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1

Outsmarting Flu Viruses | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Lead-Free Solder (Mis)Behaves under Stress How Lead-Free Solder (Mis)Behaves under Stress Dynamics of Polymer Chains Atop Different Materials Priming the Pump in the Fight against Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis The Ties that Bind Metals to Proteins A Novel Nanobio Catalyst for Biofuels Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Outsmarting Flu Viruses OCTOBER 9, 2012 Bookmark and Share Surface representation of influenza hemagglutinin (white) with the newly identified sites of vulnerability colored red. Each site is unique and targeted by a different antibody. CR8033 (blue) binds to the head of HA, CR8071 (green) just below the head, while CR9114 (yellow) binds the stem. The stem binding CR9114, with its cross-neutralizing ability for influenza

2

Flu Terms Defined  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flu Terms Defined H1N1 Influenza is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that causes regular outbreaks in pigs. People do not normally get H1N1 flu, but...

3

Flu Terms Defined  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flu Terms Defined Flu Terms Defined H1N1 Influenza is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that causes regular outbreaks in pigs. People do not normally get H1N1 flu, but human infections can and do happen. H1N1 flu viruses have been reported to spread from person-to-person, but in the past, this transmission was limited and not sustained beyond three people. Avian flu (AI) is caused by influenza viruses that occur naturally among wild birds. Low pathogenic AI is common in birds and causes few problems. Highly pathogenic H5N1 is deadly to domestic fowl, can be transmitted from birds to humans, and is deadly to humans. There is virtually no human immunity and human vaccine availability is very limited. Pandemic flu is virulent human flu that causes a global outbreak, or pandemic, of serious illness. Because there is little natural immunity, the disease can spread easily from person to person. Currently, there is no pandemic flu.

4

Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine  

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Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Print Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Print Worldwide, influenza causes substantial deaths and yearly economic burdens, but the highly changeable nature of the flu virus complicates the production of an effective vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that the effectiveness of this year's flu vaccine is about 62%. For comparison, this number for childhood vaccines is routinely well over 90%. One factor in determining the vaccine's effectiveness is how closely related the viruses used in the vaccine are to the viruses circulating that year. An international team of researchers, working at synchrotron facilities including the ALS, has solved the crystal structures of antibodies that protect against broad classes of influenza strains. Greater understanding of these antibody structures may aid in the eventual development of a universal vaccine, protecting against all types of influenza viruses and thus eliminating the guesswork that currently limits vaccine effectiveness.

5

Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toward Design of a Universal Flu Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 Worldwide, influenza causes substantial deaths and yearly economic burdens, but the highly changeable nature of the flu virus complicates the production of an effective vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that the effectiveness of this year's flu vaccine is about 62%. For comparison, this number for childhood vaccines is routinely well over 90%. One factor in determining the vaccine's effectiveness is how closely related the viruses used in the vaccine are to the viruses circulating that year. An international team of researchers, working at synchrotron facilities including the ALS, has solved the crystal structures of antibodies that protect against broad classes of influenza strains. Greater understanding of these antibody structures may aid in the eventual development of a universal vaccine, protecting against all types of influenza viruses and thus eliminating the guesswork that currently limits vaccine effectiveness.

6

A Fast Test to Diagnose Flu  

SciTech Connect

People with flu-like symptoms who seek treatment at a medical clinic or hospital often must wait several hours before being examined, possibly exposing many people to an infectious virus. If a patient appears to need more than the routine fluids-and-rest prescription, effective diagnosis requires tests that must be sent to a laboratory. Hours or days may pass before results are available to the doctor, who in the meantime must make an educated guess about the patient's illness. The lengthy diagnostic process places a heavy burden on medical laboratories and can result in improper use of antibiotics or a costly hospital stay. A faster testing method may soon be available. An assay developed by a team of Livermore scientists can diagnose influenza and other respiratory viruses in about two hours once a sample has been taken. Unlike other systems that operate this quickly, the new device, called FluIDx (and pronounced ''fluidics''), can differentiate five types of respiratory viruses, including influenza. FluIDx can analyze samples at the point of patient care--in hospital emergency departments and clinics--allowing medical providers to quickly determine how best to treat a patient, saving time and potentially thousands of dollars per patient. The FluIDx project, which is led by Livermore chemist Mary McBride of the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. To test the system and make it as useful as possible, the team worked closely with the Emergency Department staff at the University of California (UC) at Davis Medical Center in Sacramento. Flu kills more than 35,000 people every year in the US. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome and the ongoing concern about a possible bird flu pandemic show the need for a fast, reliable test that can differentiate seasonal flu from a potentially pandemic influenza. Such a test should also discriminate influenza from pathogens that cause illnesses with flu-like symptoms. When a precise diagnosis is required to treat an adult patient with serious respiratory symptoms, sample cells are usually obtained with a nasal or throat swab and analyzed with one of several laboratory methods. The gold standard test is viral culturing, a highly sensitive method that can identify the specific strain of virus. However, viral culturing is a labor-intensive process and requires 3-10 days to produce results, too long for early intervention. Enzyme and optical immunoassays offer results in 30 minutes, but these methods are less sensitive than viral culturing so they can produce false positives or negatives. They also cannot distinguish the type of virus found. Direct immunofluorescence antibody (DFA) staining is as sensitive as viral culturing. It also can detect multiple respiratory pathogens simultaneously by a process known as multiplexing. However, DFA staining requires expensive equipment, a skilled microscopist, and samples with enough target cells for testing. In addition, the results are ultimately subjective. Another method, called reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay, offers sensitivity and specificity comparable to viral culturing and DFA staining. It also produces results in two hours and can rapidly test a large number of samples. The drawback with these tests, however, is that they must be performed in a laboratory. None of them can be used where they are needed most: in the clinic or emergency department where patients are being treated. Livermore's FluIDx diagnostic system, with its instrumentation and multiplexed assays, is designed specifically for point-of-care diagnosis. The fast, easy-to-use system is based on the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System, a homeland security technology developed by LLNL. This R&D 100 Award-winning technology constantly monitors the air to detect airborne bioterrorism agents, such as anthrax. FluIDx is an integrated system designed to p

Hazi, A U

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure and Receptor Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print Wednesday, 25 July 2007 00:00 To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of genetic material from similar viruses) or mutation, is seen as a major threat to public health worldwide. Of the three influenza pandemics of the last century, the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) pandemics involved avian-human reassortments. The origin of the 1918 influenza virus (H1N1), which killed about 50 million people worldwide, is unknown. Although a number of viral factors can determine the host range restriction and pathogenicity of influenza A viruses, recent evidence suggests that hemagglutinin (HA), the principal antigen on the viral surface, is a critical factor for efficient human-to-human transmission. Researchers have now solved the HA structure to 2.9 Å at the ALS and analyzed its specificity to human receptors.

8

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of genetic material from similar viruses) or mutation, is seen as a major threat to public health worldwide. Of the three influenza pandemics of the last century, the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) pandemics involved avian-human reassortments. The origin of the 1918 influenza virus (H1N1), which killed about 50 million people worldwide, is unknown. Although a number of viral factors can determine the host range restriction and pathogenicity of influenza A viruses, recent evidence suggests that hemagglutinin (HA), the principal antigen on the viral surface, is a critical factor for efficient human-to-human transmission. Researchers have now solved the HA structure to 2.9 Å at the ALS and analyzed its specificity to human receptors.

9

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of genetic material from similar viruses) or mutation, is seen as a major threat to public health worldwide. Of the three influenza pandemics of the last century, the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) pandemics involved avian-human reassortments. The origin of the 1918 influenza virus (H1N1), which killed about 50 million people worldwide, is unknown. Although a number of viral factors can determine the host range restriction and pathogenicity of influenza A viruses, recent evidence suggests that hemagglutinin (HA), the principal antigen on the viral surface, is a critical factor for efficient human-to-human transmission. Researchers have now solved the HA structure to 2.9 Å at the ALS and analyzed its specificity to human receptors.

10

A model for characterizing annual flu cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influenza outbreaks occur seasonally and peak during winter season in temperate zones of the Northern and Southern hemisphere. The occurrence and recurrence of flu epidemics has been alluded to variability in mechanisms such temperature, climate, host ...

Miriam Nuo; Marcello Pagano

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Student Flu Shots Seasonal Flu shots will once again be offered to students at the Student Health Center located  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center located across from the University Center and Colleges 9 & 10 on McLaughlin Drive. The flu shot

California at Santa Cruz, University of

12

Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum Limit |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outsmarting Flu Viruses Outsmarting Flu Viruses How Lead-Free Solder (Mis)Behaves under Stress Dynamics of Polymer Chains Atop Different Materials Priming the Pump in the Fight against Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis The Ties that Bind Metals to Proteins Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum Limit NOVEMBER 9, 2012 Bookmark and Share Illustration of a 4-unit-cell film of NdNiO3 (white) confined by LaAlO3 (blue) at the boundaries to make a quantum well structure. Our computers carry out their functions on several semiconducting devices layered together in the very smallest of spaces, known as quantum wells,

13

Battling bird flu by the numbers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May » May » Battling bird flu by the numbers Battling bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. May 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

14

Fish Flu: Genetics Approach May Lead to Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish Flu: Genetics Approach May Lead to Treatment. From ... supports. Salmon swimming within a netted pen at a fish farm in Maine. ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fast pandemic detection tool ready to fight flu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fast pandemic detection tool ready to fight flu Fast pandemic detection tool ready to fight flu Fast pandemic detection tool ready to fight flu Researchers are developing new tools for rapidly characterizing biological pathogens that could give rise to potentially deadly pandemics such as Influenza A (H1N1). June 9, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

16

An econometric analysis of SARS and Avian Flu on international tourist arrivals to Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the impacts of SARS and human deaths arising from Avian Flu on international tourist arrivals to Asia. The effects of SARS and human deaths from Avian Flu are compared directly according to the number of human deaths. The nature of ... Keywords: Avian Flu, Data model, Dynamic panel, International tourism, SARS, Static fixed effects model

Michael McAleer; Bing-Wen Huang; Hsiao-I. Kuo; Chi-Chung Chen; Chia-Lin Chang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Full-spectrum disease response : beyond just the flu.  

SciTech Connect

Why plan beyond the flu: (1) the installation may be the target of bioterrorism - National Laboratory, military base collocated in large population center; and (2) International Airport - transport of infectious agents to the area - Sandia is a global enterprise and staff visit many foreign countries. In addition to the Pandemic Plan, Sandia has developed a separate Disease Response Plan (DRP). The DRP addresses Category A, B pathogens and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The DRP contains the Cities Readiness Initiative sub-plan for disbursement of Strategic National Stockpile assets.

Knazovich, Michael Ward; Cox, Warren B.; Henderson, Samuel Arthur

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mega-Flu Pandemic (not quite the) Worst Case Scenario V.2 INTERNATIONAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human-to-Human Transmission Outbreaks Continue in Rural China; "Surveillance Inadequate" Say WHO Shortages and Sharp Price Increases Flu-Related Buying Blamed Drugs, Water, Food, Energy, Health and Safety

19

Understanding social amplification of risk : possible impact of an avian flu pandemic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, stakeholders expect organizations to be able to endure external shocks. Hence, the real potential of an avian flu pandemic has many corporations developing business continuity plans for the disruptions that a pandemic ...

Sundrani, Aamir (Aamir Sultan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Computer-Designed Proteins to Disarm a Variety of Flu Viruses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information Prospective Users New Users Current Users APS User Portal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

RNA Folding: A Little Cooperation Goes a Long Way | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Phase in Cellular Communication A New Phase in Cellular Communication Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum Limit Outsmarting Flu Viruses How Lead-Free Solder (Mis)Behaves under Stress Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed RNA Folding: A Little Cooperation Goes a Long Way NOVEMBER 19, 2012 Bookmark and Share Shown here is the energy landscape for folding of a ribozyme, and how cooperation between tertiary interactions at different parts of the structure (red dots) help the RNA reach its unique native structure and avoid non-native intermediates. The nucleic acid RNA is an essential part of the critical process by which

22

Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum Limit Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum Limit Outsmarting Flu Viruses How Lead-Free Solder (Mis)Behaves under Stress Dynamics of Polymer Chains Atop Different Materials Priming the Pump in the Fight against Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces NOVEMBER 12, 2012 Bookmark and Share LAO thin films on STO substrates are depicted in the top schematics (LAO indicated by blue spheres, STO by green spheres). The top left-hand panel demonstrates a chemically broad interface resulting from conventional growth in a low pressure oxygen environment. In contrast, the top

23

A New Phase in Cellular Communication | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum Limit Outsmarting Flu Viruses How Lead-Free Solder (Mis)Behaves under Stress Dynamics of Polymer Chains Atop Different Materials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A New Phase in Cellular Communication NOVEMBER 15, 2012 Bookmark and Share Interactions between N-WASP, phospho-Nephrin and Nck produce large polymers (top panel) that phase separate to produce liquid droplets suspended in aqueous solution (bottom panel). In many physical processes, substances undergo phase transitions, where they are transformed from one state (solid, liquid, or gas) to another.

24

Many of us have been urged to get lots of Vitamin C in order to stay healthy during flu season. Although Vitamin C has not been proven to prevent or cure the cold and flu, eating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

attention to this time of year: Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin that is important for the immune system Chipotle Sweet Potato Soup (120% DV for Vitamin A, 6% DV for Vitamin C), and a flu season favorite, Chicken. Chicken Noodle Soup is the ultimate cold weather comfort food. Where do its healing powers come from

Huang, Jianyu

25

Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hearing the Highest Pitches Hearing the Highest Pitches Unveiling the Secrets of Nanoparticle Haloing A Fruit-Fly Protein that Captures Tumor Growth Factors A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells An X-ray Vortex on the Horizon? Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure JULY 16, 2008 Bookmark and Share The overall structure of the PAC -PB1 N complex. The structure is colored according to secondary structure and elements are labeled. Helices are shown as cylinders and are red in the brain domain and blue in the mouth domain; strands are yellow and loops are green. The PB1 N peptide is

26

FluCaP: A Heuristic Search Planner for First-Order MDPs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a heuristic search algorithm for solving first-order Markov Decision Processes (FOMDPs). Our approach combines first-order state abstraction that avoids evaluating states individually, and heuristic search that avoids evaluating all states. Firstly, in contrast to existing systems, which start with propositionalizing the FOMDP and then perform state abstraction on its propositionalized version we apply state abstraction directly on the FOMDP avoiding propositionalization. This kind of abstraction is referred to as first-order state abstraction. Secondly, guided by an admissible heuristic, the search is restricted to those states that are reachable from the initial state. We demonstrate the usefulness of the above techniques for solving FOMDPs with a system, referred to as FluCaP (formerly, FCPlanner), that entered the probabilistic track of the 2004 International Planning Competition (IPC2004) and demonstrated an advantage over other planners on the problems represented in first-order terms.

Hoelldobler, S; Skvortsova, O; 10.1613/jair.1965

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Virus Origin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virus Origin Name: jordan Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Where did viruses come from? Replies: That depends what you mean. If you point to a virus right now, over...

28

Chasing a common cold virus | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robert Fischetti (left), Glen Nemerow (center) and Vijay Reddy load samples at the Advanced Photon Source. Robert Fischetti (left), Glen Nemerow (center) and Vijay Reddy load samples at the Advanced Photon Source. Robert Fischetti (left), Glen Nemerow (center) and Vijay Reddy load samples at the Advanced Photon Source. Chasing a common cold virus By Susheela Bhat * October 19, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint As the cold and flu season makes its annual visit, a team of researchers, using Argonne's Advanced Photon Source, continue to complete a detailed map of the human adenovirus-one of several viruses responsible for the common cold. Although human adenovirus is usually not deadly, it is a seasonal nuisance to some and can cause deadly infections in others. In the early 1990s, Glen Nemerow, professor and principal investigator at the Immunology and Microbial Science division of The Scripps Institute,

29

Berkeley Emeriti Dr. Marshall Stoller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

included Ebola virus, AIDS, hepatitis C, bird flu, Legionnaires'disease, Lyme disease, mad cow disease

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

30

West Nile Virus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NILE VIRUS (WNS) NILE VIRUS (WNS) DEFINITION West Nile virus is an infection transmitted by mosquitoes. If you become infected with West Nile virus, you may not experience any signs or symptoms or you may experience only minor ones, such as fever and mild headache. However, some people who become infected with West Nile virus develop a life-threatening illness that includes inflammation of the brain. MODES OF TRANSMISSION The main route of human infection with West Nile virus is through the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds, which may circulate the virus in their blood for a few days. The virus eventually gets into the mosquito's salivary

31

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Name: Paul Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: IL Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What is a Computer Virus? What do viruses do? How do viruses Spread? How do I prevent a virus? What are Trojan Horse programs? Malware? Phishing? Replies: Paul From National Institute of Science and Technology Which is the US government office in charge of this problem and should be your reference for this subject At this URL: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-61-rev1/SP800-61rev1.pdf Please find the following definitions from paragraph 5: 5.1.1 Virus: A virus is designed to self-replicate-make copies of itself-and distribute the copies to other files, programs, or computers. Viruses insert themselves into host programs and propagate when the infected program is executed, generally by user interaction (e.g., opening a file, running a program, clicking on a file attachment). Viruses have many purposes-some are designed to play annoying tricks, whereas others have destructive intent. Some viruses present themselves as jokes while performing secret destructive functions. There two major types of viruses are compiled viruses, which are executed by the operating system, and interpreted viruses, which are executed by an application.

32

How do viruses form?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How do viruses form? How do viruses form? Name: street Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do viruses form? Replies: Well, I'll assume you mean how they replicate, since they do not (as far as we know) arise from inorganic materials. Viruses are generally thought of as obligate parasites -- that is, they need the assistance of another organism for their survival. Depending on the type of virus you're looking at you'll see many different ways of accomplishing the same goal -- reproduction. In very general terms, then, a virus will attach itself to an appropriate host cell and insert it's genetic code into the DNA of the host, which then goes thorough it's normal routine of reading through its own code to synthesize proteins and enzymes, and in the process inadvertently replicates the strand of viral DNA (or RNA, depending), which codes for its own proteins and concentrates within the cell. At some point, the cell will not be able to support that many viral particles within it's membrane, and it will die, releasing thousands of new viral particles into the environment to do the dirty deed all over again.

33

Production of virus resistant plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Production of virus resistant plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

An introduction to computer viruses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on computer viruses is based upon a thesis written for the Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Tennessee in December 1989 by David R. Brown. This thesis is entitled An Analysis of Computer Virus Construction, Proliferation, and Control and is available through the University of Tennessee Library. This paper contains an overview of the computer virus arena that can help the reader to evaluate the threat that computer viruses pose. The extent of this threat can only be determined by evaluating many different factors. These factors include the relative ease with which a computer virus can be written, the motivation involved in writing a computer virus, the damage and overhead incurred by infected systems, and the legal implications of computer viruses, among others. Based upon the research, the development of a computer virus seems to require more persistence than technical expertise. This is a frightening proclamation to the computing community. The education of computer professionals to the dangers that viruses pose to the welfare of the computing industry as a whole is stressed as a means of inhibiting the current proliferation of computer virus programs. Recommendations are made to assist computer users in preventing infection by computer viruses. These recommendations support solid general computer security practices as a means of combating computer viruses.

Brown, D.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Key words: serology/sedimentation/virus group~maize stripe virus/rice stripe virus Relationship Between Maize Stripe Virus and Rice Stripe Virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maize stripe virus (MStpV) and rice stripe virus (RSV) were compared serologically, chemically and physically. Cross-reactions in agar gel double-diffusion and microprecipitin tests, and neutralization of MStpV infectivity by antiserum to either virus showed that MStpV and RSV are serologically related. Both viruses sedimented slowly and in a heterodisperse manner in rate-zonal sucrose gradients, and both had similar buoyant densities in CsC1. Large amounts of a low molecular weight non-capsid protein were found in plants infected with either virus. Only limited maize-to-maize transmission of RSV was obtained with Peregrinus maidis (Ashmead), the MStpV vector. This transmission, however, resulted in symptoms similar to those induced by MStpV. MStpV and RSV appear to be members of the same virus group.

E. Gingery; Lowell R. Nault; Shuichi Yamashita

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a wide range of influenza strains. This structural information, in combination with electron microscope studies, allowed the researchers to understand how these antibodies...

38

Office of Health & Safety - Avian Flu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

39

Science Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liddington Research Liddington Research Burnham News Release Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Centers for Disease Control and Prevention » Videos Attacking Influenza Scientists Identify Antibodies Super Flu Vaccine » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Scientists Identify Achilles' Heel of Flu Viruses Scientists have recently identified a family of human antibodies that can take out an unprecedented number of different types of flu viruses, including H5N1 'bird flu' and the 1918 H1N1 'Spanish flu', which killed millions around the world during World War I, as well as seasonal flu. Using SSRL's Beam Line 9-2, Dr. Robert Liddington from the Burnham Institute for Medical Research led a team of scientists that determined the crystal structure of one such antibody, F10, in complex with the

40

Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of known plant viruses and are responsible for more than half the viral damage to crop plants throughout the world. New images of the viruses' structures, which were poorly...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Treatment of tumors with genetically engineered herpes virus  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed are methods for treating cancer by administering an effective amount of a modified Herpes simplex virus.

Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Roizman, Bernard; Whitley, Richard J

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

SE4C03 Winter 2004: The Computer Virus Culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relatively speaking, computer viruses are a new and unique phenomenon among computer users. During the beginning of the computer revolution computer security was only a passing concern. The industry was more concerned with phreakers, a term given to people who were able to manipulate telephone networks, than with damaging software (Krebs, 2003). Indeed, the idea of a computer virus was not thought of until 1983, when PhD student Fred Cohen coined the term (Krebs, 2003). At the time the term computer virus was used to describe a program that can affect other computer programs by modifying them in such a way as to include a (possibly evolved) copy of itself (Krebs, 2003). It was not until three years later, in 1986, that the world saw its first working computer virus. This virus, called the Brain virus, targeted the boot sectors of computers. As well, this virus was able to hide itself from detection (EXN, 2003). In the years following the release of the Brain virus, the world saw many more viruses enter the computer scene. Two years later, in 1988, the first piece of anti-virus software was written to combat the spread of computer viruses (EXN, 2003).

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Occurrence of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jatropha curcas is a drought resistant shrub native in tropical America, now widely grown in many tropical and subtropical regions for biodiesel production [1]. First reports on virus infections in Jatropha indicated the occurrence of viruses closely related to Cassava mosaic virus in India, reaching a disease incidence from 25 to 47%. This might represent a major constrain to the production of Jatropha in large scale [2]. The genome of Cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMG) consist of two components termed DNA A and DNA B ( ~ 2.7 3.0 kb) [3]. Furthermore, Jatropha has been described as host of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) [2]. Methods In this study we attempted to detect and molecularly characterize viruses infecting Jatropha in Eastern Africa (Kenya and Ethiopia). Detection methods will be valuable tools for early screening of plant viruses in order to make appropriate decisions and selection of planting material. A total of 127 Jatropha samples from Ethiopia and Kenya (districts: Kakamega, Siaya, Busia and Nakuru showing typical virus symptoms and symptomless plants were used in this study. ELISA was performed to detect the presence of three RNA viruses: CMV, Cassava common mosaic virus (CsCMV) and Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV). PCR was performed using newly designed primers based on multiple alignments of full length DNA A sequences of geminiviruses available in the NCBI Genbank, reported to infect either Jatropha or cassava. This allowed to amplify the variable regions of

Rose Ramkat; Alberto Calari; Fatemeh Maghuly; Margit Laimer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Structural Basis of Pre-existing Immunity to the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural Basis of Pre-existing Immunity to the 2009 Structural Basis of Pre-existing Immunity to the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus The emergence of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, also known as the "swine flu", marks the first human flu pandemic in 40 years and has caused significant human infection and mortality globally (1). The emergence of the 2009 H1N1 flu marks the first time that an influenza pandemic was triggered by a virus carrying the same hemagglutinin (HA) subtype as circulating seasonal strains. In contrast, all prior pandemics were caused by the rise of a novel influenza strain with a different hemagglutinin subtype. And unlike seasonal flu that usually affects the elderly most severely, swine flu has been primarily targeting people under the age of 65, implying some age-related pre-existing immunity (2, 3).

45

Pathogenicity of H5 influenza viruses for ducks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

have also occurred in Vietnam, Thailand, China, Laos, Cambodia and Indonesia. Human cases of H5N1 virus infection were reported in Vietnam and Thailand.

46

Genetically Engineered Nanofiber-Like Viruses For Tissue ...  

and computing devices and energy storage materials.20-25 The functional versatility of viruses is programmed by their ... Directional guidance is important for all ...

47

Development of a Method for the Detection of Aleutian Mink Disease Virus in Water Samples.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes significant loss to the mink industry in Nova Scotia (NS). Contaminated water is a speculated virus source therefore my (more)

Larsen, Sophie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

Papaneri, Amy B. [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States)] [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States); Wirblich, Christoph [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt [Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 (United States)] [Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 (United States); Jahrling, Peter B. [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States) [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States); Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 (United States); Schnell, Matthias J., E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jefferson Vaccine Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Blaney, Joseph E., E-mail: jblaney@niaid.nih.gov [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States)

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

Virus-Enabled Silicon Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virus-Enabled Silicon Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries Xilin Chen, Konstantinos Gerasopoulos emerged as one of the most promising next-generation anode materials for lithium-ion batteries due to its with remarkable cycling stability. KEYWORDS: silicon anode · lithium-ion battery · Tobacco mosaic virus · physical

Ghodssi, Reza

50

Comparison of virus interactions with human signal transduction pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viruses depend on their hosts at every stage of their life cycles and must therefore communicate with them via protein-protein interactions (PPI). To investigate the mechanisms of communication by different viruses, we overlay reported pairwise human, ... Keywords: host-pathogen interactions, protein function, protein-protein interaction networks, systems biology

Irtisha Singh; Oznur Tastan; Judith Klein-Seetharaman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies have stressed the prevalence of viruses in natural plant populations (e.g., Power and Remold 1996 the growth, survivorship, and reproduction of nondomesticated plants (Friess and Maillet 1996, 1997; FunayamaChapter 17 m Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant? Alison G. Power

Flecker, Alex

52

Argonne CNM Highlight: Let a Virus Do All the Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Let a Virus Do All the Work Let a Virus Do All the Work Developing an efficient method to fabricate nanoscale building blocks and organize them into functional architectures is the key to nanoscience and nanotechnology. As a result of millions years of evolution, biological systems can provide spatially defined host systems that can be used as templates for uniform fabrication of structured materials with different length scales. Viruses, in this regard, exemplify an extraordinarily organized nano-architecture: they are complex molecular biosystems in which nucleic acid strands are confined within a nano-size compartment (capsid). This project engages the use of an emptied ligand-displayed phage virus as a template to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles. Benefiting from the phage display technology, the particle generated inside the hollow phage has integrated biorecognition elements with high affinity and specificity for selected target molecules. In addition, the size and shape of the magnetic particles can be highly regulated by molecularly engineering virus capsid.

53

reaction (RT-PCR) to detect Kashmir bee virus (KBV). This technique requires time-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reaction (RT-PCR) to detect Kashmir bee virus (KBV). This technique requires time- consuming virus purification and RNA extraction steps. Hung and Shimanuki [9] developed a direct RT-PCR method of KBV detection with the sequences of many virus polyproteins. Kasmir bee virus / direct RT-PCR / pairwise comparison / phylogenetic

Recanati, Catherine

54

Microsoft Word - Avian Flu Statement3-2008.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration WWW.LANL.GOV Statement CONTACT: Nancy Ambrosiano, 505-667-0471, nwa@lanl.gov March 7, 2008 Statement on Avian Influenza Research at Los Alamos Los Alamos National Laboratory has pursued a robust experimental program in the biosciences for decades, and a major focus of its bioscience research in the past decade is in the area of biosecurity and public health. This research is both theoretical and computational, and it also involves direct laboratory experimental work with viable pathogens. The pathogen work done at Los Alamos is currently at the Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) level, and includes work with biological agents on the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Select Agent and Toxin list. Although the site has a

55

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fowl in a number of Asian countries, including China, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Indonesia, Japan, and Cambodia, and has now spread to wild bird populations. More recently,...

56

How ORISE is Making a Difference: Pandemic Flu Toolkits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to an influenza pandemic. The Pandemic Influenza Community Mitigation Measures and Business Continuity Planning Training toolkits support train-the-trainer workshops that...

57

Reassortment Networks and the Evolution of Pandemic H1N1 Swine-Origin Influenza  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior research developed Reassortment Networks to reconstruct the evolution of segmented viruses under both reassortment and mutation. We report their application to the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 virus (S-OIV). A database of all influenza A viruses, ... Keywords: Cray XMT, graph theory, influenza, multithreading, networks, pandemic, reassortment, shortest paths, S-OIV, swine flu.

Shahid H. Bokhari; Laura W. Pomeroy; Daniel A. Janies

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this project were directed at the identification and characterization of bio-mineralization processes and patterning methods for the development of nano scale materials and structures with novel energy and conductive traits. This project utilized a simple plant virus as a model template to investigate methods to attach and coat metals and other inorganic compounds onto biologically based nanotemplates. Accomplishments include: the development of robust biological nanotemplates with enhanced inorganic coating activities; novel coating strategies that allow for the deposition of a continuous inorganic layer onto a bio-nanotemplate even in the absence of a reducing agent; three-dimensional patterning methods for the assemble of nano-featured high aspect ratio surfaces and the demonstrated use of these surfaces in enhancing battery and energy storage applications. Combined results from this project have significantly advanced our understanding and ability to utilize the unique self-assembly properties of biologically based molecules to produce novel materials at the nanoscale level.

James N Culver; Michael T Harris

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Auxiliary metabolic genes in viruses infecting marine cyanobacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marine viruses shape the diversity and biogeochemical role of their microbial hosts. Cyanophages that infect the cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus often carry metabolic genes not found in other bacteriophages. ...

Thompson, Luke Richard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Interim Report on SNP analysis and forensic microarray probe design for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis virus, henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Rift Valley fever  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, enhancing the current capabilities for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the whole genome wide SNP analysis and microarray probe design for forensics characterization of South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

Jaing, C; Gardner, S

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Visualization of the African swine fever virus infection in living cells by incorporation into the virus particle of green fluorescent protein-p54 membrane protein chimera  

SciTech Connect

Many stages of African swine fever virus infection have not yet been studied in detail. To track the behavior of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in the infected cells in real time, we produced an infectious recombinant ASFV (B54GFP-2) that expresses and incorporates into the virus particle a chimera of the p54 envelope protein fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The incorporation of the fusion protein into the virus particle was confirmed immunologically and it was determined that p54-EGFP was fully functional by confirmation that the recombinant virus made normal-sized plaques and presented similar growth curves to the wild-type virus. The tagged virus was visualized as individual fluorescent particles during the first stages of infection and allowed to visualize the infection progression in living cells through the viral life cycle by confocal microscopy. In this work, diverse potential applications of B54GFP-2 to study different aspects of ASFV infection are shown. By using this recombinant virus it was possible to determine the trajectory and speed of intracellular virus movement. Additionally, we have been able to visualize for first time the ASFV factory formation dynamics and the cytophatic effect of the virus in live infected cells. Finally, we have analyzed virus progression along the infection cycle and infected cell death as time-lapse animations.

Hernaez, Bruno [Departamento de Biotecnologia, INIA, Carretera de la Coruna Km 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: hernaez@inia.es; Escribano, Jose M. [Departamento de Biotecnologia, INIA, Carretera de la Coruna Km 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: escriban@inia.es; Alonso, Covadonga [Departamento de Biotecnologia, INIA, Carretera de la Coruna Km 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: calonso@inia.es

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Can A Virus Cause Cancer: A Look Into The History And Significance Of Oncoviruses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tumor Virology. Cancer Research. 68(19): 7693-7706. deof the role of viruses in cancer, research on the subject2004. Conncecting Viruses to Cancer: How Research Moves from

Rwazavian, Niema

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Beating spam and viruses with amavisd-new and maia mailguard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here's a spam and virus filter that gives users a second chance to rescue important mail from the virtual trash.

Robert LeBlanc

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

How a Virus Prepares to Infect Cells | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Switching under Pressure Magnetic Switching under Pressure Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft Velcro for Nanoparticles A Molecular Fossil Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed How a Virus Prepares to Infect Cells DECEMBER 8, 2010 Bookmark and Share This diagram depicts how the changing arrangement of proteins in a key structure enables viruses to invade and fuse with host cells. (Courtesy Purdue University Department of Biological Sciences image/Long Li) The atomic-scale arrangement of proteins in a structure that enables a virus to invade and fuse with host cells, showing precisely how the

65

Seeing the Smallest Steps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Bird Flu Protein Link to Virulence A Bird Flu Protein Link to Virulence Smart viruses infect without killing the host, at least in the short term. In such low-level infections, the virus gains time to persist, reproduce, infect other individuals, and spread through the population. Some viruses persist in certain host populations without killing them, but in other hosts they have a rapid and deadly effect. The H5N1 virus strains responsible for recent lethal outbreaks of bird flu apparently existed for quite some time in wild goose populations without doing much harm. But when the same strains infected chickens, the results were disastrous, leading to high chicken mortality and a health risk for humans living in proximity. In fact, the risk of epidemic was considered high enough to lead China to

66

What You Need To Know  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What You Need to Know What You Need to Know An influenza (flu) pandemic is a worldwide outbreak of flu disease that occurs when a new type of influenza virus appears that people have not been exposed to before (or have not been exposed to in a long time). The pandemic virus can cause serious illness because people do not have immunity to the new virus. Pandemics are different from seasonal outbreaks of influenza that we see every year. Seasonal influenza is caused by influenza virus types to which people have already been exposed. Its impact on society is less severe than a pandemic, and influenza vaccines (flu shots and nasal-spray vaccine) are available to help prevent widespread illness from seasonal flu. Influenza pandemics are different from many of the other major public health and health care threats facing our country and the world. A pandemic will last much longer than most flu outbreaks and may include "waves" of influenza activity that last 6-8 weeks separated by months. The number of health care workers and first responders able to work may be reduced. Public health officials will not know how severe a pandemic will be until it begins.

67

Homogeneity of Powassan virus populations in naturally infected Ixodes scapularis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powassan virus (POWV, Flaviviridae: Flavivirus) is the sole North American member of the tick-borne encephalitis complex and consists of two distinct lineages that are maintained in ecologically discrete enzootic transmission cycles. The underlying genetic mechanisms that lead to niche partitioning in arboviruses are poorly understood. Therefore, intra- and interhost genetic diversity was analyzed to determine if POWV exists as a quasispecies in nature and quantify selective pressures within and between hosts. In contrast to previous reports for West Nile virus (WNV), significant intrahost genetic diversity was not observed. However, pN (0.238) and d{sub N}/d{sub S} ratios (0.092) for interhost diversity were similar to those of WNV. Combined, these data suggest that purifying selection and/or population bottlenecks constrain quasispecies diversity within ticks. These same selective and stochastic mechanisms appear to drive minor sequence changes between ticks. Moreover, Powassan virus populations seem not to be structured as quasispecies in naturally infected adult deer ticks.

Brackney, Doug E.; Brown, Ivy K.; Nofchissey, Robert A.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A. [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Ebel, Gregory D., E-mail: gebel@salud.unm.ed [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Periodic Table of Virus Capsids: Implications for Natural Selection and Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: For survival, most natural viruses depend upon the existence of spherical capsids: protective shells of various sizes composed of protein subunits. So far, general evolutionary pressures shaping capsid design have remained elusive, even though an understanding of such properties may help in rationally impeding the virus life cycle and designing efficient nano-assemblies. Principal Findings: This report uncovers an unprecedented and species-independent evolutionary pressure on virus capsids, based on the the notion that the simplest capsid designs (or those capsids with the lowest hexamer complexity, C h) are the fittest, which was shown to be true for all available virus capsids. The theories result in a physically meaningful periodic table of virus capsids that uncovers strong and overarching evolutionary pressures, while also offering geometric explanations to other capsid properties (rigidity, pleomorphy, auxiliary requirements, etc.) that were previously considered to be unrelatable properties of the individual virus. Significance: Apart from describing a universal rule for virus capsid evolution, our work (especially the periodic table) provides a language with which highly diverse virus capsids, unified only by geometry, may be described and related to each other. Finally, the available virus structure databases and other published data reiterate the predicted geometryderived

Ranjan V. Mannige; Charles L. Brooks

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses  

SciTech Connect

A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

70

INTERACTION OF BENZO[a]PYRENE-7, 8-DIHYDRODIOL-9,10-OXIDE WITH SIMIAN VIRUS 40 DNA AND CHROMATIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diol Epoxide to DNA and Chromatin, 11 in 3rd InternationalSIMIAN VIRUS 40 DNA AND CHROMATIN Howard Byron Gamper, Jr. (Simian Virus 40 DNA and Chromatin By Howard Byron Gamper,

Gamper, Jr., Howard Byron

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Using coevolution and gradient-based learning for the virus game  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel coevolutionary model which is used to create strong game (The Virus Game) playing strategies. We use two approaches to coevolve Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) which evaluate board positions of a two player zero-sum game ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, coevolution, gradient-based learning, virus game

Munir H Naveed; Peter I Cowling

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

PrimerHunter: A Primer Design Tool for PCR-Based Virus Subtype Identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PrimerHunter: A Primer Design Tool for PCR-Based Virus Subtype Identification Jorge Duitama viral subtypes such as avian influenza H5N1. The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) has become the method of choice for virus subtype identifica- tion. However, designing subtype specific PCR primer pairs is a very

Mandoiu, Ion

73

NREL: Solar Research - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 December 28, 2012 Award-Winning PV Cell Pushes Efficiency Higher NREL and Solar Junction outsmart the solar spectrum and set a world record with a 44%-efficient solar cell....

74

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Archives - 2012 December 28, 2012 Award-Winning PV Cell Pushes Efficiency Higher NREL and Solar Junction outsmart the solar spectrum and set a world record with a...

75

Attachment and survival of viruses on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata L.): role of physicochemical and biotic factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enteric viruses are responsible for a significant amount of foodborne disease in the United States. Foodborne disease associated with enteric viruses has been increasing within the last few years due to technological advances and raised awareness. Salads and salad crops are the principal vector for transmission of enteric viruses. The objective of this study was to determine if viruses are able to attach non-specifically to the surface of lettuce and to determine the forces responsible for non-specific viral adsorption to lettuce. Additionally, the impact of the microbial flora on viral persistence was studied to determine the effect on viruses. The four viruses studied were echovirus 11, feline calicivirus, MS2 and Ï?X174. The viruses were chosen based on their varying isoelectric points and similar physicochemical attributes. The isoelectric point was not the main factor determining virus attachment to lettuce. Viruses had varying attachment efficiencies, with echovirus 11 having the highest affinity to lettuce and Ï?X174 the least. Viral adsorption to lettuce was mediated by electrostatic forces due to the removal of virus adsorption at pH 7 and 8 with the addition of 1 M NaCl to the buffer solutions. Microcosm studies indicated that the microbial flora did not have a negative impact on virus survival. The bacteriophages had the highest survival rate. Virus survival in the microcosm studies was not indicative of virus survival on the surface of the lettuce. The animal viruses exhibited survival rates greater than or equal to the survival of bacteriophages at 4?° C, but at room temperature viable animal viruses rapidly declined compared to the bacteriophages. Additional studies also indicated that the microbial flora was not able to degrade the viruses for aerobic microbial growth. Overall, these results indicate that viruses are able to attach to the surface of lettuce, providing a possible explanation for the high incidence of virus associated disease involving salads and fresh produce. More importantly the use of surrogates for virus studies involving fresh produce must be re-evaluated, because of the lack of correlation between animal viruses and bacteriophages. Appropriate viral surrogates, if used, have to be carefully chosen based on viral physicochemical properties as well as the infectious route of the virus.

Vega, Everardo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Virus That Can Infect Lung Cancer Cells | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops Extreme Pressure Reveals a Volume Expansion Phenomenon A Nuclear Receptor with Implications for a Host of Diseases Unexpected Materials in Earth's Lowermost Mantle Nailing Down the Exciton in LiF Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Virus That Can Infect Lung Cancer Cells OCTOBER 21, 2008 Bookmark and Share The 3-D structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001. (Courtesy: The Scripps Research Institute) The structure of the Senecavirus is also depicted at http://viperdb.scripps.edu/, the "Virus Particle Explorer" developed at Scripps Research by Reddy and his colleagues. The online database is a

77

V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated 1: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges February 28, 2013 - 12:05am Addthis PROBLEM: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: VSE 8.8 Patch 2 with Access Protection, including Self Protection, turned off ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in McAfee VirusScan Enterprise. REFERENCE LINKS: McAfee Security Bulletins ID: SB10038 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028209 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: When Access Protection has been disabled, a local user can gain full control of the target application IMPACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. SOLUTION: The vendor has issued a fix (8.8 Patch 2 with HF778101, 8.8 Patch 3)

78

V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated 1: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges February 28, 2013 - 12:05am Addthis PROBLEM: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: VSE 8.8 Patch 2 with Access Protection, including Self Protection, turned off ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in McAfee VirusScan Enterprise. REFERENCE LINKS: McAfee Security Bulletins ID: SB10038 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028209 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: When Access Protection has been disabled, a local user can gain full control of the target application IMPACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. SOLUTION: The vendor has issued a fix (8.8 Patch 2 with HF778101, 8.8 Patch 3)

79

Structure of the Ebola virus glycoprotein bound to an antibody from a human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Structure of the Ebola virus glycoprotein bound to an antibody from a human survivor Ebolavirus: The ebolavirus causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% lethality for which no vaccines or treatments are yet available. The more frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of importation of the virus make it a significant public health concern. A team of researchers have recently determined the crystal structure of the oligomeric, viral surface glycoprotein in complex with a rare antibody derived from a human survivor. This work explains how the glycoprotein, termed GP, mediates host recognition, drives fusion of the viral and host membranes and masks itself from immune surveillance. The structure also explains why antibodies that neutralize the virus are so rare, identifies the very few sites to which a neutralizing antibody might bind, and thus, provides templates for vaccines and antibodies against the virus.

80

Cell-surface antigens associated with dualtropic and thymotropic murine leukemia viruses inducing thymic and nonthymic lymphomas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unique type-specific antigens were detected on cells infected with dualtropic and thymotropic viruses and x-ray-induced T cell- and B cell-malignant lymphomas of C57BL/6 mice. These findings support the contention that T cell lymphoma (TCL)-inducing and B cell lymphoma (BCL)-indcing viruses isolated from x-irradiated C57BL/6 mice are env gene recombinants in which ecotropic gene sequences have been substituted by xenotropic sequences. We found that unique antigenicities are associated with each TCL-inducing and BCL-inducing dualtropic virus, and that the thymotropic TCL-inducing virus isolates represent a separate serologic group. These virus mapping experiments indicated that many serologically different recombinant viruses can be isolated from C57BL/6 mice. It is suggested that many distinct recombinant viruses may exist in lymphomagenic C57BL/6 mice, some of which are associated with specific lyphoma induction.

Haas, M.; Patch, V.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of the Ebola Virus Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Wednesday, 26 November 2008 00:00 Ebolavirus, one of two members of the family of filoviruses, causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% human mortality. That no vaccines or treatments are yet available combined with the frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of importation of the virus make it a significant public health concern. A team of researchers from the Scripps Research Institute, using diffraction data collected at ALS Beamline 5.0.2, has recently determined the crystal structure of an oligomeric glycoprotein from the viral surface in complex with a rare antibody derived from a human survivor. This work explains how the glycoprotein, termed GP, mediates recognition of the host cell, drives fusion of the viral and host membranes (necessary for viral entry into the host), and masks itself from immune surveillance. The structure also explains why antibodies that neutralize the virus are so rare, identifies the very few sites to which a neutralizing antibody might bind, and thus, provides templates for vaccines and antibodies against the virus.

82

Identification of Novel Positive-Strand RNA Viruses by Metagenomic Analysis of Archaea-Dominated Yellowstone Hot Springs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are no known RNA viruses that infect Archaea. Filling this gap in our knowledge of viruses will enhance our understanding of the relationships between RNA viruses from the three domains of cellular life and, in particular, could shed light on the origin of the enormous diversity of RNA viruses infecting eukaryotes. We describe here the identification of novel RNA viral genome segments from high-temperature acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. These hot springs harbor low-complexity cellular communities dominated by several species of hyperthermophilic Archaea. A viral metagenomics approach was taken to assemble segments of these RNA virus genomes from viral populations isolated directly from hot spring samples. Analysis of these RNA metagenomes demonstrated unique gene content that is not generally related to known RNA viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. However, genes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a hallmark of positive-strand RNA viruses, were identified in two contigs. One of these contigs is approximately 5,600 nucleotides in length and encodes a polyprotein that also contains a region homologous to the capsid protein of nodaviruses, tetraviruses, and birnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRps encoded in these contigs indicate that the putative archaeal viruses form a unique group that is distinct from the RdRps of RNA viruses of Eukarya and Bacteria. Collectively, our findings suggest the existence of novel positive-strand RNA viruses that probably replicate in hyperthermophilic archaeal hosts and are highly divergent from RNA viruses that infect eukaryotes and even more distant from known bacterial RNA viruses. These positive-strand RNA viruses might be direct ancestors of RNA viruses of eukaryotes.

Benjamin Bolduc; Daniel P. Shaughnessy; Yuri I. Wolf; Eugene V. Koonin; Francisco F. Roberto; Mark Young

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Isolation and characterization of Solenopsis invicta virus 3, a new positive-strand RNA virus infecting the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a new virus from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) represents the third virus discovered from this ant species using the metagenomics approach. The single (positive)-strand RNA, monopartite, bicistronic genome of SINV-3 was sequenced in entirety (GenBank accession number (FJ528584)), comprised of 10,386 nucleotides, and polyadenylated at the 3' terminus. This genome size was confirmed by Northern analysis. The genome revealed 2 large open reading frames (ORFs) in the sense orientation with an untranslated region (UTR) at each end and between the two ORFs. The 5' proximal ORF (ORF 1) encoded a predicted protein of 299.1 kDa (2580 amino acids). The 3' proximal ORF (ORF 2) encoded a predicted protein of 73.2 kDa (651 amino acids). RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), helicase, and protease domains were recognized in ORF 1. SDS-PAGE separation of purified SINV-3 particles yielded 2 bands (ostensibly capsid proteins) with a combined molecular mass of 77.3 kDa which was similar to the mass predicted by ORF 2 (73.2 kDa). Phylogenetic analysis of the conserved amino acid sequences containing domains I to VIII of the RdRp from dicistroviruses, iflaviruses, plant small RNA viruses, picornaviruses, and 4 unassigned positive-strand RNA viruses revealed a trichotomous phenogram with SINV-3 and Kelp fly virus comprising a unique cluster. Electron microscopic examination of negatively stained samples of SINV-3 revealed isometric particles with apparent projections and a diameter of 27.3 +- 1.3 nm. SINV-3 was successfully transmitted to uninfected workers by feeding. The minus (replicative) strand of SINV-3 was detected in worker ants indicating replication of the virus. The possibility of using SINV-3 as a microbial control agent for fire ants is discussed.

Valles, Steven M., E-mail: Steven.Valles@ars.usda.go [Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, USDA-ARS, 1600 SW 23rd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32608 (United States); Hashimoto, Yoshifumi [Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research at Cornell University, Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Identification and genetic analysis of Panama-genotype Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus subtype ID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus was isolated in 1993, 1994, and 1995 from human cases of acute, undifferentiated, febrile illness in the Peruvian Amazon Basin. Two virus isolates were recovered in 1994 from Peruvian soldiers at a jungle outpost near Pantoja in northern Peru, and 10 isolates were obtained from military personnel and civilians in 19931995 in Iquitos, an urban center in northeastern Peru. The genetic relationship of these isolates to other VEE virus strains was determined by sequencing 856-867 nucleotide reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction fragments derived from the PE2 glycoprotein gene. The sequences were compared with

M. Steven Oberste; Scott C. Weaver; Douglas M. Watts; Jonathan; F. Smith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Restriction of virus infection by plants. Final report, July 1, 1987--June 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basis of genotypic resistance of the Arlington line of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) against cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) has been attributed, to an inhibitor of the processing of CPMV polyproteins. We sought to purify the protein that is postulated to be the inhibitor of polyprotein processing and to characterize the inhibitor and its gene. Such information can be the basis for engineering resistance to specific viruses in plants. In studies with cherry leafroll virus (CLRV) we sought understanding of the biochemical basis of the resistance.

Bruening, G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Identification of human hnRNP C1/C2 as a dengue virus NS1-interacting protein  

SciTech Connect

Dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a key glycoprotein involved in the production of infectious virus and the pathogenesis of dengue diseases. Very little is known how NS1 interacts with host cellular proteins and functions in dengue virus-infected cells. This study aimed at identifying NS1-interacting host cellular proteins in dengue virus-infected cells by employing co-immunoprecipitation, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Using lysates of dengue virus-infected human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293T), immunoprecipitation with an anti-NS1 monoclonal antibody revealed eight isoforms of dengue virus NS1 and a 40-kDa protein, which was subsequently identified by quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) as human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) C1/C2. Further investigation by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization confirmed the association of hnRNP C1/C2 and dengue virus NS1 proteins in dengue virus-infected cells. Their interaction may have implications in virus replication and/or cellular responses favorable to survival of the virus in host cells.

Noisakran, Sansanee [Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Adulyadejvikrom Building (12th Floor), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Sengsai, Suchada [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Adulyadejvikrom Building (12th Floor), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Thongboonkerd, Visith; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Adulyadejvikrom Building (12th Floor), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Medical Proteomics Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Sinchaikul, Supachok [Institute of Biological Chemistry and Genomic Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shui-Tein [Institute of Biological Chemistry and Genomic Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biochemical Sciences, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Puttikhunt, Chunya [Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Adulyadejvikrom Building (12th Floor), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)] (and others)

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

Armored RNA as virus surrogate in a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay proficiency panel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. B. DuBois. 1998. Armored RNA technology for production ofresistant RNA controls (armored RNA) for reverse transcrip-Reserved. Vol. 44, No. 1 Armored RNA as Virus Surrogate in a

Hietala, S K; Crossley, B M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos 21: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities November 12, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Cisco IronPort Email Security Appliances (C-Series and X-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. Cisco IronPort Web Security Appliances (S-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. ABSTRACT: Cisco Ironport Appliances Sophos Anti-Virus Vulnerabilities. REFERENCE LINKS: Cisco Security Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20121108-sophos Secunia Advisory SA51197 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Cisco has acknowledged some vulnerabilities in Cisco IronPort Web Security

89

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos 1: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities November 12, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Cisco IronPort Email Security Appliances (C-Series and X-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. Cisco IronPort Web Security Appliances (S-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. ABSTRACT: Cisco Ironport Appliances Sophos Anti-Virus Vulnerabilities. REFERENCE LINKS: Cisco Security Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20121108-sophos Secunia Advisory SA51197 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Cisco has acknowledged some vulnerabilities in Cisco IronPort Web Security

90

Hepatitis C Virus Network Based Classification of Hepatocellular Cirrhosis and Carcinoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a main risk factor for liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, particularly to those patients with chronic liver disease or injury. The similar etiology leads to a high correlation of the ...

Huang, Tao

91

Virus constructed iron phosphate lithium ion batteries in unmanned aircraft systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FePO? lithium ion batteries that have cathodes constructed by viruses are scaled up in size to examine potential for use as an auxiliary battery in the Raven to power the payload equipment. These batteries are assembled ...

Kolesnikov-Lindsey, Rachel

92

Virus-assembled flexible electrode-electrolyte interfaces for enhanced polymer-based battery applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-aspect-ratio cobalt-oxide-coated Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-) assembled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) nonstick surfaces were integrated with a solvent-free polymer electrolyte to create an anode-electrolyte interface for use in lithium-ion batteries. ...

Ayan Ghosh, Juchen Guo, Adam D. Brown, Elizabeth Royston, Chunsheng Wang, Peter Kofinas, James N. Culver

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Molecular Evolution of Adeno-associated Virus for Improved Retinal Gene Therapies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D, Flannery J, et al. (2009) Molecular evolution of adeno-Brennan C, et al. (2004) Molecular diversity of astrocytesMolecular Evolution of Adeno-associated Virus for Improved

Klimczak, Ryan Raymond

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

MAximum Multicore POwer (MAMPO): an automatic multithreaded synthetic power virus generation framework for multicore systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The practically attainable worst case power consumption for a computer system is a significant design parameter and it is a very tedious process to determine it by manually writing high power consuming code snippets called power viruses. Previous research ...

Karthik Ganesan; Lizy K. John

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Comparison of Trojan Virus Behavior in Linux and Windows Operating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trojan virus attacks pose one of the most serious threats to computer security. A Trojan horse is typically separated into two parts - a server and a client. It is the client that is cleverly disguised as significant software and positioned in peer-to-peer file sharing networks, or unauthorized download websites. The most common means of infection is through email attachments. The developer of the virus usually uses various spamming techniques in order to distribute the virus to unsuspecting users. Malware developers use chat software as another method to spread their Trojan horse viruses such as Yahoo Messenger and Skype. The objective of this paper is to explore the network packet information and detect the behavior of Trojan attacks to monitoring operating systems such as Windows and Linux. This is accomplished by detecting and analyzing the Trojan infected packet from a network segment -which passes through email attachment- before attacking a host computer. The results that have been obtained to detect i...

Al-Saadoon, Ghossoon M W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The grapefruit flavonoid naringenin as a Hepatitis C virus therapy : efficacy, mechanism and delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection accounts for approximately 40% of chronic liver disease in the United States and results in an estimated 8,000-10,000 deaths annually. Simulations suggest that in the next decade morbidity ...

Goldwasser, Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Evolution of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 viruses have circulated in Southeast Asia for more than a decade, are now endemic in parts of this region, and have also spread to more than 60 countries on three continents. The evolution of these viruses is characterized by frequent reassortment events that have created a significant number of different genotypes, both transient and longer lasting. However, fundamental questions remain about the generation and perpetuation of this substantial genetic diversity. These gaps in understanding may, in part, be due to the difficulties of genotyping closely related viruses, and limitations in the size of the data sets used in analysis. Using our recently published novel genotyping procedure ('two-time test'), which is amenable to high throughput analysis and provides an increased level of resolution relative to previous analyses, we propose a detailed model for the evolution and diversification of avian H5N1 viruses. Our analysis suggests that (i) all current H5N1 genotypes are derived from a single, clearly defined sequence of initial reassortment events; (ii) reassortment of the polymerase and NP genes may have played an important role in avian H5N1 virus evolution; (iii) the current genotype Z viruses have diverged into three distinguishable sub-genotypes in the absence of reassortment; (iv) some potentially significant molecular changes appear to be correlated with particular genotypes (for example, reassortment of the internal genes is often paralleled by a change in the HA clade); and (v) as noted in earlier studies of avian influenza A virus evolution, novel segments are typically derived from different donors (i.e., there is no obvious pattern of gene linkage in reassortment). The model of avian H5N1 viral evolution by reassortment and mutation that emerges from our study provides a context within which significant amino acid changes may be revealed; it also may help in predicting the 'success' of newly emerging avian H5N1 viruses.

Macken, Catherine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Margaret A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Ebolavirus, one of two members of the family of filoviruses, causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% human mortality. That no vaccines or treatments are yet available combined with the frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of importation of the virus make it a significant public health concern. A team of researchers from the Scripps Research Institute, using diffraction data collected at ALS Beamline 5.0.2, has recently determined the crystal structure of an oligomeric glycoprotein from the viral surface in complex with a rare antibody derived from a human survivor. This work explains how the glycoprotein, termed GP, mediates recognition of the host cell, drives fusion of the viral and host membranes (necessary for viral entry into the host), and masks itself from immune surveillance. The structure also explains why antibodies that neutralize the virus are so rare, identifies the very few sites to which a neutralizing antibody might bind, and thus, provides templates for vaccines and antibodies against the virus.

99

Virus and Bacterial Cell Chemical Analysis by NanoSIMS  

SciTech Connect

In past work for the Department of Homeland Security, the LLNL NanoSIMS team has succeeded in extracting quantitative elemental composition at sub-micron resolution from bacterial spores using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). The purpose of this task is to test our NanoSIMS capabilities on viruses and bacterial cells. This initial work has proven successful. We imaged Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Bacillus anthracis Sterne cells using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then analyzed those samples by NanoSIMS. We were able resolve individual viral particles ({approx}18 nm by 300 nm) in the SEM and extract correlated elemental composition in the NanoSIMS. The phosphorous/carbon ratio observed in TMV is comparable to that seen in bacterial spores (0.033), as was the chlorine/carbon ratio (0.11). TMV elemental composition is consistent from spot to spot, and TMV is readily distinguished from debris by NanoSIMS analysis. Bacterial cells were readily identified in the SEM and relocated in the NanoSIMS for elemental analysis. The Ba Sterne cells were observed to have a measurably lower phosphorous/carbon ratio (0.005), as compared to the spores produced in the same run (0.02). The chlorine/carbon ratio was approximately 2.5X larger in the cells (0.2) versus the spores (0.08), while the fluorine/carbon ratio was approximately 10X lower in the cells (0.008) than the spores (0.08). Silicon/carbon ratios for both cells and spores encompassed a comparable range. The initial data in this study suggest that high resolution analysis is useful because it allows the target agent to be analyzed separate from particulates and other debris. High resolution analysis would also be useful for trace sample analysis. The next step in this work is to determine the potential utility of elemental signatures in these kinds of samples. We recommend bulk analyses of media and agent samples to determine the range of media compositions in use, and to determine how agent composition relates to media composition. After these baseline analyses are performed, the data should be assessed to determine the potential forensic utility of elemental analyses. If promising, validation studies using bulk or NanoSIMS analysis would be necessary.

Weber, P; Holt, J

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus  

SciTech Connect

Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

Keener, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Thomas E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High-Resolution Structure of Viruses from Random Snapshots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advent of the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) has made it possible to record snapshots of biological entities injected into the X-ray beam before the onset of radiation damage. Algorithmic means must then be used to determine the snapshot orientations and reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the object. Existing approaches are limited in reconstruction resolution to at best 1/30th of the object diameter, with the computational expense increasing as the eighth power of the ratio of diameter to resolution. We present an approach capable of exploiting object symmetries to recover three-dimensional structure to 1/100th of the object diameter, and thus reconstruct the structure of the satellite tobacco necrosis virus to atomic resolution. Combined with the previously demonstrated capability to operate at ultralow signal, our approach offers the highest reconstruction resolution for XFEL snapshots to date, and provides a potentially powerful alternative route for analysis of data from crystalline and...

Hosseinizadeh, A; Dashti, A; Fung, R; D'Souza, R M; Ourmazd, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

EDITORIAL Persistent occult hepatitis B virus infection: Experimental fi ndings and clinical implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a highly pathogenic virus that causes chronic liver diseases in millions of people globally. In addition to a symptomatic, serologically evident infection, occult persistent HBV carriage has been identified since nucleic acid amplification assays of enhanced sensitivity became introduced for detection of hepadnaviral genomes and their replicative intermediates. Current evidence indicates that occult HBV infection is a common and long-term consequence of resolution of acute hepatitis B. This form of residual infection is termed as secondary occult infection (SOI). The data from the woodchuck model of HBV infection indicate that exposure to small amounts of hepadnavirus can also cause primary occult infection (POI) where virus genome, but no serological makers of exposure to virus, are detectable, and the liver may not be involved. However, virus replicates at low levels in the lymphatic system in both these forms. We briefl y summarize the current understanding of the nature and characteristics of occult hepadnaviral persistence as well as of its documented and expected pathological consequences.

Patricia M Mulrooney-cousins; Tomasz I Michalak; Patricia M Mulrooney-cousins; Tomasz I Michalak; Correspondence Tomasz; I Michalak

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Immune responses to epstein-barr virus in atomic bomb survivors: Study of precursor frequency of cytotoxic lymphocytes and titer levels of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-related antibodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precursor frequencies of cytotoxic lymphocytes to autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells and serum titers of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-related antibodies were measured in 68 atomic bomb survivors to clarify the immune mechanism controlling Epstein-Barr virus infection. The precursor frequency was negatively correlated with the titer of anti-early antigen lgG, which is probably produced at the stage of viral reactivation. A positive correlation between the precursor frequency and titer of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen antibody was also observed, indicating that the precursor frequency reflects the degree of in vivo destruction by T cells of the virus-infected cells. These results suggest that T-cell memory specific to Epstein-Barr virus keeps the virus under control and that the precursor frequency assay is useful for the evaluation of immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus. However, no significant effect of atomic bomb radiation on the precursor frequency was observed in the present study, probably due to the limited number of participants. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Saito, Mayumi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Hirai, Yuko; Akiyama, Mitoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Fukuda, Yasuko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) Children's Hospital Medical Center of Northern California, Oakland, CA (United States)); Huang, Hua (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

SSRL HEADLINES March 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 March, 2009 9 March, 2009 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Scientists Identify Achilles' Heel of Flu Viruses Science Highlight - Macroscopic Quantum Insulator State Observed SLAC to Receive $68.3 Million in Recovery Act Funding SSRL's New CAMS Group has Great Chemistry XAS Experiments Resume on the 'New' BL4-1 SLAC Shines in Condensed Matter Physics at the March APS Meeting New Alloys under Pressure Studied by Photon Science Faculty Member SON, GERT and RWT1 User Safety Training Now Available via the Web New X-ray/VUV Proposal Deadlines Upcoming Photon Science-Related Workshops, Conferences and Schools __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Scientists Identify Achilles' Heel of Flu

105

Molecular Cloning and Analysis of Functional Envelope Genes from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Sequence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Present knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunobiology has been derived almost exclusively from analyses of subtype B viruses, yet such viruses represent only a minority of strains currently spreading worldwide. To generate a more representative panel of genetically diverse envelope genes, we PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced complete gp160 coding regions of 35 primary (peripheral blood mononuclear cell-propagated) HIV-1 isolates collected at major epicenters of the current AIDS pandemic. Analysis of their deduced amino acid sequences revealed several important differences from prototypic subtype B strains, including changes in the number and distribution of cysteine residues, substantial length differences in hypervariable regions, and premature truncations in the gp41 domain. Moreover, transiently expressed glycoprotein precursor molecules varied considerably in both size and carbohydrate content. Phylogenetic analyses of full-length env sequences indicated that the panel included members of all major sequence

Subtypes A Through G; Feng Gao; Sandra G. Morrison; David L. Robertson; Charlotte L. Thornton; Stevenson Craig; Gunilla Karlsson; Joseph Sodroski; Mariza Morgado; Bernardo Galvao-castro; Hagen Von Briesen; Simon Beddows; Jonathan Weber; Paul M. Sharp; George M. Shaw; Beatrice H. Hahn; The Who

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evaluation of the minimal replication time of Cauliflower mosaic virus in different hosts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though the duration of a single round of replication is an important biological parameter, it has been determined for only few viruses. Here, this parameter was determined for Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in transfected protoplasts from different hosts: the highly susceptible Arabidopsis and turnip, and Nicotiana benthamiana, where CaMV accumulates only slowly. Four methods of differing sensitivity were employed: labelling of (1) progeny DNA and (2) capsid protein, (3) immunocapture PCR,, and (4) progeny-specific PCR. The first progeny virus was detected about 21 h after transfection. This value was confirmed by all methods, indicating that our estimate was not biased by the sensitivity of the detection method, and approximated the actual time required for one round of CaMV replication. Unexpectedly, the replication kinetics were similar in the three hosts; suggesting that slow accumulation of CaMV in Nicotiana plants is determined by non-optimal interactions in other steps of the infection cycle.

Khelifa, Mounia; Masse, Delphine; Blanc, Stephane [Equipe CaGeTE, UMR 385 BGPI, INRA-CIRAD-SupAgro, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Drucker, Martin, E-mail: drucker@supagro.inra.f [Equipe CaGeTE, UMR 385 BGPI, INRA-CIRAD-SupAgro, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Three-dimensional visualization of forming Hepatitis C virus-like particles by electron-tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hepatitis C virus infects almost 170 million people per year but its assembly pathway, architecture and the structures of its envelope proteins are poorly understood. Using electron tomography of plastic-embedded sections of insect cells, we have visualized the morphogenesis of recombinant Hepatitis C virus-like particles. Our data provide a three-dimensional sketch of viral assembly at the endoplasmic reticulum showing different budding stages and contiguity of buds. This latter phenomenon could play an important role during the assembly of wt-HCV and explain the size-heterogeneity of its particles.

Badia-Martinez, Daniel; Peralta, Bibiana [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain)] [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); Andres, German; Guerra, Milagros [Electron Microscopy Unit, Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa, CSIC-UAM, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)] [Electron Microscopy Unit, Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa, CSIC-UAM, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gil-Carton, David [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain)] [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); Abrescia, Nicola G.A., E-mail: nabrescia@cicbiogune.es [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Amazon Energy Budget Using the ABLE-2B and FluAmazon Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiosonde and satellite data collected from the Atmosphere Boundary Layer ExperimentWet Season and Amazon Water Vapor Flux Experiment are used to investigate the energy budget. The relationship between the cloud cover variability and the ...

Luiz A. T. Machado

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection  

SciTech Connect

Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, Elena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharya, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Stochastic Optimization Models for Rapid Detection of Viruses in Cellphone Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a class of models to represent the dynamics of a virus spreading in a cellphone network, employing a taxonomy that includes five key characteristics. Based on the resulting dynamics governing the spread, we present optimization models to rapidly detect the virus, subject to resource limitations. We consider two goals, maximizing the probability of detecting a virus by a time threshold and minimizing the expected time to detection, which can be applied to all spread models we consider. We establish a submodularity result for these two objective functions that ensures that a greedy algorithm yields a well-known constant-factor (63%) approximation. We relate the latter optimization problem, under a specific virus-spread mechanism from our class of models, to a classic facility-location model. And, for the former objective function, we provide a sample-path optimization model that yields an asymptotically-optimal design for locating the detection devices, as the number of samples grows large. Finally, using call data from a large carrier, we estimate the degree distribution in a contact network, which is central to building random networks to study our models and solution methods. 1

Jinho Lee; John J. Hasenbein; David P. Morton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A C. elegans-based foam for rapid on-site detection of residual live virus.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the response to and recovery from a critical homeland security event involving deliberate or accidental release of biological agents, initial decontamination efforts are necessarily followed by tests for the presence of residual live virus or bacteria. Such 'clearance sampling' should be rapid and accurate, to inform decision makers as they take appropriate action to ensure the safety of the public and of operational personnel. However, the current protocol for clearance sampling is extremely time-intensive and costly, and requires significant amounts of laboratory space and capacity. Detection of residual live virus is particularly problematic and time-consuming, as it requires evaluation of replication potential within a eukaryotic host such as chicken embryos. The intention of this project was to develop a new method for clearance sampling, by leveraging Sandia's expertise in the biological and material sciences in order to create a C. elegans-based foam that could be applied directly to the entire contaminated area for quick and accurate detection of any and all residual live virus by means of a fluorescent signal. Such a novel technology for rapid, on-site detection of live virus would greatly interest the DHS, DoD, and EPA, and hold broad commercial potential, especially with regard to the transportation industry.

Negrete, Oscar A.; Branda, Catherine; Hardesty, Jasper O. E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Tucker, Mark David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kaiser, Julia N. (Global Product Management, Hilden, Germany); Kozina, Carol L.; Chirica, Gabriela S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Whole-genome, deep pyrosequencing analysis of a duck influenza A virus evolution in swine cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the sub-population level evolution of a duck influenza A virus isolate during passage in swine tracheal cells. The complete genomes of the A/mallard/Netherlands/10-Nmkt/1999 strain and its swine cell-passaged descendent were analysed...

Bourret, Vincent; Croville, Guillaumec; Mariette, Jrme; Klopp, Christophe; Bouchez, Olivier; Tiley, Laurence; Guerin, Jean-Luc

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nuclear import of hepatitis B virus capsids and release of the viral genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear import of hepatitis B virus capsids and release of the viral genome Birgit Rabe*, Angelika through the nuclear pore into the nuclear basket. Import depended on phosphorylation of the capsid protein from the inner face of the nuclear pore. Immature capsids that did not contain the mature viral genome

Panté, Nelly

114

Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus The Package Matters Disarming Deadly South American Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Pull-Chain "Polymer" Solves Puzzle of Complex Molecular Packing Discovering New Talents for Diamond Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure MARCH 29, 2010 Bookmark and Share Diamond anvil cell used for high-pressure experiments Metallic glasses are emerging as potentially useful materials at the frontier of materials science research. They combine the advantages-and avoid many of the problems of-normal metals and glasses, two classes of materials with a very wide range of applications. For example, metallic

115

Ocean Viruses: Tiny entities with Global Impacts ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Matt Sullivan from the University of Arizona on "Ocean Viruses: Tiny Entities with Global Impacts" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Sullivan, Matthew B [University of Arizona

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

to test antiviral drugs without using the small-pox virus itself and would focus on replica-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to test antiviral drugs without using the small- pox virus itself and would focus on replica- tion the United States and Korea decid- ed to back the Japanese site, whereas Russia and China favored Cadarache

117

Unusual nucleotide content of Rubella virus genome as a consequence of biased RNA-editing: comparison with Alphaviruses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usage of cytosine in third codon positions of 22 complete Rubella virus genomes (52.4%) is significantly higher than the usage of guanine (28.9%), adenine (6.9%) and uracil (11.8%). ...

Vladislav Victorovich Khrustalev; Eugene Victorovich Barkovsky

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Circulation of Different Lineages of Dengue Virus 2, Genotype American/Asian in Brazil: Dynamics and Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American/Asian genotype of Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) was introduced into the Americas in the 80?s. Although there is no data showing when this genotype was first introduced into Brazil, it was first detected in ...

Drumond, Betnia Paiva

119

Dengue Virus Type 3 Adaptive Changes during Epidemics in Sao Jose de Rio Preto, Brazil, 20062007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global dengue virus spread in tropical and sub-tropical regions has become a major international public health concern. It is evident that DENV genetic diversity plays a significant role in the immunopathology of the disease ...

Villabona-Arenas, Christian Julian

120

A New DNA Binding Protein Highly Conserved in Diverse Crenarchaeal Viruses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) infects Sulfolobus species found in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. Its 37 open reading frames (ORFs) generally lack sequence similarity to other genes. One exception, however, is ORF B116. While its function is unknown, orthologs are found in three additional crenarchaeal viral families. Due to the central importance of this protein family to crenarchaeal viruses, we have undertaken structural and biochemical studies of B116. The structure reveals a previously unobserved fold consisting of a five-stranded beta-sheet flanked on one side by three alpha helices. Two subunits come together to form a homodimer with a 10-stranded mixed beta-sheet, where the topology of the central strands resembles an unclosed beta-barrel. Highly conserved loops rise above the surface of the saddle-shaped protein and suggest an interaction with the major groove of DNA. The predicted B116-DNA interaction is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

Larson, E.T.; Eilers, B.J.; Reiter, D.; Ortmann, A.C.; Young, M.J.; Lawrence, C.M.; /Montana State U. /Tubingen U.

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Crystal Structure of the Simian Virus 40 Large T-Antigen Origin-Binding Domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origins of replication of DNA tumor viruses have a highly conserved feature, namely, multiple binding sites for their respective initiator proteins arranged as inverted repeats. In the 1.45- Angstroms crystal structure of the simian virus 40 large T-antigen (T-ag) origin-binding domain (obd) reported herein, T-ag obd monomers form a left-handed spiral with an inner channel of 30 Angstroms having six monomers per turn. The inner surface of the spiral is positively charged and includes residues known to bind DNA. Residues implicated in hexamerization of full-length T-ag are located at the interface between adjacent T-ag obd monomers. These data provide a high-resolution model of the hexamer of origin-binding domains observed in electron microscopy studies and allow the obd's to be oriented relative to the hexamer of T-ag helicase domains to which they are connected.

Meinke,G.; Bullock, P.; Bohm, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/{beta}-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome-lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)] [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Yang, Hanchun, E-mail: yanghanchun1@cau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)] [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Hu, Hongbo, E-mail: hongbo@cau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)] [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Effect of 1918 PB1-F2 expression on influenza A virus infection kinetics  

SciTech Connect

Relatively little is known about the viral factors contributing to the lethality of the 1918 pandemic, although its unparalleled virulence was likely due in part to the newly discovered PB1-F2 protein. This protein, while unnecessary for replication, increases apoptosis in monocytes, alters viral polymerase activity in vitro, and produces enhanced inflammation and increased secondary pneumonia in vivo. However, the effects the PB1-F2 protein have in vivo remain unclear. To address the mechanisms involved, we intranasally infected groups of mice with either influenza A virus PR8 or a genetically engineered virus that expresses the 1918 PB1-F2 protein on a PR8 background, PR8-PB1-F2(1918). Mice inoculated with PR8 had viral concentrations peaking at 72 hours, while those infected with PR8-PB1-F2(1918) reached peak concentrations earlier, 48 hours. Mice given PR8-PB1-F2(1918) also showed a faster decline in viral loads. We fit a mathematical model to these data to estimate parameter values and select the best model. This model supports a lower viral clearance rate and higher infected cell death rate with the PR8-PB1-F2(1918) virus, although the viral production rate may also be higher. We hypothesize that the higher PR8-PB1-F2(1918) viral titers early in an infection are due to both an increase in viral production with decreased viral clearance, and that the faster decline in the later stages of infection result from elevated cell death rates. We discuss the implications these mechanisms have during an infection with a virus expressing a virulent PBI-F2 on the possibility of a pandemic and on the importance of antiviral treatments.

Ribeiro, Ruy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Amber M [UNIV OF UTAH; Adler, Frederick R [UNIV OF UTAH; Mcauley, Julie L [ST. JUDES CHILDREN RESEARCH; Mccullers, Jonathan A [ST. JUDES CHILDREN RESEARCH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Structural basis of hepatitis C virus neutralization by broadly neutralizing antibody HCV1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 2% of the global population and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver diseases. Circulating HCV is genetically diverse, and therefore a broadly effective vaccine must target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Human mAb HCV1 has broad neutralizing activity against HCV isolates from at least four major genotypes and protects in the chimpanzee model from primary HCV challenge. The antibody targets a conserved antigenic site (residues 412-423) on the virus E2 envelope glycoprotein. Two crystal structures of HCV1 Fab in complex with an epitope peptide at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution reveal that the epitope is a {beta}-hairpin displaying a hydrophilic face and a hydrophobic face on opposing sides of the hairpin. The antibody predominantly interacts with E2 residues Leu{sup 413} and Trp{sup 420} on the hydrophobic face of the epitope, thus providing an explanation for how HCV isolates bearing mutations at Asn{sup 415} on the same binding face escape neutralization by this antibody. The results provide structural information for a neutralizing epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein and should help guide rational design of HCV immunogens to elicit similar broadly neutralizing antibodies through vaccination.

Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Robbins, Justin B.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun (Scripps)

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

125

Rapid Diagnosis of IHN Virus Infection in Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective for this study was the development of a rapid diagnostic method for IHN virus in fish tissue samples. The rationale for developing new techniques for diagnosing IHNV infection was that present methods were time consuming and dependent on virus neutralization by specific antisera, a reagent that was not readily available or reliable. Fish pathologists required a rapid detection method which was sensitive enough to detect virus strain differences so that they could provide data for effective management decisions in controlling the spread of IHNV. Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) role in efforts in fish diseases and more generically the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations, is mandated by Congress through the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Regional Act), Pub. L. 96-501. Section 4 (h) of the Regional Act directs the Northwest Power Planning Council to develop a Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA's Administrator is authorized in Section 4 (h) (10) (A) to ''use funds and the authorities available to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries''. The fund is to be used to implement measures that are consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The research detailed in this final report is consistent with these objectives. This final report has been prepared as part of BPA's policy to encourage the preservation and dissemination of research results by publication in scientific journals.

Leong, JoAnn Ching

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Extensive investigation of reticuloendotheliosis virus in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) is a retrovirus that causes a neoplastic disease in a wide range of avian hosts including chickens, turkeys, and ducks. In 1993, REV was detected in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken (Tympanachus cupido attwateri), a subspecies of Tympanachus cupido. Subsequent infections of this prairie chicken have been identified at captive breeding facilities throughout Texas. The implications of these infections have severely hindered repopulation efforts by these facilities. This study focused on investigating REV infection of captive Attwater'????s prairie chicken in order to better understand the disease affecting these endangered birds. The overall objective was to develop a means of eliminating this threat to the repopulation of the Attwater's prairie chicken. Several aspects of virus infection were investigated. Reagents capable of recognizing prairie chicken IgY and viral gag polypeptides were developed for use in assays for detection of antibody responses and titration of viral concentrations. Sequencing data of genomes collected from isolates of Texas prairie chickens and domestic chickens, as well as three REV prototype viruses, were compared to determine relationships among strains and identify the potential origin of the REV infecting Attwater'????s prairie chicken. Additionally, a flow cytometry technique of segregating the lymphocyte population from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a pan leukocyte monoclonal antibody was developed to more accurately measure changes within lymphocyte populations. This technique combined with intracellular labeling was used to deduce the target cells of REV infection. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was developed for greater sensitivity in detecting infection in birds than the previous method of single amplification PCR. This greater sensitivity results in earlier identification of the virus in infected birds, which allows for earlier removal of infected birds to minimize transmission of the virus throughout the flock. The sensitivity of the nested PCR diagnostic test was determined in a dose response pathogenesis study, which was conducted on hybrid greater/Attwater's prairie chicken to observe the experimental development of disease in these birds. Finally, a vaccine was developed using plasmid DNA with REV encoded genes and tested on naturally infected prairie chickens to determine its efficacy in reducing viral load. Although no reduction in viral load was detected, the vaccine may be effective in providing prophylactic protection in future studies.

Bohls, Ryan Lanier

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Potential for Activated Biochar to Remove Waterborne Viruses from Environmental Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for clean potable water and sustainable energy are two current and pressing issues with implications affecting the global population. Renewed interests in alternative energy have prompted researchers to investigate the full capacity of biofuels. These interests have led to not only the examination of current method limitations, but also to the investigation of new conversion methods. One promising method for bioenergy production is pyrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks. Through pyrolysis, a single crop may produce ethanol, bio-oil, and/or gaseous energy (syngas). The remaining solid phase product is a black carbon dubbed 'biochar'. In the current study, biochar was used as a both an unamended sorbent and a precursor to form powdered activated carbons (PACs) capable of removing waterborne viruses. Biochar was activated with KOH, ZnCl2, and H3PO4 and analyzed using the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) method, a combination of Kjeldahl digest and ICP-MS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sorbents were tested in batch studies using phosphate buffered saline (PBS), surface water, and groundwater. Bacteriophages MS2 and thetaX174 served as viral surrogates. All activation treatments significantly increased surface area, up to 1495.5 m2/g (KOH-activated). While the non-activated biochar was not effective in virus removal, the KOH-activated PAC had tremendous removal in the PBS/MS2 batch (mean 98.7% removal, up to 6.2 x 109 particles/mL, as compared to the Darco S-51: 82.3%). As evidenced by this study, sorption efficiency will be governed by viral species, carbon type and concentration, and water quality. The results of this study indicate that biochar can serve as a precursor for a highly porous and effective PAC, capable of removing waterborne viruses from environmental waters.

Florey, James

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Acid Stability of the Hemagglutinin Protein Regulates H5N1 Influenza Virus Pathogenicity  

SciTech Connect

Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype continue to threaten agriculture and human health. Here, we use biochemistry and x-ray crystallography to reveal how amino-acid variations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein contribute to the pathogenicity of H5N1 influenza virus in chickens. HA proteins from highly pathogenic (HP) A/chicken/Hong Kong/YU562/2001 and moderately pathogenic (MP) A/goose/Hong Kong/437-10/1999 isolates of H5N1 were found to be expressed and cleaved in similar amounts, and both proteins had similar receptor-binding properties. However, amino-acid variations at positions 104 and 115 in the vestigial esterase sub-domain of the HA1 receptor-binding domain (RBD) were found to modulate the pH of HA activation such that the HP and MP HA proteins are activated for membrane fusion at pH 5.7 and 5.3, respectively. In general, an increase in H5N1 pathogenicity in chickens was found to correlate with an increase in the pH of HA activation for mutant and chimeric HA proteins in the observed range of pH 5.2 to 6.0. We determined a crystal structure of the MP HA protein at 2.50 {angstrom} resolution and two structures of HP HA at 2.95 and 3.10 {angstrom} resolution. Residues 104 and 115 that modulate the acid stability of the HA protein are situated at the N- and C-termini of the 110-helix in the vestigial esterase sub-domain, which interacts with the B loop of the HA2 stalk domain. Interactions between the 110-helix and the stalk domain appear to be important in regulating HA protein acid stability, which in turn modulates influenza virus replication and pathogenesis. Overall, an optimal activation pH of the HA protein is found to be necessary for high pathogenicity by H5N1 influenza virus in avian species.

DuBois, Rebecca M.; Zaraket, Hassan; Reddivari, Muralidhar; Heath, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.; Russell, Charles J. (Tennessee-HSC); (SJCH)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

Takahashi, Tadanobu [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, and COE Program in the 21st Century, 52-1 Yada, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, CREST, JST, and COE Program in the 21st Century, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, and COE Program in the 21st Century, 52-1 Yada, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Suzuki, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, CREST, JST, and COE Program in the 21st Century, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Miwa, Masao [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, and COE Program in the 21st Century, 52-1 Yada, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)], E-mail: miwa@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

130

BK virus has tropism for human salivary gland cells in vitro: Implications for transmission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: In this study, it was determined that BKV is shed in saliva and an in vitro model system was developed whereby BKV can productively infect both submandibular (HSG) and parotid (HSY) salivary gland cell lines. Results: BKV was detected in oral fluids using quantitative real-time PCR (QRTPCR). BKV infection was determined using quantitative RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. The infectivity of BKV was inhibited by pre-incubation of the virus with gangliosides that saturated the major capsid protein, VP1, halting receptor mediated BKV entry into salivary gland cells. Examination of infected cultures by transmission electron microscopy revealed 45-50 nm BK virions clearly visible within the cells. Subsequent to infection, encapsidated BK virus was detected in the supernatant. Conclusion: We thus demonstrated that BKV was detected in oral fluids and that BK infection and replication occur in vitro in salivary gland cells. These data collectively suggest the potential for BKV oral route of transmission and oral pathogenesis.

Jeffers, Liesl K. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Madden, Vicki [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer@med.unc.ed [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of a new noncytopathic Semliki Forest virus vector providing high expression levels and stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alphavirus vectors express high levels of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells, but their cytopathic nature makes this expression transient. In order to generate a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) noncytopathic vector we introduced mutations previously described to turn Sindbis virus noncytopathic into a conserved position in an SFV vector expressing LacZ. Interestingly, mutant P718T in replicase nsp2 subunit was able to replicate in only a small percentage of BHK cells, producing {beta}-gal-expressing colonies without selection. Puromycin N-acetyl-transferase (pac) gene was used to replace LacZ in this mutant allowing selection of an SFV noncytopathic replicon containing a second mutation in nsp2 nuclear localization signal (R649H). This latter mutation did not confer a noncytopathic phenotype by itself and did not alter nsp2 nuclear translocation. Replicase synthesis was diminished in the SFV double mutant, leading to genomic and subgenomic RNA levels that were 125-fold and 66-fold lower than in wild-type vector, respectively. Interestingly, this mutant expressed {beta}-gal levels similar to parental vector. By coexpressing pac and LacZ from independent subgenomic promoters this vector was able to generate stable cell lines maintaining high expression levels during at least 10 passages, indicating that it could be used as a powerful system for protein production in mammalian cells.

Casales, Erkuden; Rodriguez-Madoz, Juan R.; Ruiz-Guillen, Marta; Razquin, Nerea; Cuevas, Yolanda; Prieto, Jesus [Division of Gene Therapy, School of Medicine, Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), University of Navarra, Av. Pio XII 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain); Smerdou, Cristian [Division of Gene Therapy, School of Medicine, Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), University of Navarra, Av. Pio XII 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)], E-mail: csmerdou@unav.es

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Genomics-enabled sensor platform for rapid detection of viruses related to disease outbreak.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioweapons and emerging infectious diseases pose growing threats to our national security. Both natural disease outbreak and outbreaks due to a bioterrorist attack are a challenge to detect, taking days after the outbreak to identify since most outbreaks are only recognized through reportable diseases by health departments and reports of unusual diseases by clinicians. In recent decades, arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) have emerged as some of the most significant threats to human health. They emerge, often unexpectedly, from cryptic transmission foci causing localized outbreaks that can rapidly spread to multiple continents due to increased human travel and trade. Currently, diagnosis of acute infections requires amplification of viral nucleic acids, which can be costly, highly specific, technically challenging and time consuming. No diagnostic devices suitable for use at the bedside or in an outbreak setting currently exist. The original goals of this project were to 1) develop two highly sensitive and specific diagnostic assays for detecting RNA from a wide range of arboviruses; one based on an electrochemical approach and the other a fluorescent based assay and 2) develop prototype microfluidic diagnostic platforms for preclinical and field testing that utilize the assays developed in goal 1. We generated and characterized suitable primers for West Nile Virus RNA detection. Both optical and electrochemical transduction technologies were developed for DNA-RNA hybridization detection and were implemented in microfluidic diagnostic sensing platforms that were developed in this project.

Brozik, Susan Marie; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Edwards, Thayne L.; Anderson, John Moses; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Branch, Darren W.; Wheeler, David Roger; Polsky, Ronen; Lopez, DeAnna M.; Ebel, Gregory D. [Colorado State University; Prasad, Abhishek N. [Colorado State University; Brozik, James A. [Washington State University; Rudolph, Angela R. [Washington State University; Wong, Lillian P. [Washington State University

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ready to implement CIM Monolith Technology Order our CIM Disk Virus Purification Pack and identify the optimal chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ready to implement CIM® Monolith Technology Order our CIM® Disk Virus Purification Pack. Request a CIM® Technology Seminar? To educate your entire organization about CIM® Technology and its- on with the performance or use of CIM®. For more information on our products, visit our home page at: http

Lebendiker, Mario

134

Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death Responses Associated with the Influenza A Virus PB1-F2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-apoptotic properties of PB1-F2. Using a NF-kB luciferase adenoviral vector, we were able to quantify in vivo the implication of NF-kB in the inflammation mediated by the influenza virus infection; we found that PB1-F2 expression intensifies the NF-kB activity. Finally, we quantified the neutrophil recruitment within

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

135

Predicting the Seasonal Shift in Mosquito Populations Preceding the Onset of the West Nile Virus in Central Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the midwestern United States, the summertime rise in infection rate by the West Nile virus is associated with a seasonal shift in the abundance of two mosquito populations, Culex restuans and Culex pipiens. This seasonal shift usually precedes the time ...

N. E. Westcott; S. D. Hilberg; R. L. Lampman; B. W. Alto; A. Bedel; E. J. Muturi; H. Glahn; M. Baker; K. E. Kunkel; R. J. Novak

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth and look-alike disease viruses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-throughput multiplexed assay (Multiplex Version 1.0) was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRTPCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

Hindson, B J; Baker, B R; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Reid, S M; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; King, D P

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

Phylogenomic analysis of 11 complete African swine fever virus genome sequences  

SciTech Connect

Viral molecular epidemiology has traditionally analyzed variation in single genes. Whole genome phylogenetic analysis of 123 concatenated genes from 11 ASFV genomes, including E75, a newly sequenced virulent isolate from Spain, identified two clusters. One contained South African isolates from ticks and warthog, suggesting derivation from a sylvatic transmission cycle. The second contained isolates from West Africa and the Iberian Peninsula. Two isolates, from Kenya and Malawi, were outliers. Of the nine genomes within the clusters, seven were within p72 genotype 1. The 11 genomes sequenced comprised only 5 of the 22 p72 genotypes. Comparison of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations at the genome level identified 20 genes subject to selection pressure for diversification. A novel gene of the E75 virus evolved by the fusion of two genes within the 360 multicopy family. Comparative genomics reveals high diversity within a limited sample of the ASFV viral gene pool.

Villiers, Etienne P. de, E-mail: e.villiers@cgiar.or [International Livestock Research Institute, PO Box 30709, Nairobi 00100 (Kenya); Gallardo, Carmina; Arias, Marisa [EU reference Laboratory for ASF, CISA-INIA, Crta Algete el Cesar s/n 28130 Valdeolmos, Madrid (Spain); Silva, Melissa da; Upton, Chris [Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P6 (Canada); Martin, Raquel [EU reference Laboratory for ASF, CISA-INIA, Crta Algete el Cesar s/n 28130 Valdeolmos, Madrid (Spain); Bishop, Richard P. [International Livestock Research Institute, PO Box 30709, Nairobi 00100 (Kenya)

2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

138

Influence of cell dissociation procedures on the tumorigenicity of Simian Virus 40 transformed fibroblasts  

SciTech Connect

Mouse fibroblasts transformed by Simian Virus 40 (SV40) were examined for tumor forming ability in syngeneic BALB/c mice following dissociation from tissue culture dishes by two procedures. A significantly greater in vivo proliferative capacity was observed for cells dissociated by the tryspin-EDTA procedure, with the injected cell dose for tumor production in 50 percent of recipient mice (the TPD$sub 50$) being 16-fold lower than the TPD$sub 50$ for cells dissociated by the EDTA procedure. Host immunosuppression with 300 rad whole-body $gamma$ irradiation led to a significant 7-fold decrease in the TPD$sub 50$ for cells dissociated by the EDTA procedure, while no significant decrease in TPD$sub 50$ was observed for cells dissociated by the tryspin-EDTA procedure. (auth)

Tenforde, T.S.; Risius, J.; Beckmann, A.; Tobias, C.A.; Gurney, E.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

Tani, Hidenori [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi [Radioisotope Center, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Miyata, Ryo [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Tsuneda, Satoshi [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Igarashi, Masayuki [Microbial Chemistry Research Center, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Yuji [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Noda, Naohiro [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan)], E-mail: noda-naohiro@aist.go.jp

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Divergent antiviral effects of bioflavonoids on the hepatitis C virus life cycle  

SciTech Connect

We have previously demonstrated that quercetin, a bioflavonoid, blocks hepatitis C virus (HCV) proliferation by inhibiting NS5A-driven internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation of the viral genome. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of antiviral activity of quercetin and six additional bioflavonoids. We demonstrate that catechin, naringenin, and quercetin possess significant antiviral activity, with no associated cytotoxicity. Infectious virion secretion was not significantly altered by these bioflavonoids. Catechin and naringenin demonstrated stronger inhibition of infectious virion assembly compared to quercetin. Quercetin markedly blocked viral translation whereas catechin and naringenin demonstrated mild activity. Similarly quercetin completely blocked NS5A-augmented IRES-mediated translation in an IRES reporter assay, whereas catechin and naringenin had only a mild effect. Moreover, quercetin differentially inhibited HSP70 induction compared to catechin and naringenin. Thus, the antiviral activity of these bioflavonoids is mediated through different mechanisms. Therefore combination of these bioflavonoids may act synergistically against HCV.

Khachatoorian, Ronik, E-mail: RnKhch@ucla.edu [Molecular Biology Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program (MBIDP), Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States) [Molecular Biology Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program (MBIDP), Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja, E-mail: VArumugaswami@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States) [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Department of Surgery, Regenerative Medicine Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Raychaudhuri, Santanu, E-mail: SRaychau@ucla.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Yeh, George K., E-mail: GgYeh@ucla.edu [Molecular Biology Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program (MBIDP), Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Maloney, Eden M., E-mail: EMaloney@ucla.edu [Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Wang, Julie, E-mail: JulieW1521@ucla.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); and others

2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Virology Journal BioMed Central Commentary Bacteriophages: The viruses for all seasons of molecular biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Bacteriophage research continues to break new ground in our understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms of gene action and biological structure. The abundance of bacteriophages in nature and the diversity of their genomes are two reasons why phage research brims with excitement. The pages of Virology Journal will reflect the excitement of the "New Phage Biology." The launching of Virology Journal comes at a time of resurgence of interest in the basic biology of the bacteriophages and the impact that these viruses have on earth's ecology, evolution of microbial diversity and the control of infectious disease. Since playing an important part in the birth of Molecular Biology more than 50 years ago [1], phage research has continually broken new ground in our understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms of gene action and biological structure [2]. This trend shows no

Jim D Karam; Jim D Karam

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evolving T-cell vaccine strategies for HIV, the virus with a thousand faces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HIV's rapid global spread and the human suffering it has left in its wake have made AIDS a global heath priority for the 25 years since its discovery. Yet its capacity to rapidly evolve has made combating this virus a tremendous challenge. The obstacles to creating an effective HIV vaccine are formidable, but there are advances in the field on many fronts, in terms of novel vectors, adjuvants, and antigen design strategies. SIV live attenuated vaccine models are able to confer protection against heterologous challenge, and this continues to provide opportunities to explore the biological underpinnings of a protective effect (9). More indirect, but equally important, is new understanding regarding the biology of acute infection (43), the role of immune response in long-term non-progression (6,62, 81), and defining characteristics of broadly neutralizing antibodies (4). In this review we will focus on summarizing strategies directed towards a single issue, that of contending with HIV variation in terms of designing aT-cell vaccine. The strategies that prove most effective in this area can ultimately be combined with the best strategies under development in other areas, with the hope of ultimately converging on a viable vaccine candidate. Only two large HIV vaccine efficacy trials have been completed and both have failed to prevent infection or confer a benefit to infected individual (23,34), but there is ample reason to continue our efforts. A historic breakthrough came in 1996, when it was realized that although the virus could escape from a single antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, it could be thwarted by a combination of medications that simultaneously targeted different parts of the virus (HAART) (38). This revelation came after 15 years of research, thought, and clinical testing; to enable that vital progress the research and clinical communities had to first define and understand, then develop a strategy to counter, the remarkable evolutionary potential of the virus. HAART, for the first time, provided an effective treatment to help those with living with HIV stay healthy. Nonetheless, the treatment has limitations. People with HIV face a lifetime of expensive daily multi-drug regimens, often with side effects; drug resistance at the individual and population level are issues (56); and universal access, despite substantial progress, is a dream not yet realized for many of the millions of the world's poor who are living with HIV (68). These issues, combined with the growing numbers of people infected globally and impact of HIV on society, make the development of an HIV vaccine or a prophylactic prevention strategy a crucial if elusive goal. In some ways, the history of HIV vaccine deVelopment has paralleled the early stages of designing effective therapy. We had to test the simple strategies first, but meanwhile the story of the impact of diversity from an immunological perspective is still unfolding, and novel ideas countermeasures are being explored.

Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tomato chocolate spot virus, a member of a new torradovirus species that causes a necrosis-associated disease of tomato in Guatemala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29]. Analysis of the helicase domain (aa 398495) revealedspot-associated virus helicase belongs to super- family III,The aa sequence of the helicase domain is 100% identical to

Batuman, O.; Kuo, Y.-W.; Palmieri, M.; Rojas, M. R.; Gilbertson, R. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Predicting Flu Trends using Twitter Data Harshavardhan Achrekar Avinash Gandhe Ross Lazarus Ssu-Hsin Yu Benyuan Liu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

epidemics and other pandemics such as the H1N1 is of paramount im- portance for public health authorities. As diagnoses are made and reported by doctors, the system is almost entirely manual, resulting in a 1-2 weeks in aggregate ILI reports. Public health authorities need to be forewarned at the earliest time to ensure

Liu, Benyuan

145

Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses (which are of two bovine types) bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). A timeline for this development is presented in Table 1. The development of the Version 1.0 panel for FMDV rule-out and the most current efforts aimed to designed species specific panels has spanned over 2 1/2 years with multiple collaborative partnerships. This document provides a summary of the development, testing and performance data at OIE Stage 1 Feasibility into Stage 2 Assay Development and Standardization1 (see Table 2), gathered as of June 30th, 2007 for the porcine and bovine MUX assay panels. We present an overview of the identification and selection of candidate genetic signatures, the assay development process, and preliminary performance data for each of the individual signatures as characterized in the multiplexed format for the porcine and bovine panels. The Stage 1 Feasibility data of the multiplexed panels is presented in this report also includes relevant data acquired from the Version 1.0 panel as supporting information where appropriate. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must precede efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available. As a summary report, this document does not provide the details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, nor does it provide spec

Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.  

SciTech Connect

Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.

Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar A.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The requirement of the DEAD-box protein DDX24 for the packaging of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RNA helicases play important roles in RNA metabolism. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) does not carry its own RNA helicase, the virus thus needs to exploit cellular RNA helicases to promote the replication of its RNA at various steps such as transcription, folding and transport. In this study, we report that knockdown of a DEAD-box protein named DDX24 inhibits the packaging of HIV-1 RNA and thus diminishes viral infectivity. The decreased viral RNA packaging as a result of DDX24-knockdown is observed only in the context of the Rev/RRE (Rev response element)-dependent but not the CTE (constitutive transport element)-mediated nuclear export of viral RNA, which is explained by the specific interaction of DDX24 with the Rev protein. We propose that DDX24 acts at the early phase of HIV-1 RNA metabolism prior to nuclear export and the consequence of this action extends to the viral RNA packaging stage during virus assembly.

Ma Jing; Rong Liwei; Zhou Yongdong; Roy, Bibhuti Bushan; Lu, Jennifer; Abrahamyan, Levon; Mouland, Andrew J.; Pan Qinghua; Chen Liang, E-mail: chen.liang@mcgill.ca

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Infection Is Required for Efficient Production of the Angiogenesis Factor Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated malignancies are primarily composed of cells with one of the latent forms of EBV infection, a small subset of tumor cells containing the lytic form of infection is often observed. Whether the rare lytically infected tumor cells contribute to the growth of the latently infected tumor cells is unclear. Here we have investigated whether the lytically infected subset of early-passage lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) could potentially contribute to tumor growth through the production of angiogenesis factors. We demonstrate that supernatants from early-passage LCLs infected with BZLF1-deleted virus (Z-KO LCLs) are highly impaired in promoting endothelial cell tube formation in vitro compared to wild-type (WT) LCL supernatants. Furthermore, expression of the BZLF1 gene product in trans in Z-KO LCLs restored angiogenic capacity. The supernatants of Z-KO LCLs, as well as supernatants from LCLs derived with a BRLF1-deleted virus (R-KO LCLs), contained much less vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in comparison to WT LCLs. BZLF1 gene expression in Z-KO LCLs

In Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines; Gregory K. Hong; Pawan Kumar; Ling Wang; Blossom Damania; Margaret L. Gulley; Henri-jacques Delecluse; Peter J. Polverini; Shannon C. Kenney

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Protective immunity provided by HLA-A2 epitopes for fusion and hemagglutinin proteins of measles virus  

SciTech Connect

Natural infection and vaccination with a live-attenuated measles virus (MV) induce CD8{sup +} T-cell-mediated immune responses that may play a central role in controlling MV infection. In this study, we show that newly identified human HLA-A2 epitopes from MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins induced protective immunity in HLA-A2 transgenic mice challenged with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing F or H protein. HLA-A2 epitopes were predicted and synthesized. Five and four peptides from H and F, respectively, bound to HLA-A2 molecules in a T2-binding assay, and four from H and two from F could induce peptide-specific CD8{sup +} T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. Further experiments proved that three peptides from H (H9-567, H10-250, and H10-516) and one from F protein (F9-57) were endogenously processed and presented on HLA-A2 molecules. All peptides tested in this study are common to 5 different strains of MV including Edmonston. In both A2K{sup b} and HHD-2 mice, the identified peptide epitopes induced protective immunity against recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing H or F. Because F and H proteins induce neutralizing antibodies, they are major components of new vaccine strategies, and therefore data from this study will contribute to the development of new vaccines against MV infection.

Oh, Sang Kon [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bldg. 10-Rm 6B-09, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1578 (United States) and Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)]. E-mail: sangkono@baylorhealth.edu; Stegman, Brian [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bldg. 10-Rm 6B-09, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1578 (United States); Pendleton, C. David [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bldg. 10-Rm 6B-09, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1578 (United States); Ota, Martin O. [W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Pan, C.-H. [W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Griffin, Diane E. [W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Burke, Donald S. [Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Berzofsky, Jay A. [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bldg. 10-Rm 6B-09, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1578 (United States)]. E-mail: berzofsk@helix.nih.gov

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Genomic Analysis of Highly Virulent Isolate of African Swine Fever Virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

African swine fever (ASF) is widespread in Africa but has occasionally been introduced into other continents. In June 2007, ASF was isolated in the Caucasus Region of the Republic of Georgia and subsequently in neighboring countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and 9 states of the Russian Federation). Previous data for sequencing of 3 genes indicated that the Georgia 2007/1 isolate is closely related to isolates of genotype II, which has been identified in Mozambique, Madagascar, and Zambia. We report the complete genomic coding sequence of the Georgia 2007/1 isolate and comparison with other isolates. A genome sequence of 189,344 bp encoding 166 open reading frames (ORFs) was obtained. Phylogeny based on concatenated sequences of 125 conserved ORFs showed that this isolate clustered most closely with the Mkuzi 1979 isolate. Some ORFs clustered differently, suggesting that recombination may have occurred. Results provide a baseline for monitoring genomic changes in this virus. African swine fever (ASF) is a hemorrhagic fever in domestic pigs that causes serious economic losses and high mortality rates. ASF is currently endemic to many countries in sub-Saharan Africa and the island of Sardinia in Europe and was endemic to Spain and Portugal from 1960 until the mid 1990s. It is still endemic to Madagascar since its introduction in 1998. Sporadic ASF outbreaks have occurred in Brazil, the Caribbean region, the Indian Ocean island

David A. G. Chapman; Alistair C. Darby; Melissa Da Silva; Chris Upton; Alan D. Radford; Linda K. Dixon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Neurokinin-1 enables measles virus trans-synaptic spread in neurons  

SciTech Connect

Measles virus (MV), a morbillivirus that remains a significant human pathogen, can infect the central nervous system, resulting in rare but often fatal diseases, such as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Previous work demonstrated that MV was transmitted trans-synaptically and that, while a cellular receptor for the hemagglutinin (H) protein was required for MV entry, it was dispensable for subsequent cell-to-cell spread. Here, we explored what role the other envelope protein, fusion (F), played in trans-synaptic transport. We made the following observations: (1) MV-F expression in infected neurons was similar to that seen in infected fibroblasts; (2) fusion inhibitory peptide (FIP), an inhibitor of MV fusion, prevented both infection and spread in primary neurons; (3) Substance P, a neurotransmitter with the same active site as FIP, also blocked neuronal MV spread; and (4) both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of the Substance P receptor, neurokinin-1 (NK-1), reduced infection of susceptible mice. Together, these data implicate a role for NK-1 in MV CNS infection and spread, perhaps serving as an MV-F receptor or co-receptor on neurons.

Makhortova, Nina R. [Division of Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Askovich, Peter [Division of Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Patterson, Catherine E. [Division of Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Gechman, Lisa A. [Division of Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Gerard, Norma P. [Children's Hospital, Perlmutter Laboratory, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rall, Glenn F. [Division of Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)]. E-mail: glenn.rall@fccc.edu

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage  

SciTech Connect

Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

Polani, Sagi, E-mail: sagi.polani@gmail.co [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Roca, Alfred L., E-mail: roca@illinois.ed [Department of Animal Sciences and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosensteel, Bryan B., E-mail: bryanr1@umbc.ed [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis, E-mail: koloko@amnh.or [Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila, E-mail: bargal@agri.huji.ac.i [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to An Antibody From a Human Survivor  

SciTech Connect

Ebola virus (EBOV) entry requires the surface glycoprotein (GP) to initiate attachment and fusion of viral and host membranes. Here we report the crystal structure of EBOV GP in its trimeric, pre-fusion conformation (GP1+GP2) bound to a neutralizing antibody, KZ52, derived from a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak. Three GP1 viral attachment subunits assemble to form a chalice, cradled by the GP2 fusion subunits, while a novel glycan cap and projected mucin-like domain restrict access to the conserved receptor-binding site sequestered in the chalice bowl. The glycocalyx surrounding GP is likely central to immune evasion and may explain why survivors have insignificant neutralizing antibody titres. KZ52 recognizes a protein epitope at the chalice base where it clamps several regions of the pre-fusion GP2 to the amino terminus of GP1. This structure provides a template for unraveling the mechanism of EBOV GP-mediated fusion and for future immunotherapeutic development.

Lee, J.E.; Fusco, M.L.; Hessell, A.J.; Oswald, W.B.; Burton, D.R.; Saphire, E.O.

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

How ORISE is Making a Difference: H1N1 Media Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H1N1 Media Analysis H1N1 Media Analysis ORISE provides CDC with media analysis and reporting related to H1N1 outbreak The increase in confirmed cases of H1N1 prompted national worry and response from the federal government, which required around-the-clock news monitoring, and the development of tailored response materials to assist in combating the virus and educating the public. As reports of confirmed H1N1 flu cases continued to increase, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) collaborated with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Division of Healthcare Quality and Promotion (DHQP) to prepare communities for an impending public health emergency. H1N1 map This map represents the geographic origin or location of daily news articles related to H1N1 flu. The map is generated out of ORISE's

155

Three Conformational Snapshots of the Hepatitis Virus NS3 Helicase Reveal a Ratchet Translocation Mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A virally encoded superfamily-2 (SF2) helicase (NS3h) is essential for the replication of hepatitis C virus, a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Efforts to elucidate the function of NS3h and to develop inhibitors against it, however, have been hampered by limited understanding of its molecular mechanism. Here we show x-ray crystal structures for a set of NS3h complexes, including ground-state and transition-state ternary complexes captured with ATP mimics (ADP {center_dot} BeF{sub 3} and ADP {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}{sup -}). These structures provide, for the first time, three conformational snapshots demonstrating the molecular basis of action for a SF2 helicase. Upon nucleotide binding, overall domain rotation along with structural transitions in motif V and the bound DNA leads to the release of one base from the substrate base-stacking row and the loss of several interactions between NS3h and the 3{prime} DNA segment. As nucleotide hydrolysis proceeds into the transition state, stretching of a 'spring' helix and another overall conformational change couples rearrangement of the (d)NTPase active site to additional hydrogen-bonding between NS3h and DNA. Together with biochemistry, these results demonstrate a 'ratchet' mechanism involved in the unidirectional translocation and define the step size of NS3h as one base per nucleotide hydrolysis cycle. These findings suggest feasible strategies for developing specific inhibitors to block the action of this attractive, yet largely unexplored drug target.

Gu, M.; Rice, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

You give me fever : practical protection for metropolitan neuroses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of Swine Flu in the past six months has once again heightened the world's fears of a coming flu pandemic. Although H1N1 is only slightly more pathogenic than the common seasonal flu, which kills approximately ...

Case, Keith William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program F 2009 Flu Info Flu.gov Flu.gov Share This Widget HSS Logo The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) Program Background: REACTS program has...

158

Release of the herpes simplex virus 1 protease by self cleavage is required for proper conformation of the portal vertex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We identify an NLS within herpes simplex virus scaffold proteins that is required for optimal nuclear import of these proteins into infected or uninfected nuclei, and is sufficient to mediate nuclear import of GFP. A virus lacking this NLS replicated to titers reduced by 1000-fold, but was able to make capsids containing both scaffold and portal proteins suggesting that other functions can complement the NLS in infected cells. We also show that Vp22a, the major scaffold protein, is sufficient to mediate the incorporation of portal protein into capsids, whereas proper portal immunoreactivity in the capsid requires the larger scaffold protein pU{sub L}26. Finally, capsid angularization in infected cells did not require the HSV-1 protease unless full length pU{sub L}26 was expressed. These data suggest that the HSV-1 portal undergoes conformational changes during capsid maturation, and reveal that full length pU{sub L}26 is required for this conformational change.

Yang, Kui; Wills, Elizabeth G. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Baines, Joel D., E-mail: jdb11@cornell.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

Crystal Structure of Dengue Virus Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and Its Implications for Membrane Fusion  

SciTech Connect

Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the 'pH sensor' that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

Nayak, Vinod; Dessau, Moshe; Kucera, Kaury; Anthony, Karen; Ledizet, Michel; Modis, Yorgo; (Yale); (L2 Diagnostics)

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Intracellular route and biological activity of exogenously delivered Rep proteins from the adeno-associated virus type 2  

SciTech Connect

The two large Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, from the adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) are required for AAV-2 DNA replication, site-specific integration, and for the regulation of viral gene expression. The study of their activities is dependent on the ability to deliver these proteins to the cells in a time and dose-dependent manner. We evaluated the ability of a protein transduction domain (PTD) derived from the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) TAT protein to drive the cellular internalization of exogenously delivered PTD-fused Rep68 proteins. This analysis unexpectedly revealed that recombinant Rep68 alone, in the absence of any PTD, could be endocytosed by the cells. Rep68 as the chimeric TAT-Rep68 proteins were internalized through endocytosis in clathrin-coated vesicles and retained in late endosomes/lysosomes with no detectable nuclear localization. In the presence of adenovirus, the Rep proteins could translocate into the nucleus where they displayed a biological activity. These findings support recent reports on the mechanism of entry of TAT-fused proteins and also revealed a new property of Rep68.

Awedikian, Rafi [Laboratoire de Therapie Genique, INSERM U649, CHU Hotel-Dieu, Batiment Jean Monnet, 30 Bd Jean Monnet, 44035 Nantes Cedex 1 (France); Francois, Achille [Laboratoire de Therapie Genique, INSERM U649, CHU Hotel-Dieu, Batiment Jean Monnet, 30 Bd Jean Monnet, 44035 Nantes Cedex 1 (France); Guilbaud, Mickael [Laboratoire de Therapie Genique, INSERM U649, CHU Hotel-Dieu, Batiment Jean Monnet, 30 Bd Jean Monnet, 44035 Nantes Cedex 1 (France); Etablissement Francais du Sang, Pays de la Loire (France); Moullier, Philippe [Laboratoire de Therapie Genique, INSERM U649, CHU Hotel-Dieu, Batiment Jean Monnet, 30 Bd Jean Monnet, 44035 Nantes Cedex 1 (France); Salvetti, Anna [Laboratoire de Therapie Genique, INSERM U649, CHU Hotel-Dieu, Batiment Jean Monnet, 30 Bd Jean Monnet, 44035 Nantes Cedex 1 (France)]. E-mail: anna.salvetti@univ-nantes.fr

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

The effect of stress on the neuropathogenesis of Theiler's virus-induced demyelination as an animal model of multiple sclerosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stressful life events have been associated with the onset and/or exacerbation of multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate the effects of stress on the pathogenesis of MS, we employed restraint stress (RST) in the Theilerâ??s virus-induced demyelination (TVID) model, an animal model for human MS. Intracerebral inoculation of susceptible strain of mice with Theilerâ??s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in a biphasic disease â?? an acute encephalomyelitis and chronic demyelination. The establishment of persistent viral infection is critical in inducing immune-mediated demyelination during the chronic disease. The exposure of mice to RST prior to viral infection produced a stress response as evidenced by elevated circulating corticosterone (CORT). To further study the effect of stress on the immune response to TMEV infection and demyelination, we first examined the cytokine and chemokine response during the acute TMEV infection. We demonstrated that RST down-regulated the virus-induced expression of chemokines, Ltn, IP-10, RANTES, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF, IFN and LT in both the brain and spleen during early infection. Histologically, a decreased pattern of inflammation was observed in the brain of restrained mice as compared to non-restrained mice. The increased viral titer was noted in the CNS of restrained mice and was correlated with the decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokine, suggesting an impaired immune response by RST. Secondly, the duration of stress on the late demyelination was investigated. Repeated and chronically stressed SJL/J mice developed an early onset of clinical signs and a delayed onset was observed in acutely stressed mice. Both acute and chronic RST suppressed the antibody response to TMEV and stressed displayed a higher incidence of demyelination than non-restrained mice. Axonal loss was also noted in chronic stressed mice. Additionally, RST caused an increased systemic viral infection in extraneural organs during the acute infection and cardiotropic TMEV was isolated from the heart of stressed mice. Taken together, stress resulted in profound immunsuppression during acute infection, which may consequently increase the incidence of demyelination. The present study may be generalized in human MS which is potentially triggered by viral infection.

Mi, Wentao

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluation of a Subunit Vaccine to Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus, July 31, 1988 to September 20, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recombinant DNA vaccine to IHNV was prepared and tested in field trials at Clear Springs Trout Company's Box Canyon Hatchery in Buhl, Idaho this year in Phase III of the project. The vaccine under consideration in these field trials consisted of lysed bacteria that contained a plasmid which expressed an antigenic portion of the IHNV glycoprotein. In addition, laboratory trials with a bacterial expressed viral nucleoprotein indicated that this served as an immune adjuvant. Therefore, a decision was made to conduct these field trials on a vaccine containing both IHNV glycoprotein and IHNV nucleoprotein. Original plans to conduct the field trial at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery were canceled because a management decision was made by Dworshak Fish and Wildlife personnel to rear steelhead salmon eggs from IHNV positive parents at Kooskia National Fish Hatchery. This decision, which was made without prior notification to us, resulted in some discussion at the IHNV committee meeting convened by the Fish and Wildlife Service in Moscow, Idaho on April 27, 1989. At that time, the authors dismay at this decision was voiced and the prediction that an outbreak of IHNV would occur at Kooskia was made. In less than a week, a massive IHNV outbreak did occur at Kooskia and plans to run a field trial at this facility had to be discarded. An alternative site was found at the Box Canyon Hatchery site of Clear Springs Trout Company. Dr. Robert Busch, Director of Research and Development for Clear Springs Trout Company, offered the use of the site. In preparation for the site change they consulted Mary Buckman, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife statistician, and they obtained a sample of the IHN virus present at Box Canyon. The Box Canyon virus isolate was typed by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies by Dr. Sandra Ristow at Washington State University. There was insufficient time to examine the vaccine efficacy with the Box Canyon virus isolate in laboratory trials and they had to prepare for field trials without this supporting data. In addition, they had to make numerous changes in the vaccination schedule and in the design of the challenge to accommodate the new site. Most importantly, an application for a change in site had to be approved by the Idaho State Veterinarian and the Veterinary Biologics Group at the USDA National Office in Hyattsville, Maryland. A new work plan was formulated, approvals were obtained, the demands for statistical analyses were satisfied in the new work plan, and 20,000 rainbow trout fry were vaccinated on July 19, 1989. The following is a summary of the results of the work that was initiated at Box Canyon Hatchery.

Leong, JoAnn Ching

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses which are of two bovine types bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). This document provides details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used. A condensed summary of the development, testing and performance of the multiplexed assay panel was presented in a 126 page separate document, entitled 'Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out'. This supplemental document provides additional details of large amount of data collected for signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used for all steps in the assay development and utilization processes. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, VSV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must preceed efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available.

Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

Please cite this article in press as: White III, R.A., et al., Digital PCR provides absolute quantitation of viral load for an occult RNA virus. J. Virol. Methods (2011), doi:10.1016/j.jviromet.2011.09.017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quantitation of viral load for an occult RNA virus. J. Virol. Methods (2011), doi:10.1016/j.jviromet.2011.elsevier.com/locate/jviromet Digital PCR provides absolute quantitation of viral load for an occult RNA virus1 Richard Allen White IIIa-C14 LNA probes15 Microfluidics16 Occult virus17 In vitro transcription18 CV/SEM19 a b s t r a c

Quake, Stephen R.

165

Joint Environmental Assessment of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Tope Virus Control Program for the Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT JOINT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 2002-2006 OF THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE CURLY TOP VIRUS CONTROL PROGRAM FOR BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT AND DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/EA-# 1363 April, 2002 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. I. INTRODUCTION 9 A. Purpose and Need......................................................... 10 B. Background................................................................... 10-11 II. PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES Alternative 1 - Proposed Action........................................... 12 General Program.................................................... 12-15 Program Specifics.................................................. 15-18 Public Health and Environmental Considerations:

166

NRP/Optineurin Cooperates with TAX1BP1 to Potentiate the Activation of NF-kB by Human T-Lymphotropic Virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NRP/Optineurin Cooperates with TAX1BP1 to Potentiate the Activation of NF-kB by Human T Nuclear factor (NF)-kB is a major survival pathway engaged by the Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein. Tax1 activation of NF-kB occurs predominantly in the cytoplasm, where Tax1 binds NF-kB

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

An in-depth analysis of the biological functional studies based on the NMR M2 channel structure of influenza A virus  

SciTech Connect

The long-sought three-dimensional structure of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus was successfully determined recently by the high-resolution NMR [J.R. Schnell, J.J. Chou, Structure and mechanism of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus, Nature 451 (2008) 591-595]. Such a milestone work has provided a solid structural basis for studying drug-resistance problems. However, the action mechanism revealed from the NMR structure is completely different from the traditional view and hence prone to be misinterpreted as 'conflicting' with some previous biological functional studies. To clarify this kind of confusion, an in-depth analysis was performed for these functional studies, particularly for the mutations D44N, D44A and N44D on position 44, and the mutations on positions 27-38. The analyzed results have provided not only compelling evidences to further validate the NMR structure but also very useful clues for dealing with the drug-resistance problems and developing new effective drugs against H5N1 avian influenza virus, an impending threat to human beings.

Huang Ribo [Guangxi Academy of Sciences, 98 Daling Road, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Du Qishi [College of Life Science and Technique, Guangxi University, 100 University Road, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); College of Chemistry and Life Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin, 300074 (China); Gordon Life Science Institute, San Diego, CA 92130 (United States)], E-mail: qishi_du@yahoo.com.cn; Wang Chenghua [College of Chemistry and Life Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin, 300074 (China); Chou, K.-C. [Gordon Life Science Institute, San Diego, CA 92130 (United States)

2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Design and evaluation of antiretroviral peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat region (C-HR) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41  

SciTech Connect

Two {alpha}-helical heptad repeats, N-HR and C-HR, located in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp41, play an important role in membrane fusion by forming a 6-helix bundle. C34, a peptide mimicking C-HR, inhibits the formation of the 6-helix bundle; thus, it has potential as a novel antiretroviral compound. In order to improve the inhibitory effect of C34 on HIV-1 replication, we designed new C34-derived peptides based on computational analysis of the stable conformation of the 6-helix bundle. Newly designed peptides showed a stronger inhibitory effect on the replication of recombinant viruses containing CRF01{sub A}E, subtype B or subtype C Env than C34 or a fusion inhibitor, T-20. In addition, these peptides inhibited the replication of a T-20-resistant virus. We propose that these peptides could be applied to develop novel antiretroviral compounds to inhibit the replication of various subtypes of HIV-1 as well as of T-20-resistant variants.

Soonthornsata, Bongkot [Thailand-Japan Research Collaboration Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Infections (RCC-ERI), Nonthaburi (Thailand); Tian, Yu-Shi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Utachee, Piraporn; Sapsutthipas, Sompong [Thailand-Japan Research Collaboration Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Infections (RCC-ERI), Nonthaburi (Thailand); Isarangkura-na-ayuthaya, Panasda; Auwanit, Wattana [National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Takagi, Tatsuya [Thailand-Japan Research Collaboration Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Infections (RCC-ERI), Nonthaburi (Thailand); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Ikuta, Kazuyoshi [Thailand-Japan Research Collaboration Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Infections (RCC-ERI), Nonthaburi (Thailand); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Sawanpanyalert, Pathom [National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Kawashita, Norihito [Thailand-Japan Research Collaboration Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Infections (RCC-ERI), Nonthaburi (Thailand); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Kameoka, Masanori, E-mail: mkameoka@biken.osaka-u.ac.j [Thailand-Japan Research Collaboration Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Infections (RCC-ERI), Nonthaburi (Thailand); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Liquid asset www.epsrc.ac.uk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, sep- aration of carbon dioxide from flu gas and biogas, vital to addressing energy and environmental

Zharkova, Valentina V.

170

Flow cytometric and radioisotopic determinations of platelet survival time in normal cats and feline leukemia virus-infected cats  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of a flow cytometric technique to measure platelet survival time in cats utilizing autologous platelets labeled in vitro with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). When compared with a 51Cr method, no significant differences in estimated survival times were found. Both the 51Cr and FITC-labeling procedures induced similar changes in platelet shape and collagen-induced aggregation. Platelets labeled with FITC had significantly greater volumes compared with those of glutaraldehyde-fixed platelets. These changes were primarily related to the platelet centrifugation and washing procedures rather than the labels themselves. This novel technique potentially has wide applicability to cell circulation time studies as flow cytometry equipment becomes more readily available. Problems with the technique are discussed. In a preliminary study of the platelet survival time in feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-infected cats, two of three cats had significantly reduced survival times using both flow cytometric and radioisotopic methods. These data suggest increased platelet turnover in FeLV-infected cats.

Jacobs, R.M.; Boyce, J.T.; Kociba, G.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Structural studies of the SARS virus Nsp15 endonuclease and the human innate immunity receptor TLR3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional (3D) structural determination of biological macromolecules is not only critical to understanding their mechanisms, but also has practical applications. Combining the high resolution imaging of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and efficient computer processing, protein structures in solution or in two-dimensional (2D) crystals can be determined. The lipid monolayer technique uses the high affinity binding of 6His-tagged proteins to a Ni-nitrilotriacetic (NTA) lipid to create high local protein concentrations, which facilitates 2D crystal formation. In this study, several proteins have been crystallized using this technique, including the SARS virus Nsp15 endonuclease and the human Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 extracellular domain (ECD). Single particle analysis can determine protein structures in solution without the need for crystals. 3D structures of several protein complexes had been solved by the single particle method, including IniA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Nsp15 and TLR3 ECD. Determining the structures of these proteins is an important step toward understanding pathogenic microbes and our immune system.

Sun, Jingchuan

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

arXiv:1009.4058v1[physics.flu-dyn]21Sep2010 Admixture and Drift in Oscillating Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ and displacement amplitude ; (ii) we propose the inspection procedure that allows to find the natural functional), Schlichting (1979), Lighthill (1978a), Andrews & McIntyre (1978), Craik (1982), Grimshaw (1984), Craik (1985

173

Joint Environmental Assessment of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Tope Virus Control Program for the Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy, Finding of No Significant Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Curly Top Virus Control Program in California Curly Top Virus Control Program in California AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY The DOE, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a 5-year period from 2002 through 2006. It is expected that approximately 2,000 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year.

174

Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 inhibits transcription of IRF3 and IRF7 and suppresses induction of interferon-{beta}  

SciTech Connect

Activation of interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) 3 and 7 is essential for the induction of Type I interferons (IFN) and innate antiviral responses, and herpesviruses have evolved mechanisms to evade such responses. We previously reported that Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, an immediate-early (IE) protein, inhibits the function of IRF7, but the role of BRLF1, the other IE transactivator, in IRF regulation has not been examined. We now show that BRLF1 expression decreased induction of IFN-{beta}, and reduced expression of IRF3 and IRF7; effects were dependent on N- and C-terminal regions of BRLF1 and its nuclear localization signal. Endogenous IRF3 and IRF7 RNA and protein levels were also decreased during cytolytic EBV infection. Finally, production of IFN-{beta} was decreased during lytic EBV infection and was associated with increased susceptibility to superinfection with Sendai virus. These data suggest a new role for BRLF1 with the ability to evade host innate immune responses.

Bentz, Gretchen L.; Liu Renshui [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Hahn, Angela M.; Shackelford, Julia [Department of Cellular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Pagano, Joseph S., E-mail: joseph_pagano@med.unc.ed [Department of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Joint environmental assessment 1997--2001 of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program for Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE, Naval Petroleum reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a five year period from 1997 through 2001. It is expected that approximately 330 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1) and approximately 9,603 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in a Joint Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1011) with the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acting as lead agency, in consultation with the CDFA, and the DOE acting as a cooperating agency. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the conduct of the Curly Top Virus Control Program in California is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is consequently issuing a FONSI.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient  

SciTech Connect

Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China)] [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China)] [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China)] [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China)] [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China)] [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China)] [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China)] [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China)] [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China) [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Evolving Virus Threat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The message subject might say try this cool game, it's fun! 3 ... Furthermore, the availablility of powerful PCs in virtually every household has lowered ...

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

Negative regulatory element associated with potentially functional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats of endogenous murine leukemia virus-related proviral sequences  

SciTech Connect

Three series of recombinant DNA clones were constructed, with the bacterial chloramphenical acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a quantitative indicator, to examine the activities of promoter and enhancer sequence elements in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences isolated from the mouse genome. Transient CAT expression was determined in mouse NIH 3T3, human HT1080, and mink CCL64 cultured cells transfected with the LTR-CAT constructs. The 700-base pair (bp) LTRs of three polytropic MuLV-related proviral clones and the 750-bp LTRs of four modified polytropic proviral clones, in complete structures either with or without the adjacent downstream sequences, all showed very little or negligible activities for CAT expression, while ecotropic MuLV LTRs were highly active. The MuLV-related LTRs were divided into three portions and examined separately. The 3' portion of the MuLV-related LTRs that contains the CCAAC and TATAA boxes was found to be a functional promoter, being about one-half to one-third as active as the corresponding portion of the ecotropic MuLV LTRs. A MboI-Bg/II fragment, representing the distinct 190- to 200-pb inserted segment in the middle, was found to be a potential enhancer, especially when examined in combination with the simian virus 40 promoter in CCL64 cells. A PstI-MboI fragment of the 5' portion, which contains the protein-binding motifs on the enhancer segment as well as the upstream LTF sequences, showed moderate enhancer activities in CCL6 cells but was virtually inactive in NIH 3T3 cells and HT1080 cells; addition of this fragment to the ecotropic LTR-CAT constructs depressed CAT expression.

Ch' ang, L.Y.; Yang, W.K.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Mapping regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B (gB) important for fusion function with gH/gL  

SciTech Connect

Glycoproteins gB and gH/gL are required for entry of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into cells, but the role of each glycoprotein and how they function together to mediate fusion is unclear. Analysis of the functional homology of gB from the closely related primate gammaherpesvirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus (Rh-LCV), showed that EBV gB could not complement Rh gB due to a species-specific dependence between gB and gL. To map domains of gB required for this interaction, we constructed a panel of EBV/Rh gB chimeric proteins. Analysis showed that insertion of Rh gB from residues 456 to 807 restored fusion function of EBV gB with Rh gH/gL, suggesting this region of gB is important for interaction with gH/gL. Split YFP bimolecular complementation (BiFC) provided evidence of an interaction between EBV gB and gH/gL. Together, our results suggest the importance of a gB-gH/gL interaction in EBV-mediated fusion with B cells requiring the region of EBV gB from 456 to 807.

Plate, Aileen E.; Reimer, Jessica J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago IL 60611 (United States); Jardetzky, Theodore S. [Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Longnecker, Richard, E-mail: r-longnecker@northwestern.ed [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago IL 60611 (United States)

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

180

Detection of immunoreactive epitopes in proteins encoded by gag, env, and pol genes of human T-lymphotropic virus type I using synthetic peptides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivity of 26 synthetic peptides that comprise 12 to 26 amino acid residues corresponding to segments of the p19 (gag), gp46 (env), and pol proteins (pol) of human T-lymphotropic virus type I toward 31 positive sera was studied using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Specific reactivity with high titers of antibodies (presented in reciprocal dilution values) was detected for the synthetic peptides corresponding to fragments 110-130 and 100-130 (titers up to 4050) of p19, 174-197 (up to 800), 186-201 (up to to 4050), 191-215 (up to 1350), 242-257 (up to 800), and 272-292 (up to 450) of gp46. Immunoreactivity of seven peptides, fragments of pol-proteins, was weak. New linear epitopes in the regions 145-158, 272-277, and 292-300 of gp46 were detected. In addition, location of the known linear epitopes in p19 and gp46 was refined on the basis of comparative study of overlapping peptides from these proteins. 25 refs., 4 tabs.

Yaroslavtseva, N.G.; Kornilaeva, G.V.; Pashkova, T.A. [Ivanovskii Inst. of Virology, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein interacts with ATM, impairs DNA repair and enhances sensitivity to ionizing radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinomas and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas. Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of HCV possesses serine protease, nucleoside triphosphatase, and helicase activities, while NS4A functions as a cofactor for the NS3 serine protease. Here, we show that HCV NS3/4A interacts with the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated), a cellular protein essential for cellular response to irradiation. The expression of NS3/4A caused cytoplasmic translocation of either endogenous or exogenous ATM and delayed dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated ATM and {gamma}-H2AX following ionizing irradiation. As a result, the irradiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX foci persisted longer in the NS3/4A-expressing cells. Furthermore, these cells showed increased comet tail moment in single-cell electrophoresis assay, indicating increased double-strand DNA breaks. The cells harboring an HCV replicon also exhibited cytoplasmic localization of ATM and increased sensitivity to irradiation. These results demonstrate that NS3/4A impairs the efficiency of DNA repair by interacting with ATM and renders the cells more sensitive to DNA damage. This effect may contribute to HCV oncogenesis.

Lai, Chao-Kuen; Jeng, King-Song [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115, Taiwan (China); Machida, Keigo [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, 2001 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Cheng, Yi-Sheng [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Michael M.C. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, 2001 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)], E-mail: michlai@gate.sinica.edu.tw

2008-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mutational analysis of three predicted 5'-proximal stem-loop structures in the genome of tick-borne encephalitis virus indicates different roles in RNA replication and translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flavivirus gene expression is modulated by RNA secondary structure elements at the terminal ends of the viral RNA molecule. For tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), four stem-loop (SL) elements have been predicted in the first 180 nucleotides of the viral genome: 5'-SL1, 5'-SL2, 5'-SL3 and 5'-SL4. The last three of these appear to be unique to tick-borne flaviviruses. Here, we report their characterization by mutagenesis in a TBEV luciferase reporter system. By manipulating their thermodynamic properties, we found that an optimal stability of the 5'-SL2 is required for efficient RNA replication. 5'-SL3 formation is also important for viral RNA replication, but although it contains the viral start codon, its formation is dispensable for RNA translation. 5'-SL4 appears to facilitate both RNA translation and replication. Our data suggest that maintenance of the balanced thermodynamic stability of these SL elements is important for temporal regulation of its different functions.

Rouha, Harald; Hoenninger, Verena M.; Thurner, Caroline; Mandl, Christian W., E-mail: christian.mandl@meduniwien.ac.at

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter  

SciTech Connect

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

Wang, Feng-Wei [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wu, Xian-Rui [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)] [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Sheng [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)] [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Shi-Juan, E-mail: maishj@sysucc.org.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Dan, E-mail: xied@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Structure and Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Stalk Domain Reveals a Four-Helix Bundle and the Role of the Stalk in Fusion Promotion  

SciTech Connect

Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 {angstrom}, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D.; Kors, Christopher A.; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A. (NWU); (Stanford-MED)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Host cell killing by the West Nile Virus NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex: NS3 alone is sufficient to recruit caspase-8-based apoptotic pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The West Nile Virus (WNV) non-structural proteins 2B and 3 (NS2B-NS3) constitute the proteolytic complex that mediates the cleavage and processing of the viral polyprotein. NS3 recruits NS2B and NS5 proteins to direct protease and replication activities. In an effort to investigate the biology of the viral protease, we cloned cDNA encoding the NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex from brain tissue of a WNV-infected dead crow, collected from the Lower Merion area (Merion strain). Expression of the NS2B-NS3 gene cassette induced apoptosis within 48 h of transfection. Electron microscopic analysis of NS2B-NS3-transfected cells revealed ultra-structural changes that are typical of apoptotic cells including membrane blebbing, nuclear disintegration and cytoplasmic vacuolations. The role of NS3 or NS2B in contributing to host cell apoptosis was examined. NS3 alone triggers the apoptotic pathways involving caspases-8 and -3. Experimental results from the use of caspase-specific inhibitors and caspase-8 siRNA demonstrated that the activation of caspase-8 was essential to initiate apoptotic signaling in NS3-expressing cells. Downstream of caspase-3 activation, we observed nuclear membrane ruptures and cleavage of the DNA-repair enzyme, PARP in NS3-expressing cells. Nuclear herniations due to NS3 expression were absent in the cells treated with a caspase-3 inhibitor. Expression of protease and helicase domains themselves was sufficient to trigger apoptosis generating insight into the apoptotic pathways triggered by NS3 from WNV.

Ramanathan, Mathura P. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Chambers, Jerome A. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pankhong, Panyupa [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Chattergoon, Michael [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Attatippaholkun, Watcharee [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Dang, Kesen [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Shah, Neelima [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Weiner, David B. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: dbweiner@mail.med.upenn.edu

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

A human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, as a eucaryotic vector: Transient expression and encapsidation of the procaryotic gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase  

SciTech Connect

The authors have used the defective human parvovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a novel eurocaryotic vector (parvector) for the expression of a foreign gene in human cells. The recombinant, pAV2, contains the AAV genome in a pBR322-derived bacterial plasmid. When pAV2 is transfected into human cells together with helper adenovirus particles, the AAV genome is rescued from the recombinant plasmid and replicated to produce infectious AAV particles at high efficiency. To create a vector, we inserted a procaryotic sequence coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) into derivatives of pAV2 following either of the AAV promoters p/sub 40/ (pAVHiCAT) and p/sub 19/ (pAVBcCAT). When transfected into human 293 cells or HeLa cells, pAVHiCAT expressed CAT activity in the absence of adenovirus. In the presence of adenovirus, this vector produced increased amounts of CAT activity and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was replicated. In 293 cells, pAVBcCAT expressed a similar amount of CAT activity in the absence or presence of adenovirus and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was not replicated. In HeLa cells, pAVBcCAT expressed low levels of CAT activity, but this level was elevated by coinfection with adenovirus particles or by cotransfection with a plasmid which expressed the adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) product. The E1A product is a transcriptional activator and is expressed in 293 cells. Thus, expression from two AAV promoters is differentially regulated: expression from p/sub 19/ is increased by E1A, whereas p/sub 40/ yields high levels of constitutive expression in the absence of E1A. Both AAV vectors were packaged into AAV particles by complementation with wild-type AAV and yielded CAT activity when subsequently infected into cells in the presence of adenovirus.

Tratschin, J.D.; West, M.H.P.; Sandbank, T.; Carter, B.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fermilab Today - Safety Tip of the Week Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 December 20, 2004 Winter Sun Winter Sun December 13, 2004 Winter Slips Safety Tip December 6, 2004 Winter Cornering Winter Driving' November 29, 2004 SAFER attentiveness November 22, 2004 Until the EMTs Arrive Fermilab fire department November 15, 2004 Is Your Surface Flat? sidewalk November 8, 2004 Heat Gun Shock Heat Gun November 1, 2004 Safety Belts Safety Tip October 25, 2004 Carbon Monoxide Safety Tip October 18, 2004 What Could Go Wrong? Safety Tip October 11, 2004 Flu Prevention Safety Tip October 4, 2004 Smoke Detectors Safety Tip September 27, 2004 ES&H Section Web site Safety Tip September 20, 2004 West Nile Virus Update Safety Tip September 13, 2004 Fire Safety Violations Fire Safety August 30, 2004 3131 Safety Tip August 23, 2004 Move It Safety Tip August 16, 2004 Work Planning

188

Plants' Rapid Response System Revealed | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rewriting the Organofluorine Playbook Rewriting the Organofluorine Playbook Computer-Designed Proteins to Disarm a Variety of Flu Viruses Driving Membrane Curvature Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Plants' Rapid Response System Revealed JULY 6, 2012 Bookmark and Share Images of several related proteins made at synchrotrons in the U.S. and France have allowed scientists at Washington University in St. Louis and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Grenoble, France, to solve the structure of a key piece of the biochemical machinery that allows plants to control the concentrations of circulating hormones. WUSTL graduate student

189

Breaking Records in Neurological Microradiology | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exposing Valence-Bond Model Inadequacies Exposing Valence-Bond Model Inadequacies Plants' Rapid Response System Revealed Rewriting the Organofluorine Playbook Computer-Designed Proteins to Disarm a Variety of Flu Viruses Driving Membrane Curvature Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Breaking Records in Neurological Microradiology AUGUST 9, 2012 Bookmark and Share A dense neuron cluster including details of cells in deeper tissue layers. As neuroscientists probe ever deeper into the mysteries of the brain and nervous system, they need ever sharper vision. A group of researchers has developed some exciting new techniques for imaging neuronal and synaptic networks using the hard synchrotron x-rays

190

Iowa State University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Beardshear Hall Beardshear Hall Research Research & Economic Development Research Units ISU Technology Search Students & Research at ISU DOE ARPA-E Biofuel Project DOE Office of Science Funding ISU & Ames Lab Tech Marketing Summaries ISU research in Energy Citations Database ISU research in E-print Network Ames Laboratory is a DOE National Laboratory operated under contract by Iowa State University Physicist developing, improving designer optical materials Chemists discover proton mechanism used by flu virus to infect cells ISU, Ames Lab's Bryden & McCorkle win 2010 R&D 100 Award New tool for cell research may help unravel secrets of disease Search this site: Search ISU's vision is to lead the world in advancing the land-grant ideas of putting science, technology, and human creativity to work.

191

The Molecular Mechanics of Hearing and Deafness | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cementing the Structure of CSHs Cementing the Structure of CSHs Self- and X-ray-Induced Crystallization of Supramolecular Filaments An Anti-Cancer Drug that Stunts Tumor Growth Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure The Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed The Molecular Mechanics of Hearing and Deafness APRIL 23, 2010 Bookmark and Share Cadherin-23 stretching simulations. A close-up view of the linker region between cadherin-23 repeats 1 and 2 is shown during a molecular dynamics simulation in which the protein is stretched from both ends. The simulations mimic in vivo conditions in which tip-link cadherins are

192

Why Sequence Uncultivated Marine Viruses?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or bioremediation. Principal Investigator: Grieg F. Steward (Univ. of Hawaii) Program: CSP 2009 Home > Sequencing > UC logo DOE logo Contact Us Credits Disclaimer Access...

193

An association, in adult Japanese, between the occurrence of rogue cells among cultured lymphocytes (JC virus activity) and the frequency of simple chromosomal damage among the lymphocytes of persons exhibiting these rogue cells  

SciTech Connect

Data from a previous study of the cytogenetic effects, in cultured lymphocytes, of exposure to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima have been reanalyzed to determine the relationship between the occurrence of rogue cells in an individual and the frequency of simple chromosomal damage in the nonrogue cells of the same individual. Rogue cells are cells with complex chromosomal damage, currently believed to be a manifestation of the activity of a human polyoma virus termed JC. Among a total of 1,835 persons examined, there were 45 exhibiting rogue cells. A total of 179,599 cells were scored for simple chromosomal damage. In both the exposed and the control populations, there was an absolute increase of {approximately}1.5% in the frequency of simple chromosomal damage in the nonrogue cells of those exhibiting rogue cells, when compared with the frequencies observed in those not exhibiting rogue cells, which is a statistically significant difference. It is argued that this phenomenon, occurring not only in lymphocytes but possibly also in other cells/tissues, may play a contributory role in the origin of malignancies characterized by clonal chromosome abnormalities. Unexpectedly, among those exhibiting rogue cells, there was a disproportionately greater representation of persons who had received relatively high radiation exposures from the bomb. The reason for this is unclear, but it is tempting to relate the finding to some lingering effect of the exposure (or the circumstances surrounding the exposure) on immunocompetence.

Neel, J.V. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Human Genetics] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Human Genetics

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

HIV-1 Gag p17 presented as virus-like particles on the E2 scaffold from Geobacillus stearothermophilus induces sustained humoral and cellular immune responses in the absence of IFN{gamma} production by CD4+ T cells  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed stable virus-like particles displaying the HIV-1 Gag(p17) protein as an N-terminal fusion with an engineered protein domain from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E2. Mice immunized with the Gag(p17)-E2 60-mer scaffold particles mounted a strong and sustained antibody response. Antibodies directed to Gag(p17) were boosted significantly with additional immunizations, while anti-E2 responses reached a plateau. The isotype of the induced antibodies was biased towards IgG1, and the E2-primed CD4+ T cells did not secrete IFN{gamma}. Using transgenic mouse model systems, we demonstrated that CD8+ T cells primed with E2 particles were able to exert lytic activity and produce IFN{gamma}. These results show that the E2 scaffold represents a powerful vaccine delivery system for whole antigenic proteins or polyepitope engineered proteins, evoking antibody production and antigen specific CTL activity even in the absence of IFN{gamma}-producing CD4+ T cells.

Caivano, Antonella [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, C.N.R., via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Doria-Rose, Nicole A. [Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 307 Westlake Av, Seattle, WA 98109-5240 (United States); Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98124-6108 (United States); Buelow, Benjamin [Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 307 Westlake Av, Seattle, WA 98109-5240 (United States); Dept. of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98124-6108 (United States); Sartorius, Rossella; Trovato, Maria; D' Apice, Luciana [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, C.N.R., via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Sutton, William F. [Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 307 Westlake Av, Seattle, WA 98109-5240 (United States); Haigwood, Nancy L. [Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 307 Westlake Av, Seattle, WA 98109-5240 (United States); Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98124-6108 (United States); Dept. of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98124-6108 (United States); De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe, E-mail: p.deberardinis@ibp.cnr.i [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, C.N.R., via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy)

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIsotopicAnalysis-Flu...

196

Shoreland, Inc. All rights reserved. International Travel Medical Questionnaire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, varicella, MMRV, yellow fever, FluMist, HPV, Zostavax, BCG, JE, doxycycline and other antibiotics. For other stomach conditions? oral typhoid, mefloquine, doxycycline, Malarone, chloroquine, rotavirus #12;(con

Tullos, Desiree

197

2010 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

10 10 News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Featured Articles 2010 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page A line of windmills in the sunset 12.27.10From the Labs Outsmarting the Wind External link Using existing technology in a new way could help the Office of Science's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists predict when and how much the wind will blow to maximize the efficiency of wind turbines. Read More » Wild turkies 11.24.10DOE Blog Saluting a Great American Scientist-Founder This Thanksgiving This week, we can be especially thankful for an electrifying

198

NREL: Technology Transfer - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 October 25, 2012 NREL's Industry Growth Forum The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 25th Industry Growth Forum this week attracted nearly 400 investors, entrepreneurs, scientists and policymakers to Denver. December 28, 2012 Award-Winning PV Cell Pushes Efficiency Higher NREL and Solar Junction outsmart the solar spectrum and set a world record with a 44%-efficient solar cell. December 20, 2012 Concentrated Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage Can Help Utilities' Bottom Line, Study Shows The storage capacity of concentrating solar power (CSP) can add significant value to a utility company's optimal mix of energy sources, a new report by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) suggests.

199

Virus-based Piezoelectric Energy Generation  

electrical energy. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, they characterized the structure-dependent piezoelectric properties of the phage at the ...

200

Modelling the evolution of the influenza virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jones Colin Russell Nicola Lewis (& AHT) Dan Horton (& VLA) Ana Mosterin Eugene Skepner Yan Wong (& Leeds) Margaret Mackinnon (& KEMRI) David Wales (Chemistry) Chris Whittleston (Chemistry) Birgit Strodel (Chemistry...

Burke, David

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Why sequence viruses that infect freshwater cyanobacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production since their area yields exceed those of conventional crops by at least an order of magnitude. Additionally, many countries employ colony-forming freshwater...

202

Light Rail System Safety Improvements Using ITS Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the flu side of the street onto the light rail track i thewhere a multi-lane street crosses the light rail tracks. Theran" the red light on the cross street, and started to enter

Chira-chavala, Ted; Coifman, Ben; Empey, Dan; Hansen, Mark; Lechner, Ed; Porter, Chris

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dont Let the HumBUG Get Achoo - Tips for a healthy winter at work and home  

SciTech Connect

Safety-related article for recurrinig column in the Tri-City Area Journal of Business. Focuses on seasonal wellness tips for employers and employees - namely, cold and flu prevention through personal hygiene.

Schlender, Michael H.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Visual Memes in Social Media Tracking real-world news on YouTube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

80 100 0 100 200 300 400 500 Swine Flu Earthquake Iran Pakistan text processing ... query definiGon pakistan military pakistan india tension pakistan taliban pakistan bhuEo pakistan ppp pakistan terrorist #12;7 Who

Xie, Lexing

205

A pandemic influenza simulation model for preparedness planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pandemic influenza continues to be a national and international public health concern that has received significant attention recently with the recent swine flu outbreak worldwide. Many countries have developed and updated their preparedness plans for ...

Ozgur M. Araz; John W. Fowler; Tim W. Lant; Megan Jehn

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of avian influenza, or bird flu. You go to the advanced search page and enter your search terms. Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile320x340 Icon64x64 Reply (If you're a human,...

207

Slide13 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

an advanced search on the topic of avian influenza, or bird flu. You go to the advanced search page and enter your search terms. Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile320x340 Icon64x64...

208

Human host factors required for influenza virus replication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Donna M. Tscherne4 , Mila B. Ortigoza4 , Yuhong Liang4 , Qinshan Gao4 , Shane E. Andrews3 , Sourav

209

Integrative viral molecular epidemiology: hepatitis C virus modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional molecular epidemiology of viral infections is based onidentifying genetic markers to assist in epidemiological investigation. The limitationsof early molecular technologies led to preponderance of analyticalmethodology focused on the viral ...

James Lara; Zoya Dimitrova; Yuri Khudyakov

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

VirusMeter: Preventing Your Cellphone , Guanhua Yan2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

answer key event, but cannot happen more than 25 seconds before the answer key event, because ringing event. If the user decides to answer the call by pressing the answer key, the answer key event is generated, which makes the state machine move to the Answer state if the answer key event happens half

Chen, Songqing

211

Human Immunodeficiency Virus gag and protease: partners in resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:31233129.26. Turner SR, Strohbach JW, Tommasi RA, Aristoff PA, Johnson PD, Skulnick HI, Dolak LA, Seest EP, Tomich PK, Bohanon MJ, Horng MM, Lynn JC, Chong KT, Hinshaw RR, Watenpaugh KD, Janakiraman MN, Thaisrivongs S: Tipranavir (PNU-140690): a potent, orally... bioavailable nonpeptidic HIV protease inhibitor of the 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone sulfonamide class. J Med Chem 1998, 41:34673476. 27. Koh Y, Matsumi S, Das D, Amano M, Davis DA, Li J, Leschenko S, Baldridge A, Shioda T, Yarchoan R, Ghosh AK, Mitsuya H...

Fun, Axel; Wensing, Annemarie MJ; Verheyen, Jens; Nijhuis, Monique

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Disarming Deadly South American Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses | Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nose, eyes, and other orifices. Most outbreaks occur in rural regions of Bolivia, Venezuela, Argentina, and Brazil. "The outbreaks of New World hemorrhagic fever tend to be...

213

Association between virus, bladder cancers detected using Lawrence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with scientists from the University of Split in Croatia, LLNL and the University of Jordan in Amman is believed to be the first study to demonstrate an association between...

214

general interest 1 "Talk about doing more with less. Viruses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considerably disappointed him, I imagine, I found my road to Damascus in his article Sur les équations catastrophes, which are the only local accidents that can affect a family of potentials depending on at most

215

Hepatitis C- and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Induced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

gonococcemia), and Lyme disease. Many medications can cause hypersensitivity vasculitis. The penicillins, cephalo- sporins, sulfonamides (

216

T-lymphocyte senescence and hepatitis C virus infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cells ......................................................................... 61 Cell cycle arrest ........................................................................................................... 62 Ageing and the immune system... Severe combined immune deficiency SD Standard deviation SNP Single nucleotide polymorphism SOCS Suppressor of cytokine signalling Stat Signal transducer and activators of transcription SVR Sustained virological response TGF Transforming growth...

Hoare, Matthew

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ecology, diversity and comparative genomics of oceanic cyanobacterial viruses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The marine cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are numerically dominant primary producers in the oceans. Each genera consists of multiple physiologically and genetically distinct groups (termed "ecotypes" in ...

Sullivan, Matthew Brian, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Thermodynamics of nano-spheres encapsulated in virus capsids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermodynamics of complexation of functionalized charged nano-spheres with viral proteins. The physics of this problem is governed by electrostatic interaction between the proteins and the nano-sphere cores (screened by salt ions), but also by configurational degrees of freedom of the charged protein N-tails. We approach the problem by constructing an appropriate complexation free energy functional. On the basis of both numerical and analytical studies of this functional we construct the phase diagram for the assembly which contains the information on the assembled structures that appear in the thermodynamical equilibrium, depending on the size and surface charge density of the nano-sphere cores. We show that both the nano-sphere core charge as well as its radius determine the size of the capsid that forms around the core.

Antonio Siber; Roya Zandi; Rudolf Podgornik

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Isolation of Frog Virus 3 from Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shift Thomas B. Waltzek, Debra L. Miller, Bruce Drecktrah, Jeff T. Briggler, Beth MacConnell, Crystal #12;· Pallid Sturgeon Conservation within the Missouri River Basin ­ History of the decline · Significance & Future Directions Topics Covered #12;Decline of Pallid Sturgeon within the Missouri River Basin

Gray, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

differential equations on the computer; this is done for computational speed, because an agent-based component is much more demanding. Once a person is infected, heshe becomes an...

222

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Giant Virus, Tiny Protein...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A big payoff from tiny crystals The protein structure experiments were led by Chapman and Arizona State's John Spence and Petra Fromme. They chose as their target Photosystem I, a...

223

Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

Korber, Bette T. (Los Alamos, NM); Perkins, Simon (Los Alamos, NM); Bhattacharya, Tanmoy (Los Alamos, NM); Fischer, William M. (Los Alamos, NM); Theiler, James (Los Alamos, NM); Letvin, Norman (Boston, MA); Haynes, Barton F. (Durham, NC); Hahn, Beatrice H. (Birmingham, AL); Yusim, Karina (Los Alamos, NM); Kuiken, Carla (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

PCR detection of pathogenic viruses in southern California urban rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10.1111/j.1365-2672.2004.02269.x PCR detection of pathogenicdetected using nested- and RT-PCR from 11 rivers and creeks.by reverse transcrip- tase PCR and of microbial indicators

Jiang, Sunny C; Chu, W

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ew LLNL detection technology identifies bacteria, viruses, other...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Journal of Virology U.S. Food and Drug Administration Social Media Logos Follow LLNL on YouTube Subscribe to LLNL's RSS feed Follow LLNL on Facebook Follow LLNL on Twitter...

226

Incident Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virus Pages Sophos Virus Info Page Symantec Trend Micro Virus Encyclopedia Virus Bulletin Home Page Cyber Security Sites AUSCERT FIRST NSA (National Security Agency) NVD (National...

227

Alternative A(H1N1) suspects management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the differential diagnostics process behind the verdict of AH1N1 infection or not for the swine flu suspects. The application was designed as a support for doctors was built with ASP.NET 3.5 technology, the broad spectrum development ... Keywords: A(H1N1), application, charts, diagnostic, management

Dan Adrian Marior; Radu Zglimbea; Constantin Crciumaru

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

for all Student Housing residents IN A COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that research suggests will be most common during the flu season. Vaccination is especially important for people and dressers off the street; steer clear of yard sales or flea markets; never buy used bedding. · If you dry, opening windows and running fans to ventilate areas, letting as much natural light as possible

Hammock, Bruce D.

229

NEUTRINORIPPLES SPOTTEDINSPACE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

farmers were using the drugs. The FAO's avian-flu surveillance network coordinator in China, Fusheng Guo to one of the most effective antiviral drugs against it -- and it seems that Chinese farmers' use. But at some point after 1997 the H5N1 strain became resistant to the amantadine family of anti- viral drugs

Cai, Long

230

WISDOM-II: a large in silico docking effort for finding novel hits against malaria using computational grid infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After having deployed a first data challenge on malaria and a second one on avian flu, respectively in summer 2005 and spring 2006, we are demonstrating here again how efficiently the computational grids can be used to produce massive docking data at ... Keywords: EGEE grid infrastructure, Malaria, computational grid, docking

Vinod Kumar Kasam; Jean Salzemann; Vincent Breton; Nicolas Jacq

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Santosh Krishnamurthy Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Phase Void Fraction and Pressure Drop in Horizontal Crossflow Across a Tube Bundle," ASME J. Flu- ids Eng, namely, single tube, single heated tube in an unheated in- line tube bundle, and heated in-line tube a tube/cylinder in a tube bundle is strongly dependent on geometrical parameters such as tube con

Peles, Yoav

232

Resource allocation for demand surge mitigation during disaster response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale public health emergencies can result in an overwhelming demand for healthcare resources. Regional aid in the form of central stockpiles and resource redistribution can help mitigate the resulting demand surge. This paper discusses a resource ... Keywords: Decision support, Optimization, Pandemic flu, Resource allocation

Hina Arora; T. S. Raghu; Ajay Vinze

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

On the applicability of the minimal configured hierarchical fuzzy control and its relevance to function approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to minimal hierarchical fuzzy control systems design. It maintains the idea of distributing behaviors inside a fuzzy structure, while the minimal hierarchical fuzzy control is an effective procedure for dealing with systems ... Keywords: ANFIS, Behavioral decomposition, Control, Design, FIS, FLU, Function approximation, Hierarchical fuzzy systems, MCANHFLS, Methodology, RMSE, TSK

Taher M. Jelleli; Adel M. Alimi

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES COORDINATION OF MONETARY AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oqs'~nuoqdn 1 o 1 IIOBpnuiolnqL96lui~doosoiertu8urnunns noqeisnsnipenunuonpun~oio~peu`eruiojqn~)jo~PS1OA1~f)uniiflD(snln)onbisoininqur~unw -oounquo~1qrqoliuUOii0OIO048urpnn~ewsrunqoowanu`snilawnuusnb `8uqnuunilunuosni)5i0i0fl~U001U105A

235

Science & Technology Highlights ZEBRAlliance Campaign Under Way  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric power has been carried long distances by high theory and nonlinear dynamics to energy technologies, including gas-flu- idized beds, internal combustion. SpaciMS takes gaseous samples inside the confined spaces of chemical reactors, such as automotive

236

The Molecular Structure of a Key Viral Protein  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have determined the molecular structure of a viral protein, the parainfluenza virus 5 fusion (F) protein. The parainfluenza virus 5 is part of a family of viruses...

237

Assembly and detection of viruses and biological molecules on inorganic surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is composed of three distinct, albeit related, projects. Each project is an exploration of the ways in which interactions between inorganic surfaces and biological molecules can be advantageously exploited. The ...

Sinensky, Asher Keeling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Multifunctional virus scaffolds fore energy applications : nanomaterials synthesis and two dimensional assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological systems inherently posses the ability to synthesize and assemble nanomaterials with remarkable precision, as evident in biomineralization. These unique abilities of nature continue to inspire us to develop new ...

Nam, Ki Tae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A fluorescence quenching assay to discriminate between specific and nonspecific inhibitors of dengue virus protease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

positives is a major hurdle in the search for lead compounds that can be developed into drugs. A small electrophoresis; Nle, norleucine; RFU, relative fluorescence units; AMC, 7-amino-4-methyl coumarin; SE, standard­9, Bz-nKRR-H) were chemically synthesized in-house. Fluorogenic peptide substrate Bz-Nle

Caflisch, Amedeo

240

V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ID: 1028209 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: When Access Protection has been disabled, a local user can gain full control of the target application IMPACT: A local user...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Three-dimensional virus scaffolds for energy storage and microdevice applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With constantly increasing demand for lightweight power sources, electrode architectures that eliminate the need for conductive and organic additives will increase mass specific energy and power densities. The increased ...

Burpo, F. John (Fred John)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Study of Molecular and Biological Properties of Citrus exocortis viroid and Dweet mottle virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxygenase, endo-peptidase, helicase, and RNA-dependent RNAOxygenase protein; Hel: Helicase; RdRP: RNA-dependent RNAOxygenase protein; Hel: Helicase; RdRP: RNA-dependent RNA

Hajeri, Subhas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Type I Interferon is Not Just for Viruses: Cytosolic Sensing of Bacterial Nucleic Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanism of RIG-I helicase and activation of antiviraltriphosphate by RIG-I helicase requires short blunt double-Fujita, T. (2004). The RNA helicase RIG-I has an essential

Monroe, Kathryn McGee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comparative analysis of the Epstein-Barr virus encoded nuclear proteins of EBNA-3 family  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is known that the EBNA-3 family proteins (EBNA-3, -4 and -6, alternative nomenclature EBNA-3A, B and C correspondingly) show a limited sequence similarity. We have analyzed EBNA-3 proteins both at the primary sequence and secondary structure levels. ... Keywords: Charge clusters, EBNA3 family proteins, Praline rich domain, Secondary structure analysis, Stonin homology domain

Surya Pavan Yenamandra; Ramakrishna Sompallae; George Klein; Elena Kashuba

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Virus Capsid Expansion Driven By the Capture of Mobile Surface Loops  

SciTech Connect

The capsids of tailed-DNA bacteriophages first assemble as procapsids, which mature by converting into a new form that is strong enough to contain a densely packed viral chromosome. We demonstrate that the intersubunit crosslinking that occurs during maturation of HK97 capsids actually promotes the structural transformation. Small-angle X-ray scattering and crosslinking assays reveal that a shift in the crosslink pattern accompanies conversion of a semimature particle, Expansion Intermediate-I/II, to a more mature state, Balloon. This transition occurs in a switch-like fashion. We find that crosslink formation shifts the global conformational balance to favor the balloon state. A pseudoatomic model of EI-I/II derived from cryo-EM provides insight into the relationship between crosslink formation and conformational switching.

Lee, K.K.; Gan, L.; Tsuruta, H.; Moyer, C.; Conway, J.F.; Duda, R.L.; Hendrix, R.W.; Steven, A.C.; Johnson, J.E.

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

Multi-Strain Virus-Host Dynamics from HIV to Phage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

availability and infection of resting and activated CD4+ T cells in transmission andavailability and infection of resting and activated CD4+ T cells in transmission and

Weinberger, Ariel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Epidemiology and interactions of Human Immunodeficiency Virus -- 1 and Schistosoma mansoni in sub-Saharan Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, characterized by interleukin-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-13, antibody (IgE and IgG4), eosinophils and mast cells. However, these responses are tightly regulated to pro- duce a modified Th2 immune environment. The down- regulatory mechanisms involved not only... was found to ex- pand the proportion of circulating CD25hi CD4+ cells, a significant proportion of which are likely to be FoxP3 +ve T-reg cells, amongst sand-harvesters in Kisumu, Kenya [94]. However, no significant difference in the proportion of CD4+CD25hi...

Mazigo, Humphrey D; Nuwaha, Fred; Wilson, Shona; Kinung'hi, Safari M; Morona, Domenica; Waihenya, Rebecca; Heukelbach, Jorg; Dunne, David W

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

Quantitative Description of Glycan-Receptor Binding of Influenza A Virus H7 Hemagglutinin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of recently emerged novel influenza strains through reassortment, avian influenza subtypes such as H5N1, H7N7, H7N2, H7N3 and H9N2 pose a constant threat in terms of their adaptation to the human host. Among ...

Srinivasan, Karunya

249

,J. Mol. Riol. (1983) 163. 1-26 Post-transcriptional Processing of Simian Virus 40  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) : thr I !$S tra.nsc.rifd is ohstwwf f>>.t tw hwkgt~~~tit~. Thesr data are consistrnt with pubfishcci

Wickens, Marv

250

Type I Interferon is Not Just for Viruses: Cytosolic Sensing of Bacterial Nucleic Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Oldstone, M.B. (2007). Type I interferon during viralCutting edge: FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae is a novelTaniguchi, T. , et al. (2004). Type I interferon production

Monroe, Kathryn McGee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Folding and Insertion of the Ebola Virus Fusion Peptide into a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Infectious Diseases, Ft. Detrick, MD, USA 2 Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications

252

Evaluation of a Subunit Vaccine to Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nucleotide sequence of the IHNV glycoprotein gene has been determined from a cDNA clone containing the entire coding region. The glycoprotein cDNA clone contained a leader sequence of 48 bases, a coding region of 1524 nucleotides, and 39 bases at the 3 foot end. The entire cDNA clone contains 1609 nucleodites and encodes a protein of 508 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence gave a translated molecular weight of 56,795 daltons. A hydropathicity profile of the deduced amino acid sequence indicated that there were two major hydrophobic domains: one,at the N-terminus,delineating a signal peptide of 18 amino acids and the other, at the C-terminus,delineating the region of the transmembrane. Five possible sites of N-linked glyscoylation were identified. Although no nucleic acid homology existed between the IHNV glycoprotein gene and the glycoprotein genes of rabies and VSV, there was significant homology at the amino acid level between all three rhabdovirus glycoproteins.

Leong, JoAnn Ching

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Altered expression of cell cycle and apoptotic proteins in chronic hepatitis C virus infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ancy could be the different antibodies and sample size used, along with the high prevalence of genotype 3 infected patients in our study. We further examined if the low apoptotic index in hepatocytes is due to the high lev- els of Bcl-2. Interestingly...

Sarfraz, Saira; Hamid, Saeed; Siddiqui, Anwar; Hussain, Snawar; Pervez, Shahid; Alexander, Graeme

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

ZEB1 limits adenoviral infectability by transcriptionally repressing the Coxsackie virus and Adenovirus Receptor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZEB1) 2 microgram/mL doxycycline hyclate (Sigma-Aldrich).which the presence of doxycycline repressed ZEB1 expression,of the repressor (doxycycline) (Figure 4E and Additional

Lacher, Markus D; Shiina, Marisa; Chang, Peter; Keller, Debora; Tiirikainen, Maarit I; Korn, W Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Type I Interferon is Not Just for Viruses: Cytosolic Sensing of Bacterial Nucleic Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the nucleus and assemble with NF-kB and other transcriptionactivation of IRF3/7, NF-kB, and MAP kinases (Yoneyama andtype I IFNs primarily via NF-kB, which synergizes with other

Monroe, Kathryn McGee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Role of metabolism and viruses in aflatoxin-induced liver cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of biomarkers in molecular epidemiology studies for identifying stages in the progression of development of the health effects of environmental agents has the potential for providing important information for critical regulatory, clinical and public health problems. Investigations of aflatoxins probably represent one of the most extensive data sets in the field and this work may serve as a template for future studies of other environmental agents. The aflatoxins are naturally occurring mycotoxins found on foods such as corn, peanuts, various other nuts and cottonseed and they have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic in many experimental models. As a result of nearly 30 years of study, experimental data and epidemiological studies in human populations, aflatoxin B{sub 1} was classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The long-term goal of the research described herein is the application of biomarkers to the development of preventative interventions for use in human populations at high-risk for cancer. Several of the aflatoxin-specific biomarkers have been validated in epidemiological studies and are now being used as intermediate biomarkers in prevention studies. The development of these aflatoxin biomarkers has been based upon the knowledge of the biochemistry and toxicology of aflatoxins gleaned from both experimental and human studies. These biomarkers have subsequently been utilized in experimental models to provide data on the modulation of these markers under different situations of disease risk. This systematic approach provides encouragement for preventive interventions and should serve as a template for the development, validation and application of other chemical-specific biomarkers to cancer or other chronic diseases.

Groopman, John D. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)]. E-mail: jgroopma@jhsph.edu; Kensler, Thomas W. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Subject: FW: O U 052226Z ARMY WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) CONTROL PROGRAM Importance: High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RUERSWA. ZNR UUUUU ZYW ZOC ZEO T ALL US ARMY REPS AND ACTIVITIES O 052226Z AUG 02 FM DA WASHINGTON DC//DAMO-AOC-CAT// TO RUEADWD/DA WASHINGTON DC//DAMO-AOC-CAT// ALARACT INFO RUEADWD/DA WASHINGTON DC TROOP AND FAMILY LIVING QUARTERS. CHECK WINDOWS AND DOOR SCREENS TO MAKE SURE THEY ARE INTACT. ENFORCE

US Army Corps of Engineers

258

Mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

Korber, Bette T. (Los Alamos, NM); Fischer, William (Los Alamos, NM); Liao, Hua-Xin (Durham, NC); Haynes, Barton F. (Durham, NC); Letvin, Norman (Boston, MA); Hahn; Beatrice H. (Birmingham, AL)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd virus is a natural-born cheat that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. caudifer to remain in energy balance, it requires about 4 h of foraging time, 800 floral visits, and in, Helversen and Reyer (1984) also calculated a daily energy expenditure of 310% the basal rate or 12.4 kcal coinhabiting caves with the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata

Manapat, Michael

260

Marine Viruses Exploit Their Host's Two-Component Regulatory System in Response to Resource Limitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phosphorus (P) availability, which often limits productivity in marine ecosystems, shapes the P-acquisition gene content of the marine cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus [ [1], [2], [3] and [4

Zeng, Qinglu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NMR studies of p7 protein from hepatitisC virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heteronuclear Dipolar Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy. J Magn1104 high ?eld solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples.009-0533-y ORIGINAL PAPER NMR studies of p7 protein from

Cook, Gabriel A.; Opella, Stanley J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Armored RNA as virus surrogate in a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay proficiency panel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

second ring test to evaluate RT-PCR detection methods. Vet.real-time, reverse transcription-PCR assays for detection ofHigh-throughput real-time RT-PCR assay to detect the exotic

Hietala, S K; Crossley, B M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Single-step PCR in molecular diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These include: Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new articles cite this article), more Downloaded from

E Farma; E Boeri; P Bettini; C M Repetto; J Mcdermott; F B Lillo; O E Varnier; J. Clin Microbiol

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Viruses in laboratory-reared cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae), is a non-native species threatening a variety of native cacti, particularly endangered species of Opuntia (Zimmerman et al. 2001), on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Cactoblastis cactorum populations have expanded from Florida northward along the Atlantic coast as far as Charleston, SC, and westward along the Gulf of Mexico to Dauphin Island, south of Mobile, AL. It is feared that further movement to the west will allow C. cactorum to enter the US desert Southwest and Mexico, particularly the latter. Numerous cactus species, especially those of the genera Opuntia and Nopalea, are native to the U.S. and Mexico. Local economies based on agricultural and horticultural uses of cacti could be devastated by C. cactorum (Vigueras and Portillo 2001). A bi-national control program between the US and Mexico is being developed, utilizing the sterile insect technique (SIT). In the SIT program, newly emerged moths are irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source and released to mate with wild individuals. The radiation dose completely sterilizes the females and partially sterilizes the males. When irradiated males mate with wild females, the F1 progeny of these matings are sterile. In order for the SIT program to succeed, large numbers of moths must be reared from egg to adult on artificial diet in a quarantined rearing facility (Carpenter et al. 2001). Irradiated insects must then be released in large numbers at the leading edge of the invasive population and at times which coincide with the presence of wild individuals available for mating. Mortality from disease in the rearing colony disrupts the SIT program by reducing the numbers of insects available for release.

Marti, O.G.; Myers, R.E.; Carpenter, J.E. [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Crop Protection and Management Research Laboratory, PO Box 748, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States); Styer, E.L. [University of Georgia, Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory, PO Box 1389, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Tobacco Mosaic Virus Enabled Si Anodes and LiFePO4 Cathodes ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D Nanostructured Bicontinuous Electrodes: Path to Ultra-High Power and Energy ... The Electrochemical Flow Capacitor for Efficient Grid-Scale Energy Storage.

266

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2010 , 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Aug. 2 THERE WILL BE NO PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS SEMINAR THIS WEEK 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ALL EXPERIMENTERS' MEETING THIS WEEK Tuesday, Aug. 3 12 p.m. Summer Lecture Series - One West Speaker: Tom Kroc, Fermilab Title: Neutrons Against Cancer 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR THIS WEEK Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up H1N1 Flu For information about H1N1, visit Fermilab's flu information site. Weather Weather Sunny 88°/70° Extended Forecast

267

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2010 4, 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, May 24 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: Robert Feldman, Fermilab Title: The Morphological Evolution of Group Galaxies 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting Special Topic: Tentative Shutdown Schedule - Curia II Tuesday, May 25 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up H1N1 Flu For information about H1N1, visit Fermilab's flu information site. Weather Weather Sunny 90°/68° Extended Forecast

268

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2010 4, 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Jan 4 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: Jaiyul Yoo, Harvard University Title: A New Perspective on Galaxy Clustering as a Cosmological Probe: General Relativistic Effects 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topic: ArgoNeuT Tuesday, Jan. 5 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd floor crossover THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up H1N1 Flu For information about H1N1, visit Fermilab's flu information site.

269

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2006 8, 2006 Calendar Monday, August 28 PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS SEMINARS WILL RESUME IN THE FALL 3:30 p.m. Director's Coffee Break - 2nd floor crossover 4:00 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topics: Meson Roof Repair Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL-2) Tuesday, August 29 12:00 p.m. Wellness Works Brown Bag Seminar - 1 West Speaker: B. Svazas, Fermilab Title: Avian Flu (Bird Flu) 3:30 p.m. Director's Coffee Break - 2nd floor crossover THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY 4:00 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - 1 West Speaker: M. Woods, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Title: MDI Studies at the ILC and Related Test Beam Program at SLAC's End Station A Facility Click here for a full calendar with links to additional information.

270

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 9, 2010 July 9, 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Friday, July 9 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Joint Experimental-Theoretical Physics Seminar - One West Speaker: Holger Meyer, Wichita State University Title: Particle Production Results from the MIPP Experiment Monday, July 12 THERE WILL BE NO PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS SEMINAR THIS WEEK 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up H1N1 Flu For information about H1N1, visit Fermilab's flu information site. Weather Weather Sunny 85°/62°

271

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2010 8, 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Friday, Jan. 8 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Joint Experimental-Theoretical Physics Seminar - One West Speaker: Marat Gataullin, California Institute of Technology Title: First LHC Collisions with CMS Monday, Jan. 11 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: Hugh Lippincott, Yale University Title: DEAP/CLEAN: Detecting Dark Matter with Liquid Argon (and Neon) 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up H1N1 Flu For information about H1N1, visit Fermilab's flu information site.

272

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2010 1, 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Jan. 11 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: Hugh Lippincott, Yale University Title: DEAP/CLEAN: Detecting Dark Matter with Liquid Argon (and Neon) 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Tuesday, Jan. 12 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd floor crossover THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up H1N1 Flu For information about H1N1, visit Fermilab's flu information site. Weather Weather Chance of snow

273

Prevention & Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prevention and Treatment Prevention and Treatment These steps may help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses such as the flu: Stay Healthy Vaccination Antivirals Stay Informed Stay Healthy Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze-throw the tissue away immediately after you use it. Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If you are not near water, use an alcohol-based (60-95%) hand cleaner. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too. If you get the flu, stay home from work, school, and social gatherings. This will help prevent others from catching your illness. Try not to touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs often spread this way.

274

Putting the Pressure on MOFs | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Hearing the Highest Pitches Unveiling the Secrets of Nanoparticle Haloing A Fruit-Fly Protein that Captures Tumor Growth Factors A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Putting the Pressure on MOFs JULY 30, 2008 Bookmark and Share Sometimes, it's not what's on the outside that matters, but what happens inside, in the spaces in between. That's certainly the case with metal-organic framework (MOF) materials, which are crystalline constructs made up of metallic ions connected to organic molecules, put together in

275

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2010 30, 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Friday, July 30 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO JOINT EXPERIMENTAL-THEORETICAL PHYSICS SEMINAR TODAY Monday, August 2 THERE WILL BE NO PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS SEMINAR THIS WEEK 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ALL EXPERIMENTERS' MEETING THIS WEEK Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up H1N1 Flu For information about H1N1, visit Fermilab's flu information site. Weather Weather Chance of thunderstorms 81°/65° Extended Forecast Weather at Fermilab Current Security Status Secon Level 3

276

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2010 2, 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, July 12 THERE WILL BE NO PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS SEMINAR THIS WEEK 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Tuesday, July 13 THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY 12 p.m. Summer Lecture Series - One West Speaker: Brian DeGraff and Leonardo Ristori, Fermilab Title: Civil and Mechanical Engineering 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Tune IT Up H1N1 Flu For information about H1N1, visit Fermilab's flu information site. Weather Weather Chance of storms

277

Evaluation of a Subunit Vaccine to Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus, July 31, 1989 to September 30, 1990, Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The IHNV glycoprotein has been identified as the virion protein which elicits neutralizing antibody in rabbits and induces protective immunity in fish to homologous and heterologous strains of IHNV (Engelking and Leong, 1989). These findings suggested that genetic engineering might be used to develop an economically feasible IHNV vaccine for fish. Thus, a clone of the IHNV glycoprotein gene was made and expression of a portion of this gene in bacteria resulted in a prototype IHNV subunit vaccine. Only 350 bases of IHNV sequence was expressed in this initial vaccine construction because there were 16 cysteine residues in the glycoprotein gene. Previous work with the rabies glycoprotein had shown that when the entire gene was expressed in bacteria, a denatured protein was produced, presumably because appropriate folding mechanisms for disulfide bond formation in protein were absent in E. coli. The IHNV vaccine clone contained a region of the gene which encoded only one cysteine residue. Despite the efficacy of the vaccine in laboratory trials, it seemed useful to determine whether other regions of the IHNV glycoprotein gene would be expressed in an antigenically recognizable form in bacteria and thereby, provide increased protection in fish. The recombinant plasmids pXL2, pXL3, and pXL7 were constructed so that all regions of the glycoprotein gene were expressed in bacteria as trpE-G fusion proteins. All of these recombinant plasmids produced fusion proteins that were also analyzed in Western immunoblots with anti-IHNV sera and specific monoclonal antibodies. These results were compared with the proteins produced by p52G and p618G, the plasmids identified in the original vaccine construction. The results of this comparison are shown.

Leong, JoAnn Ching

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

This Bug Man Is a Pest George Ledin teaches students how to write viruses, and it makes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's going on in Ledin's classroom. He has been likened to A.Q. Khan, the Pakistani scientist who sold--and the http://www.newsweek.com/2008/08/01/this-bug-man-is-a-pest.prin... 1 of 2 #12;hackers. "We've changed

Ravikumar, B.

279

Response to ISRP Review Comments: Project ID 35029 Transfer IHN virus genetic strain typing technology to fish health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will thereafter test twice a year with two isolates. Where errors occur we will troubleshoot to identify

280

Nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Dweet mottle virus and its relationship to members of the family Betaflexiviridae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxygenase, endo- peptidase, helicase, and RNA-dependent RNAin auto-proteolysis, helicase and RNA-dependent RNA

Hajeri, Subhas; Ramadugu, Chandrika; Keremane, Manjunath; Vidalakis, Georgios; Lee, Richard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade B superinfection: Evidence for differential immune containment of distinct clade B strains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a superinfecting strain. Subject 2030 presented with acuteThe subject. Subject 2030 was a 33-year-old homosexualnot shown). FIG. 1. Subject 2030 plasma HIV-1 and CD4 ? -T-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

On the phylogenetic placement of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 sequences associated with an Andean mummy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of 188 published LTR DNA sequences from extant strains belonging to the HTLV-1 Cosmopolitan clade to the root of the Cosmopolitan clade, consistent with an ancient origin for both this mummy sequence and the Cosmopolitan clade. # 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Ancient DNA; HTLV-1; Mummy

Posada, David

283

M13 virus/single-walled carbon nanotubes as a materials platform for energy devices and biomedical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making nanocomposites from combinations of materials each with their own unique functional advantage can often solve issues that cannot be addressed when utilizing only one type of materials. Therefore, controlling ...

Yi, Hyunjung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Genetic modification of alternative respiration in Nicotiana benthamiana affects basal and salicylic acid-induced resistance to potato virus X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seed, agar media were supplemented with kana- mycin (50 ?g.ml-1), hygromycin B (29 ?g.ml-1), or both antibiotics as appropriate. After transfer to soil, all plants were maintained in a growth room (Conviron Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) under a 16 h...

Lee, Wing-Sham; Fu, Shih-Feng; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie; Carr, John P

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

285

Usefulness of commercially available GPS data-loggers for tracking human movement and exposure to dengue virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban environment. Cost, battery life, size, programmabilityenvironments. The GPS cost, battery life, size, weight andPassword protection Cost (US$) (without battery or case) Yes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

ZASC1 knockout mice exhibit an early bone marrow-specific defect in murine leukemia virus replication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005, 12. Okimoto MA, Fan H: Identification of directly2):455463. 16. Belli B, Fan H: The leukemogenic potential19. Lander JK, Chesebro B, Fan H: Appearance of mink cell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Mechanical Property Measurements of Membranes and Viruses by Using Fluorescence Interference Contrast Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment.Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment.

Gui, Dong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Development of Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus to RNA Interference Therapies: Understanding Mechanism and Developing Strategies to Overcome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the small molecules doxycycline or tetracycline andculture medium, the doxycycline binds to rtTA and induces ang/mL or 1000 ng/mL of doxycycline for negative controls or

Shah, Priya Shirish

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development of High-Throughput and Real-Time Methods for the Detection of Infectious Enteric Viruses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melvin. 2005. Quenching of CdSe quantum dot emission, a new2000. Self-assembly of CdSe-ZnS quantum dot bioconjugates2000. Self-assembly of CdSe-ZnS quantum dot bioconjugates

YEH, HSIAO-YUN

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Spatio-temporal point process models for the spread of avian in?uenza virus (H5N1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a knowledge of how events trigger other events. In Ogatasthe information on how each event triggers other events. Thebranching structure. An event will trigger other events and

Kim, Harry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Loss of ATM Function Enhances Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Transduction and Integration through Pathways Similar to UV Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as double-stranded breaks occurs frequently on exposure to chemical carcinogens and radiation *Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology and of Internal Medicine, Center for Gene Therapy, and Department and ionizing radiation ap- pears to be altered in AT patients, because the onset of p53 activation is delayed

Engelhardt, John F.

292

Antivirus Procedures, Cyber Security, Information Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anti-virus Software Trend OfficeScan for PCs & Trend Micro Security for Mac Anti-Virus procedures are an important component of BNL's host-based security architecture. Anti-Virus...

293

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of genomic sequences for HIV, hepatitis C, hemorrhagic fever viruses, influenza, oral pathogens (both bacterial and viral), and bacteria and viruses responsible for...

294

Biosecurity and Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of genomic sequences for HIV, hepatitis C, hemorrhagic fever viruses, influenza, oral pathogens (both bacterial and viral), and bacteria and viruses responsible for...

295

Analysis of the Argonne distance tabletop exercise method.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize and evaluate the Argonne Distance Tabletop Exercise (DISTEX) method. DISTEX is intended to facilitate multi-organization, multi-objective tabletop emergency response exercises that permit players to participate from their own facility's incident command center. This report is based on experience during its first use during the FluNami 2007 exercise, which took place from September 19-October 17, 2007. FluNami 2007 exercised the response of local public health officials and hospitals to a hypothetical pandemic flu outbreak. The underlying purpose of the DISTEX method is to make tabletop exercising more effective and more convenient for playing organizations. It combines elements of traditional tabletop exercising, such as scenario discussions and scenario injects, with distance learning technologies. This distance-learning approach also allows playing organizations to include a broader range of staff in the exercise. An average of 81.25 persons participated in each weekly webcast session from all playing organizations combined. The DISTEX method required development of several components. The exercise objectives were based on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Target Capabilities List. The ten playing organizations included four public health departments and six hospitals in the Chicago area. An extent-of-play agreement identified the objectives applicable to each organization. A scenario was developed to drive the exercise over its five-week life. Weekly problem-solving task sets were designed to address objectives that could not be addressed fully during webcast sessions, as well as to involve additional playing organization staff. Injects were developed to drive play between webcast sessions, and, in some cases, featured mock media stories based in part on player actions as identified from the problem-solving tasks. The weekly 90-minute webcast sessions were discussions among the playing organizations that were moderated by a highly-qualified public health physician, who reviewed key scenario developments and player actions, as well as solicited input from each playing organization. The exercise control structure included trusted agents who oversaw exercise planning, playing organization points of contact to ensure exercise coordination, and exercise controller/evaluators to initiate and oversee exercise play. A password-protected exercise website was designed for FluNami 2007 to serve as a compartmentalized central information source, and for transmitting exercise documents. During the course of FluNami 2007, feedback on its quality was collected from players and controller/evaluators. Player feedback was requested at the conclusion of each webcast, upon completion of each problem-solving task, and on October 17, 2007, after the final webcast session had ended. The overall average score given to FluNami 2008 by the responding players was 3.9 on a five-point scale. In addition, suggestions for improving the process were provided by Argonne controller/evaluators after the exercise concluded. A series of recommendations was developed based on feedback from the players and controller/evaluators. These included improvements to the exercise scope and objectives, the problem-solving tasks, the scenarios, exercise control, the webcast sessions, the exercise website, and the player feedback process.

Tanzman, E. A.; Nieves, L. A.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

296

Omega Mine Injection Program: Monongalia County, West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the largest project of its kind, coal combustion products (CCPs) were injected into West Virginia's Omega Mine to prevent mine subsidence and decrease acid mine drainage. This report documents the use of an alkaline grout consisting of 49 percent fluidized-bed combustion ash, 49 percent pulverized coal fly ash, plus 2 percent cement to fill the 10.4-hectare (26-acre) north lobe of a 68-hectare (170-acre) mine. The general requirements for such a grouting material were that it possess 1) sufficient flu...

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

RetiRement CenteR mission statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy & Management, "Lyme Disease and West Nile Virus: Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases of Public Health

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

298

CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF THE LOEB FELLOWSHIP The Loeb Alumni Council, on the occasion of our 40th Anniversary, wanted to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virus, Lyme disease, etc) 14. Selected Topics in Horticulture (any other current / seasonal issues) C

299

Luciano Floridi Research Fellow del Wolson College e Lecturer in Logic and Epistemology presso il St.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a nostra insaputa, mentre i crimini variano dalla pornografia elettronica ai virus, dalla riproduzione

Floridi, Luciano

300

BNL | Walter Mangel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Walter Mangel Walter Mangel Development of New Antiviral Agents Abstract from NIH grant proposal The arsenal of weapons for treating virus infections is relatively meager. Although vaccines for some viruses can be effective, for other viruses, antiviral agents are needed. Among potential targets for antiviral therapy that arise during certain viral infections are the virus-coded proteinases. These enzymes, essential for the synthesis of infectious virus, are required to process virus-specific precursor proteins involved in the maturation, assembly and replication of such pathogenic human viruses as adenovirus, poliovirus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Inhibition of the proteinase aborts the virus infection. Our model system for the development of new antiviral agents is human adenovirus.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

It's Elemental - The Element Fluorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Previous Element (Oxygen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Neon) Neon The Element Fluorine [Click for Isotope Data] 9 F Fluorine 18.9984032 Atomic Number: 9 Atomic Weight: 18.9984032 Melting Point: 53.53 K (-219.62°C or -363.32°F) Boiling Point: 85.03 K (-188.12°C or -306.62°F) Density: 0.001696 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Latin and French words for flow, fluere. Say what? Fluorine is pronounced as FLU-eh-reen or as FLU-eh-rin. History and Uses: Fluorine is the most reactive of all elements and no chemical substance is capable of freeing fluorine from any of its compounds. For this reason, fluorine does not occur free in nature and was extremely difficult for

302

Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (/sup 3/H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on /sup 3/H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; /sup 3/H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas /sup 3/H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites.

Schlegel, J.R.; Kriegstein, A.R.

1987-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Riboproteomics of the Hepatitis C Virus Internal Ribosomal Entry Henry Lu, Weiqun Li, William Stafford Noble, Donald Payan, and D. C. Anderson*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stafford Noble, Donald Payan, and D. C. Anderson*, Rigel, Inc., South San Francisco, California 94066

Noble, William Stafford

304

Different immune responses to three different vaccines following H6N1 low pathogenic avian influenza virus challenge in Taiwanese local chicken breeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group Antibody titer Periods1 a b a a b b Figure 4 Antibody titers against IB on 0, 14 and 28 days post-inoculation. a,b within days post-inoculation with no common superscript differ significantly (P < 0.05). 1000 3000 5000 7000 9000 11000 IB0 IB14 IB28...

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

305

Establishment of a Bovine Herpesvirus 4 based vector expressing a secreted form of the Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus structural glycoprotein E2 for immunization purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrophilic (as calculated by Hopp & Woods method (Hopp & Woods 1983)) non structured 14-amino-acid peptide (Fig. 1a and 1c), that we hypothe- sized would increase the secretion of the protein. To test this hypothesis, a second expression cassette, pCMV- IgKE2... and pelleted using 5000 r.p.m. (eppendorf centrifuge) at 0C for 5 min. The supernatant was poured off and the pellet was resuspended in 1 ml ice-cold ddH2O by gently swirling the tubes in ice/water bath slurry. Subsequently, 9 ml ice- cold ddH2O was added...

Donofrio, Gaetano; Sartori, Chiara; Ravanetti, Lara; Cavirani, Sandro; Gillet, Laurent; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Taddei, Simone; Flammini, Cesidio Filippo

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

306

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Cisco IronPort Web Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple...

307

HIV entering the cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Question: How does the HIV virus enter the cell, is it through active transport or passive? Could it be endocytosis? Replies: None of these, usually. Many viruses, T4 for...

308

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses Name: Angel Status: student Grade: other Location: NY Date: NA Question: What are the most common signs that indicate you have a computer virus? Replies: The most...

309

Patents -- Ivar Giaever (1976)  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and separating select viruses, bacteria and other cells from multi-cell, bacteria or virus populations. US 3,975,238 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETECTING MOLECULES IN SOLUTIONS --...

310

Microbial and viral genomics of surface ocean communities within the Southern California Bight and adjacent California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Williamson, S.J. Single Virus Genomics: A New Tool for VirusMicrobial and viral genomics of surface ocean communitiesa sequencing simulator for genomics and metagenomics. PloS

Zeigler, Lisa Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Development and characterization of an in vitro culture system as a physiological model for chronic Hepatitis B infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the prototype member of the family Hepadnaviridae that consists of enveloped, partially double stranded DNA viruses that specifically target hepatocytes for viral replication. Although a ...

Sams, Alexandria V. (Alexandria Victoria)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Old and rising stars in the lymphoid liver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the recent observation of occult hepatitis B infection [45]G, Pollicino T (2008) Occult hepatitis B virus in liver

Selmi, Carlo; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M. Eric

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reciprocity law experiments in polymeric photodegradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In this review, biological applications include the inactiva- tion of viruses, bacteria, fungi, mold, and algae whereas medical applications include ...

2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

BioMed Central BMC Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with helicase c domain 1 innate immune response, regulation of apoptosis, response to virus SRV_04819_a

315

Bioinspired Materials Engineering - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... materials synthesis mediated by microorganisms (bacteria, virus, fungi, algae), biopolymer/ceramic composites. Microstructure pattern formation for functional...

316

Consumerizing PCs from research to product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-17 are exposed to unwanted porn Viruses, spam, spyware, phishing, bots Zero-day vulnerability #12;6 Stanford

Bejerano, Gill

317

Duplicate File Names-A Novel Steganographic Data Hiding Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or a terrorist plot. None-the-less, these files can also be potentially dangerous viruses, malware, child porn

Wu, Jie

318

SANS for Beginners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(GISAXS) Rubber, ribosome Soft matter, surfactants, switchgrass Time-resolved, thermodynamics Uranium separation Vesicles, virus Wine science Xylose isomerase...

319

Pseudolymphoma evolving into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

immunodeficiency test and Lyme titers were negative. Blood-varicella-zoster virus, and Lyme borreliosis). Higher rates

Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Pulitzer, Melissa; Epstein, Wendy; Rosenman, Karla; Latkowski, Jo-Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

TRENDS in Neurosciences Vol.24 No.9 September 2001 http://tins.trends.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-associated virus gene transfer. Gene Ther. 5, 1604­1611 62 Corti, O. et al. (1999) Long-term doxycycline

Schafe, Glenn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

September/October 1999 Operating in the Red Newton Apiaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

September/October 1999 Operating in the Red Newton Apiaries Varroa and Apimondia Sticky Boards Pollinators Booklet UCD Trailer Warning Operating in the Red As with any other business, you cannot operate paralysis virus (SPV), deformed wing virus (DWV), and cloudy wing virus (CWV) all were involved

Hammock, Bruce D.

322

APS User News, Issue 58  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, November 11, 2009 8, November 11, 2009 CONTENTS MESSAGE FROM MURRAY SCIENCE NEWS 1. Fast CCD Detector Collaboration 2. Science & Research Highlights The Power of Proteins: Prion Diseases Demystified Bacterium Helps in the Formation of Gold Getting to the Roots of Lethal Hairs Creating a Precise Atomic-Scale Map of Quantum Dots USER MATTERS 3. Users and the Flu Season 4. Workshop on the Role of Synchrotron Radiation in Solving Scientific Challenges in Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems 5. First Experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source 6. New Postings Available on Employment Bulletin Board FACILITY NEWS 7. Recent SAC Meeting Focuses on APS Upgrade 8. The Life Sciences Council at the APS 9. Fitness Center Now Open in New Location AWARDS AND HONORS 10. APS Users Awarded 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

323

An Update ofthe U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Issue No. 4, Fat, ,991 3 Issue No. 4, Fat, ,991 An Update ofthe U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Nine New Clean Coal Technology Projects Selected In Fourth Round of Competition Clean Coal Briefs Highlights ofthis past quarter of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstra- tion Program include the addition 01 nine new projects selected for funding under the fourth round of competition, a new $203 million cooperative agree- ment for a pressurized circulating flu- idized bed combustion plant in Des Moines, Iowa, and the kick-off of next year's planned fifth round with the announcement of public meetings (see separate stories for details). The 42 government-industry projects now in the Clean Coal Pro- gram family-with a total value ex-

324

DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib August 18, 2011 - 1:03pm Addthis Powerful X-Rays Enable Development of Successful Treatment for Melanoma and Other Life-Threatening Diseases WASHINGTON, DC - Powerful X-ray technology developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories is revealing new insights into diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to the swine flu, and, most recently, enabled the discovery of a groundbreaking new drug treatment for malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The drug, Zelboraf (vemurafenib), received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval on Wednesday. In showing the structures of diseased and

325

SSRL HEADLINES May 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 May, 2010 1 May, 2010 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging Science Highlight - Structural Basis for Senior Immunity to the Current H1N1 Flu Science Highlight - Suspected Copper Chelator Binds not just Copper but Copper-Protein Trimer Complexes From the Acting Director of SSRL: Where Do We Go from Here? SPEAR3 Increased Current and Frequent Fill Update ARRA Funded Facility Upgrade Project First Bio-Imaging Results from LCLS: Henry Chapman Presents June 7 SLAC Colloquium LCLS/SSRL Users' Conference and Workshops, October 17-21, 2010 Fomer SSRL Director Named to the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences

326

LBL Highlights 1994-1995  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights 1994-1995 Highlights 1994-1995 FOREWORD DISCOVERING THE TOP QUARK BEAMING IN ON CONTAMINANTS SEEKING A CLUE OF FLU CREATING A TRUE BLUE LIGHT CHILL IN A DRILL PICTURING PROTEINS UNTANGLING PSEUDOKNOTS UNLOCKING THE SECRETS OF CELL SENESCENCE ACTIVATING ALKANES PURSUING THE MYSTERIES OF MATTER MBONE: COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE NEXT MILLENNIUM RESEARCH IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST A CONTRACT FOR EDUCATION STAFF CREDITS ON THE COVER: Rising up like an island in the sea is the concentration of chromium in a square millimeter of soil taken from a polluted San Francisco Bay wetland. This computer image, generated on the x-ray fluorescence microprobe beamline of LBL's Advanced Light Source, shows that chromium is drawn to highly localized chemical "hot spots" in the soil. The color scale

327

Quantum Physics Makes Water Different | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weird Oxygen Bonding under Pressure Weird Oxygen Bonding under Pressure A Breakthrough in Improving Osteoporosis Drug Design Allaying Structural-Alloy Corrosion Putting the Pressure on MOFs Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Quantum Physics Makes Water Different AUGUST 11, 2008 Bookmark and Share Based on the July 22, 2008, online article in ScienceNews By Davide Castelvecchi Reprinted with permission from ScienceNews, copyright 2008 http://sciencenews.org/ Heavy water, which contains higher-than-normal quantities of the hydrogen isotope deuterium (D), is not just heavier than "ordinary" water.

328

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I- S I... SJ4.'i_ .---- - I- S I... SJ4.'i_ .---- - ---- ----- -- _- , 1 .3 t fLU4 ' I 04 - -t - rt . .5 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-04GO14006 ENTITLED "DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF NEW CARBON-EIASED SORBENT SYSTEMS FOR AN EFFECTIVE CONTAINMENT OF HYDROGEN"; W(A)-04-028; CH-1197 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Air Products and Chemicals Inc. (Air Products) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above- identified cooperative agreement by its employees and its subcontractors' employees. regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions

329

Inspection Report: IG-0784 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84 84 Inspection Report: IG-0784 December 19, 2007 The Department of Energy's Pandemic Influenza Planning According to the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention AND (CDC), in a worst case scenario, as many as 90 million people in the U.S., including 30 percent of its workforce, could become sick from a mutated avian influenza (bird flu) H5N1 strain. Proactive steps are therefore necessary to protect U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) personnel and maintain the Department's mission-essential functions. The Government issued mandates to Federal agencies to conduct pandemic influenza planning. On November 1, 2005, the President announced the "National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza," requiring Federal agencies that perform mission-critical functions, including DOE, to develop agency pandemic

330

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

331

Inspection Report: IG-0784 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IG-0784 IG-0784 Inspection Report: IG-0784 December 19, 2007 The Department of Energy's Pandemic Influenza Planning According to the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention AND (CDC), in a worst case scenario, as many as 90 million people in the U.S., including 30 percent of its workforce, could become sick from a mutated avian influenza (bird flu) H5N1 strain. Proactive steps are therefore necessary to protect U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) personnel and maintain the Department's mission-essential functions. The Government issued mandates to Federal agencies to conduct pandemic influenza planning. On November 1, 2005, the President announced the "National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza," requiring Federal agencies that perform mission-critical functions, including DOE, to develop agency pandemic

332

Allaying Structural-Alloy Corrosion | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting the Pressure on MOFs Putting the Pressure on MOFs Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Hearing the Highest Pitches Unveiling the Secrets of Nanoparticle Haloing A Fruit-Fly Protein that Captures Tumor Growth Factors Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Allaying Structural-Alloy Corrosion JULY 30, 2008 Bookmark and Share The search for ways to conserve energy is leading scientists to explore unexpected but important avenues, such as technologies that make extensive use of alloys that are subject to corrosion, which can result in significant energy inefficiency. Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Argonne National Laboratory, using three DOE

333

Weird Oxygen Bonding under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Breakthrough in Improving Osteoporosis Drug Design A Breakthrough in Improving Osteoporosis Drug Design Allaying Structural-Alloy Corrosion Putting the Pressure on MOFs Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Hearing the Highest Pitches Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Weird Oxygen Bonding under Pressure AUGUST 8, 2008 Bookmark and Share Schematic shows the topology of π* orbital interactions in the (O2)4 cluster. (Image copyright National Academy of Sciences, PNAS.) Oxygen, the third most abundant element in the cosmos and essential to life on Earth, changes its forms dramatically under pressure, transforming to a solid with spectacular colors. Eventually it becomes metallic and a

334

Social Web mining and exploitation for serious applications: Technosocial Predictive Analytics and related technologies for public health, environmental and national security surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores techno-social predictive analytics (TPA) and related methods for Web data mining where users posts and queries are garnered from Social Web (Web 2.0) tools such as blogs, microblogging and social networking sites to form coherent representations of real-time health events. The paper includes a brief introduction to commonly used Social Web tools such as mashups and aggregators, and maps their exponential growth as an open architecture of participation for the masses and an emerging way to gain insight about peoples collective health status of whole populations. Several health related tool examples are described and demonstrated as practical means through which health professionals might create clear location specific pictures of epidemiological data such as flu outbreaks.

Kamel Boulos, Maged; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Corley, Courtney D.; Wheeler, Steve

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Agent-Based vs. Equation-based Epidemiological Models:A Model Selection Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This paper is motivated by the need to design model validation strategies for epidemiological disease-spread models. We consider both agent-based and equation-based models of pandemic disease spread and study the nuances and complexities one has to consider from the perspective of model validation. For this purpose, we instantiate an equation based model and an agent based model of the 1918 Spanish flu and we leverage data published in the literature for our case- study. We present our observations from the perspective of each implementation and discuss the application of model-selection criteria to compare the risk in choosing one modeling paradigm to another. We conclude with a discussion of our experience and document future ideas for a model validation framework.

Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib August 18, 2011 - 1:03pm Addthis Powerful X-Rays Enable Development of Successful Treatment for Melanoma and Other Life-Threatening Diseases WASHINGTON, DC - Powerful X-ray technology developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories is revealing new insights into diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to the swine flu, and, most recently, enabled the discovery of a groundbreaking new drug treatment for malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The drug, Zelboraf (vemurafenib), received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval on Wednesday. In showing the structures of diseased and

337

Interim Report on Multiple Sequence Alignments and TaqMan Signature Mapping to Phylogenetic Trees  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, addressing a significant capability gap for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the Taqman signature development for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

Gardner, S; Jaing, C

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

SURVEY AND SUMMARY Role of RNA helicases in HIV-1 replication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Viruses are replication competent genomes which are relatively gene-poor. Even the largest viruses (i.e. Herpesviruses) encode only slightly.200 open reading frames (ORFs). However, because viruses replicate obligatorily inside cells, and considering that evolution may be driven by a principle of economy of scale, it is reasonable to surmise that many viruses have evolved the ability to co-opt cell-encoded proteins to provide needed surrogate functions. An in silico survey of viral sequence databases reveals that most positive-strand and double-stranded RNA viruses have ORFs for RNA helicases. On the other hand, the genomes of retroviruses are devoid of virally-encoded helicase. Here, we review in brief the notion that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has adopted the ability to use one or more cellular RNA helicases for its replicative life cycle.

Kuan-teh Jeang; Venkat Yedavalli

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DISPATCHES Emergence of African Swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008, African swine fever was introduced into Georgia, after which it spread to neighboring Armenia, Azerbaijan, and the Russian Federation. That same year, PCR and sequence analysis identifi ed African swine fever virus in samples from 3 dead female wild boars in northwestern Iran. Wild boars may serve as a reservoir. African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable, highly contagious, lethal, hemorrhagic disease in domestic pigs (1,2). ASF virus (ASFV) (International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses database no. 00.002.0.01.001), an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus, is the only known DNA arbovirus (3). Maintenance and transmission of ASFV involves cycling of virus between soft ticks of the genus Ornithodoros and wild pigs (warthogs, bush pigs, and giant forest boars) (1,2). The virus can also be acquired through

Pooneh Rahimi; Amir Sohrabi; Javad Ashrafihelan; Rosita Edalat; Mehran Alamdari; Mohammadhossein Masoudi; Saied Mostofi; Kayhan Azadmanesh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The impact of Global Health Initiatives and HIV and AIDS Programs on the Zambian Health System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Background: The Human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) and Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic peaked in 1999, which led to an increase in funding by (more)

Lundstrm, Tomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the intermediate form of the virus, but it always quickly morphed into its final armored form, even without DNA present. Finally, working with collaborators from the...

342

Development of an ELISA to determine Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) capsid protein antibody titers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is a naturally occurring, autonomous parvovirus that is capable of infecting some members of the Mustelidae family. Although this virus (more)

Pennick, Kate Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

BMC Infectious Diseases BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article A sensitive one-step real-time PCR for detection of avian influenza viruses using a MGB probe and an internal positive control

Livia Di Trani; Barbara Bedini; Isabella Donatelli; Laura Campitelli; Maria Aless; Ra De Marco; Mauro Delogu; Canio Buonavoglia; Gabriele Vaccari; Open Access

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

ALSNews Vol. 331  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the High-Speed Hard Drive: Topological Insulators Open a Path to Room-Temperature Spintronics Berkeley Lab Scientists Generate Electricity From Viruses Bay Area PV Consortium...

345

Applied Genetics Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MaterialsNIST has produced several PCR-based DNA Profiling Standard Reference ... of a Standard Reference Material for BK viral loadBK virus ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

346

Control of Viral Contamination of Food and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type 1 in mixed human and swine wastes and by bacteria fromA virus in mixed human and human wastes. Applied and

Cliver, Dean O.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Controlled Photolytic Release of Biocides for High Efficiency ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Airborne microorganismsbacteria, viruses, and fungithat enter heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, and deposit on...

348

Construction of a multiple targeting RNAi plasmid that inhibits target ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 7, 2010 ... Error bars refer to standard deviations ..... Dave RS, Pomerantz RJ (2004) Antiviral effects of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1-specific...

349

Assembly of biological building blocks for nano- and micro-fabrication of materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental studies were performed to fabricate various material structures using genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. This virus template showed superior controls of material syntheses from nanoscale to microscale. ...

Chiang, Chung-Yi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Board members attending: Dan Chenok, Jaren Doherty, Joe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... investigations identified no personal firewalls, out- of-date or no anti-virus software, and risky surfing habits (peer-2-peer and porn sites) as ...

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

UIC Developing Drug for SARS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

but their backbones. When viruses mutate, as they frequently do, thwarting the action of drugs, the mutations typically occur in these sidechains. "By targeting the backbone, we...

352

Artificial intelligence systems based on texture descriptors for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

peptides that bind human leukocyte antigens and on a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). ..... this paper by evaluating the error independence between.

353

Drug injection rates and needle-exchange use in New York City ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who attended anywhere from 4 to 11 quarterly .... standard error) for each person were used as the dependent variable

354

Correspondence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A minimal region in the NTPase/helicase domain of the TGBp1 plant virus movement protein is responsible for ATPase activity and cooperative RNA binding

Anna D. Leshchiner; Andrey G. Solovyev; Sergey Yu. Morozov; Natalia O. Kalinina; Natalia O. Kalinina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Transcript: NUIT Information Security News Podcast, May 31, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, whether you've got child porn on your machine, or you got a virus, or any of these types of things, you

Chisholm, Rex L.

356

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 7, 2009... also found that the virus batteries offer the same power performance as rechargeable batteries being developed to power plug-in hybrid cars,...

357

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a number of countries (Bulgaria, Hungary, the Czech and Slovak republics, and Poland) of the new Europe. Read more Safety Tip West Nile Virus Update Mosquito trap Several...

358

Technologies  

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy. August 26, 2013. LLNL Home. Latest News Headlines. Association between virus, bladder cancers detected. September 10, 2013.

359

FY 2009: Awards Accepted by OU by PI Academic Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be on the rise due to climate change--Lyme disease and the dengue virus. Drought-Tolerant Designer Genes June

Mountziaris, T. J.

360

Unraveling the Tick-Host-Pathogen Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

virus Aedes aegypti 7. Lyme Borreliosis Borrelia burgdorferiand transmission of the lyme disease agent." PLoS Pathog 6(Narasimhan, et al. (2005). "The Lyme disease agent exploits

Severo, Maiara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Particle Adventure | How do we detect what's happening? ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to scanning electron microscopes when studying sub-microscopic things like viruses. However, even the best scanning electron microscope can only show a fuzzy picture of an atom...

362

Medical and Biological Applications - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2010 ... Airborne microorganismsbacteria, viruses, and fungithat enter heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, and deposit on...

363

Biosafety Links | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Substances Organizations Prions Recombinant DNA Regulated Medical Waste Safety Manuals Select Agents Shipping Specimen IATA Training Virus-Specific Information Adenovirus...

364

INL Cyber Security Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Cyber security research at INL will help protect critical infrastructure control system computers against worms and other viruses. INL Cyber Security Research More...

365

Report Details Efforts to Improve, Advance Indoor Microbial ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... viruses, scientists estimate, make up half of the world's biomasssome 10 ... the results of these discussions, highlighting the current state of science ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fermilab | Tune IT Up | Milestones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

campaign for computing at Fermilab. We will accomplish this goal by better managing computers, strengthening passwords, protecting important data and guarding against viruses....

367

Visualizing fusion of pseudotyped HIV-1 particles in real time by live cell microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Results We generated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) particles pseudotyped with the envelope (Env) protein of ecotropic murine leukemia virus eMLV to study retrovirus entry at the plasma membrane using live-cell microscopy. This Env protein mediates...

Koch, Peter; Lampe, Marko; Godinez, William J; Muller, Barbara; Rohr, Karl; Kraeusslich, Hans-Georg; Lehmann, Maik J

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

System-level max power (SYMPO): a systematic approach for escalating system-level power consumption using synthetic benchmarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To effectively design a computer system for the worst case power consumption scenario, system architects often use hand-crafted maximum power consuming benchmarks at the assembly language level. These stressmarks, also called power viruses, are very ... Keywords: synthetic benchmark, system-level power virus, thermal design point

Karthik Ganesan; Jungho Jo; W. Lloyd Bircher; Dimitris Kaseridis; Zhibin Yu; Lizy K. John

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Child  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is reemerging in Peru. VEE virus subtype ID in Peru has not been previously associated with severe disease manifestations. In 2006, VEE virus subtype ID was isolated from a boy with severe febrile disease and gastrointestinal bleeding; the strain contained 2 mutations within the PE2 region.

Stalin Vilcarromero; V. Alberto Laguna-torres; Connie Fernndez; Eduardo Gotuzzo; Luis Surez; Manuel Cspedes; Patricia V. Aguilar; Tadeusz J. Kochel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Anti-influenza M2e antibody  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

Bradbury, Andrew M.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Anti-influenza M2e antibody  

SciTech Connect

Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Network forensics: random infection vs spreading epidemic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer (and human) networks have long had to contend with spreading viruses. Effectively controlling or curbing an outbreak requires understanding the dynamics of the spread. A virus that spreads by taking advantage of physical links or user-acquaintance ... Keywords: epidemic process, network inference

Chris Milling; Constantine Caramanis; Shie Mannor; Sanjay Shakkottai

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The ecology of Malware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fight against malicious software (or malware, which includes everything from worms to viruses to botnets) is often viewed as an "arms race." Conventional wisdom is that we must continually "raise the bar" for the malware creators. However, the multitude ... Keywords: botnets, malware analysis, malware ecology, viruses, worms

Jedidiah R. Crandall; Roya Ensafi; Stephanie Forrest; Joshua Ladau; Bilal Shebaro

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Development of Real Time RT-PCR Assays for Neuraminidase Subtyping of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Real Time RT-PCR Assays for Neuraminidase Subtyping of Avian Influenza Virus Yanyan (PCR) has become the method of choice for virus subtype identification, largely replacing traditional]. However, designing subtype specific PCR primer pairs is a very challenging task [4]: on one hand, selected

Mandoiu, Ion

375

Science Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 image Outside view of the T=4 subunit arrangement. » Links Scientific Highlight Johnson Lab » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Following the pH-dependent Conformational Changes of a Maturing Viral Capsid summary written by Raven Hanna The capsid that surrounds viruses is formed from subunit proteins that interact in specific ways to form a tight shell. The processes of coming together and forming interactions are multistep and complex and are fundamental events to acquire viral infectivity. The capsid maturation process of the Nudaurelia capensis omega virus includes pH-dependant conformational changes and auto-proteolysis. Like many human viruses such as HIV and herpes virus, NwV, an insect virus, requires these specific structural changes to become infectious.

376

Structural, Biochemical, and in Vivo Characterization of the First Virally Encoded Cyclophilin from the Mimivirus  

SciTech Connect

Although multiple viruses utilize host cell cyclophilins, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and human immunodeficiency virus type-1(HIV-1), their role in infection is poorly understood. To help elucidate these roles, we have characterized the first virally encoded cyclophilin (mimicyp) derived from the largest virus discovered to date (the Mimivirus) that is also a causative agent of pneumonia in humans. Mimicyp adopts a typical cyclophilin-fold, yet it also forms trimers unlike any previously characterized homologue. Strikingly, immunofluorescence assays reveal that mimicyp localizes to the surface of the mature virion, as recently proposed for several viruses that recruit host cell cyclophilins such as SARS and HIV-1. Additionally mimicyp lacks peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity in contrast to human cyclophilins. Thus, this study suggests that cyclophilins, whether recruited from host cells (ie HIV-1 and SARS) or virally encoded (ie Mimivirus), are localized on viral surfaces for at least a subset of viruses.

Thai,V.; Renesto, P.; Fowler, C.; Brown, D.; Davis, T.; Gu, W.; Pollock, D.; Kern, D.; Raoult, D.; Eisenmesser, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.  

SciTech Connect

Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

X:\ARM_19~1\P225-243.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SO SO 2 4 0.5 F T (1 A c )T 2 (1 R s ) 2 RH r SO 2 4 (RH) SO 2 4 x F(RH)] SO 2 SO 2 ) F T A c (1 A c ) R s RH r SO 2 4 (RH) SO 2 4 SO 2 SO 2 , SO 2 SO 2 Session Papers 231 (1) Direct Shortwave Forcing of Climate by Anthropogenic Sulfate Aerosol: Sensitivity to Particle Size, Composition, and Relative Humidity S. Nemesure, R. Wagener, and S. E. Schwartz Environmental Chemistry Division Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Recent estimates of global- or hemispheric-average forcing = the solar constant, the solar radiative flu x of climate by anthropogenic sulfate aerosol due t o at a mean distance from the earth to th e scattering of shortwave radiation ("direct" effect) ar e sun uncertain by somewhat more than a factor of 2. Th e = the fractional cloud cover in the area o f principal sources of this uncertainty are atmospheri

379

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Anaconda Smelter Site, Mill Creek, Montana (first remedial action), October 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 160-acre community of Mill Creek is located in Deerlodge County, Montana, immediately adjacent to the Anaconda Smelter NPL site. The community of Mill Creek has been contaminated for over 100 years with smelter emissions, fugitive emissions of flu dust at the smelter, and continued fugitive emissions emanating from adjacent highly contaminated soils. Settled flue emissions in the community of Mill Creek, from the now-defunct copper-smelting operation, contain arsenic, cadmium, and lead. Environmental siting of the community and biological testing of pre-school children, led EPA to conclude that contamination in the Mill Creek area poses an imminent and substantial endangerment to the health of individuals residing there. The primary contaminant of concern at this site is arsenic. Cadmium and lead are secondary contaminants of concern. The selected remedial action for the site includes: permanent relocation of all residents (8 homes) with temporary erosional stabilization of disturbed areas by establishing and maintaining a vegetative cover; demolition, consolidation, and storage.

Not Available

1988-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Reynolds David Reynolds Electronics Technician Gore, Oklahoma Special thanks to: SWPA Marshall Boyken Beth Nielsen Carrie Quick Dawn Rodriguez Steve Wall CNI/Bearskin Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia William Hiller Chad Holland Kathy O'Neal Jimmy Robison Mary Beth Hudson Tulsa District Corps Rhonda James SW Division Corps P.J. Spaul Little Rock District Corps U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N A P R I L - J U N E 2 0 1 0 Southwestern Readies for Remote Chance continued on page 2 During a hypothetical spring in the near future, a virulent new strain of flu overwhelms medical services across the country. The contagion spreads quickly and easily in offices, schools, and public places, and an effective vaccine is months away. As the infection reaches pandemic proportions, Southwestern employees are instructed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Studies Revealed Three Kinetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 2010 June 2010 Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Studies Revealed Three Kinetic Stages of a T=4 Virus Maturation Most eukaryotic viruses, including HIV, influenza and herpes viruses, undergo maturation when transitioning from the noninfectious provirion to the infectious virion. Maturation processes involve reorganization of viral quaternary structure to defend viral gene from the cellular defense mechanism and lead to effective transfection. Nudaurelia capensis omega virus, NwV, is a T=4, non-enveloped, icosahedral, single strand RNA virus, where T is the triangulation number defining an icosahedral lattice of the virus capsid structure. Virus like particles (VLPs) of NwV exhibit large pH-dependent conformational changes (LCC) when the procapsid, purified at pH=7.6, (~480 Å) is exposed to pH=5.0, resulting in ~400 Å particles (Figure 1). In response to the LCC, an auto-proteolysis occurs in which each of 240 subunits is cleaved at Asn570-Phe571 (1). We investigated this pH-induced maturation by equilibrium and time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at SSRL beam line 4-2.

382

Hershey-Chase experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hershey-Chase experiment Hershey-Chase experiment Name: pei01 Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I would like to know the characteristics of Griffth's experiment, and Hershey-Chase experiment. Replies: For the H-C experiment: It was designed to show that the type of virus known as a bacteriophage infected bacteria by injecting its DNA, and not by incorporating the entire virus into the bacterium. This was important because it showed that the entire replication of the virus could be coded for in the DNA of the virus, and not in the coat protein. They labeled with radioactivity the coat of the virus using one type of label 35-S, and the DNA with another, 32-P and then infected bacteria. After infection, the bacteria contained only 32-P, and no 35-S. The viruses went on to destroy the bacteria and reproduce, and the new viruses contained no 35-S in their coats. Source: Biology, 3rd ed., by Solomon et al., although the same information is in almost all texts at the college level

383

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Communication Environmental Surveillance. An Additional/Alternative Approach for Virological Surveillance in Greece?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The detection of viruses in the sewage of an urban city by nucleic acid amplification techniques allows the identification of the viral strains that are circulating in the community. The aim of the study was the application of such detection which gives useful data on the distribution, spread, and frequency of these viruses, supporting epidemiological studies of the related viral infections. A two year (20072009) survey was conducted in order to evaluate the presence of human adenoviruses (hAdV), hepatitis A viruses (HAV), hepatitis E viruses (HEV), noroviruses (NoV), and human polyomaviruses (hPyV) in sewage samples collected from the inlet of a municipal biological wastewater treatment plant located in southwestern Greece. PCR methods were used for this survey. In total, viruses have been detected in 87.5 % (42/48) of the analyzed sewage samples. Analytically, DNA viruses, hAdVs and hPyVs have been detected in 45.8 % (22/48) and 68.8 % (33/48) of the samples, respectively. As it concerns RNA viruses, HAV was detected in 8.3 % (4/48), NoVs in 6.3 % (3/48), while HEV has not been detected at all. After sequencing, AdVs were typed as Ad8, Ad40 and Ad41, while both JC and BK hPyVs have been recognized. All NoVs have been identified as GII4, while HAV was typed as

Petros Kokkinos; Panos Ziros; Danai Meri; Stella Kolla; Alexis Galanis; Apostolos Vantarakis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Colds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colds Colds Name: John Smith Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What causes colds and how can they be cured? Replies: Colds are caused by a virus (rhinovirus) that invades the membranes of the nose and trachea (the windpipe). The symptoms that we call a "cold" are mostly the body's attempts to get rid of the virus. There is not a cure for the cold you just wait for the body's immune system (defense system) to get rid of the virus. You can treat the symptoms, though aspirin for fever, antihistamines to clear up congestion in the nose, etc. Sometimes, after a bad cold, you can get bronchitis, where bacteria invade the windpipe and lungs because the cold made them more susceptible. This can be treated with antibiotics, which kill bacteria, but not viruses

385

Immunity-Based Intrusion Detection System: A General ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and proliferation of B cells are closely regulated (with a co-stimulation) in order to ... The signals tell how to kill the new virus as well as similar one. ...

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

Beachy, Roger N. (St. Louis, MO); Petruccelli, Silvana (La Plata, AR); Dai, Shunhong (St. Louis, MO)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

The NoAH difference Generic architecture The NoAH Components Argos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worms, viruses and trojans common occurrences in our daily interaction with computers Zero-day exploits used for installing various malware Selective attacks Traditional approaches too slow too inaccurate looking for known malware

Dr. Catalin Meirosu; Evangelos Markatos; Asia Slowinska; Klaus Moeller; Jan Kohlrausch; Spiros Antonatos

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dendritic cell maturation and activation via RNA/DNA danger signals : co-delivery of protein antigen with siRNA or CpG DNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional vaccines consisting of live attenuated pathogens or inactivated toxins cannot be readily applied to the more challenging diseases of the present e.g. hepatitis C and the human immunodeficiency virus. As such, ...

Yap, Jonathan Woon Teck

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Early Days of Food and Environmental Virology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type 1 in mixed human and swine wastes and by bacteria fromA virus in mixed human and animal wastes. Applied anddisposal of mixed human and animal wastesA review. Waste

Cliver, Dean O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 19, 2013-Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

virus spread and evolution studied virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling November 19, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 19, 2013-Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are investigating the complex relationships between the spread of the HIV virus in a population (epidemiology) and the actual, rapid evolution of the virus (phylogenetics) within each patient's body. "We have developed novel ways of estimating epidemics dynamics such as who infected whom, and the true population incidence of infection versus mere diagnoses dates," said Thomas Leitner, principal investigator. "Obviously, knowledge about these things is important for public health monitoring, decision making and intervention campaigns, and further to forensic investigations." The team models the uninfected population using traditional differential equations

391

Audit Report: IG-0500 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Audit Report: IG-0500 April 5, 2001 Virus Protection Strategies and Cyber Security Incident Reporting Information Technology (IT) plays an integral role in the programs and operations of the Department of Energy. In Fiscal Year 2001, the Department budgeted $1.4 billion for the acquisition and maintenance of IT related resources, a portion of which supports the Advanced Strategic Computing Initiative. These resources, and the programs they support, are vulnerable to malicious software, viruses, trojans, worms (collectively referred to as viruses), and cyber security attacks. To effectively protect its IT resources, the Department must ensure that its virus protection and detection capabilities as well as its cyber security incident reporting practices are "state of the art."

392

Orientational order of carbon nanotube guests in a nematic host suspension of colloidal viral rods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to investigate the coupling between the degrees of alignment of elongated particles in binary nematic dispersions, surfactant stabilized single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been added to nematic suspensions of colloidal rodlike viruses in aqueous solution.We have independently measured the orientational order parameter of both components of the guest-host system by means of polarized Raman spectroscopy and by optical birefringence, respectively. Our system allows us therefore to probe the regime where the guest particles (CNTs) are shorter and thinner than the fd virus host particles. We show that the degree of order of the CNTs is systematically smaller than that of the fd virus particles for the whole nematic range. These measurements are in good agreement with predictions of an Onsager-type second-viral theory, which explicitly includes the flexibility of the virus particles, and the polydispersity of the CNTs.

Nicolas Puech; Matthew Dennison; Christophe Blanc; Paul van der Schoot; Marjolein Dijkstra; Ren van Roij; Philippe Poulin; Eric Grelet

2013-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Prediction of ribosomal frameshift signals of user-defined models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programmed ribosomal frameshifts are used frequently by RNA viruses to synthesize a single fusion protein from two or more overlapping open reading frames. Depending on the number of nucleotides shifted and the direction of shifting, frameshifts are ...

Yanga Byun; Sanghoon Moon; Kyungsook Han

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

NANO-IMMUNOASSAYS FOR ULTRAHIGH SENSITIVE/SELECTIVE DETECTION OF HIV K.-B. Lee, E.-Y. Kim, C. A. Mirkin, and S. M. Wolinsky, "The Use of Nanoarrays for Highly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO-IMMUNOASSAYS FOR ULTRAHIGH SENSITIVE/SELECTIVE DETECTION OF HIV K.-B. Lee, E.-Y. Kim, C. A Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Plasma", Nano Lett. 2004, 4, 1869 ­ 1872. The ability to create antibody

Shull, Kenneth R.

395

J-26: Nanocomposite Photocatalysts Containing TiO2 for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... viruses, fungi and algae. The main drawbacks of the low quantum yields and the lack of visible-light utilization hinder the practical applications of TiO2. Hence ...

396

Cell type specific gene expression : profiling and targeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. Herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA amplified as bacterialUCSC). hNPPC (AAV)- c-type natriuretic peptide precursor,A. Architecture and cell types of the adult subventricular

Nathanson, Jason Lawrence

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films with antimicrobial, antifouling and drug releasing properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis work focuses on designing thin polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films via layer-bylayer (LbL) deposition technique with the ability to kill pathogenic bacteria and inactivate human viruses, especially the ...

Wong, Sze Yinn (Sze Yinn Jessie)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Researchers Funded by the DOE "Genomes to Life" Program Achieve...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Abraham said. IBEA scientists have assembled more than 5,000 bases or building blocks of DNA to create a small artificial virus, a so-called phage that infects...

399

Enzymatic Blockade of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ubiquitin-dependent processes control much of cellular physiology. We show that expression of a highly active, Epstein-Barr virus-derived deubiquitylating enzyme (EBV-DUB) blocks proteasomal degradation of cytosolic and ...

Ernst, Robert

400

A mobile phone malicious software detection model with behavior checker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been cases reported for the new threats from mobile phone technologies and it has raised the awareness among the technology and antivirus vendors. Malicious programs such as Viruses, Trojan, and Worms have been created and targeted at mobile ...

Teck Sung Yap; Hong Tat Ewe

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - The Man at the End of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Man at the End of the X-ray Laser By Glenn Roberts Jr. February 5, 2013 Daniel DePonte, a pioneer in finding ways to serve up a steady and precise supply of crystals, viruses and...

402

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a glass substrate into a solution containing the virus and withdrawing it in just the right way, they were able to produce various structures. The process they developed could...

403

Analysis of High-Throughput Sequencing and Annotation Strategies for Phage Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Bacterial viruses (phages) play a critical role in shaping microbial populations as they influence both host mortality and horizontal gene transfer. As such, they have a significant impact on local and global ...

Chisholm, Sallie (Penny)

404

The Role of U.S. Insurance Regulators in Responding to Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

note 23. 25. John Brownstein, Lyme Disease: Implications ofNile Virus to ticks carry- ing Lyme Disease 25 to rodentsWNV in North America. Lyme disease is the most widespread

Mills, Evan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Antiviral polymeric drugs and surface coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Viruses are a major cause of human morbidity and mortality in the world. New effective approaches to stop their spread are paramount. Herein, two approaches toward this goal are explored: (i) developing multivalent ...

Larson, Alyssa Maxine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

IPS: IDS or IPS: what is best?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intrusion detection systems (IDS) have become one of the most common countermeasures in the network security arsenal. But while other technologies such as firewalls and anti-virus provide proactive protection, most current IDSs are passive; detection ...

Maria Papadaki; Steven Furnell

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Unix systems monitoring with FCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many existing software tools for identifying specific and severe IT security threats (virus checkers, firewalls). But it is more difficult to detect less severe and more general problems, such as disclosure of sensitive or private data. In ...

Uta Priss

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

ES&H Advisory Avian Influenza, October 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

re- ported in Southeast Asia (Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Ja- pan, Laos, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam). In recent months, H5N1 was isolated from birds in Russia. The virus...

409

Bette Korber, 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Page Live Sciences: For her studies delineating the genetic characteristics of the HIV virus and for her development of the Los Alamos HIV database, a foundation for HIV research...

410

Snapshots and Scrapbooks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

study, the X-ray pulse lasted a millionth of a billionth of a second and heated the virus to 100,000 degrees Celsius, but not before this image was obtained. But pulling out...

411

University of Florida | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

grant to research pine-based biofuels New gene chip may help detect, treat West Nile virus in horses and humans UF teamed with USF, FSU and UCF to build the DOE Solar Decathlon...

412

Visualisation of influenza A protein segments in distance invariant self-organising map  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the lateral gene transfer, the phylogenetic tree could be inadequate for representing the evolution of virus. This paper employs the distance invariant manifold (Cheng and Liou, 2009) to display the collection of influenza A in a cubic space. ...

Wei-Chen Cheng; Cheng-Yuan Liou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or ecard, Fermilab's computer security team warns not to click on the email's enclosed link or you could download a virus. Please use discretion when clicking on email links or...

414

Dogs and Human Diseases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diseases Name: Doris Status: Other Grade: 9-12 Location: OK Date: NA Question: Can a dog contact the shingles or chicken pox virus from a human? Replies: Hi Doris, Great...

415

ALSNews Vol. 293  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00:00 In This Issue The ALS Prepares for DOE Office of Health, Safety, and Security Audit Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor...

416

Optimization of HAART with genetic algorithms and agent-based models of HIV infection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Highly Active AntiRetroviral Therapies (HAART) can prolong life significantly to people infected by HIV since, although unable to eradicate the virus, they are quite effective in maintaining control of the infection. However, since ...

F. Castiglione; F. Pappalardo; M. Bernaschi; S. Motta

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Antigen-specific memory T cell distribution in non-lymphoid tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CD8+ T cells are the main adaptive immune system cell type responding to intracellular pathogens, particularly viruses, and tumor antigens. In the case of influenza, activated T cells migrate from the mediastinal (draining) ...

Olurinde, Mobolaji O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

SPiKE: engineering malware analysis tools using unobtrusive binary-instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Malware -- a generic term that encompasses viruses, trojans, spywares and other intrusive code -- is widespread today. Malware analysis is a multi-step process providing insight into malware structure and functionality, facilitating the development of ... Keywords: instrumentation, malware, security

Amit Vasudevan; Ramesh Yerraballi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Real-time quantitative PCR for enteric adenovirus serotype 40 in environmental waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adenovirus detection by PCR as an index of human viruses.polluted waters by nested PCR amplification. Appl. Environ.real-time quantitative PCR. J. Clin. Microbiol. Wigand, R. ,

Jiang, Sunny C; Dezfulian, H; Chu, W P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

[Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants]. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is described concerning genetic mapping CMV movement genes for CMV coat protein in squash and ToMV gene in tomato. These gene products appear to be involved in resistance to squash and tomato mosaic viruses respectively.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL, AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and agarose gel electrophoresis; mouse colony management and genotyping; perform biochemical experiments procedures and in vivo virus work. Laboratory Organization/Maintenance: maintain lab equipment; keep records research laboratory. Good organizational, time management and problem solving skills. The abilities

California at Santa Cruz, University of

422

main_title.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Nests Buffalo Canada Geese Deer Fungi Grass Insects Lichens Math Patterns in Nature Poison Ivy Prairie Insects in Winter Red-tailed Hawk West Nile Virus Woodchuck Prairie...

423

In defense of the realm: understanding the threats to information security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The popular press is replete with information about attacks on information systems. Viruses, worms, hackers, and employee abuse and misuse have created a dramatic need for understanding and implementing quality information security. In order to accomplish ...

Michael E. Whitman

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Vaccine to control the viral infection of fish  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Subunit vaccines and their use for immunizing fish against infection by viruses are disclosed. In particular, plasmid pG8 is constructed by joining, with the plasmid pUC8, DNA which encodes the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). E. coli cells are transformed by pG8, whereby pure viral antigen is produced to provide a vaccine for the control of IHNV in fish.

Leong, Jo-Ann C. (Albany, OR)

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

Vaccine to Control the Viral Infection of Fish.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Subunit vaccines and their use for immunizing fish against infection by viruses are disclosed. In particular, plasmid pG8 is constructed by joining, with the plasmid pUC8, DNA which encodes the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). E. coli cells are transformed by pG8, whereby pure viral antigen is produced to provide a vaccine for the control of IHNV in fish. 10 figs.

Leong, JoAnn Ching

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Remote Access to Brookhaven, Information Services Division (ISD),  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISD Homepage ISD Homepage Site Details ISD Staff Remote Access Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Remote Access to Brookhaven External BNL users who need internet access to the internal ISD website which includes the Research Library, Records Management, Publications and Technical Editing must have a Virtual Private Network (VPN) account to connect to the BNL Internal Campus Network. This account can be setup by the Accounts Management Office. Available Options Remote Access Policy Broad-Band Connection: must use VPN with a CryptoCard Token Anti-Virus Procedures All Windows PCs should be running one of Brookhaven's official anti-virus software packages when connecting remotely to the BNL Internal Campus Network. Anti-Virus procedures are an important component of BNL's host-based security architecture. Anti-Virus software is the component of this architecture that provides a protection mechanism against malicious code. Malicious codes are programs, such as Trojan horses or viruses, that run on a host system without the authorization of the system user. These codes typically come from e-mail attachments, or can be downloaded along with programs from the Internet, or through an infected floppy disk. Properly installed anti-virus software can minimize these vulnerabilities.

427

Chicken Pox  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicken Pox Chicken Pox Name: Mike Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why is the virus entitled Chicken Pox when it is contracted by humans? How did Chicken Pox get its name? If cows can contract a virus entitled cow pox, why is Chicken Pox Chicken Pox? Replies: Hi! The reason is exactly that: because there is a chicken disease called "chicken pox"...even "our " chicken pox isn't caused by the same virus... see, pox diseases are a complex of viral diseases in domestic animals and men, marked mainly by eruptions of the skin and mucous membranes. So there is for example: smallpox (men), sheep pox, rabbit pox, horse pox, fowl pox, cow pox, mouse pox, and so on... Pox virus are the group of viruses responsible for small pox in humans and a wide range of pox diseases in animals. Chicken pox in humans is also called varicella and is caused by a herpes virus.

428

Construction and biological activities of the first infectious cDNA clones of the genus Foveavirus  

SciTech Connect

Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV, genus Foveavirus, family Betaflexiviridae) is one of the most prevalent viruses in grapevines and is associated with three distinct diseases: rupestris stem pitting, vein necrosis and Syrah decline. Little is known about the biology and pathological properties of GRSPaV. In this work, we engineered a full-length infectious cDNA clone for GRSPaV and a GFP-tagged variant, both under the transcriptional control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S promoter. We demonstrated that these cDNA clones were infectious in grapevines and Nicotiana benthamiana through fluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immuno electron microscopy. Interestingly, GRSPaV does not cause systemic infection in four of the most commonly used herbaceous plants, even in the presence of the movement proteins of two other viruses which are known to complement numerous movement-defective viruses. These infectious clones are the first of members of Foveavirus which would allow further investigations into mechanisms governing different aspects of replication for GRSPaV and perhaps related viruses.

Meng, Baozhong, E-mail: bmeng@uoguelph.ca [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Venkataraman, Srividhya; Li, Caihong; Wang, Weizhou [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Dayan-Glick, Cathy; Mawassi, Munir [The Plant Pathology Department-The Virology Unit, Plant Protection Institute, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250 (Israel)] [The Plant Pathology Department-The Virology Unit, Plant Protection Institute, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250 (Israel)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Design of high efficiency blowers for future aerosol applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High efficiency air blowers to meet future portable aerosol sampling applications were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. A Centrifugal blower was designed to achieve a flow rate of 100 L/min (1.67 x 10^-3 m^3/s) and a pressure rise of WC " 4 (1000 PA). Commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, FLUENT 6.1.22, was used extensively throughout the entire design cycle. The machine, Reynolds number (Re) , was around 10^5 suggesting a turbulent flow field. Renormalization Group (RNG) ?ºâ???µ turbulent model was used for FLUENT simulations. An existing design was scaled down to meet the design needs. Characteristic curves showing static pressure rise as a function of flow rate through the impeller were generated using FLUENT and these were validated through experiments. Experimentally measured efficiency (?·EXP) for the base-design was around 10%. This was attributed to the low efficiency of the D.C. motor used. CFD simulations, using the ?ºâ???µ turbulent model and standard wall function approach, over-predicted the pressure rise values and the percentage error was large. Enhanced wall function under-predicted the pressure rise but gave better agreement (less than 6% error) with experimental results. CFD predicted a blower scaled 70% in planar direction (XZ) and 28% in axial direction (Y) and running at 19200 rpm (70xz_28y@19.2k) as the most appropriate choice. The pressure rise is 1021 Pa at the design flow rate of 100 L/min. FLUENT predicts an efficiency value based on static head (?·FLU) as 53.3%. Efficiency value based on measured static pressure rise value and the electrical energy input to the motor (?·EXP) is 27.4%. This is almost a 2X improvement over the value that one gets with the hand held vacuum system blower.

Chadha, Raman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nowcasting influenza outbreaks using open-source media report.  

SciTech Connect

We construct and verify a statistical method to nowcast influenza activity from a time-series of the frequency of reports concerning influenza related topics. Such reports are published electronically by both public health organizations as well as newspapers/media sources, and thus can be harvested easily via web crawlers. Since media reports are timely, whereas reports from public health organization are delayed by at least two weeks, using timely, open-source data to compensate for the lag in %E2%80%9Cofficial%E2%80%9D reports can be useful. We use morbidity data from networks of sentinel physicians (both the Center of Disease Control's ILINet and France's Sentinelles network) as the gold standard of influenza-like illness (ILI) activity. The time-series of media reports is obtained from HealthMap (http://healthmap.org). We find that the time-series of media reports shows some correlation ( 0.5) with ILI activity; further, this can be leveraged into an autoregressive moving average model with exogenous inputs (ARMAX model) to nowcast ILI activity. We find that the ARMAX models have more predictive skill compared to autoregressive (AR) models fitted to ILI data i.e., it is possible to exploit the information content in the open-source data. We also find that when the open-source data are non-informative, the ARMAX models reproduce the performance of AR models. The statistical models are tested on data from the 2009 swine-flu outbreak as well as the mild 2011-2012 influenza season in the U.S.A.

Ray, Jaideep; Brownstein, John S. [Boston Children%3CU%2B2019%3Es Hospital, Boston, MA

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Multiple sclerosis and interferon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multiple sclerosis and interferon Multiple sclerosis and interferon Name: iguanajoe Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: I have recently read that interferon is being used as a treatment for multiple sclerosis. Please explain how it affects the nerve tissue and how effective it is. Replies: Interferon is a cell to cell chemical messenger which essentially protects cells from viruses. That is, when a virus infects a cell, it sends out interferon, which is received by neighboring cells. A biochemical reaction then follows which builds the cells resistance viruses, and hopefully, it will be enough to prevent the virus from spreading. If there is work with interferon and MS, perhaps some researchers believe that MS is caused by a viral infection that destroys nervous tissue. r, that viruses cause some genetic mutation which compromises the maintenance of healthy nervous tissue. By the way, the genetic cause for another muscular-nervous disorder, Lou Gherigs Disease or ALS, was recently found to be a hereditary genetic disorder. People susceptible to ALS did not have a gene which codes for a certain superoxide dismutase antioxidant enzyme, necessary to maintain healthy nervous tissue and prevent it from free radical destruction. Maybe the cause of MS is similar.

432

Outbreak?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outbreak? Outbreak? Name: Nathan W Brandsma Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the chances that a diseases, like in the movie outbreak, could occur? Replies: The movie Outbreak is about a disease caused by a virus. Many diseases are actually caused by viruses (AIDS, chicken pox, colds, etc). Most viral diseases can only be prevented (by getting vaccinated), but can't be cured; though we can often reduce the symptoms (like anti-itch cream for chicken pox, or cough drops for a cold). Viral diseases are usually spread from one person to another. What people sometimes worry about is a new virus that is deadly but can be spread really easily (like through the air or by touch). Since there are so many people in the world today, this virus could travel all over the place going from person to person. Nobody knows what the chances are that a virus like that will turn up. Fortunately, there are a number of organizations that keep a close watch on infectious diseases, and have lots of doctors who specialize in containing "outbreaks." So it is something to think about, but I wouldn't stay up at night worrying about it!

433

Malware Detection Module using Machine Learning Algorithms to Assist in Centralized Security in Enterprise Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Malicious software is abundant in a world of innumerable computer users, who are constantly faced with these threats from various sources like the internet, local networks and portable drives. Malware is potentially low to high risk and can cause systems to function incorrectly, steal data and even crash. Malware may be executable or system library files in the form of viruses, worms, Trojans, all aimed at breaching the security of the system and compromising user privacy. Typically, anti-virus software is based on a signature definition system which keeps updating from the internet and thus keeping track of known viruses. While this may be sufficient for home-users, a security risk from a new virus could threaten an entire enterprise network. This paper proposes a new and more sophisticated antivirus engine that can not only scan files, but also build knowledge and detect files as potential viruses. This is done by extracting system API calls made by various normal and harmful executable, and using machine l...

Singhal, Priyank; 10.5121/ijnsa.2012.4106

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: > We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. > Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. > A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. > Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

Poulin, Kathy L. [Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Centre for Neuromuscular Disease, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga [Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Pool, Madeline [Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Centre for Neuromuscular Disease, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Kothary, Rashmi [Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Centre for Neuromuscular Disease, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Parks, Robin J., E-mail: rparks@ohri.ca [Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Centre for Neuromuscular Disease, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

435

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relationships between HIV spread and Relationships between HIV spread and evolution examined November 14, 2013 Thomas Leitner of LANL's Theoretical Biology and Biophysics group and collaborators are investigating the development of HIV from the point of contraction onwards. They are examining the relationships between the spread of the virus in a population (epidemiology) and the evolution of the virus (phylogenetics). The genetic evolution of HIV in infected humans means that unique HIV populations are manifest in each infected individual, which change over time. This evolutionary process leaves a footprint of the transmission history in the genetic material of the virus. The researchers aim to utilize the HIV genetic footprint in mathematical models to reconstruct accurately how epidemics spread. The model systems could be used to

436

Evaluation of an Experimental Re-introduction of Sockeye Salmon into Skaha Lake; Year 2 of 3, 2001 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings from YEAR 2 of a three-year disease risk assessment. The Okanagan Nation Fisheries Commission (ONFC) and the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT) are investigating the risks involved in re-introducing sockeye salmon into Skaha Lake, part of their historical range (Ernst and Vedan 2000). The disease risk assessment compares the disease and infection status of fish above and below McIntyre Dam (the present limit of sockeye migration). The disease agents identified that are of a particular concern are: infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus type 2 (IHNV type2), erythrocytic inclusion body syndrome virus (EIBSV), the whirling disease agent (Myxobolus cerebralis), and the ceratomyxosis agent (Ceratomyxa shasta).

Fisher, Christopher (Colville Confederated Tribes, Omak Community Center, Omak, WA); Machin, Deanna; Wright, Howie (Okanagan National Fisheries Commission, Westbank, BC, Canada)

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Viral genome structures are optimal for capsid assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how virus capsids assemble around their nucleic acid (NA) genomes could promote efforts to block viral propagation or to reengineer capsids for gene therapy applications. We develop a coarse-grained model of capsid proteins and NAs with which we investigate assembly dynamics and thermodynamics. In contrast to recent theoretical models, we find that capsids spontaneously `overcharge'; i.e., the negative charge of the NA exceeds the positive charge on capsid. When applied to specific viruses, the optimal NA lengths closely correspond to the natural genome lengths. Calculations based on linear polyelectrolytes rather than base-paired NAs underpredict the optimal length, demonstrating the importance of NA structure to capsid assembly. These results suggest that electrostatics, excluded volume, and NA tertiary structure are sufficient to predict assembly thermodynamics and that the ability of viruses to selectively encapsidate their genomic NAs can be explained, at least in part, on a thermodynamic basis.

Jason D. Perlmutter; Cong Qiao; Michael F. Hagan

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ig-0500.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 21 AUDIT REPORT VIRUS PROTECTION STRATEGIES AND CYBER SECURITY INCIDENT REPORTING U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES APRIL 2001 DOE/IG-0500 April 5, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Virus Protection Strategies and Cyber Security Incident Reporting" BACKGROUND Information Technology (IT) plays an integral role in the programs and operations of the Department of Energy. In Fiscal Year 2001, the Department budgeted $1.4 billion for the acquisition and maintenance of IT related resources, a portion of which supports the Advanced

439

Research Highlights | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology & Medicine Archive Biology & Medicine Archive Research Highlights Biology & Medicine Archive Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Team Finds Structural Differences in Sindbis Virus Particles from Different Host Species (2010) Published Work: "The Structure of Sindbis Virus Produced from Vertebrate and Invertebrate Hosts as Determined by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering" Contact: Flora Meilleur Targeted Drug Delivery Systems Studies of the unique structure of synthetic molecules will help in the development of drugs that can target diseased areas of the body. This researched on dendrimers revealed how molecules function within solutions at different pH levels. (2008) Research in progress. Contact: Wei-Ren Chen "Intelligent" Polymers for Biomedical Technologies

440

unknown title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cases of rubella were notified in five municipalities in Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Eight cases were laboratoryconfirmed by positive IgM against rubella virus*. Four virus isolates were obtained and identified as genotype 2B strains, with one isolate differing by a single mutation in the region of the E1 gene. This ongoing outbreak revealed gaps in the immunisation programme during the war in BiH (1992-1995) and highlights the need to revise legislation to permit immunisation of children above 14 years of age with measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine and to introduce supplemental immunisation activities.

A Novo; Who Country Office For Bosnia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Determining mutant spectra of three RNA viral samples using ultra-deep sequencing  

SciTech Connect

RNA viruses have extremely high mutation rates that enable the virus to adapt to new host environments and even jump from one species to another. As part of a viral transmission study, three viral samples collected from naturally infected animals were sequenced using Illumina paired-end technology at ultra-deep coverage. In order to determine the mutant spectra within the viral quasispecies, it is critical to understand the sequencing error rates and control for false positive calls of viral variants (point mutantations). I will estimate the sequencing error rate from two control sequences and characterize the mutant spectra in the natural samples with this error rate.

Chen, H

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this dissertation is threefold: to determine the differences in apparent prevalence and the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. between antimicrobial-free and conventional swine farms; secondly, to introduce an appropriate statistical model to compare the minimum inhibitory concentration distributions of Escherichia coli and Campylobacter spp. isolated from both farm types; and thirdly, to examine the potential herd level risk factors that may be associated with antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter spp. and E. coli isolates from finishers on antimicrobial-free and conventional farming systems. In addition, a critical review of studies that have compared the levels and patterns of antimicrobial resistance among animals from antimicrobial-free and conventional farming practices was performed. Fecal samples from 15 pigs were collected from each of 35 antimicrobial-free and 60 conventional farms in the Midwestern U.S. Campylobacter spp. was isolated from 464 of 1,422 fecal samples, and each isolate was tested for susceptibility to 6 antimicrobials. The apparent prevalence of Campylobacter spp. isolates was approximately 33 percent on both conventional and antimicrobial-free farms. The proportion of antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter was higher for three antimicrobials within conventional compared to antimicrobial-free farms. The susceptibilities of populations of bacteria to antimicrobial drugs were summarized as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) frequency distributions. The use of MIC values removed the subjectivity associated with the choice of breakpoints which define an isolate as susceptible or resistant. A discrete-time survival analysis model was introduced as the recommended statistical model when MICs are the outcome. A questionnaire was completed by each farm manager on biosecurity, preventive medication, vaccines, disease history, and production management. Multivariable population-averaged statistical models were used to determine the relationships among antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and potential herd-level risk factors. Controlling for herd type (antimicrobial-free versus conventional), each antimicrobial-bacterial species combination yielded unique combinations of risk factors; however, housing type, history of rhinitis, farm ventilation, and history of swine flu were significant in more than one model. A variety of herd-level practices were associated with the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance on swine farms. Further studies are encouraged when considering interventions for antimicrobial resistance on both antimicrobial-free and conventional farms.

Rollo, Susan Noble

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

444

Towards more efficient infection and fire fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The firefighter problem models the situation where an infection, a computer virus, an idea or fire etc. is spreading through a network and the goal is to save as many as possible nodes of the network through targeted vaccinations. The number of ... Keywords: approximation algorithms, subexponential algorithms

Peter Floderu, Andrzej Lingas, Mia Persson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The annual news magazine of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories FALL 2010 microsystems technology laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as graphene, and materials and processes for solar energy and solid state lighting, in addition to the core engineered viruses; long-lasting high-efficiency light bulbs; windows that can double as solar energy technology for concentrating solar energy systems using coated glass. Baldo said Obama was curious and asked

Culpepper, Martin L.

446

Software Security www.wiley.co.uk/go/gollmann 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: replicating but not infecting program; most reported virus attacks would be better described as worm attacks bomb: program that is only executed when a specific trigger condition is met. #12;www, array, integer, data & program, address (resource locator), atomic transaction, ... These concepts have

Boyar, Joan

447

Ethical issues in human experimentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the effects of the atom bomb; helped lead to important advances medical exams, free meals and free burial insurance · Stopped in 1972 after PHS employees leaked info ~ · Info at http://www.cdc.gov/nchstp/od/tuskegee/ · (wary of medical profession) #12;2 Jewish chronic

Behrmann, Marlene

448

ISMCS: an intelligent instruction sequence based malware categorization system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, automated malware (e.g., viruses, backdoors, spyware, Trojans and worms) categorization methods and an industry-wide naming convention have been the computer security topics that are of great interest. Resting on the analysis of function based ... Keywords: instruction sequence, malware categorization, weighted subspace clustering

Kai Huang; Yanfang Ye; Qinshan Jiang

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Best Damn Windows Server 2008 Book Period, 2 edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Second Edition of the Best Damn Windows Server Book Period is completely revised and updated to Windows Server 2008.This book will show you how to increase the reliability and flexibility of your server infrastructure with built-in Web and ... Keywords: Applied, Computer Science, Computers, Security, Viruses

Anthony Piltzecker

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A conceptual framework for nonkin food sharing: timing and currency of benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is their ability to enter into daily torpor and seasonal hibernation to conserve energy during cool nights. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus...........Desmodus rotundus (vampire bat), Uroderma bilobatum (tent's horseshoe bat), Rhinolophus horsfeldi (possibly Megaderma spasma, lesser false vampire bat) Mojui dos Campos

Stevens, Jeffrey

451

THE PATHOGENESIS OF ALEUTIAN DISEASE OF MINK I. IN VlVO VIRAL REPLICATION AND THE HOST ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aleutian disease (AD) is a common chronic virus disease of mink, which may cause serious economic losses to commercial ranchers. The most consistent and striking feature of AD is that once a mink has been infected with Aleutian disease virus (ADV), infectious virus may be recovered from the serum, organs, and urine for the remainder of the animal's life (1-4). ADV in the serum of such mink has been shown to exist as an infectious virus-antibody complex (5). The primary lesion of AD is a systemic proliferation of plasma cells. A marked hypergammaglobulinemia, which may change into a monoclonal gammopathy, is secondary to the plasma cell proliferation (6-8). Glomerulonephritis, degenerative arterial lesions, and proliferation of intrahepatic bile ducts are frequently seen in AD (9-11). The markedly increased gamma globulin in AD is the result of overproduction, and has been found to have some degree of specificity (7, 12, 13). However, except for the infectious complexes, antibody to ADV antigens has not been previously demonstrated. The present study was undertaken to define the early and late stages of

Vmal Antigen; Austin E. Larsen; Helen G. Porter

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Marine and Freshwater Microbial Biodiversity The Earth is a complex and ever-changing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microbes shape the global system. Marine microbes play a critical role in regulating natural and man methane production, and how marine viruses affect levels of dimethyl sulphide, a gas that promotes cloud. In the long-term, they determine the composition of the atmosphere, and hence the climate, and how nutrients

Brierley, Andrew

453

The Rockefeller University Press $30.00 J. Exp. Med.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be distributed to dis- tinct subcellular locations and exhibit distinct speci cities for di erent nucleic acid, thus, appear to be particularly important for initiating immune responses to viruses. CORRESPONDENCE and coregulated genes via induction of TBK1, IRF3, nuclear factor B, and MAP kinases. However, the cytosolic

Vance,. Russell

454

Introduction Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited dis-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with morbidity and mortality in patients with CF, the initial phases of gene therapy for this disorder to infection with these viruses. These include viral binding, endocytosis, endosomal processing, nuclear, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA Address correspondence to: John F

Engelhardt, John F.

455

E: Commerce: The Dark Side: What to Do When the Worst Happens!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last few weeks have been full of news that confirms the advice we've been presenting to readers of this column. The Love Bug virus was one example, it demonstrated the current pitiful state we find ourselves in when we have global electronic commerce, ...

Bill Boni

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A general computational model for predicting ribosomal frameshifts in genome sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programmed ribosomal frameshifts are frequently used by RNA viruses to synthesize a single fusion protein from two or more overlapping open reading frames. We previously developed a program called FSFinder for predicting -1 and +1 frameshifts for Windows ... Keywords: Bioinformatics, Programmed ribosomal frameshift, Recoding, Shewanella

Yanga Byun; Sanghoon Moon; Kyungsook Han

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ontology mapping context & approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Care Units, different vocab's Want to compare quality of care OLVG-1400: 1400 terms in a flat list used_system, respiratory_system) · aetiology (e.g. virus, poising) · abnormality (e.g. fracture, tumor) · action (e Combine lexical analysis with hierarchical structure 313 suggested matches, around 70 % correct 209

van Harmelen, Frank

458

EMLTrust: An enhanced Machine Learning based Reputation System for MANETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many mission critical networks including MANETs for military communications and disaster relief communications rely on node cooperation. If malicious nodes gain access to such networks they can easily launch attacks, such as spreading viruses or spam, ... Keywords: Digital credentials, Fading Memories, Machine Learning, Trust management

Rehan Akbani; Turgay Korkmaz; G. V. Raju

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Longitudinal study to assess the safety and efficacy of a live-attenuated SHIV vaccine in long term immunized rhesus macaques  

SciTech Connect

Live-attenuated viruses derived from SIV and SHIV have provided the most consistent protection against challenge with pathogenic viruses, but concerns regarding their long-term safety and efficacy have hampered their clinical usefulness. We report a longitudinal study in which we evaluated the long-term safety and efficacy of {delta}vpuSHIV{sub PPC}, a live virus vaccine derived from SHIV{sub PPC}. Macaques were administered two inoculations of {delta}vpuSHIV{sub PPC}, three years apart, and followed for eight years. None of the five vaccinated macaques developed an AIDS-like disease from the vaccine. At eight years, macaques were challenged with pathogenic SIV and SHIV. None of the four macaques with detectable cellular-mediated immunity prior to challenge had detectable viral RNA in the plasma. This study demonstrates that multiple inoculations of a live vaccine virus can be used safely and can significantly extend the efficacy of the vaccine, as compared to a single inoculation, which is efficacious for approximately three years.

Yankee, Thomas M. [Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3025 WHW - MS 3029, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)], E-mail: tyankee@kumc.edu; Sheffer, Darlene; Liu Zhengian; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Jia Fenglan; Chebloune, Yahia [Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3025 WHW - MS 3029, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Stephens, Edward B. [Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3025 WHW - MS 3029, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Narayan, Opendra [Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3025 WHW - MS 3029, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

460

Bacteriophage and microsphere transport in saturated porous media: Forced-gradient experiment at Borden, Ontario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.54 m away from the injection well were a small fraction of those injected. A simplified planar radial of one extraction well, one supply well, and two injection wells (Figure 1). Two field ex- periments were conducted at the same time: a virus-transport test involving injection well 2 and a pesticide transport test

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Using DISE to protect return addresses from attack  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stack-smashing by buffer overflow is a common tactic used by viruses and worms to crash or hijack systems. Exploiting a bounds-unchecked copy into a stack buffer, an attacker can---by supplying a specially-crafted and unexpectedly long input---overwrite ...

Marc L. Corliss; E. Christopher Lewis; Amir Roth

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 81, NO. 1, 10 JULY 2001 5 Volume 81 Number 1 10 July 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the catalytic power of ribo- nucleic acid (RNA). John Horgan quotes Lynn Margulis in raising doubts of panspermia, where life on earth was seeded from outer space. Lord Kelvin and Svante Arrhenius were among the picturesque possibility of strains of viruses arriving on earth, borne by solar winds, travelling across

Balaram , P.

463

Integrating ISA Server 2006 with Microsoft Exchange 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is a convenient, targeted, single-source guide to integrating Microsoft's ISA Server with Exchange 2007 SP1. Unlike longwinded "comprehensive resources" it doesn't waste time re-hashing general information on the architectures and purposes ... Keywords: Applied, Computer Architecture, Computer Science, Computers, Information Management, Operating Systems, Security, Viruses

Fergus Strachan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Disposal: Science and Theory Disposal: Science and Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal: Science and Theory #12;Disposal: Science and Theory Mass Emergency Composting · Basic ­ Create carcass and litter windrow #12;Disposal: Science and Theory Mass Emergency Composting · Basic cover ­ Clean and disinfect house ­ Sample for virus again #12;Disposal: Science and Theory Mass

Benson, Eric R.

465

Insect Repellent Picking the right insect repellent could protect your health! Mosquitoes, biting flies, and ticks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nile Virus and Lyme disease). Forms and Concentrations: Aerosol and pump-spray products are intended Avon Skin-So-Soft Bug Guard Pump spray, .1% citronella 0.67 n/a Not labeled for ticks Avon Skin version may still be available Bite Blocker Light Country Scent Lotion, 2% soybean oil 0.46 2­4 hours

466

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(~30 µl min­1 ). Viruses were distinguished on the basis of their RALS vs green DNA-dye fluorescence 1880 (370 vs 280 µatm) and is likely to continue to increase in the © Inter-Research 2004 · www in the aquatic environment and led to the proposal that phytoplankton is not a direct source of CDOM

Jacquet, Stéphan

467

Theory of self-assembled smectic-A "crenellated disks"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smectic-A monolayers self-assembled in aqueous solutions of chiral fd viruses and a polymer depletant have been shown to exhibit a variety of structures including large, flat disks and twisted ribbons. The virus particles twist near the edge of the structure in a direction determined by the chirality of the viruses. When fd viruses and their mutants of opposite chirality are mixed together in nearly equal amounts unusual structures referred to as "crenellated disks" can appear. These disks are achiral overall but the twist at the edge alternates between left- and right-handedness. To minimize the mismatch where the two regions of opposing twist meet, the "crenellated" structure exhibits cusps rising out of the plane of the monolayer. We use a phenomenological elastic theory previously applied to flat disks and twisted ribbons to analyze an analytic model proposed to describe the "crenellated" structure . When compared with flat, circular disks, we find that the model "crenellated disks" are stable or at least metastable in a wide region of the phase diagram spanned by the Gaussian curvature modulus and the edge energy modulus, with a large energy barrier separating the two structures. The director pattern and geometric parameters of the "crenellated disks" are found to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

Hao Tu; Robert A. Pelcovits

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

An adaptive architecture of applying vulnerability analysis to IDS alerts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing intrusions and attacks on the Internet, there is an urgent need to develop techniques for network security. Current standalone network security products, such as the firewall systems, the Intrusion Detection System (IDS), the anti-virus ... Keywords: alert, intrusion detection, network security, predicate-based evaluation, vulnerability analysis

Xuejiao Liu; Xin Zhuang; Debao Xiao

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

2013 Winner of the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize Dr. Angela Belcher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Build New and Improved Materials Angela Belcher was inspired by the way soft-bodied organisms in the sea, or simple viruses with single-stranded DNA that have the ability to infect bacteria, to build a toolkit building blocks that are used as the basis for technologically-important materials. By using

Sabatini, David M.

470

Mobile Malware Attacks and Defense  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Malware has gone mobile, and the security landscape is changing quickly with emerging attacks on cell phones, PDAs, and other mobile devices. This first book on the growing threat covers a wide range of malware targeting operating systems like Symbian ... Keywords: Applied, Computer Science, Computers, Handheld Computing, Macintosh, Security, Viruses

Ken Dunham

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

A hybrid graphical password based system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this age of electronic connectivity, where we all face viruses, hackers, eavesdropping and electronic fraud, there is indeed no time when security is not critical. Passwords provide security mechanism for authentication and protection services against ... Keywords: authentication, graphical passwords, network security

Wazir Zada Khan; Yang Xiang; Mohammed Y. Aalsalem; Quratulain Arshad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

The [216:1 Ratio]: bridging the growing support gap through proactive deployment of emerging technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Philadelphia University has developed radically as an entity since 1992. In 2002-2003, the University technology infrastructure was forced to evolve in response to selective pressure from a series of catastrophic worm (Blaster, Nachi, Sasser) incidents ... Keywords: adaptive networking, adaptive support, antivirus, malware, network access standardization, network security, personal computer security, preventative computing, remediation, spyware, updates, virus

Johnathon A. Mohr

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A multi-actor spatio-temporal interaction model used to geosimulate the zoonosis propagation (WIP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several approaches and models have been proposed to simulate the spread of infectious diseases such as West Nile virus (WNV) or Lyme disease. However, these models such as mathematical models have some weaknesses when trying to simulate the influence ... Keywords: GeoSimulation, decision support systems, spatio-temporal interactions, spread of infectious diseases

Mondher Bouden; Bernard Moulin

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

World Health Through Collaboration World Health Through Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as Lyme disease orWest Nile virus (WNV) in humans (LoGiudice et al.2003,Ezenwa et al.2006).At the same or manipulation of the snail community. Lyme disease Recent studies have demonstrated that variation in host species diversity has a strong effect on the level of human risk from Lyme disease, the most frequently

Sheridan, Jennifer

475

Evidences of regulatory and signalling role of electromagnetic fields in biological objects: review of literature and own studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are growing evidence supporting the role of electromagnetic fields and interactions in biological processes. In this paper we're trying to theoretically substantiate the feasibility and necessity of the "Theory of Electromagnetic Biological Regulation ... Keywords: antibodies, biological regulation, cell, electromagnetic field, signalling, viruses

Valeriy Zaporozhan; Andriy Ponomarenko

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Research Article: Computational model for analyzing the evolutionary patterns of the neuraminidase gene of influenza A/H1N1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we performed computer simulations to evaluate the changes of selection potentials of codons in influenza A/H1N1 from 1999 to 2009. We artificially generated the sequences by using the transition matrices of positively selected codons over ... Keywords: Computer simulation, Evolution, H1N1 subtype, Influenza A virus, Neuraminidase

Insung Ahn; Hyeon Seok Son

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Chemical calls for help from trees in the forest are they heard and how can we utilize them?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical calls for help from trees in the forest ­ are they heard and how can we utilize them Chemical Calls for help in the forest - Forest Research - NRS Eggs Fungi Bacteria Viruses Gallers UV Surface feeders Phloem suckers Xylems suckers Eggs Specific defense / response of the tree Chemical Calls

478

Modeling Shrimp Biomass and Viral Infection for Production of Biological Countermeasures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Shrimp Biomass and Viral Infection for Production of Biological Countermeasures H. T of large quantities of therapeutic and/or preventative countermeasures. We couple equations for biomass machinery in an existing biomass for the production of a vaccine or antibody by infection using a virus

479

Improved call graph comparison using simulated annealing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of suspicious binary executables submitted to Anti-Virus (AV) companies are in the order of tens of thousands per day. Current hash-based signature methods are easy to deceive and are inefficient for identifying known malware that have undergone ... Keywords: call graph, graph edit distance, malware, simulated annealing, static analysis

Orestis Kostakis; Joris Kinable; Hamed Mahmoudi; Kimmo Mustonen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Server-side detection of malware infection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the intertwined problems of malware and online fraud, and argue that the fact that service providers often are nancially responsible for fraud causes a relative lack of incentives for clients to manage their own security well. This suggests ... Keywords: anti-virus, audit, cell phone, detection, fraud, incentive compatible, infection, malware, mobile, post-mortem, retroactive

Markus Jakobsson; Ari Juels

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outsmarting flu viruses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

INSIDE: COMPUTER SCIENTISTS Fighting Brain Tumors 18 FILMMAKER Tom DiCillo 32 KEITH FENIMORE'S Social Networking 38  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cucumber mosaic susceptible CMV - cucumber mosaic virus COC crop oil concentrate CPB - Colorado potato - miles per hour MoA - mode of action MR - mosaic resistant MSO methylated seed oil MT - mosaic tested N OF - oil formulation OLF - other labeled formulations OMRI Organic Materials Review Institute opt - optimum

482

Respond, Recover, Restructure: Technologies Helping the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cucumber mosaic susceptible CMV - cucumber mosaic virus COC crop oil concentrate CPB - Colorado potato - miles per hour MoA - mode of action MR - mosaic resistant MSO methylated seed oil MT - mosaic tested N OF - oil formulation OLF - other labeled formulations opt - optimum OS - ozone sensitive OT - ozone

Québec, Université du

483

Deployment Aware Modeling of Node Compromise Spread in Wireless Sensor Networks Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emerged viruses that can spread over air interfaces, and the various broadcast protocols for transferring or commercial advantage, the ACM copyright/server notice, the title of the publication, and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the ACM, Inc. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post

Liu, Yonghe

484

Human retroviruses and AIDS 1994  

SciTech Connect

This compendium, including accompanying floppy diskettes, is the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts it comprises: (I) Nucleic Acid Alignments and Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Alignments; (III) Analysis; (IV) Related Sequences; (V) Database communications.

Myers, G.; Korber, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S.; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Henderson, L.E.; Pavlakis, G.N. [eds.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Established by the World Health Assembly in 2010,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the third annual World Hepatitis Day will be observed July 28, 2013. Viral hepatitis is a leading cause of infectious disease mortality globally, each year causing approximately 1.4 million deaths (1). Most of these deaths occur among the approximately 400 million persons living with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus infection who die from cirrhosis or liver cancer years and decades after their infection. In addition to HBV, hepatitis A virus is a leading cause of vaccine-preventable death globally (1). Hepatitis E virus (HEV) also causes significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in Asia and Africa. HBV and HEV infection are important yet largely neglected causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality in resource-constrained settings. This issue of MMWR includes a report describing the investigation of a hepatitis E outbreak among refugees in South Sudan, where a significant proportion of affected pregnant women died from HEV infection. A second report from Laos describes missed opportunities for vaccination of newborns to protect them from mother-to-child transmission of HBV. Prevention of both new infections and mortality from viral hepatitis are the goals of global control efforts. Additional information on viral hepatitis for health professionals and the public is available at

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

From molecular changes to customised therapy A. Hemminki*,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review From molecular changes to customised therapy A. Hemminki*,1 Division of Human Gene Therapy 35294-3300, USA Received 1 October 2001; accepted 9 October 2001 Abstract The revolution in molecular-associated defects, and molecular chemotherapy for delivering toxic substances locally to tumour cells. Viruses which

Hemminki, Akseli

487

Functional analysis of the microRNA genes of C. elegans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were discovered in C. elegans during studies of the control of developmental timing. MicroRNAs are a large class of short non-coding RNAs found in many viruses, plants and animals that regulate gene ...

Alvarez-Saavedra, Ezequiel (Ezequiel Andrs)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Least-Squares Support Vector Machine Approach to Viral Replication Origin Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Replication of their DNA genomes is a central step in the reproduction of many viruses. Procedures to find replication origins, which are initiation sites of the DNA replication process, are therefore of great importance for controlling the growth and ... Keywords: caudoviruses, feature selection, herpesviruses, least-squares support vector machines, replication origins

Raul Cruz-Cano; David S. H. Chew; Kwok-Pui Choi; Ming-Ying Leung

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

GPU-accelerated molecular visualization on petascale supercomputing platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petascale supercomputers create new opportunities for the study of the structure and function of large biomolecular complexes such as viruses and photosynthetic organelles, permitting all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of tens to hundreds of millions ... Keywords: GPU, many-core, molecular surface, molecular visualization, parallel rendering, ray tracing

John E. Stone, Kirby L. Vandivort, Klaus Schulten

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Rockefeller University Press, 0021-9525/99/10/7/6 $5.00 The Journal of Cell Biology, Volume 147, Number 1, October 4, 1999 712  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the concentration of doxycycline (DX), amount of virus, and length of time after removal of DX. Very high levels-bound form; ARF6­WT, wild-type ARF6; BL, basolateral; DX, doxycycline; gal, galactosidase; pIgR, polymeric

Apodaca, Gerard

491

Spatiotemporal reasoning about epidemiological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: In this article, we propose new methods to visualize and reason about spatiotemporal epidemiological data. Background: Efficient computerized reasoning about epidemics is important to public health and national security, but it is a difficult ... Keywords: Epidemiology, Knowledge-base, Recursive definition, Spatiotemporal data, Visualization, West Nile Virus

Peter Revesz; Shasha Wu

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Poxvirus Targeting of E3 Ligase b-TrCP by Molecular Mimicry: A Mechanism to Inhibit NF-kB Activation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poxvirus Targeting of E3 Ligase b-TrCP by Molecular Mimicry: A Mechanism to Inhibit NF-kB, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Abstract The transcription factor NF-kB is essential for immune degradation of IkBa. Here we describe an inhibitor of NF-kB from vaccinia virus that has a closely related

Utrecht, Universiteit

493

Biocompatibility and Toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Associated diseases along with the location of main enzymatic antioxidants...virus Plasma SOD Parkinson's disease and Neurons CAT, GPx, SOD, HO-1 Alzheimer's disease Kidney chronic nephritis Kidney Cu/Zn-SOD, GPx Crohn's disease Gastrointestinal tract CAT, GPx, SOD...