Virus Fusion Peptide into a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Folding and Insertion of the Ebola Virus Fusion Peptide- residue Ebola virus fusion peptide into a membrane bilayer. We applied a multi-resolution computational viruses, the filoviruses contain a highly compact genome, consisting of only seven encoded proteins

  6. A ligand-binding pocket in the dengue virus envelope glycoprotein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    A ligand-binding pocket in the dengue virus envelope glycoprotein Yorgo Modis*, Steven Ogata Heights Drive, Suite 200, Aiea, HI 96701 Contributed by Stephen C. Harrison, April 14, 2003 Dengue virus by membrane fusion. A crystal structure of the soluble ectodomain of E from dengue virus type 2 reveals

  7. Dengue virus nonstructural protein 3 redistributes fatty acid synthase to sites of viral replication and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    | replication complex Dengue virus (DENV) is the causative agent of dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic feverDengue virus nonstructural protein 3 redistributes fatty acid synthase to sites of viral August 27, 2010 (received for review July 23, 2010) Dengue virus (DENV) modifies cellular membranes

  8. Phenothiazines Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Entry, Likely by Increasing the Fluidity of Cholesterol-Rich Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phenothiazines Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Entry, Likely by Increasing the Fluidity of Cholesterol hepatitis C virus (HCV), more effective therapies are still urgently needed. We and others previously inhibitors. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects at least 130 million people worldwide and is the major cause

  9. Short Communication Differential effect of p7 inhibitors on hepatitis C virus cell-to-cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short Communication Differential effect of p7 inhibitors on hepatitis C virus cell Accepted 14 October 2013 Available online 21 October 2013 Keywords: p7 Hepatitis C Assembly Inhibitors Cell-to-cell a b s t r a c t Inhibitors targeting the hepatitis C virus (HCV) encoded viroporin, p7 prevent virus

  10. Reduction of the infectivity of hepatitis C virus pseudoparticles by incorporation of misfolded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reduction of the infectivity of hepatitis C virus pseudoparticles by incorporation of misfolded to hepatitis C virus (HCV). The aim of this study was to determine whether these inhibitors would affect HCV of DNJ derivatives in combating HCV infection. INTRODUCTION Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause

  11. The Hepatitis C Virus Internal Ribosome Entry Site Adopts an Ion-dependent Tertiary Fold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    The Hepatitis C Virus Internal Ribosome Entry Site Adopts an Ion-dependent Tertiary Fold Jeffrey S-0539, USA Hepatitis C virus (HCV) contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located in the 5H entry site (IRES); hepatitis C virus (HCV); chemical and enzymatic probing*Corresponding author

  12. Hepatitis C virus infection protein network B de Chassey1,2,9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hepatitis C virus infection protein network B de Chassey1,2,9 , V Navratil2,3,9 , L Tafforeau1-wide mapping of interactions between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human proteins was performed to provide; microbiology & pathogens Keywords: functional analysis; hepatitis C; interactome; virus­host cell

  13. VIRUS DYNAMICS: A GLOBAL ANALYSIS PATRICK DE LEENHEER AND HAL L. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Leenheer, Patrick

    VIRUS DYNAMICS: A GLOBAL ANALYSIS PATRICK DE LEENHEER AND HAL L. SMITH SIAM J. APPL. MATH. c 2003 and Nelson [SIAM Rev., 41 (1999), pp. 3­44] and Nowak and May [Virus Dynamics, Oxford University Press, New of their dynamics. If the basic reproduction number R0 virus is cleared and the disease dies out; if R0 > 1

  14. SOLVING VIRUS STRUCTURES FROM XFEL DIFFRACTION PATTERNS OF RANDOM PARTICLE ORIENTATIONS USING ANGULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    SOLVING VIRUS STRUCTURES FROM XFEL DIFFRACTION PATTERNS OF RANDOM PARTICLE ORIENTATIONS USING August 2013 #12;ABSTRACT SOLVING VIRUS STRUCTURES FROM XFEL DIFFRACTION PATTERNS OF RANDOM PARTICLE such as viruses. To quote from Caspar and Klug [2] "there are only a limited number of efficient designs possible

  15. Construction of a Mechanical Model for the Expansion of a Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guest, Simon

    Construction of a Mechanical Model for the Expansion of a Virus S.D. Guest1 , F. Kovács2 , T@eng.cam.ac.uk, fax +44 1223 332662 Abstract Many viruses have an outer protein coat with the structure of a truncated icosahedron, and can expand following changes to the environment around the virus. The protein coat consists

  16. Virus Calculated as Culprit Killing Sea Stars By Ben Young Landis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virus Calculated as Culprit Killing Sea Stars By Ben Young Landis [Reprinted from USGS Science Features: Top Story, November 17, 2014, virus://soundwaves.usgs.gov/ (Virus Killing Sea Stars continued on page 2) Sound Waves Volume FY 2015, Issue No. 156156 January

  17. Biomaterials 27 (2006) 41654168 Molecularly imprinted polymers for tobacco mosaic virus recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterials 27 (2006) 4165­4168 Molecularly imprinted polymers for tobacco mosaic virus mosaic virus (TMV) have been synthesized. Batch equilibrium studies using imprinted and non-imprinted polymer hydrogels in TMV and TNV solutions were conducted to determine virus-binding capacities. TMV

  18. Modeling West Nile Virus One Host Infections Explaining Survival Curve Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, James K

    Modeling West Nile Virus One Host Infections Explaining Survival Curve Data James K. Peterson healthy cells also. The cells in G1 state are not upregulated as much and so virus hides in them and hence is decoyed into preferentially recognizing the upregulated cells while the virus actively propagates

  19. The avian influenza virus H5N1 -possible concequences for the NTNU animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bech, Claus

    The avian influenza virus H5N1 - possible concequences for the NTNU animal facilities Bi8091 Autumn The avian influenza virus H5N1 _______________________________________________ 5 Virology of H5N1_________________________________________________________ 5 How does the virus infect? _________________________________________________ 7 Characteristics

  20. Virus-Polymer Hybrid Nanowires Tailored to Detect Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gregory A.

    Virus-Polymer Hybrid Nanowires Tailored to Detect Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Jessica A ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the de novo fabrication of a biosensor, based upon virus-containing poly(3). This development pro- cess occurs in three phases: (1) isolation of a M13 virus with a displayed polypeptide

  1. GLOBAL STABILITY FOR A VIRUS DYNAMICS MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND REMOVAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL STABILITY FOR A VIRUS DYNAMICS MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND REMOVAL PAUL GEORGESCU AND YING-HEN HSIEH Abstract. Global dynamics of a compartmental model which describes virus and the removal rate of the virus are assumed to be nonlinear. In the case where the functional quotient between

  2. Analyze Influenza Virus Sequences Using Binary Encoding HamChing Lam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boley, Daniel

    Analyze Influenza Virus Sequences Using Binary Encoding Approach HamChing Lam Dept. of Computer 55455, USA boley@cs.umn.edu ABSTRACT Capturing mutation patterns of each individual influenza virus with dimension reduction technique, we were able to capture the intrinsic mutation pattern of the virus. Our

  3. c 2007 by Elizabeth A. Van Ruitenbeek. All rights reserved. MODELING MOBILE PHONE VIRUS PROPAGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, William H.

    c 2007 by Elizabeth A. Van Ruitenbeek. All rights reserved. #12;MODELING MOBILE PHONE VIRUS of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007 Urbana, Illinois #12;ABSTRACT Viruses that infect smartphones are emerging as a new research area in the fight against com- puter viruses. This thesis presents two models

  4. Modeling West Nile Virus One Host Infections Explaining Survival Curve Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, James K

    Modeling West Nile Virus One Host Infections Explaining Survival Curve Data James K. Peterson virus hides in them and hence is propagated upon rupture. Hence, this type of model is referred while the virus actively propagates in another small, but important, cell population. The development

  5. Virus Research 119 (2006) 6375 Cap-independent translation of plant viral RNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W. Allen

    2006-01-01

    Virus Research 119 (2006) 63­75 Cap-independent translation of plant viral RNAs Elizabeth L. Pettit 19 October 2005 Available online 19 December 2005 Abstract The RNAs of many plant viruses lack a 5 families, and genus Tobamovirus. Many other plant viruses have uncapped RNAs but their translation control

  6. Double-link expandohedra: a mechanical model for expansion of a virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guest, Simon

    Double-link expandohedra: a mechanical model for expansion of a virus By F. Kov´acs1 , T. Tarnai2), the derived expandohedra provide a mechanical model for the experimen- tally observed swelling of viruses such as cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). A fully symmetric swelling motion (a finite mechanism) is found

  7. Vaccination of Monoglycosylated Hemagglutinin induces Cross-strain Protection against Influenza Virus Infections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Virus Infections Monoglycosylated HA provides cross-strain protection against infection from various H1N1 viruses in mice and ferrets. Juine-Ruey Chen, Yueh-Hsiang Yu, Yung-Chieh Tseng, Wan-Ling Chiang(%) 0 20 40 60 80 100 PBS HAfg HAmg HAug Virus: A/California/07/2009 (NIBRG-121) * * *** *** Dilution

  8. Virus removal by soil passage at field scale and ground-water protection of sandy aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    Virus removal by soil passage at field scale and ground- water protection of sandy aquifers J; The Netherlands (E-mail: Majid@ct.tudelft.nl) Abstract Virus removal from groundwater by soil passage often for attachment than thereafter. A model is presented which interprets virus removal as a function of collision

  9. May 2015 Volume 1 University of Illinois Extension Neurologic Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Deming

    May 2015 Volume 1 University of Illinois Extension Neurologic Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1) What is EHV-1? EHV-1 (equine herpesvirus-1) is one of a large group of DNA viruses that causes potentially recent outbreaks have involved the EHV-1 respiratory/neurological form of the virus causing a condition

  10. 1HORTSCIENCE VOL. 40(3) JUNE 2005 Dahlia Mosaic Virus: Molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    1HORTSCIENCE VOL. 40(3) JUNE 2005 Dahlia Mosaic Virus: Molecular Detection and Distribution reaction, virus-free material Abstract. Dahlia is an important ornamental crop in the U.S. The economic value of the crop is often affected by viral diseases. Of several viruses that infect dahlia, dahlia

  11. Relating influenza virus membrane fusion kinetics to stoichiometry of neutralizing antibodies at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relating influenza virus membrane fusion kinetics to stoichiometry of neutralizing antibodies of antibodies or antibody fragments (Fab) bound to an individual virion with the capacity of the same virus particle to undergo membrane fusion. To this end, individual, in- fectious virus particles bound

  12. Inhibition of HIV-1 virus replication using small soluble Tat peptides Emmanuel Agbottah a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Chen

    Inhibition of HIV-1 virus replication using small soluble Tat peptides Emmanuel Agbottah inhibitor; Transcription; Cell cycle; Computer modeling; PBMC Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV not produce infectious virus (Garza and Carr, 1995). Tat not only stimulates the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR

  13. Phosphoprotein of Rinderpest Virus Forms a Tetramer Through Coiled Coil Region Important for Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    1 Phosphoprotein of Rinderpest Virus Forms a Tetramer Through Coiled Coil Region Important exists as a tetramer. The tetramer is formed by coiled coil interaction as shown by circular dichroism: Paramyxoviridae, Rinderpest virus, Phosphoprotein, coiled coil, tetramer. INTRODUCTION Rinderpest virus (RPV

  14. Stochastic Optimization Models for Rapid Detection of Viruses in Cellphone Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasenbein, John

    messages, and access the internet. As a consequence, smartphone networks are increasingly vulnerable the internet, using smartphones' capability to connect to the internet to replicate standard computer virus history of cellphone viruses. The first known cellphone virus, called Cabir, was written for the Symbian

  15. Prototype development of the Integral-Field unit for VIRUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Kelz; Svend M. Bauer; Frank Grupp; Gary J. Hill; Emil Popow; Povilas Palunas; Martin M. Roth; Phillip J. MacQueen; Ute Tripphahn

    2006-06-09

    VIRUS is a planned integral-field instrument for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). In order to achieve a large field-of-view and high grasp at reasonable costs, the approach is to replicate integral-field units (IFU) and medium sized spectrographs many times. The Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) contributes to VIRUS with the development and testing of the IFU prototype. This paper describes the optomechanical design and the manufacture of the fiber-based IFU subsystem. The initial VIRUS development aims to produce a prototype and to measure its performance. Additionally, techniques will be investigated to allow industrial replication of the highly specific fiber-bundle layout. This will be necessary if this technique is to be applied to the next generation of even larger astronomical instrumentation.

  16. Influenza-Like Illness Self-Care Instructions Let your Dean and professors know that you have been instructed to go into self-isolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    to avoid spreading the virus. Avoid touching your face or eyes. Cough into your elbow instead of your hand or persistent vomiting · Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough · Rash Oct-09 #12;

  17. NMR study of complexes between low molecular mass inhibitors and the West Nile virus NS2BNS3 protease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    ¨rich, Switzerland Introduction West Nile virus (WNV) encephalitis is a mosquito- borne disease that infects mainly by the US Depart- ment of Health [1]. WNV is a member of the flavivirus genus along with yellow fever virus, dengue virus and Japanese encepha- litis virus, all of which cause human diseases. There is no vaccine

  18. Proteomic Analysis of HepaRG Cells: A Novel Cell Line That Supports Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proteomic Analysis of HepaRG Cells: A Novel Cell Line That Supports Hepatitis B Virus Infection, the only cell line that is susceptible to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and supports a complete virus cellular response to HBV infection. Keywords: Hepatitis B virus · HepaRG cell line · Two dimensional

  19. Symptom Attenuation by a Satellite RNA in Vivo Is Dependent on Reduced Levels of Virus Coat Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Anne

    Symptom Attenuation by a Satellite RNA in Vivo Is Dependent on Reduced Levels of Virus Coat Protein; returned to author for revision April 14, 1999; accepted April 26, 1999 Many plant RNA viruses provide the symptoms of the associated helper virus. Sat-RNA C, a virulent sat-RNA associated with turnip crinkle virus

  20. 10/16/14 1:29 PMThe Virus Next Time? -Civil Beat Page 1 of 4http://www.civilbeat.com/2014/10/the-virus-next-time/#comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    10/16/14 1:29 PMThe Virus Next Time? - Civil Beat Page 1 of 4http://www.civilbeat.com/2014/10/the-virus-next-time/#comments The Virus Next Time? Take action against new viruses by making Hawaii less hospitable for mosquitoes on the African outbreak of Ebola virus and whether it could spread to the rest of the planet, another fortunately

  1. VirusMeter: Preventing Your Cellphone , Guanhua Yan2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Songqing

    . Due to the rapid advancement of mobile communication technology, mobile devices nowadays can support. The rationale underlying VirusMeter is the fact that mobile devices are usu- ally battery powered and any malicious activity would inevitably consume some battery power. By monitoring power consumption on a mobile

  2. Visualization of a fish wake using tobacco mosaic virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W.M.

    Visualization of a fish wake using tobacco mosaic virus David L. Hu, Lucy Mendel, and Brian Chan is that it is harmless to fish, providing a safe alternative for visualizing their wakes. The black neon tetra Fig. 1 of body length 3.6 cm maintains a steady position by flicking its fins and creating vortices. The fish

  3. Reverse Genetics System for Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Kristen

    2011-04-19

    , providing a convenient animal model that can be investigated without the restrictions necessary to work with the SARS-coronavirus. A reverse genetic cDNA assembly system was developed for the betacoronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHVA59), in 2002...

  4. Studies on shope fibroma virus: A tumorigenic poxvirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obom, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of Shope fibroma virus (SFV) to induce oncogenesis in vitro was investigated by inoculating an immortalized rabbit cell line (SIRC) with ultraviolet-irradiated virus. The resulting cell transformants displayed the characteristic properties of the malignant phenotype: lack of infectious particles, low serum requirement, high efficiency of cloning, resistance to superinfection, presence of viral DNA sequences in the nucleus, expression of viral proteins and induction of tumors in rabbits. This transformation was not stable since in all cell lines studied, a loss of the malignant phenotype was recorded close to the 50th passage. To assess the oncogenic potential of SFV, NTH 3T3 cells were transfected with SFV DNA. Focus-derived cell lines were established to study the biological and molecular properties of the transformants. At early passages all cell lines contained SFV DNA sequences and two of three lines tested expressed SFV DNA. To test which region(s) of the genome is (are) necessary for transformation, NIH 3T3 cells were transfected with cloned Bam HI fragments of SFV DNA containing terminal sequences of the molecule, either alone or in combination. Comparative DNA studies of SFV, Indiana virus and vaccinia virus revealed the presence of mitochondria (mt) DNA in purified preparations of viral DNA.

  5. Synopsis: Repulsion Helps Virus Pack DNA APS/Joan Tycko

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas E.

    Synopsis: Repulsion Helps Virus Pack DNA APS/Joan Tycko Repulsive DNA-DNA Interactions Accelerate, and Douglas E. Smith Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 248101 (2014) Published June 17, 2014 Featured in Physics Editors reported in Physical Review Letters show that, surprisingly, switching the DNA self-interaction from

  6. Virus-Enabled Silicon Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghodssi, Reza

    silicon particles and rapid capacity fading.4 Recently, silicon nanowires and nanotubes have been used particle) for the synthesis of nickel and cobalt nanowires. These struc- tures self-assemble vertically depending upon virus concentration.14 Incorporation of these sur- faces into simple nickel zinc microbatter

  7. The Mannose Receptor Mediates Dengue Virus Infection of Macrophages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Mannose Receptor Mediates Dengue Virus Infection of Macrophages Joanna L. Miller1 , Barend J. M. deWet1, , Luisa Martinez-Pomares2 , Catherine M. Radcliffe3¤ , Raymond A. Dwek3 , Pauline M. Rudd3 for the MR in DV infection. Citation: Miller JL, deWet BJM, Martinez-Pomares L, Radcliffe CM, Dwek RA, et al

  8. Development of simulation tools for virus shell assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Bonnie

    2001-01-05

    Prof. Berger's major areas of research have been in applying computational and mathematical techniques to problems in biology, and more specifically to problems in protein folding and genomics. Significant progress has been made in the following areas relating to virus shell assembly: development has been progressing on a second-generation self-assembly simulator which provides a more versatile and physically realistic model of assembly; simulations are being developed and applied to a variety of problems in virus assembly; and collaborative efforts have continued with experimental biologists to verify and inspire the local rules theory and the simulator. The group has also worked on applications of the techniques developed here to other self-assembling structures in the material and biological sciences. Some of this work has been conducted in conjunction with Dr. Sorin Istrail when he was at Sandia National Labs.

  9. Virus-Enabled Silicon Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X L; Gerasopoulos, K; Guo, J C; Brown, A; Wang, Chunsheng; Ghodssi, Reza; Culver, J N

    2010-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional Tobacco mosaic virus assembled silicon anode is reported. This electrode combines genetically modified virus templates for the production of high aspect ratio nanofeatured surfaces with electroless deposition to produce an integrated nickel current collector followed by physical vapor deposition of a silicon layer to form a high capacity silicon anode. This composite silicon anode produced high capacities (3300 mAh/g), excellent charge?discharge cycling stability (0.20% loss per cycle at 1C), and consistent rate capabilities (46.4% at 4C) between 0 and 1.5 V. The biological templated nanocomposite electrode architecture displays a nearly 10-fold increase in capacity over currently available graphite anodes with remarkable cycling stability.

  10. Virus Structure: From Crick and Watson to a New Conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Iorio; Siddhartha Sen

    2007-07-25

    We conjecture that certain patterns (scars), theoretically and numerically predicted to be formed by electrons arranged on a sphere to minimize the repulsive Coulomb potential (the Thomson problem) and experimentally found in spherical crystals formed by self-assembled polystyrene beads (an instance of the generalized Thomson problem), could be relevant to extend the classic Caspar and Klug construction for icosahedrally-shaped virus capsids. The main idea is that scars could be produced at an intermediate stage of the assembly of the virus capsids and the release of the bending energy present in scars into stretching energy could allow for a variety of non-spherical capsids' shapes. The conjecture can be tested in experiments on the assembly of artificial protein-cages where these scars should appear.

  11. Tomato chocolate spot virus, a member of a new torradovirus species that causes a necrosis-associated disease of tomato in Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batuman, O.; Kuo, Y.-W.; Palmieri, M.; Rojas, M. R.; Gilbertson, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Tomato chocolate spot virus, a member of a new torradovirusRepublic of Guatemala this virus being the causal agent oflate-spot-associated virus, revealed a genome composed of

  12. Initial Steps Towards Evaluating the Potential Disease Impacts of Propagated Marine Fish on Wild Stock: Examination of a New Herpes-like Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedrick, Ronald P.; Arkush, Kristen D.

    2009-01-01

    Examination of a New Herpes-like Virus Ronald P. Hedricknewly discovered herpes-like virus among white seabass as amethodology Herpes-like virus particles (WSB-HV) have been

  13. Scleromyxedema secondary to hepatitis c virus and successfully treated with antiviral therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, JA; Kalimullah, FA; Erickson, CP; Peng, LS

    2015-01-01

    Therapy For Chronic Active Hepatitis C. J Am Acad Dermatol.scleromyxedema secondary to hepatitis C successfully treatedWe recommend considering hepatitis C virus when working up

  14. Natural and experimental host range of the Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leisy, Ralph Herbert

    1968-01-01

    in. adjacent to, or in the vicinity of virus infected f'elds were collected for virus assay and for experimental susceptibility studies. Virus assays were (sade by mechanically inoculating suscep- tible host plants with the extracted sap of each... with MDMV, the grasses wh'ch were collected for determination of natural susceptibility and which proved to be free of the virus were grown in isolation and mechanically inocu- lated with the extracted sap of MDfliV (isolate Tx66-BBJg-I) infected AKS 614...

  15. Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

    2007-07-26

    A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

  16. Interactions of foot-and-mouth disease virus with cells in organised lymphoid tissue influence innate and adaptive immune responses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juleff, Nicholas Dylan

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is one of the most contagious viruses of animals and is recognised as the most important constraint to international trade in animals and animal products. Two fundamental problems remain ...

  17. Nox1 and Nox4 enzymes are persistently elevated in human hepatocytes producing infectious hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes de Mochel, Nabora Soledad

    2009-01-01

    A. , & Naccarato, R. (2007). Journal of Viral hepatitis.Hepatitis C virus: from oxygen free radicals toWu, J. (2008). NS3 protein of hepatitis C virus regulates

  18. TOMATO: Lycopersicon esculentum (Mill.), `Florida 47' CONTROL OF SILVERLEAF WHITEFLY AND INCIDENCE OF TOMATO YELLOW LEAF CURL VIRUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    AND INCIDENCE OF TOMATO YELLOW LEAF CURL VIRUS ON STAKED TOMATO WITH NEONICOTINOID AND OTHER INSECTICIDES, 2005 (SLW) and whitefly-borne tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) are major constraints to tomato

  19. Stem-loop Structure in the 5H Region of Potato Virus X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James W.

    Stem-loop Structure in the 5H Region of Potato Virus X Genome Required for Plus-strand RNA 27695, USA Computer-generated thermodynamic predictions and solution structure probing indicated two nt of potato virus X (PVX) RNA. Because the existence of SL1 was further supported by co- variation

  20. Catching Old Influenza Virus with A New Markov Model HamChing Lam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boley, Daniel

    Catching Old Influenza Virus with A New Markov Model HamChing Lam Dept. of Computer Science. of Computer Science and Engineering University of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA boley@cs.umn.edu ABSTRACT We have developed a novel Markov model which models the genetic distance between viruses based

  1. Stability of elastic icosadeltahedral shells under uniform external pressure: Application to viruses under osmotic pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    to viruses under osmotic pressure Antonio Siber1,* and Rudolf Podgornik2,3 1 Institute of Physics, P.O. Box, and are applied to the case of viruses under osmotic pressure. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.011919 PACS number s : 87 submitted to osmotic pressure of the external solu- tion. The impenetrability of the viral capsid

  2. IMPRINTED MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR BIOIN-SPIRED DETECTION OF AVIAN INFLUNZA VIRUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPRINTED MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR BIOIN- SPIRED DETECTION OF AVIAN INFLUNZA VIRUS USING NANOWIRES for the detection of avian influenza virus. A roll-to-roll im- printed microfluidic device suitable for simple process were integrated to the designed microfluidic chip (Figure 1). Using this system, we developed

  3. PCR detection of nearly any dengue virus strain using a highly sensitive primer `cocktail'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, George

    an estimated 50 million people annually [1]. Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a severe form of dengue feverPCR detection of nearly any dengue virus strain using a highly sensitive primer `cocktail' Charul to target effectively. This problem is espe- cially pronounced with the mutation-prone RNA viruses. Dengue

  4. Suppression of Hepatitis C Virus Genome Replication in Cells with RNA-Cleaving DNA Enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Suppression of Hepatitis C Virus Genome Replication in Cells with RNA-Cleaving DNA Enzymes, the hepatitis C virus nonstructural gene 3 (HCV NS3) RNA that encodes viral helicase and protease, from a pool. These selected DNAzyme and shRNA may be a viable therapeutic intervention to inhibit HCV replication in hepatic

  5. THE HEPATITIS C VIRUS E2p7 LOCALIZATION AND TOPOLOGY IN A RECOMBINANT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE HEPATITIS C VIRUS E2p7 LOCALIZATION AND TOPOLOGY IN A RECOMBINANT SYSTEM COSTIN I. POPESCU,1, 2 Road, Oxford, OX1 3QU, United Kingdom (Received September 1, 2009) The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome cleavage at the E2/p7 site is not regulated by changes in p7 membrane topology. Key words: hepatitis C

  6. Figure 1: Genome of the hepatitis B virus December 3rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    1 Figure 1: Genome of the hepatitis B virus Huy Phan December 3rd , 2009 Genomics and Medicine: Final Paper Professor Douglas Brutlag Current Understanding of the Hepatitis B Virus and Its Genotypes What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is one of the five hepatitis infections and is the world's most common

  7. VISUALIZING THE SPREAD OF WEST NILE VIRUS Jurgen Symanzik , Utah State University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    was rst recognized in the United States in 1999 as the cause of severe and fatal human illness, there were only a few states in the Western United States where the virus had not been observed. However, indications are that the virus will be observed in every state of the contiguous United States by the end

  8. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus entry mechanism requires late endosome formation and resists cell membrane cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Fleming, Elisa H.; Davey, Robert A. . E-mail: radavey@utmb.edu

    2006-04-10

    Virus envelope proteins determine receptor utilization and host range. The choice of receptor not only permits specific targeting of cells that express it, but also directs the virus into specific endosomal trafficking pathways. Disrupting trafficking can result in loss of virus infectivity due to redirection of virions to non-productive pathways. Identification of the pathway or pathways used by a virus is, thus, important in understanding virus pathogenesis mechanisms and for developing new treatment strategies. Most of our understanding of alphavirus entry has focused on the Old World alphaviruses, such as Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus. In comparison, very little is known about the entry route taken by more pathogenic New World alphaviruses. Here, we use a novel contents mixing assay to identify the cellular requirements for entry of a New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Expression of dominant negative forms of key endosomal trafficking genes shows that VEEV must access clathrin-dependent endocytic vesicles for membrane fusion to occur. Unexpectedly, the exit point is different from Old World alphaviruses that leave from early endosomes. Instead, VEEV also requires functional late endosomes. Furthermore, unlike the Old World viruses, VEEV entry is insensitive to cholesterol sequestration from cell membranes and may reflect a need to access an endocytic compartment that lacks cholesterol. This indicates fundamental differences in the entry route taken by VEEV compared to Old World alphaviruses.

  9. The structure of Sindbis virus produced from vertebrate and invertabrate hosts determined by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lilin [ORNL; Piper, Amanda [North Carolina State University; Meilleur, Flora [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Hernandez, Raquel [North Carolina State University; Brown, Dennis [North Carolina State University; Heller, William T [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The complex natural cycle of vectored viruses that transition between host species, such as between insects and mammals, makes understanding the full life cycle of the virus an incredibly complex problem. Sindbis virus, an arbovirus and prototypic alphavirus having an inner protein shell and an outer glycoprotein coat separated by a lipid membrane, is one example of a vectored virus that transitions between vertebrate and insect hosts. While evidence of host-specific differences in Sindbis virus has been observed, no work has been performed to characterize the impact of the host species on the structure of the virus. Here, we report the first study of the structural differences between Sindbis viruses grown in mammalian and insect cells, which were determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), a nondestructive technique that did not decrease the infectivity of the Sindbis virus particles studied. The scattering data and modeling showed that, while the radial position of the lipid bilayer did not change significantly, it was possible to conclude that it did have significantly more cholesterol when the virus was grown in mammalian cells. Additionally, the outer protein coat was found to be more extended in the mammalian Sindbis virus. The SANS data also demonstrated that the RNA and nucleocapsid protein share a closer interaction in the mammalian-cell-grown virus than in the virus from insect cells.

  10. Hepatitis C Virus Internal Ribosome Entry Site-mediated Translation Is Stimulated by Specific Interaction of Independent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    Hepatitis C Virus Internal Ribosome Entry Site-mediated Translation Is Stimulated by Specific site (IRES) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in vitro. Using a yeast three-hybrid sys- tem, we demonstrated with the HCV IRES and are involved in stimulating internal initiation of translation. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)1

  11. A Rapid Micro Polymerase Chain Reaction System (GenSpector Micro PCR) for Hepatitis B Virus DNA Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Kwang W.

    A Rapid Micro Polymerase Chain Reaction System (GenSpector® Micro PCR) for Hepatitis B Virus DNA reaction) system (GenSpector® Micro PCR) for the application of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA detection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA detection [1]. Silicon micromachining technology has been utilized

  12. Modification of the Hepatitis B Virus Envelope Protein Glycosylation Pattern Interferes with Secretion of Viral Particles, Infectivity, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Modification of the Hepatitis B Virus Envelope Protein Glycosylation Pattern Interferes Transfusion Sanguine (INTS), Paris, France ABSTRACT The envelope proteins of hepatitis B virus (HBV) bear an N protein synthesis and stability and to secretion of subviral particles (SVPs) and hepatitis delta virus

  13. Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein*S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein, the ¶ Unité d'Epidémiologie et Physiopathologie des Virus Oncogènes, Département de Virologie, Institut, or tropical spastic paraparesis. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causa- tive agent of adult

  14. VIRUS BULLETIN www.virusbtn.com 55555DECEMBER 2004DECEMBER 2004DECEMBER 2004DECEMBER 2004DECEMBER 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhotia, Arun

    VIRUS BULLETIN www.virusbtn.com 55555DECEMBER 2004DECEMBER 2004DECEMBER 2004DECEMBER 2004DECEMBER VIRUSESAMORPHIC VIRUSES REALLREALLREALLREALLREALLY INVINCIBLE? PARY INVINCIBLE? PARY INVINCIBLE? PARY INVINCIBLE of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA In the game of hide and seek, where a virus tries to hide and AV scanners try

  15. Nanomechanical Characterization of the Triple b-Helix Domain in the Cell Puncture Needle of Bacteriophage T4 Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müftü, Sinan

    of Bacteriophage T4 Virus SINAN KETEN,1 J. FERNANDO RODRIGUEZ ALVARADO,2 SINAN MU¨ FTU¨ ,3 and MARKUS J. BUEHLER 1 of the bacteriophage T4 virus. We characterize the compressive mechanical strength of this protein nanotube using full- teriophage T4 virus.17,18,27 Single molecule biophysics techniques13 are com- monly used to experimentally

  16. Backbone Structure of the Amantadine-Blocked Trans-Membrane Domain M2 Proton Channel from Influenza A Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Virus Jun Hu,* Tom Asbury,y Srisairam Achuthan,yz Conggang Li,§{ Richard Bertram,yz Jack R. Quine proton channel of the Influenza A virus. Here, we present a structure of the M2 trans-membrane domain types of influenza viruses--A, B, and C--only Influenza A and B can cause epidemic diseases. Amantadine

  17. Self-Assembly of Virus-Structured High Surface Area Nanomaterials and Their Application as Battery Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Self-Assembly of Virus-Structured High Surface Area Nanomaterials and Their Application as Battery mosaic Virus (TMV) templates. Rod-shaped TMV templates (300 × 18 nm) engineered to encode unique cysteine-fold increase in surface area. Electroless deposition of ionic metals onto surface-assembled virus

  18. Proc. 10th ACM Conf. on Principles of Distributed Systems, August 1991 1 How To Withstand Mobile Virus Attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovsky, Rafail

    Virus Attacks Extended Abstract Rafail Ostrovsky Moti Yungy Abstract We initiate a study of distributed, analogous to a spread of a virus or a worm. We show how local computations (at each processor) and global in the computation. 1 Introduction Computer viruses pose one of the central problems in distributed computing today

  19. Avfs: An On-Access Anti-Virus File System Yevgeniy Miretskiy, Abhijith Das, Charles P. Wright, and Erez Zadok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Avfs: An On-Access Anti-Virus File System Yevgeniy Miretskiy, Abhijith Das, Charles P. Wright (Security 2004) Abstract Viruses and other malicious programs are an ever- increasing threat to current to combat. Most cur- rent virus scanners perform scanning only when a file is opened, closed, or executed

  20. TOMATO: Lycopersicon esculentum (Mill.) `Florida 47' `Tygress' CONTROL OF SILVERLEAF WHITEFLY AND INCIDENCE OF TOMATO YELLOW LEAF CURL VIRUS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    AND INCIDENCE OF TOMATO YELLOW LEAF CURL VIRUS ON STAKED TOMATO WITH INSECTICIDES AND RESISTANT VARIETIES, 2006 to whitefly-borne tomato yellow leafcurl virus (TYLCV) is a major constraint to tomato production in southwest-susceptible `Florida 47' and left untreated to serve as the untreated check and as source of whiteflies and virus

  1. Proc. 10th ACM Conf. on Principles of Distributed Systems, August 1991 1 How To Withstand Mobile Virus Attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovsky, Rafail

    Virus Attacks Extended Abstract Rafail Ostrovsky \\Lambda Moti Yung y Abstract We initiate a study the network, analogous to a spread of a virus or a worm. We show how local computations (at each processor redundancy in the computation. 1 Introduction Computer viruses pose one of the central problems

  2. Prevalence of serologic markers for hepatitis B and C viruses in Brazilian blood donors and incidence and residual risk of transfusion transmission of hepatitis C virus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    and residual risk of hepatitis B infection among bloodchi S. Prevalence of hepatitis B and C serological markersCR. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C virus markers among

  3. Comparative immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys of DNA plasmid, recombinant vaccinia virus, and replication-defective adenovirus vectors expressing a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volkin, David B.; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Minchun; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Freed, Daniel C.; Wilson, Keith A.; Dubey, Sheri; Zhu, De-Min; Nawrocki, Denise K.; Mach, Henryk; Troutman, Robert; Isopi, Lynne; Williams, Donna; Hurni, William; Xu, Zheng; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Wang, Su; Liu, Xu; Guan, Liming; Long, Romnie; Trigona, Wendy; Heidecker, Gwendolyn J.; Perry, Helen C.; Persaud, Natasha; Toner, Timothy J.; Su, Qin; Liang, Xiaoping; Youil, Rima; Chastain, Michael; Bett, Andrew J.; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2003-06-01

    Cellular immune responses, particularly those associated with CD3+ CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), play a primary role in controlling viral infection, including persistent infection with human immunodeficiency virus ...

  4. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.-C. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Kao, Y.-C. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, T-J. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wong, M.-L. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: mlwong@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2005-08-26

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression.

  5. Sorting of influenza A virus RNA genome segments after nuclear export

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takizawa, Naoki [Department of Infection Biology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Infectious Agents, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Kumakura, Michiko; Takeuchi, Kaoru [Department of Infection Biology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Kobayashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Infectious Agents, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.j [Department of Infection Biology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan)

    2010-06-05

    The genome of the influenza A virus consists of eight different segments. These eight segments are thought to be sorted selectively in infected cells. However, the cellular compartment where segments are sorted is not known. We examined using temperature sensitive (ts) mutant viruses and cell fusion where segments are sorted in infected cells. Different cells were infected with different ts mutant viruses, and these cells were fused. In fused cells, genome segments are mixed only in the cytoplasm, because M1 prevents their re-import into the nucleus. We made a marker ts53 virus, which has silent mutations in given segments and determined the reassortment frequency on all segments using ts1 and marker ts53. In both co-infected and fused cells, all of marker ts53 segments and ts1 segments were incorporated into progeny virions in a random fashion. These results suggest that influenza virus genome segments are sorted after nuclear export.

  6. A Local Rule Based Theory of Virus Shell Assembly Bonnie Berger \\Lambday Peter W. Shor z Lisa TuckerKellogg y Jonathan King x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Local Rule Based Theory of Virus Shell Assembly Bonnie Berger \\Lambday Peter W. Shor z Lisa­assembly of icosahedral virus shells may depend on only the lower­level interactions of a protein subunit with its provides a framework for understanding the assembly of icosahedral viruses. These include both viruses

  7. Virus-Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Biocomposite Films Keith C. Donavan, Jessica A. Arter, Gregory A. Weiss,* and Reginald M. Penner*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gregory A.

    Virus-Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Biocomposite Films Keith C. Donavan, Jessica A. Arter, California 92697-2025, United States ABSTRACT: Virus-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (virus- PEDOT electrolytes containing 12 mM LiClO4 and the bacteriophage M13. The concentration of virus in these solutions

  8. Mechanisms of receptor/coreceptor-mediated entry of enveloped viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah A. Nowak; Tom Chou

    2008-11-18

    Enveloped viruses enter host cells either through endocytosis, or by direct fusion of the viral membrane envelope and the membrane of the host cell. However, some viruses, such as HIV-1, HSV-1, and Epstein-Barr can enter a cell through either mechanism, with the choice of pathway often a function of the ambient physical chemical conditions, such as temperature and pH. We develop a stochastic model that describes the entry process at the level of binding of viral glycoprotein spikes to cell membrane receptors and coreceptors. In our model, receptors attach the cell membrane to the viral membrane, while subsequent binding of coreceptors enables fusion. The model quantifies the competition between fusion and endocytotic entry pathways. Relative probabilities for each pathway are computed numerically, as well as analytically in the high viral spike density limit. We delineate parameter regimes in which fusion or endocytosis is dominant. These parameters are related to measurable and potentially controllable quantities such as membrane bending rigidity and receptor, coreceptor, and viral spike densities. Experimental implications of our mechanistic hypotheses are proposed and discussed.

  9. varicose veins smoking obesity swine flu high blood pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    diabetes kidney failure dementia thrombosis high anorexia nervosa hormone replacement varicose veins underactive thyroid cystitis incontinence breast cancer obesity bulimia nervosa anorexia nervosa hormone obesity bulimia nervosa anorexia nervosa hormone replacement varicose veins smoking high blood pressure

  10. Die Dynamik magnetischer Flu rohren im Sonnen eck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlichenmaier, Rolf

    pressure. The background gas pressure is constant horizontally. Since the photospheric part of the tube by an interchange of magnetic ux tubes (Jahn & Schmidt 1994). The motion of an individual magnetic ux tube inside is governed by the forces of gravity, buoyancy, gas pressure gradient inside the tube, magnetic tension

  11. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    epizootic levels in domestic fowl in a number of Asian countries, including China, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Indonesia, Japan, and Cambodia, and has now spread to wild bird...

  12. Controlling Pandemic Flu: The Value of International Air Travel Restrictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistics and Epidemiology, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, United States of America, 3 Statistics and Epidemiology, RTI International, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America

  13. HHeal: A Personalized Health App for Flu Tracking and Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Frank

    . According to a 2011 meta- analysis of 10 studies [2], people taking probiotics were 42% less likely to get

  14. BACTERIAL MENINGITIS AND SWINE FLU THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE SYMPTOMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    bright lights stiff neck cough sore throat body aches runny nose congestion fatigue If you think you have

  15. Swine Flu and Common Infections to Prepare For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    particles can travel up to 12 feet through the air when someone with a cold coughs or sneezes http symptoms: ­ Headache or pressure on the face ­ Cough ­ Stuffy nose Nose drainage ("snots") or phlegm (rest do not require antibiotics) ­ Fever, swollen lymph nodes, no cough, white spots on tonsils

  16. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton SourceSuperconductorsSRS

  17. Fast pandemic detection tool ready to fight flu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah861 ANNUAL|FacilityAboutHeat & CoolSpunFast

  18. February most likely month for flu season to peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah861May 2011April David28 February 28our

  19. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics

  20. Point-of-Care Flu Diagnosis | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access| DepartmentPeerFederalPlatinumtake the 2011|Poem gives glimpse

  1. ORISE: Pandemic Flu Toolkits | How ORISE is Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE TheForensic ScienceHowNews

  2. FLU5A425 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtrans - PermeationGovernment

  3. Pandemic Flu Planning | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams forOrhanTheoretical MethodsENERGYPalm Physics

  4. Identification of Novel Positive-Strand RNA Viruses by Metagenomic Analysis of Archaea-Dominated Yellowstone Hot Springs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Bolduc; Daniel P. Shaughnessy; Yuri I. Wolf; Eugene V. Koonin; Francisco F. Roberto; Mark Young

    2012-05-01

    There are no known RNA viruses that infect Archaea. Filling this gap in our knowledge of viruses will enhance our understanding of the relationships between RNA viruses from the three domains of cellular life and, in particular, could shed light on the origin of the enormous diversity of RNA viruses infecting eukaryotes. We describe here the identification of novel RNA viral genome segments from high-temperature acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. These hot springs harbor low-complexity cellular communities dominated by several species of hyperthermophilic Archaea. A viral metagenomics approach was taken to assemble segments of these RNA virus genomes from viral populations isolated directly from hot spring samples. Analysis of these RNA metagenomes demonstrated unique gene content that is not generally related to known RNA viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. However, genes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a hallmark of positive-strand RNA viruses, were identified in two contigs. One of these contigs is approximately 5,600 nucleotides in length and encodes a polyprotein that also contains a region homologous to the capsid protein of nodaviruses, tetraviruses, and birnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRps encoded in these contigs indicate that the putative archaeal viruses form a unique group that is distinct from the RdRps of RNA viruses of Eukarya and Bacteria. Collectively, our findings suggest the existence of novel positive-strand RNA viruses that probably replicate in hyperthermophilic archaeal hosts and are highly divergent from RNA viruses that infect eukaryotes and even more distant from known bacterial RNA viruses. These positive-strand RNA viruses might be direct ancestors of RNA viruses of eukaryotes.

  5. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  6. Computational biology approach to uncover hepatitis C virus helicase operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flechsig, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus helicase is a molecular motor that splits nucleic acid duplex structures during viral replication, therefore representing a promising target for antiviral treatment. Hence, a detailed understanding of the mechanism by which it operates would facilitate the development of efficient drug-assisted therapies aiming to inhibit helicase activity. Despite extensive investigations performed in the past, a thorough understanding of the activity of this important protein was lacking since the underlying internal conformational motions could not be resolved. Here we review investigations that have been previously performed by us for HCV helicase. Using methods of structure-based computational modelling it became possible to follow entire operation cycles of this motor protein in structurally resolved simulations and uncover the mechanism by which it moves along the nucleic acid and accomplishes strand separation. We also discuss observations from that study in the light of recent experimental studies t...

  7. Computational biology approach to uncover hepatitis C virus helicase operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holger Flechsig

    2013-11-26

    Hepatitis C virus helicase is a molecular motor that splits nucleic acid duplex structures during viral replication, therefore representing a promising target for antiviral treatment. Hence, a detailed understanding of the mechanism by which it operates would facilitate the development of efficient drug-assisted therapies aiming to inhibit helicase activity. Despite extensive investigations performed in the past, a thorough understanding of the activity of this important protein was lacking since the underlying internal conformational motions could not be resolved. Here we review investigations that have been previously performed by us for HCV helicase. Using methods of structure-based computational modelling it became possible to follow entire operation cycles of this motor protein in structurally resolved simulations and uncover the mechanism by which it moves along the nucleic acid and accomplishes strand separation. We also discuss observations from that study in the light of recent experimental studies that confirm our findings.

  8. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Leopold [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Giang, Erick [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Nieusma, Travis [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Kadam, Rameshwar U. [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Cogburn, Kristin E. [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Hua, Yuanzi [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Dai, Xiaoping [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Stanfield, Robyn L. [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Burton, Dennis R. [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Ward, Andrew B. [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Wilson, Ian A. [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Law, Mansun [The Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold ? sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  9. Exploring Disease Transmission On Networks with Winfried Just

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Just, Winfried

    the relevant contact network, depends on the particular disease. Think of the flu vs. a computer virus vs of disease transmission Infectious diseases are caused by pathogens (such as viruses, bacteria, fungi identical. Such models can be embodied in computer code as agent-based models. Winfried Just and Ying Xin

  10. UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES | FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS What college students need to know

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    to know Q. What is norovirus (aka stomach flu)? A. Norovirus is a very contagious virus that causes with the virus) Q. How long are people contagious? A. People infected with norovirus are contagious from the moment they begin feeling ill to at least three days after recovery. Some people may be contagious

  11. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  12. Virus constructed iron phosphate lithium ion batteries in unmanned aircraft systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolesnikov-Lindsey, Rachel

    FePO? lithium ion batteries that have cathodes constructed by viruses are scaled up in size to examine potential for use as an auxiliary battery in the Raven to power the payload equipment. These batteries are assembled ...

  13. Evolutionary history, cross-species transmission and host adaptation of human viruses and their primate homologues 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Sinead Mary Kathleen

    2014-11-28

    At present the origins of major human pathogens associated with hepatic disease are poorly understood. The absence of such information pertaining to the evolutionary history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C ...

  14. The Role of Regulatory T cells in Primary Infection with Epstein-Barr Virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingate, Phoebe J

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during adolescence results in an immunopathological disease, Infectious Mononucleosis (IM), in around 25% of cases. A role for Regulatory T cells (Treg) in IM has yet to be ...

  15. Spatiotemporal quantification of cell dynamics in the lung following influenza virus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Lu

    Lung injury caused by influenza virus infection is widespread. Understanding lung damage and repair progression post infection requires quantitative spatiotemporal information on various cell types mapping into the tissue ...

  16. The grapefruit flavonoid naringenin as a Hepatitis C virus therapy : efficacy, mechanism and delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection accounts for approximately 40% of chronic liver disease in the United States and results in an estimated 8,000-10,000 deaths annually. Simulations suggest that in the next decade morbidity ...

  17. First Characterization of Avian Memory T Lymphocyte Responses to Avian Influenza Virus Proteins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Shailbala

    2011-02-22

    responses induced by intramuscular inoculation of chickens with AIV HA and NP expressing cDNA plasmids or a non-replicating human adenovirus vector were identified through ex vivo stimulation with virus infected, major histocompatibility complex (MHC...

  18. Persistent hepatitis C virus infection in microscale primary human hepatocyte cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khetani, Salman R.

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major public health problem, affecting approximately 130 million people worldwide. HCV infection can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver disease, as well as ...

  19. Sociodemographic Trends in National Ambulatory Care Visits for Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsui, Judith I.; Maselli, Judith; Gonzales, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    U.S. veterans with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Am JAlter MJ. Epidemiology of hepatitis C. Hepatology. 1997;26Surveillance for acute viral hepatitis—United States, 2006.

  20. Hepatitis C Virus Network Based Classification of Hepatocellular Cirrhosis and Carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tao

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a main risk factor for liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, particularly to those patients with chronic liver disease or injury. The similar etiology leads to a high correlation of the ...

  1. Polymer-attached zanamivir inhibits synergistically both early and late stages of influenza virus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chia Min

    Covalently conjugating multiple copies of the drug zanamivir (ZA; the active ingredient in Relenza) via a flexible linker to poly-l-glutamine (PGN) enhances the anti-influenza virus activity by orders of magnitude. In this ...

  2. Characterisation of the response of Aedes mosquito cells to Semliki Forest virus infection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siu, Ricky Wai Chi

    2012-06-30

    Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrates by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes or ticks. The replication of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) (Togaviridae; Alphavirus) in vertebrate cells is well established and triggers ...

  3. Multi-Strain Virus-Host Dynamics from HIV to Phage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    sampled from the acid mine drainage solution – air interfaceI- plasma in an acid mine drainage (AMD) biofilm reveal thatloci and viruses in an acid mine drainage system across the

  4. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Hanson, Alica M.; Shadrick, William R.; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L.; Hernadez, John J.; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Heck, Julie A.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Schoenen, Frank; Frick, David N,

    2012-06-27

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative...

  5. Design and manufacture of an icosahedral virus model for educational use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stach, Laurie A. (Laurie Anna)

    2005-01-01

    A model of an icosahedral virus was designed and manufactured. Much consideration was given to the design of different aspects of the part. though there were many uncertainties about some parameters that disallowed precise ...

  6. Di#erential equation models for Aujeszky's Disease Virus (ADV) in Irish pig herds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland Abstract Aujeszky's Disease virus, (ADV) is a contagious viral Aladar Aujeszky, when he distinguished psuedorabies from rabies [23]. Aujeszky's Disease is a contagious

  7. Spatial analysis of West Nile Virus and predictors of hyperendemicity in the Texas equine industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittich, Courtney Anne

    2008-10-10

    West Nile Virus (WNV) first appeared in Texas equids during June 2002. It has since spread rapidly across the state and apparently become endemic. Data from outbreaks occurring between 2002 and 2004 were analyzed to ...

  8. ECOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY OF AVIAN VIRUSES USING NICHE MODELS AND WILD BIRD SURVEILLANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Richard A.J.

    2010-12-14

    The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza strain H5N1 (hereafter "H5N1"), and other bird-associated viruses, have raised serious concerns about impacts on human, livestock, and wildlife populations. Ecological ...

  9. Engineering and targeting glycan receptor binding of influenza A virus hemagglutinin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaraman, Akila

    2011-01-01

    The critical first step in the host infection by influenza A virus is the binding of the viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) to the sialylated glycan receptors terminated by N-acetyineuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) ...

  10. The serological detection of tobacco ringspot virus reservoirs in the Lower Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Leon Russell

    1962-01-01

    and of the "pijcples" disease of watermelon reported by' Rosberg (19) in %exes -end by Shepherd. and Struble (20) in Gislahossu Valleau (25) in Kentucky inoculated tobacco with expressed sap. free eggplants showing the yellows disease and obtained typical TRSV... to determine potential v1rus carriers - mschani- csl inoculation of expressed sap to susceptible test plants, snd sero- logical techniques . utilisisg the reaction. of ths virus antigen with antiserum homologous to the virus. Xost oi' the known hosts of TRSV...

  11. Influenza A H3N2 subtype virus NS1 protein targets into the nucleus and binds primarily via its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS to nucleolin and fibrillarin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melén, Krister; Tynell, Janne; Fagerlund, Riku; Roussel, Pascal; Hernandez-Verdun, Danièle; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A H3N2 subtype virus NS1 protein targets into theBinding of the influenza A virus NS1 protein to PKR mediatespathogenic H5N1 influenza virus. Nature 2008, 456:985–988.

  12. Structural basis for the antibody neutralization of Herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Li-Ling [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chan, Woan-Eng [Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Ko, Tzu-Ping [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Jiann-Shiun [Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Wang, Andrew H.-J., E-mail: ahjwang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    The gD–E317-Fab complex crystal revealed the conformational epitope of human mAb E317 on HSV gD, providing a molecular basis for understanding the viral neutralization mechanism. Glycoprotein D (gD) of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) binds to a host cell surface receptor, which is required to trigger membrane fusion for virion entry into the host cell. gD has become a validated anti-HSV target for therapeutic antibody development. The highly inhibitory human monoclonal antibody E317 (mAb E317) was previously raised against HSV gD for viral neutralization. To understand the structural basis of antibody neutralization, crystals of the gD ectodomain bound to the E317 Fab domain were obtained. The structure of the complex reveals that E317 interacts with gD mainly through the heavy chain, which covers a large area for epitope recognition on gD, with a flexible N-terminal and C-terminal conformation. The epitope core structure maps to the external surface of gD, corresponding to the binding sites of two receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, which mediate HSV infection. E317 directly recognizes the gD–nectin-1 interface and occludes the HVEM contact site of gD to block its binding to either receptor. The binding of E317 to gD also prohibits the formation of the N-terminal hairpin of gD for HVEM recognition. The major E317-binding site on gD overlaps with either the nectin-1-binding residues or the neutralizing antigenic sites identified thus far (Tyr38, Asp215, Arg222 and Phe223). The epitopes of gD for E317 binding are highly conserved between two types of human herpesvirus (HSV-1 and HSV-2). This study enables the virus-neutralizing epitopes to be correlated with the receptor-binding regions. The results further strengthen the previously demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic potential of the E317 antibody.

  13. Adaptive immunity and histopathology in frog virus 3-infected Xenopus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert, Jacques . E-mail: robert@mail.rochester.edu; Morales, Heidi; Buck, Wayne; Cohen, Nicholas; Marr, Shauna; Gantress, Jennifer

    2005-02-20

    Xenopus has been used as an experimental model to evaluate the contribution of adaptive cellular immunity in amphibian host susceptibility to the emerging ranavirus FV3. Conventional histology and immunohistochemistry reveal that FV3 has a strong tropism for the proximal tubular epithelium of the kidney and is rarely disseminated elsewhere in Xenopus hosts unless their immune defenses are impaired or developmentally immature as in larvae. In such cases, virus is found widespread in most tissues. Adults, immunocompromised by depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells or by sub-lethal {gamma}-irradiation, show increased susceptibility to FV3 infection. Larvae and irradiated (but not normal) adults can be cross-infected through water by infected adult conspecifics (irradiated or not). The natural MHC class I deficiency and the absence of effect of anti-CD8 treatment on both larval CD8{sup +} T cells and larval susceptibility to FV3 are consistent with an inefficient CD8{sup +} T cell effector function during this developmental period.

  14. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keener, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Thomas E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  15. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  16. Differential cytokine mRNA expression induced by binding of virulent and avirulent molecularly cloned equine infectious anemia viruses to equine macrophages 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wah-Seng

    2004-11-15

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) causes rapid development of acute disease followed by recurring episodes of fever, thrombocytopenia and viremia, termed chronic EIA. Most infected horses control the virus by immune ...

  17. Genetic analysis of equine 2', 5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OASI) and ribonculclease L (RNASEL) polymorphims and association to severe West Nile Virus disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rios, Jonathan Joseph

    2009-05-15

    West Nile virus (WNV), a member of the Flaviviridae family of RNA viruses, was first introduced to the United States in 1999 with rapid transmission across a variety of hosts throughout the continental states. Genetic ...

  18. Effect of D222G Mutation in the Hemagglutinin Protein on Receptor Binding, Pathogenesis and Transmissibility of the 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belser, Jessica A.

    Influenza viruses isolated during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic generally lack known molecular determinants of virulence associated with previous pandemic and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. The frequency of the amino ...

  19. Email networks and the spread of computer viruses M. E. J. Newman, 1 Stephanie Forrest, 1, 2 and Justin Balthrop 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Mark

    Email networks and the spread of computer viruses M. E. J. Newman, 1 Stephanie Forrest, 1, 2 Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131--1386 Many computer viruses spread via electronic of computer virus epidemics. The structure of various networks, including social and computer networks, has

  20. Protein-Protein Interactions: Modeling the Hepatitis C Virus Ion Channel p7 George Patargias, Nicole Zitzmann, Raymond Dwek, and Wolfgang B. Fischer*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protein-Protein Interactions: Modeling the Hepatitis C Virus Ion Channel p7 George Patargias-channel-forming membrane polypeptide encoded by the hepatitis C virus which consists of two transmembrane R-helices, TM1. Introduction Hepatitis C virus is the major cause of chronic viral hepatitis which can lead eventually

  1. Primer Design for Automated Virus Diagnosis in Plants C. MEDEIROS, D. TAVARES, K. ROCHA, M. MONTEIRO, L. GONCALVES, P. M. L UCIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    Primer Design for Automated Virus Diagnosis in Plants C. MEDEIROS, D. TAVARES, K. ROCHA, M sequences into plant virus genome it is possible to perform a data mining to search efficient primers to help in diagnostic works. 1 Introduction One of the main issues to be observed in virus diagnosis

  2. Contributions of Antibody and T Cell Subsets to Protection Elicited by Immunization with a Replication-Defective Mutant of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knipe, David M.

    with a Replication-Defective Mutant of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Lynda A. Morrison1 and David M. Knipe Department Replication-defective mutants of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) elicit immune responses in mice that reduce. Passive transfer of sera from mice immunized with the replication-defective mutant virus, d301, its

  3. Virus Electrodes for Universal Biodetection Li-Mei C. Yang, Phillip Y. Tam, Benjamin J. Murray, Theresa M. McIntire, Cathie M. Overstreet,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gregory A.

    Virus Electrodes for Universal Biodetection Li-Mei C. Yang, Phillip Y. Tam, Benjamin J. Murray of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 A dense virus layer, readily tailored-assembled mono- layer. The resistance of this "virus electrode", ZRe, mea- sured in the frequency range from 2

  4. Covalent Virus Layer for Mass-Based Biosensing Li-Mei C. Yang, Juan E. Diaz, Theresa M. McIntire, Gregory A. Weiss,* and Reginald M. Penner*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gregory A.

    Covalent Virus Layer for Mass-Based Biosensing Li-Mei C. Yang, Juan E. Diaz, Theresa M. Mc, California 92697-2025 M13 virus particles were covalently attached to a planar gold-coated quartz crystal produced a phage multilayer hav- ing a coverage equivalent to 6.5 close-packed monolay- ers of the virus

  5. Rapid detection of Ebola virus with a reagent-free, point-of-care biosensor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baca, Justin T.; Severns, Virginia; Lovato, Debbie; Branch, Darren W.; Larson, Richard S.

    2015-04-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors can rapidly detect Ebola antigens at the point-of-care without the need for added reagents, sample processing, or specialized personnel. This preliminary study demonstrates SAW biosensor detection of the Ebola virus in a concentration-dependent manner. The detection limit with this methodology is below the average level of viremia detected on the first day of symptoms by PCR. We observe a log-linear sensor response for highly fragmented Ebola viral particles, with a detection limit corresponding to 1.9 × 10? PFU/mL prior to virus inactivation. We predict greatly improved sensitivity for intact, infectious Ebola virus. This point-of-care methodologymore »has the potential to detect Ebola viremia prior to symptom onset, greatly enabling infection control and rapid treatment. This biosensor platform is powered by disposable AA batteries and can be rapidly adapted to detect other emerging diseases in austere conditions.« less

  6. Structural Studies of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Tetramer in Complex with Its Receptor, Sialyllactose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Ping; Thompson, Thomas B.; Wurzburg, Beth A.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) functions in virus attachment to cells, cleavage of sialic acid from oligosaccharides, and stimulating membrane fusion during virus entry into cells. The structural basis for these diverse functions remains to be fully understood. We report the crystal structures of the parainfluenza virus 5 (SV5) HN and its complexes with sialic acid, the inhibitor DANA, and the receptor sialyllactose. SV5 HN shares common structural features with HN of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and human parainfluenza 3 (HPIV3), but unlike the previously determined HN structures, the SV5 HN forms a tetramer in solution, which is thought to be the physiological oligomer. The sialyllactose complex reveals intact receptor within the active site, but no major conformational changes in the protein. The SV5 HN structures do not support previously proposed models for HN action in membrane fusion and suggest alternative mechanisms by which HN may promote virus entry into cells.

  7. Stochastic dynamics of virus capsid formation: direct versus hierarchical self-assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johanna E. Baschek; Heinrich C. R. Klein; Ulrich S. Schwarz

    2015-01-31

    In order to replicate within their cellular host, many viruses have developed self-assembly strategies for their capsids which are sufficiently robust as to be reconstituted in vitro. Mathematical models for virus self-assembly usually assume that the bonds leading to cluster formation have constant reactivity over the time course of assembly (direct assembly). In some cases, however, binding sites between the capsomers have been reported to be activated during the self-assembly process (hierarchical assembly). In order to study possible advantages of such hierarchical schemes for icosahedral virus capsid assembly, we use Brownian dynamics simulations of a patchy particle model that allows us to switch binding sites on and off during assembly. For T1 viruses, we implement a hierarchical assembly scheme where inter-capsomer bonds become active only if a complete pentamer has been assembled. We find direct assembly to be favorable for reversible bonds allowing for repeated structural reorganizations, while hierarchical assembly is favorable for strong bonds with small dissociation rate, as this situation is less prone to kinetic trapping. However, at the same time it is more vulnerable to monomer starvation during the final phase. Increasing the number of initial monomers does have only a weak effect on these general features. The differences between the two assembly schemes become more pronounced for more complex virus geometries, as shown here for T3 viruses, which assemble through homogeneous pentamers and heterogeneous hexamers in the hierarchical scheme. In order to complement the simulations for this more complicated case, we introduce a master equation approach that agrees well with the simulation results.

  8. The effect of the time of inoculation with Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus on grain sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batte, Robert Dan

    1969-01-01

    the effect of the time of inoculation with Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus on some agronomic charac- teristics of a tolerant and a susceptible grain sorghum hybrid. A completely randomized block design with three replications was util- ized, Mass inoculation... of the plants was accomplished through use of' t' he artist's air'brush procedure. The virus was found to cause reductior: in yield, delay in ma- turity, stunting snd. lowering of test weights of hot'n hybrids. Additional effects on the susceptible hyb. . d...

  9. Field distribution and genetic variability of Panicum mosaic virus satellite RNAs in St. Augustine decline 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabrera Perez, Over

    1999-01-01

    RNA is found associated with Australian isolates of BYDV-RPV. This non- coding satRNA is undetectable in the field and becomes perceptible only following greenhouse propagation. This satRNA attenuates the symptoms induced by the helper virus (BYDV-RPV) alone..., but does not affect the severe symptoms caused by mixed infection with BYDV-RPV and PAV serotypes. There is no effect on PAV RNA accumulation in oats (84, 100). Satellite RNAs Associated With Viruses of the Genus Sobemovirus Low molecular weight RNAs...

  10. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-10

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  11. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korber, Bette; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, T

    2009-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  12. Clinical mite infestations of domestic cats seropositive for feline immunodeficiency and/or feline leukemia viruses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Christian Eric

    2000-01-01

    and feral cats in College Station, Texas. The virus status of each cat was determined and correllated to the presence or absence of parasitic mites. Results from the Austin area study were inconclusive due to an inadequte sample size. Results from...

  13. The distribution of fitness effects caused by single-nucleotide substitutions in an RNA virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena, Santiago F.

    The distribution of fitness effects caused by single-nucleotide substitutions in an RNA virus of each mutant. The distribution of nonlethal deleterious effects was highly skewed and had a long, flat-normal distribution, with 19% reduction of average fitness; the effects distribution of preobserved deleterious

  14. The envelope glycoprotein from tick-borne encephalitis virus at 2 Aresolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    H. MEMBRANE glycoproteins of enveloped viruses have essential functions in the viral life cycle, including protein of a flavivirus reveals an unusual architecture. The flat, elongated dimer extends in a direction-395, most of the ectodomain. We describe here the structure at 2.0 A resolution. Its architecture is very

  15. The Effects of Estrogen on Theiler’s Virus Infection of Endothelial Cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, Steven M.

    2011-01-11

    the effects of estrogen on Theiler’s virus infection of cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB): cerebral vascular endothelial (CVE) cells in vitro. The hypotheses to be tested were that (1) estrogen would have a protective effect on the CVE cells...

  16. Dose response effects of feline immunodeficiency virus PPR strain infection in cats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokanson, Regina Marie

    1998-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (F1V) causes an immune phics. deficiency disease in cats similar to HIV-AIDS in humans. FIV-specific antibodies have been found in symptomatic and asymptomatic, domestic and non-domestic, cats world-wide. Little...

  17. When Selfish Meets Evil: Byzantine Players in a Virus Inoculation Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When Selfish Meets Evil: Byzantine Players in a Virus Inoculation Game Thomas Moscibroda Computer Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory ETH Zurich 8092 Zurich, Switzerland schmiste@tik.ee.ethz.ch Roger Wattenhofer Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory ETH Zurich 8092 Zurich, Switzerland

  18. ACT: Attachment Chain Tracing Scheme for Email Virus Detection and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxson, Vern

    of viruses. We propose a progressive immunization strategy which uses transmission chain infor- mation, Algorithms Keywords worm defense, transmission chain, contact tracing 1. INTRODUCTION Today's society depends, 2004, Washington, DC, USA. Copyright 2004 ACM 1-58113-970-5/04/0010 ...$5.00. of information. Computer

  19. Peptide Inhibitors of Dengue-Virus Entry Target a Late-Stage Fusion Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    with positive-strand RNA genomes packaged into compact particles, about 500 A° in diameter [5]. Their fusionPeptide Inhibitors of Dengue-Virus Entry Target a Late- Stage Fusion Intermediate Aaron G. Schmidt1 School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America Abstract The mechanism of membrane fusion

  20. Evaluation of Performance in Yearling Crossbred Steers following Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Challenge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runyan, Chase Anthony

    2013-10-31

    Virus (BVDV) challenge. Yearling, F2 and F3 Nellore-Angus steers (n = 380) from the Texas A&M McGregor Genomics herd were utilized over 4 years, and were stratified by sire over three vaccine groups of modified-live (MLV), killed (KV), and non...

  1. Detection and Typing of Viruses Using Broadly Sensitive Cocktail-PCR and Mass Spectrometric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, George

    be useful in the treatment of secondary infections that may cause the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever spectrometric characterization of the individual isolates. Dengue virus is the causative agent of dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome with an estimated 50 million infections and 12

  2. MAximum Multicore POwer (MAMPO) -An Automatic Multithreaded Synthetic Power Virus Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    and cooling issues along with a world-wide initiative towards green computing, power consump- tion is a firstMAximum Multicore POwer (MAMPO) - An Automatic Multithreaded Synthetic Power Virus Generation worst case power consumption for a com- puter system is a significant design parameter and it is a very

  3. ADAM: An Automatic and Extensible Platform to Stress Test Android Anti-Virus Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lui, John C.S.

    ADAM: An Automatic and Extensible Platform to Stress Test Android Anti-Virus Systems Min Zheng a variety of malware samples for the Android platform. Specifically, ADAM can automatically transform 222 Android malware samples that we collected in the wild. Using ADAM, we generate different vari

  4. Evaluation of Sindbis-M2e Virus Vector as a Universal Influenza A Vaccine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuong, Christine

    2012-10-19

    expressing the PR8 influenza strain's M2e peptide was developed as a potential universal DIVA vaccine. M2e is a conserved peptide amongst influenza A viruses; M2e-specific antibodies induce antibody-dependent cytotoxicity or phagocytosis of infected cells...

  5. Structure of the Newcastle disease virus F protein in the post-fusion conformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, Kurt; Wen, Xiaolin; Leser, George P.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (Stanford-MED); (NWU); (HHMI)

    2010-11-17

    The paramyxovirus F protein is a class I viral membrane fusion protein which undergoes a significant refolding transition during virus entry. Previous studies of the Newcastle disease virus, human parainfluenza virus 3 and parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins revealed differences in the pre- and post-fusion structures. The NDV Queensland (Q) F structure lacked structural elements observed in the other two structures, which are key to the refolding and fusogenic activity of F. Here we present the NDV Australia-Victoria (AV) F protein post-fusion structure and provide EM evidence for its folding to a pre-fusion form. The NDV AV F structure contains heptad repeat elements missing in the previous NDV Q F structure, forming a post-fusion six-helix bundle (6HB) similar to the post-fusion hPIV3 F structure. Electrostatic and temperature factor analysis of the F structures points to regions of these proteins that may be functionally important in their membrane fusion activity.

  6. A C. elegans-based foam for rapid on-site detection of residual live virus.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negrete, Oscar A.; Branda, Catherine; Hardesty, Jasper O. E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Tucker, Mark David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kaiser, Julia N. (Global Product Management, Hilden, Germany); Kozina, Carol L.; Chirica, Gabriela S.

    2012-02-01

    In the response to and recovery from a critical homeland security event involving deliberate or accidental release of biological agents, initial decontamination efforts are necessarily followed by tests for the presence of residual live virus or bacteria. Such 'clearance sampling' should be rapid and accurate, to inform decision makers as they take appropriate action to ensure the safety of the public and of operational personnel. However, the current protocol for clearance sampling is extremely time-intensive and costly, and requires significant amounts of laboratory space and capacity. Detection of residual live virus is particularly problematic and time-consuming, as it requires evaluation of replication potential within a eukaryotic host such as chicken embryos. The intention of this project was to develop a new method for clearance sampling, by leveraging Sandia's expertise in the biological and material sciences in order to create a C. elegans-based foam that could be applied directly to the entire contaminated area for quick and accurate detection of any and all residual live virus by means of a fluorescent signal. Such a novel technology for rapid, on-site detection of live virus would greatly interest the DHS, DoD, and EPA, and hold broad commercial potential, especially with regard to the transportation industry.

  7. Nuclear import of hepatitis B virus capsids and release of the viral genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panté, Nelly

    Nuclear import of hepatitis B virus capsids and release of the viral genome Birgit Rabe*, Angelika through the nuclear pore into the nuclear basket. Import depended on phosphorylation of the capsid protein from the inner face of the nuclear pore. Immature capsids that did not contain the mature viral genome

  8. Rapid emergence of hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor resistance is expected

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Current therapy, consisting of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV), leads to sustained viral elimination in only about 45% of patients treated. Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel HCV NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection. However, some patients experience viral breakthrough during dosing, with drug resistant variants being 5%-20% of the virus population as early as day 2 after treatment initiation. Why viral variants appear such a short time after the start of dosing is unclear, especially since this has not been seen with monotherapy for either human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B virus. Here, using a viral dynamic model, we explain why such rapid emergence of drug resistant variants is expected when potent HCV protease inhibitors are used as monotherapy. Surprisingly, our model also shows that such rapid emergence need not be the case with some potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors. Examining the case of telaprevir therapy in detail, we show the model fits observed dynamics of both wild-type and drug-resistant variants during treatment, and supports combination therapy of direct antiviral drugs with PEG-IFN and/or RBV for hepatitis C.

  9. 6 BREAKTHROUGHS SPRING 2012 COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES 7 UNDERSTANDING THE HERPES VIRUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    studying how the virus commandeers host enzymes to orchestrate the destruction of RNA, as well as revealing lifestyle that includes colonizing the xylem vessels -- the veins of the plant, where it blocks water flow to find groups of genes hypothesized to be responsible for adaptation, and then testing the hypotheses

  10. Influenza type C virus biology, interaction with the host, and epidemiology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, William Wyatt

    1995-01-01

    protein polymerases, P1, P2, P3 respectively, which form a transcriptase that includes a capped RNA primer binding site, a nucleotide binding site, and a site for nucleotide chain elongation. Influenza virus RNA segment 4 codes for the one surface...

  11. Deformed wing virus and drone mating flights in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): implications for sexual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Robert

    Deformed wing virus and drone mating flights in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): implications clear evidence for the occurrence of high DWV titres in the endophallus of sexually mature drones collected from drone congregation areas (DCAs). Furthermore, the endophallus DWV titres of drones collected

  12. A Dynamic Model for Induced Reactivation of Latent Virus G.M. Kepler1,5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that inducing agents such as Tetradecanoyl Phorbol Acetate (TPA), sodium butyrate, and other short chain fatty is applied to the reactivation of latent KSHV in BCBL-1 cell cultures with butyrate as the inducing agent acids (SFAs) can induce lytic replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpes virus (KSHV) and Epstein

  13. Lung Irradiation Increases Mortality After Influenza A Virus Challenge Occurring Late After Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Casey M.; Johnston, Carl J.; Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York ; Reed, Christina K.; Lawrence, B. Paige; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York ; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Finkelstein, Jacob N.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To address whether irradiation-induced changes in the lung environment alter responses to a viral challenge delivered late after exposure but before the appearance of late lung radiation injury. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice received either lung alone or combined lung and whole-body irradiation (0-15 Gy). At 10 weeks after irradiation, animals were infected with 120 HAU influenza virus strain A/HKx31. Innate and adaptive immune cell recruitment was determined using flow cytometry. Cytokine and chemokine production and protein leakage into the lung after infection were assessed. Results: Prior irradiation led to a dose-dependent failure to regain body weight after infection and exacerbated mortality, but it did not affect virus-specific immune responses or virus clearance. Surviving irradiated animals displayed a persistent increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and edema. Conclusions: Lung irradiation increased susceptibility to death after infection with influenza virus and impaired the ability to complete recovery. This altered response does not seem to be due to a radiation effect on the immune response, but it may possibly be an effect on epithelial repair.

  14. The VIRUS Data Reduction Pipeline Claus A. Goessla, Niv Droryb, Helena Relkec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grupp, Frank

    The VIRUS Data Reduction Pipeline Claus A. Goessla, Niv Droryb, Helena Relkec Karl Gebhardtb, Frank resolution, 145 IFU spectrograph. The data reduction pipeline will have to extract 35.000 spectra per our ideas how to achieve this goal. Keywords: Data reduction pipeline, IFU spectroscopy, dark energy 1

  15. Rates of Vaccine Evolution Show Strong Effects of Latency: Implications for Varicella Zoster Virus Epidemiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Lucy A.; Depledge, Daniel P.; Kundu, Samit; Gershon, Anne A.; Nichols, Richard A.; Balloux, Francois; Welch, John J.; Breuer, Judith

    2015-01-06

    electrophoretic data on protein identity. Am Nat. 105: 385. Nichols RA, Averbeck KT, Poulsen AG, Al Bassam MM, Cabral F, Aaby P, Breuer J. 2011. Household size is critical to varicella-zoster virus transmission in the tropics despite lower viral infectivity...

  16. Structural Basis for Suppression of a Host Antiviral Response by Influenza A Virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das,K.; Ma, L.; Xiao, R.; Radvansky, B.; Aramini, J.; Zhao, L.; Marklund, J.; Kuo, R.; Twu, K.; Arnold, E.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are responsible for seasonal epidemics and high mortality pandemics. A major function of the viral NS1A protein, a virulence factor, is the inhibition of the production of IFN-{beta}{beta} mRNA and other antiviral mRNAs. The NS1A protein of the human influenza A/Udorn/72 (Ud) virus inhibits the production of these antiviral mRNAs by binding the cellular 30-kDa subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30), which is required for the 3' end processing of all cellular pre-mRNAs. Here we report the 1.95- Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of the complex formed between the second and third zinc finger domain (F2F3) of CPSF30 and the C-terminal domain of the Ud NS1A protein. The complex is a tetramer, in which each of two F2F3 molecules wraps around two NS1A effector domains that interact with each other head-to-head. This structure identifies a CPSF30 binding pocket on NS1A comprised of amino acid residues that are highly conserved among human influenza A viruses. Single amino acid changes within this binding pocket eliminate CPSF30 binding, and a recombinant Ud virus expressing an NS1A protein with such a substitution is attenuated and does not inhibit IFN-{beta} pre-mRNA processing. This binding pocket is a potential target for antiviral drug development. The crystal structure also reveals that two amino acids outside of this pocket, F103 and M106, which are highly conserved (>99%) among influenza A viruses isolated from humans, participate in key hydrophobic interactions with F2F3 that stabilize the complex.

  17. Dried-Blood Spots: A Cost-Effective Field Method for the Detection of Chikungunya Virus Circulation in Remote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) in the Comoros Islands. CHIKV then spread to other islands in the Indian Ocean: La Re´union, Mauritius of the Union of the Comoros) were also affected by this virus [3,10,11]. The Northern and Ea

  18. Ocean Viruses: Tiny entities with Global Impacts ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Matthew B [University of Arizona

    2013-01-15

    Matt Sullivan from the University of Arizona on "Ocean Viruses: Tiny Entities with Global Impacts" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  19. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: Targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flather, D; Semler, BL

    2015-01-01

    FMDV Foot and mouth disease virus HRV Human rhinovirus CVB3and human rhinovirus (HRV) 2 (Jang and Wimmer, 1990; Luz andand Semler, 2011). CVB3 and HRV 16 also likely utilize SRSF3

  20. Genome-wide analysis of Marek's disease virus proteins and their role in modulating the innate immune response in chickens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanin, Ola

    2010-01-01

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV), the causative agent of Marek’s disease in chicken, is an important oncogenic avian pathogen which leads to world-wide economic losses in the poultry industry. It targets the chicken's immune ...

  1. Characterization and Mapping of the Gene Conferring Resistance to Rift Valley Fever Virus Hepatic Disease in WF.LEW Rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callicott, Ralph J.

    2010-01-14

    Rift Valley Fever Virus is a plebovirus that causes epidemics and epizootics in sub-Saharan African countries but has expanded to Egypt and the Arabian Peninsula. The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is susceptible to ...

  2. Ocean Viruses: Tiny entities with Global Impacts ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Matthew B [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona

    2012-03-22

    Matt Sullivan from the University of Arizona on "Ocean Viruses: Tiny Entities with Global Impacts" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  3. Dengue Virus Type 3 Adaptive Changes during Epidemics in Sao Jose de Rio Preto, Brazil, 2006–2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villabona-Arenas, Christian Julian

    Global dengue virus spread in tropical and sub-tropical regions has become a major international public health concern. It is evident that DENV genetic diversity plays a significant role in the immunopathology of the disease ...

  4. Citrus tristeza virus: characterization of Texas isolates, studies on aphid transmission and pathogen-derived control strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herron, Caroline Mary

    2004-11-15

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), an economically important graft-transmissible pathogen of citrus, causes major global declines in citrus production. In the commercial citrus of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas (LRGV), where red grapefruit...

  5. N-Terminal Phosphorylation Sites of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 Differentially Regulate Its Activities and Enhance Viral Replication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostafa, Heba H.; Thompson, Thornton W.; Davido, David J.

    2013-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) is an immediate-early phosphoprotein that transactivates viral gene expression. Evidence suggests that phosphorylation regulates the functions of ICP0, and ...

  6. Modeling host interactions with hepatitis B virus using primary and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocellular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Robert E.

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects 400 million people worldwide and is a leading driver of end-stage liver disease and liver cancer. Research into the biology and treatment of HBV requires an in vitro cell-culture ...

  7. Real-time imaging of hepatitis C virus infection using a fluorescent cell-based reporter system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Christopher T.

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), which infects 2–3% of the world population, is a causative agent of chronic hepatitis and the leading indication for liver transplantation1. The ability to propagate HCV in cell culture (HCVcc) is ...

  8. A needlestick or a cut from a contaminated scapel can lead to infection from hepatitis B virus (HBV) or human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    A needlestick or a cut from a contaminated scapel can lead to infection from hepatitis B virus (HBV from occupational exposure, approximately 8,700 health care workers each year contract hepatitis B

  9. Circulation of Different Lineages of Dengue Virus 2, Genotype American/Asian in Brazil: Dynamics and Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drumond, Betania Paiva

    The American/Asian genotype of Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) was introduced into the Americas in the 80?s. Although there is no data showing when this genotype was first introduced into Brazil, it was first detected in ...

  10. The Role of Climatic and Environmental Variability on West Nile Virus in Harris County, Texas, 2006-2007 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berhane, Stephen

    2010-07-14

    Between the years 2006-2007, Harris County, located at the heart of the Houston metropolitan area, experienced a nearly 90% decline in the number of female mosquitoes which tested positive for the West Nile virus. Different ...

  11. Evaluation of a modified-live, gene deletion mutant pseudorabies virus vaccine for field use in swine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawhorn, Donald Bruce

    1989-01-01

    EVALUATION OF A MODIFIED-LIVE, GENE DELETION MUTANT PSEUDORABIES VIRUS VACCINE FOR FIELD USE IN SWINE A Thesis by DONALD BRUCE LAWHORN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiblogy EVALUATION OF A MODIFIED-LIVE, GENE DELETION MUTANT PSEUDORABIES VIRUS VACCINE FOR FIELD USE IN SWINE A Thesis by DONALD BRUCE LAWHORN Approved...

  12. The Structure of the Herpes Simplex Virus DNA-Packaging Terminase pUL15 Nuclease Domain Suggests an Evolutionary Lineage among Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigamani, Sundaresan Selvarajan; Zhao, Haiyan; Kamau, Yvonne N.; Baines, Joel D.; Tang, Liang

    2013-04-17

    .org/site/subscriptions/To subscribe to to another ASM Journal go to: o n June 30, 2014 by University of Kansas http://jvi.asm.org/ D ow nloaded from o n June 30, 2014 by University of Kansas http://jvi.asm.org/ D ow nloaded from The Structure of the Herpes Simplex Virus DNA..., American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. doi:10.1128/JVI.00311-13 7140 jvi.asm.org Journal of Virology p. 7140–7148 June 2013 Volume 87 Number 12 o n June 30, 2014 by University of Kansas http://jvi.asm.org/ D ow nloaded from tron of 3...

  13. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; et al

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tiermore »2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.« less

  14. A New DNA Binding Protein Highly Conserved in Diverse Crenarchaeal Viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, E.T.; Eilers, B.J.; Reiter, D.; Ortmann, A.C.; Young, M.J.; Lawrence, C.M.; /Montana State U. /Tubingen U.

    2007-07-09

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) infects Sulfolobus species found in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. Its 37 open reading frames (ORFs) generally lack sequence similarity to other genes. One exception, however, is ORF B116. While its function is unknown, orthologs are found in three additional crenarchaeal viral families. Due to the central importance of this protein family to crenarchaeal viruses, we have undertaken structural and biochemical studies of B116. The structure reveals a previously unobserved fold consisting of a five-stranded beta-sheet flanked on one side by three alpha helices. Two subunits come together to form a homodimer with a 10-stranded mixed beta-sheet, where the topology of the central strands resembles an unclosed beta-barrel. Highly conserved loops rise above the surface of the saddle-shaped protein and suggest an interaction with the major groove of DNA. The predicted B116-DNA interaction is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

  15. Visualization of the structures of the hepatitis C virus replication complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Shih-Ching [Graduate Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lo, Shih-Yen [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Liou, Je-Wen [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lin, Min-Ching [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Syu, Ciao-Ling [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lai, Meng-Jiun; Chen, Yi- Cheng [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Li, Hui-Chun, E-mail: huichun@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Lipid rafts are known to play an important role in virus entry and virus assembly of many viruses. {yields} However, HCV is the first example of the association of lipid raft with viral RNA replication. {yields} Our results in this manuscript demonstrate that purified HCV RCs with associated lipid raft membrane appeared as distinct particles of around 0.7 um under EM and AFM. {yields} Knockdown of proteins associated with lipid raft suppressed the HCV replication and reduced the number of these particles. {yields} To our knowledge, structures of HCV RCs were demonstrated at its first time in this manuscript. -- Abstract: Hepatitis C viral RNA synthesis has been demonstrated to occur on a lipid raft membrane structure. Lipid raft membrane fraction purified by membrane flotation analysis was observed using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Particles around 0.7 um in size were found in lipid raft membrane fraction purified from hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon but not their parental HuH7 cells. HCV NS5A protein was associated with these specialized particles. After several cycles of freezing-thawing, these particles would fuse into larger sizes up to 10 um. Knockdown of seven proteins associated with lipid raft (VAPA, COPG, RAB18, COMT, CDC42, DPP4, and KDELR2) of HCV replicon cells reduced the observed number of these particles and suppressed the HCV replication. Results in this study indicated that HCV replication complexes with associated lipid raft membrane form distinct particle structures of around 0.7 um as observed from transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  16. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; et al

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/foundermore »(T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a breadth of T cell responses to conserved viral epitopes.« less

  17. Plant Disease Note 2006 | First Report of Iris yellow spot virus on Onion (Allium cepa) in Texas Overview Current Issue Past Issues Search PD Search APS Journals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    Report of Iris yellow spot virus on Onion (Allium cepa) in Texas. M. E. Miller and R. R. Saldana, Texas A

  18. A variant upstream of IFNL3 (IL28B) creating a novel interferon gene IFNL4 is associated with impaired clearance of hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infectionStatement: Management of hepatitis C 2002 (June 10–12,Statement on Management of Hepatitis C: 2002. NIH Consens

  19. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charych, Deborah (Albany, CA); Reichart, Anke (Albany, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  20. Screening for resistance to cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus, gummy stem blight, and monosporascus root rot and detection of RAPD markers associated with QLT for soluble solids, sugars, and vitamin C in melon (Cucumis melo l.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, Jonathan Walker

    2005-02-17

    Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV) is a relatively new virus affecting cantaloupe production in South Texas and worldwide. No resistant commercial cultivars are available. A cross of ?Dulce? (susceptible) x ...

  1. Development of one-step SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR for quantifying bovine viral diarrhea virus type-1 and its comparison with conventional RT-PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ni; Liu, Zhengwen; Han, Qunying; Qiu, Jianming; Chen, Jinghong; Zhang, Guoyu; Li, Zhu; Lou, Sai; Li, Na

    2011-07-29

    Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a worldwide pathogen in cattle and acts as a surrogate model for hepatitis C virus (HCV). One-step real-time fluorogenic quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay...

  2. Beyond Biomedicine: Developing New Models of Medical Practice from the Pragmatist and Existentialist Traditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Cody

    2012-07-16

    Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) in the 1980?s. Patients would present to their physicians complaining of unceasing lethargy. Scientist and physicians were unable to locate a somatic cause for this phenomenon, and CFS was largely ignored by physicians, given mock... labels such as ?yuppie flu.? However, interest in CFS grew immensely when a possible link was suggested between the virus-like symptoms of CFS and the Epson-Barr Virus (EBV). Even though the link was later seriously called into question, Aronowitz...

  3. February 2004 | Volume 2 | Issue 2 | Page 0140PLoS Biology | http://biology.plosjournals.org Of the 300 or so viruses that cause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Jeffrey

    ://biology.plosjournals.org Of the 300 or so viruses that cause disease in humans,HIV may have the greatest adaptive advantage.Like most the virus.But as the infection progresses, CD4 counts drop and the body's ability to renew T-cells decreases

  4. Development of an in vitro procedure to eradicate potato viruses X, Y, and S from the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) variety Russet Norko two of its strains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapata Carrero, Carmen Cecilia

    1994-01-01

    and transplanted onto a solid medium containing MS and vitamins. Plants were tested using ELISA to identify the virus free plants. Six later a second ELISA test conf irmed that the plants still free. weeks were Ribavirin alone eradicated the viruses from some...

  5. Riboproteomics of the Hepatitis C Virus Internal Ribosomal Entry Henry Lu, Weiqun Li, William Stafford Noble, Donald Payan, and D. C. Anderson*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, William Stafford

    Riboproteomics of the Hepatitis C Virus Internal Ribosomal Entry Site Henry Lu, Weiqun Li, William of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 Received February 8, 2004 Hepatitis C virus. Keywords: hepatitis C · IRES · RNA · binding proteins · shotgun peptide sequencing · machine learning

  6. 5/27/2014 Screening for Hepatitis B Virus in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults: Clinical Summary http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf12/hepb/hepbsumm.htm 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    5/27/2014 Screening for Hepatitis B Virus in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults: Clinical Summary for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults > Clinical Summary Screening for Hepatitis vaccinated for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and other high-risk individuals (including persons who were

  7. The effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on tobacco tissue and tobacco mosaic virus multiplication 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Lester Lynn

    1969-01-01

    of polio-P. '. !A infectivity bv Di'ISO; however, DNSO did not erh=nce Infection by intact viruses. D!%0 failed to protect RNA from R. "IAse; his enzyme destroyed tha bio". ogical activity of polio-RNA. Cochran et al. (S) i'epo"ted that the ini...0 was applied to the plant by infusion. Orchid rials fil'. ed " ith 3 percent D"ISO were placed on freshly broken leai' Detioles at thc base of the plants. The inoculum was a purj fied pron raticn previously described and diluted to 10 3 with dis+"'l...

  8. West Nile virus in the New World: potential impacts on bird species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Komar, Nicholas; Komar, Oliver; Navarro-Sigü enza, Adolfo G.; Robbins, Mark B.; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    is probably well under way; and (2) in tropical areas, diagnosis of WNV in humans is complicated by the similarity of symptoms to other flavivirus infections such as dengue fever. Ornithologists involved in WNV surveillance and research should consider using..., J. (1999) West Nile fever — a reemerging mosquito-borne viral disease in Europe. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 5: 643–650. Klenk, K. and Komar, N. (2003) Poor replication of West Nile virus (New York 1999 strain) in three reptilian and one amphibian species...

  9. Detection of hepatitis E virus antibodies in dogs in the United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McElroy, Aoife; Hirade, Rintaro; Bexfield, Nick; Jalal, Hamid; Brownlie, Joe; Goodfellow, Ian; Caddy, Sarah L.

    2015-06-10

    Detection of Hepatitis E Virus antibodies in dogs in the United Kingdom 2 3 Authors and affiliations 4 Aoife McElroy1, Rintaro Hirade1, Nick Bexfield2, Hamid Jalal3, Joe Brownlie4, Ian 5 Goodfellow1*, Sarah L Caddy1,5* 6 1 Division of Virology... , GTP, and UTP (each), 2.5?g T7 polymerase, and 80 units of RNaseOUT (Life 160 Techologies) in a 50?l volume. The in-vitro transcription reactions were carried out at 37°C 161 for 2h. Afterwards, the reaction mixtures were incubated with 20 units...

  10. Electron microscopic investigations and indexing studies of psorosis and citrus ringspot virus of citrus / by Margaret Atchison Barkley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkley, Margaret Atchison

    1979-01-01

    -253. In W. C. Price, (ed. ) Pro- ceedings 3rd Conf. Intern. Organ. Citrus Virol. Univ. of Florida Press, Gainesville. 1968. Purification of citrus crinkly-leaf virus. p. 255-263. In J. F. L Childs, (ed. ) Proceedings 4th Conf. Intern. Organ. Citrus...:519-520. 19. 1961. Mechanical transmission of infectious variega- tion virus in citrus and non-citrus hosts. p. 197-204. In W. C. Price, (ed. ) Proc. 2nd Conf. Intern. Organ. Citrus Virol. Univ. of Florida Press, Gainesville. 20. Greenwood, A. P, , R. M...

  11. IS IT A COLD OR IS IT FLU? It is often difficult to distinguish a bad cold (URTI) from mild influenza (flu) symptoms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    (Temperature > 100 degrees F). Coughing, headaches, body aches and GI symptoms are also more common sneezing Mild, hacking cough Cough, often early and severe Slight aches and pains Often severe aches

  12. Dynamics of lipid droplets induced by the hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa ; Kennedy, David C.; Stolow, Albert; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pezacki, John Paul

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatitis C virus uses lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind. {yields} HCV core proteins on LDs facilitate viral particle assembly. {yields} We used a novel combination of CARS, two-photon fluorescence, and DIC microscopies. {yields} Particle tracking experiments show that core slowly affects LD localization. {yields} Particle tracking measured the change in speed and directionality of LD movement. -- Abstract: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, with limited treatment options and no vaccine available. HCV uses components of the host cell to proliferate, including lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind and facilitate viral particle assembly. We have measured the dynamics of HCV core protein-mediated changes in LDs and rates of LD movement on microtubules using a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence (TPF), and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopies. Results show that the HCV core protein induces rapid increases in LD size. Particle tracking experiments show that HCV core protein slowly affects LD localization by controlling the directionality of LD movement on microtubules. These dynamic processes ultimately aid HCV in propagating and the molecules and interactions involved represent novel targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  13. Hemin potentiates the anti-hepatitis C virus activity of the antimalarial drug artemisinin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paeshuyse, Jan [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Coelmont, Lotte [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Vliegen, Inge [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Hemel, Johan van [Kemin Pharma, Atealaan 4H, B-2200 Herentals (Belgium); Vandenkerckhove, Jan [Kemin Pharma, Atealaan 4H, B-2200 Herentals (Belgium); Peys, Eric [Kemin Pharma, Atealaan 4H, B-2200 Herentals (Belgium); Sas, Benedikt [Kemin Pharma, Atealaan 4H, B-2200 Herentals (Belgium); Clercq, Erik De [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Neyts, Johan [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium)]. E-mail: johan.neyts@rega.kuleuven.be

    2006-09-15

    We report that the antimalarial drug artemisinin inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon replication in a dose-dependent manner in two replicon constructs at concentrations that have no effect on the proliferation of the exponentially growing host cells. The 50% effective concentration (EC{sub 5}) for inhibition of HCV subgenomic replicon replication in Huh 5-2 cells (luciferase assay) by artemisinin was 78 {+-} 21 {mu}M. Hemin, an iron donor, was recently reported to inhibit HCV replicon replication [mediated by inhibition of the viral polymerase (C. Fillebeen, A.M. Rivas-Estilla, M. Bisaillon, P. Ponka, M. Muckenthaler, M.W. Hentze, A.E. Koromilas, K. Pantopoulos, Iron inactivates the RNA polymerase NS5B and suppresses subgenomic replication of hepatitis C virus, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005) 9049-9057.)] at a concentration that had no adverse effect on the host cells. When combined, artemisinin and hemin resulted, over a broad concentration range, in a pronounced synergistic antiviral activity. Also at a concentration (2 {mu}M) that alone had no effect on HCV replication, hemin still potentiated the anti-HCV activity of artemisinin.

  14. Role and Importance of NS1 Protein of Avian Influenza Virus to Grow in the Presence of Interferon and Evaluation of the NS1 Mutant Viruses as Potential DIVA Vaccines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brahmakshatriya, Vinayak

    2010-10-12

    A proper vaccination program can play a critical role in prevention and control of avian influenza (AI) in commercial poultry. Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) of H5 and H7 AI subtypes cause serious economic losses to the poultry...

  15. Solution structure and functional analysis of a frameshift-stimulating RNA pseudoknot from sugarcane yellow leaf virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornish, Peter Verle

    2006-04-12

    for maintaining frameshifting efficiency and pseudoknot stability. A proposed P1-P2 mRNA pseudoknot from sugarcane yellow leaf virus (ScYLV) was of interest since it contained two adenosine to cytidine substitutions in L2. Functional analysis shows...

  16. Structural transitions and energy landscape for Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus capsid mechanics from nanomanipulation in vitro and in silico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kononova, Olga; Brasch, Melanie; Cornelissen, Jeroen; Dima, Ruxandra I; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Virus shells can have applications as nanocontainers and delivery vehicles in biotechnology and medicine. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on sub-second timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsid show that the capsid's physical properties are dynamic and local characteristics of the structure, which depend on the magnitude and geometry of mechanical input. Surprisingly, under large deformations the CCMV capsid transitions to the collapsed state without substantial local structural alterations. The enthalpy change in this deformation state dH = 11.5 - 12.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to large-amplitude out-of-plane excitations, which contribute to the capsid bending, and the entropy change TdS = 5.1 - 5.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to coherent in-plane rearrangements of pr...

  17. I use the University-recommended free anti-virus software to scan my computer at least once

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    I use the University-recommended free anti- virus software to scan my computer at least once every month. I set up my computer to receive automatic updates for my operating system. · Windows: update products, when prompted to do so. My computer has a User Account for everyday use. I only use

  18. Bayesian Inference of the Number of Factors in Gene-Expression Analysis: Application to Human Virus Challenge Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carin, Lawrence

    Bayesian Inference of the Number of Factors in Gene-Expression Analysis: Application to Human Virus. Ginsburg2 , Alfred Hero III3 , Joseph Lucas2 , David Dunson4 and Lawrence Carin1§ 1 Electrical and Computer University 3 Electrical & Computer Engineering Department, University of Michigan 4 Statistics Department

  19. MicroRNAs of Gallid and Meleagrid herpesviruses show generally conserved genomic locations and are virus-specific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Pamela

    and are virus-specific Lisa A. Waidner a , Robin W. Morgan a , Amy S. Anderson a , Erin L. Bernberg a , Sachin 19711, USA c Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Delaware Biotechnology Institute Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Department of Computer Engineering & Computer

  20. In 2005, an outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) disease occurred in Sacramento County, California; 163 human cas-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    In 2005, an outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) disease occurred in Sacramento County, California, the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District conducted an emergency aerial spray. We determined disease. WNV disease in Sacramento County cost $2.28 million for medical treatment and patients' pro

  1. Attachment and survival of viruses on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata L.): role of physicochemical and biotic factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega, Everardo

    2006-10-30

    affinity to lettuce and �X174 the least. Viral adsorption to lettuce was mediated by electrostatic forces due to the removal of virus adsorption at pH 7 and 8 with the addition of 1 M NaCl to the buffer solutions. Microcosm studies indicated...

  2. Endogenous Hepatic Expression of the Hepatitis B Virus X-Associated Protein 2 Is Adequate for Maximal Association with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdew, Gary

    ,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and, to some extent, This work was supported by National Institute,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; HSP90, 90-kDa heat shock protein; XAP2, hepatitis B virus X-associated protein 2; PCR

  3. The Fusion Core Complex of the Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus Is a Six-Helix Bundle Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    The Fusion Core Complex of the Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus Is a Six-Helix Bundle Assembly (PPRV) fusion protein (F) to obtain insights into the mechanism by which these repeats influence PPRV-mediated cell fusion. Both HR1 and HR2 inhibit PPRV-mediated syncytia formation in Vero cells in vitro. Of these

  4. Sparse Bayesian Variable Selection for the Identification of Antigenic Variability in the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    of Glasgow, UK v.davies.1@research.gla.ac.uk Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health model using spike and slab priors which is able to predict antigenic variability and identify sites of new virus strains, the need to produce effective vaccines has become ever more vital. Predicting where

  5. Relative concordance of human immunodeficiency virus oligomeric and monomeric envelope in CCR5 coreceptor usage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeravechyan, Samaporn; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Essex, Max; Lee, Tun-Hou

    2008-01-20

    A major difference between binding and fusion assays commonly used to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope is the use of monomeric envelope for the former assay and oligomeric envelope for the latter. Due to discrepancies in their readouts for some mutants, envelope regions involved in CCR5 coreceptor usage were systematically studied to determine whether the discordance is due to inherent differences between the two assays or whether it genuinely reflects functional differences at each entry step. By adding the binding inhibitor TAK-779 to delay coreceptor binding kinetics in the fusion assay, the readouts were found comparable between the assays for the mutants analysed in this study. Our finding indicates that monomeric binding reflects oligomeric envelope-CCR5 interaction, thus discordant results between binding and fusion assays do not necessarily indicate differences in coreceptor usage by oligomeric envelope and monomeric gp120.

  6. Rational design and adaptive management of combination therapies for Hepatitis C virus infection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ke, Ruian; Loverdo, Claude; Qi, Hangfei; Sun, Ren; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-06-30

    Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensatemore »when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design.« less

  7. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus on the agronomic characteristics of corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alston, Freddy Gene

    1969-01-01

    weights v!ere not ef Fected by MDMV. Al 1 the i n- bred lines shcwed symptoms oF the virus but there were different degrees of tolerance. in the hybrid test NiDNiV delayed maturity, ; educed plant and ear heigh'ts, reduc d yi lds and also ear widths... and the uninoculated plots . For the inb& ed test. Inbred Lines FD~aays to 5i]k+ Inoculated Uninoculated K64 Tx61M I x585 ; x12/C Tx441 Tx173D Tx203 i'x 303 Tx325 Tx508 Tx601 Tx602 77. 3 g 78. 8 efg 79. 8 def 78. 3 efg 74. 8 h 83. 2 bc 79. 3 def...

  8. The relationship of arthropods to the transmission of the virus of cotton mosaic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Michael Frank

    1961-01-01

    6143 52, 6 63, 6 73, 3 67. 3 Per cent infected plants per row, plot 2 planted 1959 March 21 ll, 1 5, 4 5 ~ 6 3, 7 6 ~ 6 6, 5 April 22 May 20 29 0 20, 4 22 9 21, 4 30 ~ 5 24, 8 21, 6 14. 7 15 ~ 7 15 ~ 9 14. 2 16 4 June 27 30. 7 20, 4 22, 9 22 5 50.... In the second and third tests 10 to 20 plants were infested with 11 to 140 aphids and 10 to 64 Table 3. Virus transmission tests with ~Ahia ~oss ~ii, Acquisition Inoculation Plants Test f eading f eading Av, no. inf ected no. Oate period period per plant 2...

  9. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a unique clade in South Asia.

  10. Multivalent ion effects on electrostatic stability of virus-like nano-shells Leili Javidpour, Anze Losdorfer Bozi, Ali Naji, and Rudolf Podgornik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    Multivalent ion effects on electrostatic stability of virus-like nano-shells Leili Javidpour, Anze Anze Losdorfer Bozic,2 Ali Naji,1,3,a) and Rudolf Podgornik2,4,5 1 School of Physics, Institute

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation Downregulate miR-29: miR-29 Overexpression Reduces Hepatitis C Viral Abundance in Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha

    Background.?Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)–induced liver fibrosis involves upregulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)–? and subsequent hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate HCV infection ...

  12. Metadata-driven comparative analysis tool for sequences (meta-CATS): An automated process for identifying significant sequence variations that correlate with virus attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickett, B.E.

    The Virus Pathogen Resource (ViPR; www.viprbrc.org) and Influenza Research Database (IRD; www.fludb.org) have developed a metadata-driven Comparative Analysis Tool for Sequences (meta-CATS), which performs statistical ...

  13. Influence of the host cell factors CK2, hTERT, and PML, on the antiviral response to herpes simplex virus type I infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Miles Christian

    2013-08-31

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is a significant human pathogen that infects a large portion of the human population. As an obligate intracellular parasite, HSV-1 requires certain cellular factors for its replication; ...

  14. Versatile Three-Dimensional Virus-Based Template for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Improved Electron Transport and Light Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po-Yen

    By genetically encoding affinity for inorganic materials into the capsid proteins of the M13 bacteriophage, the virus can act as a template for the synthesis of nanomaterial composites for use in various device applications. ...

  15. Oxidative Modifications of Kynostatin-272, a Potent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Inhibitor: Potential Mechanism for Altered Activity in Monocytes/Macrophages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, David A.; Read-Connole, Elizabeth; Pearson, Kara; Fales, Henry M.; Newcomb, Fonda M.; Moskovitz, Jackob; Yarchoan, Robert

    2002-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) are less active at blocking viral replication in HIV-1 infected peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages (M/M) than ...

  16. Vaccine-Induced Immunity in Baboons by Using DNA and Replication-Incompetent Adenovirus Type 5 Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Freed, Daniel C.; Hurni, William; Aste-Amezaga, Jose M.; Guan, Liming; Long, Romnie; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Nawrocki, Denise K.; Mach, Henryk; Troutman, Robert D.; Isopi, Lynne A.; Murthy, Krishna K.; Rice, Karen; Wilson, Keith A.; Volkin, David B.; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2003-07-01

    The cellular immunogenicity of formulated plasmid DNA and replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vaccine vectors expressing a codon-optimized human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene was examined in ...

  17. Cell cycle regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in T cells: antagonistic effects of nuclear envelope breakdown and chromatin condensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mannioui, Abdelkrim . E-mail: karim.mannioui@chu-stlouis.fr; Schiffer, Cecile . E-mail: cecile.schiffer@voila.fr; Felix, Nathalie . E-mail: nathalie.felix@chu-stlouis.fr

    2004-11-10

    We examined the influence of mitosis on the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in T cells. Single-round infection of cells arrested in G1b or allowed to synchronously proceed through division showed that mitosis delays virus integration until 18-24 h postinfection, whereas integration reaches maximum levels by 15 h in G1b-arrested cells. Subcellular fractionation of metaphase-arrested cells indicated that, while nuclear envelope disassembly facilitates docking of viral DNA to chromatin, chromosome condensation directly antagonizes and therefore delays integration. As a result of the balance between the two effects, virus integration efficiency is eventually up to threefold greater in dividing cells. At the single-cell level, using a green fluorescent protein-expressing reporter virus, we found that passage through mitosis leads to prominent asymmetric segregation of the viral genome in daughter cells without interfering with provirus expression.

  18. Influenza A virus evolution and spatio-temporal dynamics in Eurasian Wild Birds: A phylogenetic and phylogeographic study of whole-genome sequence data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Nicola S.; Verhagen, Josanne H.; Javakhishvili, Zurab; Russell, Colin A.; Lexmond, Pascal; Westgeest, Kim B.; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Lin, Xudong; Ransier, Amy; Fedorova, Nadia B.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Olsen, Björn; Smith, Gavin; Bahl, Justin; Wentworth, David E.; Waldenström, Jonas; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; de Graaf, Miranda

    2015-04-22

    Cooperative 19 Wildlife Disease Study, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. 20 8Department of Medical Sciences, Zoonosis Science Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala Sweden. 21 9Laboratory of Virus Evolution, Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases... that human 67 population size, duck density, rice cropping intensity, wild bird migration, and poultry trade all 68 contribute to virus prevalence and potential for detection (Takekawa et al., 2010; Takekawa et al., 69 2013). Ideally we would also want...

  19. Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses (which are of two bovine types) bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). A timeline for this development is presented in Table 1. The development of the Version 1.0 panel for FMDV rule-out and the most current efforts aimed to designed species specific panels has spanned over 2 1/2 years with multiple collaborative partnerships. This document provides a summary of the development, testing and performance data at OIE Stage 1 Feasibility into Stage 2 Assay Development and Standardization1 (see Table 2), gathered as of June 30th, 2007 for the porcine and bovine MUX assay panels. We present an overview of the identification and selection of candidate genetic signatures, the assay development process, and preliminary performance data for each of the individual signatures as characterized in the multiplexed format for the porcine and bovine panels. The Stage 1 Feasibility data of the multiplexed panels is presented in this report also includes relevant data acquired from the Version 1.0 panel as supporting information where appropriate. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must precede efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available. As a summary report, this document does not provide the details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, nor does it provide spec

  20. Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar A.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.