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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Multiple output timing and trigger generator  

SciTech Connect

In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

On Time-Invariant Purified-Output-Based Discrete Time Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 14, 2005 ... On Time-Invariant Purified-Output-Based Discrete Time Control. Aharon Ben-Tal (abental ***at*** ie.technion.ac.il) Stephen Boyd (boyd ***at*** ...

3

Time-of-flight radio location system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Time-of-flight radio location system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. 7 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Time-of-flight radio location system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Time-of-flight radio location system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation. 8 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

Maximal covering location problem (MCLP) with fuzzy travel times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fuzzy maximal covering location problem (FMCLP) in which travel time between any pair of nodes is considered to be a fuzzy variable. A fuzzy expected value maximization model is designed for such a problem. Moreover, a hybrid algorithm ... Keywords: Credibility theory, Facility location, Fuzzy travel times, Maximal covering location problem (MCLP), Simulation

Soheil Davari; Mohammad Hossein Fazel Zarandi; Ahmad Hemmati

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Brief paper: Output feedback strict passivity of discrete-time nonlinear systems and adaptive control system design with a PFC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a passivity-based adaptive output feedback control for discrete-time nonlinear systems is considered. Output Feedback Strictly Passive (OFSP) conditions in order to design a stable adaptive output control system will be established. Further, ... Keywords: Adaptive control, Discrete nonlinear systems, Output feedback, Parallel feedforward compensator, Strict passivity

Ikuro Mizumoto; Satoshi Ohdaira; Zenta Iwai

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Event-Triggered Real-Time Scheduling For Stabilization Of Passive and Output Feedback Passive Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the output information of the control system and an estimate of the lower bound on inter-sampling time, the control strategy obtained based on this approach is conser- vative in the sense that resource usage mechanism usually The authors are with the Department of Electrical Engineer- ing, University of Notre Dame

Antsaklis, Panos

11

The application of satellite time references to HVDC fault location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An HVdc fault location scheme is described which relies on very precise detection of the time of arrival of fault created surges at both ends of the line. Such detection is achieved by a very accurate data acquisition and processing system combined with the time reference signals provided by a global positioning system receiver. Extensive digital simulation is carried out to determine the voltage and current waveforms, to identify the main sources of error and suggest possible compensation techniques.

Dewe, M.B.; Sankar, S.; Arrillaga, J. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Estimating Solar PV Output Using Modern Space/Time Geostatistics (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes a project that uses mapping techniques to predict solar output at subhourly resolution at any spatial point, develop a methodology that is applicable to natural resources in general, and demonstrate capability of geostatistical techniques to predict the output of a potential solar plant.

Lee, S. J.; George, R.; Bush, B.

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

13

Release Time Scheduling and Hub Location for Next-Day Delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inspired by a real-life problem faced by one of the largest ground-based cargo companies of Turkey, the current study introduces a new facet to the hub location literature. The release time scheduling and hub location problem aims to select a specified ... Keywords: cargo delivery, hub location, release times, time definite delivery, valid inequalities

Hande Yaman; Oya Ekin Karasan; Bahar Y. Kara

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Real Time Location Tool For Precision Tracking Of Passive UHF RFID Tags In Two Dimensions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bredow, Jonathan This thesis addresses this problem of a precise RTLS (Real Time Location System) by implementing a Passive UHF RFID system. A software is… (more)

Kenarangui, Nasir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Timed Discrete Event Control of Parallel Production Lines with Continuous Outputs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution we present an approach to formulate and solve certain scheduling tasks for hybrid systems using timed discrete event control methods. To demonstrate our approach, we consider a cyclically operated plant with parallel reactors using ... Keywords: Discrete event control, Hybrid systems, Multirate timed automata, Parallel production lines, Scheduling, Verification

Stephanie Geist; Dmitry Gromov; Jörg Raisch

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

URL: http://www.elsevier.nl/locate/entcs/volume68.html 18 pages Timed CSP = Closed Timed Automata 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URL: http://www.elsevier.nl/locate/entcs/volume68.html 18 pages Timed CSP = Closed Timed Automata 1 70118, USA Abstract We study the expressive power of an augmented version of Timed CSP and show constraints. We also show that this new version of Timed CSP is expressive enough to capture the most widely

Ouaknine, Joël

17

Characterization of nonlinear input-output systems using time series analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data obtained from time series analysis has been used for a number of years for the characterization and response prediction of linear systems. This paper describes a time series technique for the analysis of nonlinear systems through the use of embeddings using delay coordinates or appropriate transformations of delay coordinates (local singular value decomposition or local canonical variate analysis). Local linear approaches are used to characterize the state evolution. Application of the technique is illustrated for a single degree of freedom oscillator with nonlinear stiffness, a mechanical chaos beam, and a climatic data time series. In each application analysis from measured data is emphasized. State rank, lyapunov exponents, and expected iterated prediction errors are quantified. The technique illustrated should be useful in the analysis of many forms of experimental data, especially where the state rank is not excessively large. 8 refs., 6 figs.

Hunter, N.F.; Theiler, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Time and location differentiated NOX control in competitive electricity markets using cap-and-trade mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to variations in weather and atmospheric chemistry, the timing and location of nitrogen oxide (NOX) reductions determine their effectiveness in reducing ground-level ozone, which adversely impacts human health. Electric ...

Martin, Katherine C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Real-time location and inpatient care systems based on passive RFID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RFID technology meets identification and tracking requirements in healthcare environments with potential to speed up and increase reliability of involved processes. Due to this, high expectations for this integration have emerged, but hospital and medical ... Keywords: EPC Gen1&2 performance, Hospital information system, Inpatient management, Medical asset management, Real-time location system

Pablo Najera; Javier Lopez; Rodrigo Roman

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 993 0 116 0 876 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2010 January 118 0 83 30 5 February 110 0 79 27 5 March 132 0 94 32 6 April 131 0 93 33 6 May 132 0 92 34 6 June 139 0 104 30 5 July 140 0 102 33 5 August 132 0 95 32 5 September 148 0 113 30 5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 517 0 111 6 399 2003 763 0 80 9 675 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2010 January 92 0 10 1 81 February 93 0 10 1 82 March 84 0 12 1 71 April 76 0 9 1 66 May 84 0 10 0 75 June 93 0 8 0 86 July 89 0 8 0 80 August 87 0 2 1 84 September 82 0 2 1 79

22

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 193,120 57,296 105,416 227 30,182 2003 197,827 69,695 92,384 309 35,440 2004 245,389 116,086 90,747 259 38,297 2005 256,441 115,727 111,098 260 29,356 2006 246,687 102,117 98,314 269 45,987 2007 208,198 77,941 81,845 348 48,064 2008 180,034 64,843 79,856 280 35,055 2009 166,449 77,919 52,428 245 35,856 2010 173,078 94,331 41,090 340 37,317 2011 176,349 99,257 40,167 173 36,752 2012 144,266 60,862 24,925 353 58,126 2010 January 14,949 7,995 3,716 38 3,199

23

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,005,144 767,803 209,703 1,405 26,232 2003 1,031,778 757,384 247,732 1,816 24,846 2004 1,044,798 772,224 244,044 1,917 26,613 2005 1,065,281 761,349 276,135 1,922 25,875 2006 1,053,783 753,390 273,246 1,886 25,262 2007 1,069,606 764,765 280,377 1,927 22,537 2008 1,064,503 760,326 280,254 2,021 21,902 2009 955,190 695,615 238,012 1,798 19,766 2010 1,001,411 721,431 253,621 1,720 24,638 2011 956,470 689,316 243,168 1,668 22,319 2012 845,066 615,467 208,085 1,450 20,065

24

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 500 0 61 0 439 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2010 January 61 0 44 14 3 February 58 0 42 13 3 March 67 0 49 15 3 April 67 0 49 15 3 May 68 0 49 16 3 June 73 0 56 14 3 July 73 0 55 16 2 August 69 0 52 15 3 September 79 0 62 14 3 October 75 0 59 14 2

25

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 17,561 0 2,255 929 14,377 2003 17,720 0 2,080 1,234 14,406 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584 2012 19,333 0 2,790 1,143 15,400 2010 January 1,972 0 371 160 1,440 February 1,820 0 347 139 1,334 March 1,839 0 338 123 1,378 April 2,142 0 284 95 1,764

26

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 29,854 0 10,655 757 18,442 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0 6,460 1,566 35,458 2012 46,863 0 6,914 1,796 38,153 2010 January 4,885 0 1,088 137 3,661 February 4,105 0 943 137 3,025 March 4,398 0 845 136 3,417 April 4,224 0 399 138 3,688

27

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 14,395 0 3,192 179 11,024 2003 21,170 0 2,282 244 18,644 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012 38,777 0 3,281 315 35,181 2010 January 2,683 0 285 33 2,365 February 2,770 0 302 29 2,439 March 2,424 0 338 36 2,050 April 2,257 0 255 22 1,980

28

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 64,629 2,456 26,514 5,323 30,337 2004 49,443 2,014 21,294 6,935 19,201 2005 55,862 2,485 17,640 6,763 28,974 2006 54,693 2,611 16,348 6,755 28,980 2007 60,840 2,992 19,155 6,692 32,001 2008 66,139 3,409 22,419 5,227 35,085 2009 66,658 3,679 23,586 5,398 33,994 2010 77,150 3,668 22,884 5,438 45,159 2011 74,255 4,488 22,574 5,382 41,810 2012 77,205 4,191 22,654 5,812 44,548 2010 January 7,109 189 2,166 458 4,295 February 6,441 275 2,151 429 3,586

29

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,135,572 2,307,358 3,481,961 75,985 1,270,268 2003 6,498,549 1,809,003 3,450,177 60,662 1,178,707 2004 6,912,661 1,857,247 3,749,945 73,744 1,231,725 2005 7,220,520 2,198,098 3,837,717 69,682 1,115,023 2006 7,612,500 2,546,169 3,847,644 69,401 1,149,286 2007 8,181,986 2,808,500 4,219,827 71,560 1,082,099 2008 7,900,986 2,803,283 4,046,069 67,571 984,062 2009 8,138,385 2,981,285 4,062,633 77,077 1,017,390 2010 8,694,186 3,359,035 4,191,241 87,357 1,056,553

30

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 1,358 0 311 865 182 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190 2010 January 191 0 69 107 14 February 178 0 61 106 11 March 204 0 66 126 12 April 207 0 67 127 13 May 249 0 67 167 15 June 204 0 69 120 14 July 194 0 68 115 11

31

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 137,414 9,168 122,100 3,280 2,865 2004 146,018 11,250 126,584 4,091 4,093 2005 143,822 11,490 124,030 5,232 3,070 2006 162,084 16,617 136,632 7,738 1,096 2007 168,762 17,442 144,490 5,699 1,131 2008 196,802 20,465 170,001 5,668 668 2009 207,585 19,583 181,234 6,106 661 2010 219,954 19,975 193,623 5,905 451 2011 235,990 22,086 183,609 29,820 474 2012 259,564 25,193 204,753 27,012 2,606 2010 January 17,649 1,715 15,406 491 37 February 16,300 1,653 14,198 410 38

32

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,353 2,125 3,691 8 1,529 2003 7,067 2,554 3,245 11 1,257 2004 8,721 4,150 3,223 9 1,339 2005 9,113 4,130 3,953 9 1,020 2006 8,622 3,619 3,482 10 1,511 2007 7,299 2,808 2,877 12 1,602 2008 6,314 2,296 2,823 10 1,184 2009 5,828 2,761 1,850 9 1,209 2010 6,053 3,325 1,452 12 1,264 2011 6,092 3,449 1,388 6 1,248 2012 5,021 2,105 869 13 2,034 2010 January 525 283 130 1 110 February 497 258 131 1 106 March 522 308 119 1 94

33

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 13,694 0 3,118 8,858 1,718 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0 5,807 9,731 1,227 2012 16,310 0 4,180 10,615 1,515 2010 January 1,476 0 518 851 107 February 1,365 0 444 835 86 March 1,572 0 486 992 93 April 1,598 0 495 1,003 100

34

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 12,228 0 286 384 11,558 2003 14,124 0 1,197 512 12,414 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012 3,097 0 992 122 1,984 2010 January 606 0 105 31 470 February 504 0 78 26 401 March 335 0 46 7 281 April 355 0 86 9 260 May 340 0 93 14 232

35

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 885,987 0 267,675 45,359 572,953 2003 762,779 0 250,120 21,238 491,421 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001 486,274 2011 861,006 0 315,411 40,976 504,619 2012 909,087 0 330,354 48,944 529,788 2010 January 74,586 0 27,368 4,148 43,070 February 65,539 0 24,180 3,786 37,573

36

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 40,020 1,319 2,550 214,137 5,961 12,550 4,732 281,269 2003 38,249 5,551 1,828 200,077 9,282 19,785 3,296 278,068 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167 22,109 17,052 4,854 292,234 2009 38,015 5,341 1,445 190,875 19,830 17,625 5,055 278,187

37

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 76,737 0 1,669 3,276 71,788 2003 85,488 0 6,963 3,176 75,349 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927 1,039 15,833 2012 18,233 0 5,871 746 11,616 2010 January 3,648 0 614 190 2,843 February 3,027 0 422 157 2,447 March 2,015 0 272 43 1,699

38

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 146,643 88,595 39,320 1,210 17,517 2003 189,260 105,319 62,617 1,394 19,929 2004 185,761 103,793 57,843 1,963 22,162 2005 185,631 98,223 63,546 1,584 22,278 2006 87,898 53,529 18,332 886 15,150 2007 95,895 56,910 24,097 691 14,198 2008 61,379 38,995 14,463 621 7,300 2009 51,690 31,847 11,181 477 8,185 2010 44,968 30,806 9,364 376 4,422 2011 31,152 20,844 6,637 301 3,370 2012 25,702 17,521 5,102 394 2,685 2010 January 6,193 4,381 1,188 48 576

39

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 682,060 0 9,585 727 671,747 2003 746,375 0 10,893 762 734,720 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357 1,064 856,620 2011 893,314 0 16,577 1,022 875,716 2012 883,158 0 19,251 949 862,958 2010 January 73,418 0 1,677 91 71,651 February 67,994 0 1,689 81 66,224

40

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 66,270 3,930 59,149 1,753 1,438 2004 70,489 5,373 60,929 2,098 2,089 2005 68,897 5,650 59,144 2,571 1,532 2006 77,004 8,287 64,217 3,937 563 2007 80,697 8,620 68,657 2,875 544 2008 94,768 10,242 81,300 2,879 346 2009 100,261 9,748 87,086 3,089 337 2010 106,681 10,029 93,405 3,011 236 2011 114,173 11,146 91,279 11,497 251 2012 125,927 12,721 101,379 10,512 1,315 2010 January 8,502 853 7,379 251 19 February 7,882 830 6,823 209 20

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 18,477 2,600 143 36,265 0 6,902 4,801 69,188 2003 22,780 2,520 196 16,955 0 8,296 6,142 56,889 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155 25,902 0 8,450 5,761 61,420 2010 19,216 845 216 29,791 13 7,917 5,333 63,330 2011 17,234 687 111 24,848 14 7,433 5,988 56,314

42

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 912,218 553,390 243,561 7,229 108,031 2003 1,174,795 658,868 387,341 8,534 120,051 2004 1,156,763 651,712 358,685 11,763 134,603 2005 1,160,733 618,811 395,489 9,614 136,820 2006 546,529 335,130 112,052 5,444 93,903 2007 595,191 355,999 147,579 4,259 87,354 2008 377,848 242,379 87,460 3,743 44,266 2009 315,420 196,346 66,834 2,903 49,336 2010 273,357 188,987 55,444 2,267 26,660 2011 186,753 125,755 39,093 1,840 20,066 2012 153,189 105,179 29,952 2,364 15,695

43

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 860,024 0 263,619 41,435 554,970 2003 721,267 0 225,967 19,973 475,327 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769 46,324 473,683 2011 839,681 0 308,669 39,856 491,155 2012 886,103 0 322,607 47,883 515,613 2010 January 72,867 0 26,791 4,086 41,990

44

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 421,084 0 50,041 23,099 347,944 2003 416,700 0 47,817 28,479 340,405 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011 479,822 0 84,855 28,056 366,911 2012 420,923 0 58,275 23,673 338,975 2010 January 44,514 0 8,627 3,445 32,442 February 40,887 0 8,041 3,024 29,823

45

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,287,114 10,659 139,532 1,196 1,135,727 2003 1,265,669 16,545 150,745 1,199 1,097,180 2004 1,360,258 19,973 145,216 1,661 1,193,408 2005 1,352,582 27,373 157,600 1,235 1,166,373 2006 1,399,235 27,455 154,360 1,314 1,216,106 2007 1,335,511 31,568 154,388 2,040 1,147,516 2008 1,262,675 29,150 148,198 1,410 1,083,917 2009 1,136,729 29,565 150,481 1,408 955,276 2010 1,225,571 40,167 155,429 1,338 1,028,637 2011 1,240,937 35,474 146,684 1,504 1,057,275

46

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 336,848 61,313 11,513 708,738 117,513 571,509 48,263 1,855,697 2003 333,361 68,329 16,934 610,122 110,263 632,366 54,960 1,826,335 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816 2008 315,244 29,554 18,263 509,330 110,680 610,131 23,729 1,616,931 2009 281,557 32,591 20,308 513,002 99,556 546,974 33,287 1,527,276

47

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 161,803 5,766 132,065 21,953 2,020 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989 132,877 27,868 1,021 2010 162,436 3,322 130,467 27,509 1,138 2011 152,007 3,433 121,648 25,664 1,262 2012 152,045 3,910 117,598 28,923 1,614 2010 January 13,015 244 10,405 2,260 107

48

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2002 2,423,963 10,881 5,194 2003 2,445,094 10,646 4,532 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 Notes: The emissions data presented include total emissions from both electricity generation and the production of useful thermal output. See Appendix A, Technical Notes, for a description of the sources and methodology used to develop the emissions estimates.

49

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 22,554 695 18,611 2,952 296 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402 17,621 3,549 152 2011 19,016 388 15,367 3,103 158 2012 18,954 418 14,757 3,577 203 2010 January 1,737 30 1,402 291 14 February 1,562 25 1,276 250 11 March 1,854 36 1,500 306 12

50

An Operational System for the Remote Location of Lightning Flashes Using a VLF Arrival Time Difference Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational system for the remote location of lightning flashes at ranges of thousands of kilometers is presented. The vertical electric fields of VLF radio atmospherics (sferics), together with time data, are observed at a network of just ...

Anthony C. L. Lee

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012" Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012" "Company Name","Plant Location" "Top Ten Manufacturers" "American Crystal Sugar Co","MN, ND" "Archer Daniels Midland","IA, IL, MN, ND, NE" "Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc","AL, IL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, VA, WI" "Cemex Inc","AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX" "Dakota Gasification Company","ND" "Eastman Chemical Company","TN" "Georgia-Pacific LLC","AL, GA, OK, VA, WI" "Holcim (US) Inc","AL, CO, MD, MO, MT, OK, SC, TX, UT" "NewPage Corporation","MD, MI, WI" "U S Steel Corporation","AL, IN, MI, MN"

52

Delimiting “Thunderstorm Watch” Periods by Real-Time Lightning Location for a Power Utility Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During times of thunderstorm activity, the power utility serving metropolitan New York enters a potentially costly “thunderstorm watch” mode of operation which is designed to prevent a major power outage caused by lightning. To evaluate the ...

Vincent P. Idone; Richard E. Orville

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Bias Elimination and Scatter in Lightning Location by the VLF Arrival Time Difference Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the very low frequency (VLF) band lightning flashes are detectable at ranges of several thousand kilometers. Studies of experimental data show that if systematic biases were eliminated from the U.K. Meteorological Office's VLF arrival time ...

Anthony C. L. Lee

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Location Analysis Model for Belgian Intermodal Terminals: Importance of the value of time in the intermodal transport chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intermodal transport, the combination and integration of several transport modes, with the use of loading units, is in most cases more environmentally friendly than unimodal road transport for the carriage of goods. The LAMBIT-model (Location Analysis ... Keywords: Empty returns, GIS network model, Intermodal transport, Value of time

Ethem Pekin; Cathy Macharis; Dries Meers; Piet Rietveld

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Multi-horizon solar radiation forecasting for Mediterranean locations using time series models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considering the grid manager's point of view, needs in terms of prediction of intermittent energy like the photovoltaic resource can be distinguished according to the considered horizon: following days (d+1, d+2 and d+3), next day by hourly step (h+24), next hour (h+1) and next few minutes (m+5 e.g.). Through this work, we have identified methodologies using time series models for the prediction horizon of global radiation and photovoltaic power. What we present here is a comparison of different predictors developed and tested to propose a hierarchy. For horizons d+1 and h+1, without advanced ad hoc time series pre-processing (stationarity) we find it is not easy to differentiate between autoregressive moving average (ARMA) and multilayer perceptron (MLP). However we observed that using exogenous variables improves significantly the results for MLP . We have shown that the MLP were more adapted for horizons h+24 and m+5. In summary, our results are complementary and improve the existing prediction techniques ...

Voyant, Cyril; Muselli, Marc; Nivet, Marie Laure

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Overload protection circuit for output driver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

Stewart, Roger G. (Neshanic Station, NJ)

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

test output enable Veto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to BIP/FSCC's RESET to (NIM) test output FSCC/COM (NIM) INPUT TRIGGER GLOBAL 0.08­19.5 usec adjustable

Berns, Hans-Gerd

58

Time efficient heuristics for cell-to-switch assignment in quasi-static/dynamic location area planning of mobile cellular networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a set of time efficient, sub-optimal heuristics to solve the problem of assigning cells to mobile switching centers (or, switches in short) for an effective location area (LA) planning in a mobile cellular network (MCN). A common ... Keywords: CSA, Cellular networks, Clustering and heuristics, Handoff, Hybrid cost, Load balancing, Location area partitioning, Mobile communication, Optimization

Debashis Saha; Partha S. Bhattacharjee; Amitava Mukherjee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Implementing a time- and location-differentiated cap-and-trade program : flexible nitrogen oxide abatement from power plants in the eastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies suggest that timing and location of emissions can change the amount of ozone formed from a given amount of nitrogen oxide (NOx) by a factor of five (Mauzerall et al. 2005). Yet existing NOx cap-and-trade programs ...

Martin, Katherine C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Applying Spatiotemporal and Demographic Data to Locate Next Crime Location Control #7501  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geographic profiling is a tool used by law enforcement to predict the location of a serial criminal’s next crime. A typical geographic profile outputs estimated probabilities with the input of time and location of previous crimes. In this paper, we develop a new geographic profile that is able to incorporate demographical observations while remaining an effective predictor. We assume that (1) there are buffer zones around previous crime scenes because the criminal fears capture, (2) there is distance decay as criminals prefer something about the locations where previous crimes were committed, and (3) criminals target potential victims based on income and (4) target areas based on crime rate, which are claims supported by research of serial criminals. In order to find an effective profile, we have combined two models of criminal behavior which predict the location of future crime. First, we compute probability densities using a time-weighted kernel density algorithm, which includes buffer zone

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HARD X-RAY PULSE TIMINGS AND THE LOCATIONS OF FOOTPOINT SOURCES DURING SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

The cause of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares remains the subject of debate. Recently, Nakariakov and Zimovets proposed a new model suggesting that, in two-ribbon flares, such pulsations could be explained by propagating slow waves. These waves may travel obliquely to the magnetic field, reflect in the chromosphere, and constructively interfere at a spatially separate site in the corona, leading to quasi-periodic reconnection events progressing along the flaring arcade. Such a slow wave regime would have certain observational characteristics. We search for evidence of this phenomenon during a selection of two-ribbon flares observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer; the flares of 2002 November 9, 2005 January 19, and 2005 August 22. We were not able to observe a clear correlation between hard X-ray footpoint separations and pulse timings during these events. Also, the motion of hard X-ray footpoints is shown to be continuous within the observational error, whereas a discontinuous motion might be anticipated in the slow wave model. Finally, we find that for a preferential slow wave propagation angle of 25 Degree-Sign -28 Degree-Sign that is expected for the fastest waves, the velocities of the hard X-ray footpoints lead to estimated pulse periods and ribbon lengths significantly larger than the measured values. Hence, for the three events studied, we conclude that the observational characteristics cannot be easily explained via the Nakariakov and Zimovets propagating slow wave model when only angles of 25 Degree-Sign -28 Degree-Sign are considered. We provide suggested flare parameters to optimize future studies of this kind.

Inglis, A. R.; Dennis, B. R. [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Simulation of timed input/output automata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Master of Engineering Thesis describes the design, implementation, and usage of the TIOA Simulator. The TIOA Simulator, along with the other components of the TIOA Toolset aims to provide a framework for developing ...

Mavrommatis, Panayiotis P

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

8.5. Adding New Outputs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have fixed values in the Output definition will not ... are a few example Output definitions, extracted from ... an example, illustrating the Energy output and ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

64

Project Location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USGS quadrangle base-map. 2. Plot Plan with Exploration Data with Building Footprint: 1 boring or exploration shaft per 5000 ft 2, with minimum of 2 for any one building. Exploratory trench locations. 3. Site Coordinates: (Latitude & Longitude) Engineering Geology/Site Characterization 4. Regional Geology and Regional Fault Maps: Concise page-sized illustrations with site plotted. 5. Geologic Map of Site: Detailed (large-scale) geologic map with proper symbols and geologic legend. 6. Subsurface Geology: Engineering geology description summarized from boreholes or trench logs. Summarize ground water conditions. 7. Geologic Cross Sections: Two or more detailed geologic sections with pertinent foundations and site grading. 8. Active Faulting & Coseismic Deformation Across Site: Prepare page-sized extract map of Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zones and/or any potential fault rupture hazard identified from the Safety Element of the local agency (city or county); show location of fault investigation trenches; 50-foot setbacks perpendicular from fault plane and proposed

Date Reviewed __________________________

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Coded output support vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose a coded output support vector machine (COSVM) by introducing the idea of information coding to solve multi-class classification problems for large-scale datasets. The COSVM is built based on the support vector regression (SVR) machine ... Keywords: coded output, multi-class classification, number system, parallel implementation, support vector machine (SVM)

Tao Ye; Xuefeng Zhu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

? Adjustable Output Voltage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LM25010 features all the functions needed to implement a low cost, efficient, buck regulator capable of supplying in excess of 1A load current. This high voltage regulator integrates an N-Channel Buck Switch, and is available in thermally enhanced LLP-10 and TSSOP-14EP packages. The constant on-time regulation scheme requires no loop compensation resulting in fast load transient response and simplified circuit implementation. The operating frequency remains constant with line and load variations due to the inverse relationship between the input voltage and the on-time. The valley current limit detection is set at 1.25A. Additional features include: VCC under-voltage lock-out, thermal shutdown, gate drive under-voltage lock-out, and maximum duty cycle limiter.

Lmq Is Aec-q Grade

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

PV output smoothing with energy storage.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

PDT012 output  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3DNA: Analysis & Rebuilding of 3-Dimensional Nucleic Acid Structures 3DNA: Analysis & Rebuilding of 3-Dimensional Nucleic Acid Structures by Xiang-Jun Lu @ Wilma K. Olson's Laboratory at Rutgers (olson@rutchem.rutgers.edu) **************************************************************************** 1. The list of the parameters given below are along the 5' to 3' direction of strand I and 3' to 5' direction of strand II 2. All angular parameters, except for the phase angle of sugar pseudo- rotation, are measured in degrees in the range of [-180, +180], and all displacements are measured in Angstrom **************************************************************************** File name: pdt012.pdb Date and time: Mon Mar 6 08:36:53 2000 Number of base-pairs: 12 Number of atoms: 486 ****************************************************************************

69

rifsimp_output.html - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whenever DiffConstraint or UnSolve entries are present in the output, some parts of the algorithm have been disabled by options, and the resulting cases must ...

70

A study of the utility of heat collectors in reducing the response time of automatic fire sprinklers located in production modules of Building 707  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several of the ten production Modules in Building 707 at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant recently underwent an alteration which can adversely affect the performance of the installed automatic fire sprinkler systems. The Modules have an approximate floor to ceiling height of 17.5 ft. The alterations involved removing the drop ceilings in the Modules which had been at a height of 12 ft above the floor. The sprinkler systems were originally installed with the sprinkler heads located below the drop ceiling in accordance with the nationally recognized NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Automatic Sprinkler Systems. The ceiling removal affects the sprinkler`s response time and also violates NFPA 13. The scope of this study included evaluation of the feasibility of utilizing heat collectors to reduce the delays in sprinkler response created by the removal of the drop ceilings. The study also includes evaluation of substituting quick response sprinklers for the standard sprinklers currently in place, in combination with a heat collector.

Shanley, J.H. Jr.; Budnick, E.K. Jr. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Wheaton, MD (United States)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Research Plan to Determine Timing, Location, Magnitude and Cause of Mortality for Wild and Hatchery Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts Above Lower Granite Dam. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1966 to 1968, Raymond estimated an average survival rate of 89% for yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrating from trap sites on the Salmon River to Ice Harbor Dam, which was then the uppermost dam on the Snake River. During the 1970s, the estimated survival rate declined as the proportion of hatchery fish increased and additional dams were constructed. Recent survival indices for yearling chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin indicate that substantial mortalities are occurring en route to Lower Granite Dam, now the uppermost dam on the Snake River. Detection rates for wild and hatchery PIT-tagged smolts at Lower Granite Dam have been much lower than expected. However, for wild fish, there is considerable uncertainty whether overwinter mortality or smolt loss during migration is the primary cause for low survival. Efforts to rebuild these populations will have a better chance of success after the causes of mortality are identified and addressed. Information on the migrational characteristics and survival of wild fish are especially needed. The goal of this initial planning phase is to develop a research plan to outline potential investigations that will determine the timing, location, magnitude, and cause of smolt mortality above Lower Granite Dam.

Lower Granite Migration Study Steering Committee

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Statistical Location and Timing of the Convective Lines off the Mountainous Coast of Southeastern Taiwan from Long-Term Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, observations from the C-band Doppler radar on Green Island, which is located off the southeastern coast of Taiwan, during 1998–2004 were analyzed to investigate the statistical characteristics of the convective lines occurring off ...

Cheng-Ku Yu; Che-Yu Lin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Characterizing output bottlenecks in a supercomputer  

SciTech Connect

Supercomputer I/O loads are often dominated by writes. HPC (High Performance Computing) file systems are designed to absorb these bursty outputs at high bandwidth through massive parallelism. However, the delivered write bandwidth often falls well below the peak. This paper characterizes the data absorption behavior of a center-wide shared Lustre parallel file system on the Jaguar supercomputer. We use a statistical methodology to address the challenges of accurately measuring a shared machine under production load and to obtain the distribution of bandwidth across samples of compute nodes, storage targets, and time intervals. We observe and quantify limitations from competing traffic, contention on storage servers and I/O routers, concurrency limitations in the client compute node operating systems, and the impact of variance (stragglers) on coupled output such as striping. We then examine the implications of our results for application performance and the design of I/O middleware systems on shared supercomputers.

Xie, Bing [Duke University; Chase, Jeffrey [Duke University; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Drokin, Oleg [Intel Corporation; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reading Room Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOIA Offices and Reading Rooms FOIA Offices and Reading Rooms FOIA Office Locations Our FOIA Officers are located at various sites throughout the DOE complex, each with responsibility for records located at or under the jurisdiction of the site. We recommend that you send your request directly to that specific site. This will shorten the processing time. However, if you do not know which location has responsive records, you may either call the Headquarters FOIA office at (202) 586-5955 to determine the appropriate office, or mail the request to the Headquarters FOIA office. Other records are publicly available in the facilities listed below: Headquarters U.S. Department of Energy FOIA/Privacy Act Group 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Phone: 202-586-5955 Fax: 202-586-0575

78

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

location | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

location location Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released November 30th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biodiesel ethanol location production capacity transportation Data application/zip icon Biorefineries.zip (zip, 7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optimal fault location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic goal of power system is to continuously provide electrical energy to the users. Like with any other system, failures in power system can occur. In those situations it is critical that correct remedial actions are applied as soon as possible after the accurate fault condition and location are detected. This thesis has been focusing on automated fault location procedure. Different fault location algorithms, classified according to the spatial placement of physical measurements on single ended, multiple ended and sparse system-wide, are investigated. As outcome of this review, methods are listed as function of different parameters that influence their accuracy. This comparison is than used for generating procedure for optimal fault location algorithm selection. According to available data, and position of the fault with respect to the data, proposed procedure decides between different algorithms and selects an optimal one. A new approach is developed by utilizing different data structures such as binary tree and serialization in order to efficiently implement algorithm decision engine. After accuracy of algorithms is strongly influenced by available input data, different data sources are recommended in proposed architecture such as the digital fault recorders, circuit breaker monitoring, SCADA, power system model and etc. Algorithm for determining faulted section is proposed based on the data from circuit breaker monitoring devices. This algorithm works in real time by recognizing to which sequence of events newly obtained recording belongs. Software prototype of the proposed automated fault location analysis is developed using Java programming language. Fault location analysis is automatically triggered by appearance of new event files in a specific folder. The tests were carried out using the real life transmission system as an example.

Knezev, Maja

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Optimal Filtering of AC Output Anemometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The output of pulsed and AC output anemometers suffer from discretization noise when such anemometers are sampled at fast rates (>1 Hz). This paper describes the construction of an optimal filter designed to reduce this noise. By comparing the ...

J. C. Barnard; L. L. Wendell; V. R. Morris

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Single-Station Approach to Model Output Statistics Temperature Forecast Error Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Error characteristics of model output statistics (MOS) temperature forecasts are calculated for over 200 locations around the continental United States. The forecasts are verified on a station-by-station basis for the year 2001. Error measures ...

Andrew A. Taylor; Lance M. Leslie

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.  

SciTech Connect

We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

86

The world of quantum noise and the fundamental output process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stationary theory of quantum stochastic processes of second order is outlined. It includes KMS processes in wide sense like the equilibrium finite temperature quantum noise given by the Planck's spectral formula. It is shown that for each stationary noise there exists a natural output process output process which is identical to the noise in the infinite temperature limit, and flipping with the noise if the time is reversed at finite temperature. A canonical Hilbert space representation of the quantum noise and the fundamental output process is established and a decomposition of their spectra is found. A brief explanation of quantum stochastic integration with respect to the input-output processes is given using only correlation functions. This provides a mathematical foundation for linear stationary filtering transformations of quantum stochastic processes. It is proved that the colored quantum stationary noise and its time-reversed version can be obtained in the second order theory by a linear nonadapted filtering of the standard vacuum noise uniquely defined by the canonical creation and annihilation operators on the spectrum of the input-output pair.

V. P. Belavkin; O. Hirota; R. Hudson

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

87

Location and Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facts, Figures Location and Infrastructure Location and Infrastructure LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and...

88

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located...

89

Light output simulation of LYSO single crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used the Geant4 simulation toolkit to estimate the light collection in a LYSO crystal by using cosmic muons and E=105 MeV electrons. The light output as a function of the crystal length is studied. Significant influence of the crystal wrapping in the reflective paper and optical grease coupling to the photodetectors on the light output is demonstrated.

Usubov, Zafar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine's compactness, low maintenance, and high levels of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability concern as more gas turbines are added to the electric system. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises only 10% of the electric system, does not cause reliability concerns. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises 50% of the electric system, could create reliability and operational problems. This paper explores the potential for maintaining constant, reliable outputs from gas turbines by cooling ambient air temperatures before the air is used in the compressor section of the gas turbine.

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Characterizing output bottlenecks in a supercomputer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercomputer I/O loads are often dominated by writes. HPC (High Performance Computing) file systems are designed to absorb these bursty outputs at high bandwidth through massive parallelism. However, the delivered write bandwidth often falls well below ...

Bing Xie; Jeffrey Chase; David Dillow; Oleg Drokin; Scott Klasky; Sarp Oral; Norbert Podhorszki

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Dynamical Properties of Model Output Statistics Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical properties of forecasts corrected using model output statistics (MOS) schemes are explored, with emphasis on the respective role of model and initial condition uncertainties. Analytical and numerical investigations of low-order ...

S. Vannitsem; C. Nicolis

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Ensemble Model Output Statistics for Wind Vectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bivariate ensemble model output statistics (EMOS) technique for the postprocessing of ensemble forecasts of two-dimensional wind vectors is proposed, where the postprocessed probabilistic forecast takes the form of a bivariate normal probability ...

Nina Schuhen; Thordis L. Thorarinsdottir; Tilmann Gneiting

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

ARM - Instrument Location Table  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsLocation Table govInstrumentsLocation Table Instruments Location Table Contacts Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument Locations Site abbreviations explained in the key. Instrument Name Abbreviation NSA SGP TWP AMF C1 C2 EF BF CF EF IF C1 C2 C3 EF IF Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor ACSM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer AERI Aethalometer AETH Ameriflux Measurement Component AMC Aerosol Observing System AOS Meteorological Measurements associated with the Aerosol Observing System AOSMET Broadband Radiometer Station BRS

96

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Fiat 500 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer...

97

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Nissan Altima Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle...

98

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input...

99

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chrysler 300 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer...

100

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Facility location: distributed approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we initiate the study of the approximability of the facility location problem in a distributed setting. In particular, we explore a trade-off between the amount of communication and the resulting approximation ratio. We give a distributed ... Keywords: distributed approximation, facility location, linear programming, primal-dual algorithms

Thomas Moscibroda; Rogert Wattenhofer

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Method of locating underground mines fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of locating an underground mine fire by comparing the pattern of measured combustion product arrival times at detector locations with a real time computer-generated array of simulated patterns. A number of electronic fire detection devices are linked thru telemetry to a control station on the surface. The mine's ventilation is modeled on a digital computer using network analysis software. The time reguired to locate a fire consists of the time required to model the mines' ventilation, generate the arrival time array, scan the array, and to match measured arrival time patterns to the simulated patterns.

Laage, Linneas (Eagam, MN); Pomroy, William (St. Paul, MN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Automated Detection and Location of Indications in Eddy Current Signals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, said signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

Brudnoy, David M.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Levy, Arthur J.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado.

105

Entrance Maze Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entrance Maze Locations Entrance Maze Locations for the Storage Ring Tunnel Martin Knott LS-83 2/17/87 The Purpose of this note is to document the locations and decision rationale of the entrance mazes for the APS storage ring. There are a total of seven entrance mazes, four on the infield side and three on the operating floor side of the ring. Three of the infield mazes are associated with infield buildings, one in the Extraction Building and one each in the two RF Buildings. These three were located to provide convenient passage between the technical buildings and the storage ring components associated with those buildings. The Extraction Building maze allows passage between the positron beam transfer area and the storage ring two sectors upstream of the injection

106

Magma Source Location Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of Industry/University geophysicists was conducted to obtain their opinions on the existence of shallow (less than 10 km from surface) magma bodies in the western conterminous United States and methods for locating and defining them. Inputs from 35 individuals were received and are included. Responses were that shallow magma bodies exist and that existing geophysical sensing systems are adequate to locate them.

Hardee, H.C.; Dunn, J.C.; Colp, J.L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

System dynamics model of construction output in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates fluctuations of construction output, and growth of the output in Kenya. Fluctuation and growth of construction activity are matters of concern in… (more)

Mbiti, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Pine Tree Growth Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pine Tree Growth Locations Pine Tree Growth Locations Name: Amielee Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do pine trees not grow south of the equator? Replies: Dear Amielee, The natural distribution of the pines is the northern hemisphere: http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/tree/eukaryotes/green_plants/embryophytes/conif ers/pinaceae/pinus/pinus.html However, pines have become introduced into the southern hemisphere through cultivation: http://www.woodweb.com/~treetalk/Radiata_Pine/wowhome.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, Ph.D. Hi Amielee Some pine trees do live south of the equator but we (I live in Australia) do not have the huge forests of native conifers that you have in the northern hemisphere. Even in the northern hemisphere conifers are only found in two forest types: 1. Tiaga

109

University Location Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location Project Description Location Project Description Boise State University Boise, Idaho Boise State University has undertaken a study of the structural setting and geothermal potential at Neal Hot Springs that will integrate geology, geochemistry, and geophysics to analyze the site on the western Snake River plain. Boise State will determine if Neal Hot Springs sustains the necessary rock dilation and conduit pathways for hydrothermal fluid flow and successful geothermal development. The result will be new data acquisition, including a deep geophysical survey and fault surface data. Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado Colorado School of Mines will conduct an investigation near Homedale, Idaho, an area that straddles volcanic rock and unconsolidated sediments.

110

UFO - The Universal FeynRules Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so- called Universal FeynRules Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a Python module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the Mathematica package FeynRules that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

Degrande, Céline; Fuks, Benjamin; Grellscheid, David; Mattelaer, Olivier; Reiter, Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

UFO - The Universal FeynRules Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so- called Universal FeynRules Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a Python module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the Mathematica package FeynRules that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

Céline Degrande; Claude Duhr; Benjamin Fuks; David Grellscheid; Olivier Mattelaer; Thomas Reiter

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

112

Method for leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery as a function of speed  

SciTech Connect

The invention is a method of leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery during its discharge, while at the same time maximizing its power output into a given load. The method employs the concept of series resonance, employing a capacitor the parameters of which are chosen optimally to achieve the desired near-flatness of power output over any chosen charged-discharged speed ratio. Capacitors are inserted in series with each phase of the windings to introduce capacitative reactances that act to compensate the inductive reactance of these windings. This compensating effect both increases the power that can be drawn from the generator before inductive voltage drops in the windings become dominant and acts to flatten the power output over a chosen speed range. The values of the capacitors are chosen so as to optimally flatten the output of the generator over the chosen speed range.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Monitoring of Photovoltaic Plant Output and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems, including variability characteristics, is of increasing interest to utilities as they integrate more solar energy onto the electric grid. This study is part of a multi-year research series to investigate influencing factors that affect PV plant output, variability, and approaches to system management. It explores PV variability both from a grid perspective and through examination of project design aspects that can affect annual power production. ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Location-based communication services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our demo shows end-user-oriented location-based services based on application-layer, human understandable location descriptions. Keywords: internet telephony, location-based services

Xiaotao Wu; Ron Shacham; Matthew J. Mintz-Habib; Kundan Singh; Henning Schulzrinne

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The portable electronics market is rapidly migrating towards more compact devices with multiple functionalities. Form factor, performance, cost and efficiency of these devices constitute the factors of merit of devices like cell phones, MP3 players and PDA's. With advancement in technology and more intelligent processors being used, there is a need for multiple high integrity voltage supplies for empowering the systems in portable electronic devices. Switched mode power supplies (SMPS's) are used to regulate the battery voltage. In an SMPS, maximum area is taken by the passive components such as the inductor and the capacitor. This work demonstrates a single inductor used in a buck converter with two output voltages from an input battery with voltage of value 3V. The main focus areas are low cross regulation between the outputs and supply of completely independent load current levels while maintaining desired values (1.2V,1.5V) within well controlled ripple levels. Dynamic hysteresis control is used for the single inductor dual output buck converter in this work. Results of schematic and post layout simulations performed in CADENCE prove the merits of this control method, such as nil cross regulation and excellent transient response.

Eachempatti, Haritha

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Comparison of CAISO-run Plexos output with LLNL-run Plexos output  

SciTech Connect

In this report we compare the output of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) 33% RPS Plexos model when run on various computing systems. Specifically, we compare the output resulting from running the model on CAISO's computers (Windows) and LLNL's computers (both Windows and Linux). We conclude that the differences between the three results are negligible in the context of the entire system and likely attributed to minor differences in Plexos version numbers as well as the MIP solver used in each case.

Schmidt, A; Meyers, C; Smith, S

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electric current locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

Detection and Location of Damage on Pipelines  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL has developed and successfully tested a real-time pipeline damage detection and location system. This system uses porous metal resistive traces applied to the pipe to detect and locate damage. The porous metal resistive traces are sprayed along the length of a pipeline. The unique nature and arrangement of the traces allows locating the damage in real time along miles of pipe. This system allows pipeline operators to detect damage when and where it is occurring, and the decision to shut down a transmission pipeline can be made with actual real-time data, instead of conservative estimates from visual inspection above the area.

Karen A. Moore; Robert Carrington; John Richardson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

180 x 120: designing alternate location systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using 180 RFID tags to track and plot locations over time, guests to an event at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) collectively constructed a public visualization of the individual and group activities by building a history of movement ... Keywords: RFID, crowds, design, location tracking, tessellation

Eric Paulos; Anthony Burke; Tom Jenkins; Karen Marcelo

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Recommended methods for evaluating the benefits of ECUT Program outputs. [Energy Conversion and Utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to define and develop techniques that could be used to assess the complete spectrum of positive effects resulting from the Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program activities. These techniques could then be applied to measure the benefits from past ECUT outputs. In addition, the impact of future ECUT outputs could be assessed as part of an ongoing monitoring process, after sufficient time has elapsed to allow their impacts to develop.

Levine, L.O.; Winter, C.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy conserving automatic light output system  

SciTech Connect

An energy conserving lighting system is provided wherein a plurality of fluorescent lamps are powered by a poorly regulated voltage source power supply which provides a decreasing supply voltage with increasing arc current so as to generally match the volt-ampere characteristics of the lamps. A transistor ballast and control circuit connected in the arc current path controls the arc current, and hence the light output, in accordance with the total ambient light, i.e., the light produced by the lamps together with whatever further light is produced by other sources such as daylight. In another embodiment, a transistor ballast is utilized in combination with an inductive ballast. The transistor ballast provides current control over a wide dynamic range up to a design current maximum at which maximum the transistor is saturated and the inductive ballast takes over the current limiting function. An operational amplifier is preferably connected in the base biassing circuit of the control transistor of the transistor ballast. In an embodiment wherein two sets of lamps with separate inductive ballasts are provided, the arc currents for the two ballasts are scaled or matched to provide the desired light output.

Widmayer, D.F.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations Locations Clean Cities coalitions are primarily located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. Select the dots on the map for information about individual coalitions. See also the list of coalitions by designation date. United States map showing Clean Cities Coalition locations. Philadelphia State of Delaware Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Connecticut Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State State of Vermont Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Detroit Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) Central New York (Syracuse) Capital District (Albany) Empire Clean Cities State of Maryland Washington DC Metropolitan South Shore Western Riverside County Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Atlanta Alabama Denver Philadelphia State of Delaware Las Vegas Washington DC Metropolitan Massachusetts Clean Cities Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) Southeast Florida Chicago Land of Enchantment Wisconsin-Southeast Area Southern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Long Beach Antelope Valley Utah Clean Cities State of Maryland Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership Coalition Rogue Valley State of West Virginia San Joaquin Valley San Francisco Columbia-Willamette St. Louis Central New York (Syracuse) Dallas/Ft. Worth Honolulu Central Arkansas Pittsburgh Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Los Angeles Coachella Valley Region Northern Colorado Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) Virginia Clean Cities Coalition San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Maine Clean Communities Tulsa Valley of the Sun (Phoenix) Western Riverside County New Jersey Genesee Region (Rochester) Western Washington Clean Cities (Seattle) Ocean State Connecticut Connecticut2 Kansas City Regional Coalition Greater Indiana Clean Cities Coalition Capital District (Albany) Tucson Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Alamo Area (San Antonio) Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill) Twin Cities Clean Fuels Ohio Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Greater Lansing Palmetto State Houston-Galveston Middle Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition State of Iowa Treasure Valley Central Coast Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership Land of Sky Coalition

123

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Locations Locations Clean Cities coalitions are primarily located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. Select the dots on the map for information about individual coalitions. See also the list of coalitions by designation date. United States map showing Clean Cities Coalition locations. Philadelphia State of Delaware Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Connecticut Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State State of Vermont Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Detroit Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) Central New York (Syracuse) Capital District (Albany) Empire Clean Cities State of Maryland Washington DC Metropolitan South Shore Western Riverside County Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Atlanta Alabama Denver Philadelphia State of Delaware Las Vegas Washington DC Metropolitan Massachusetts Clean Cities Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) Southeast Florida Chicago Land of Enchantment Wisconsin-Southeast Area Southern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Long Beach Antelope Valley Utah Clean Cities State of Maryland Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership Coalition Rogue Valley State of West Virginia San Joaquin Valley San Francisco Columbia-Willamette St. Louis Central New York (Syracuse) Dallas/Ft. Worth Honolulu Central Arkansas Pittsburgh Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Los Angeles Coachella Valley Region Northern Colorado Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) Virginia Clean Cities Coalition San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Maine Clean Communities Tulsa Valley of the Sun (Phoenix) Western Riverside County New Jersey Genesee Region (Rochester) Western Washington Clean Cities (Seattle) Ocean State Connecticut Connecticut2 Kansas City Regional Coalition Greater Indiana Clean Cities Coalition Capital District (Albany) Tucson Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Alamo Area (San Antonio) Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill) Twin Cities Clean Fuels Ohio Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Greater Lansing Palmetto State Houston-Galveston Middle Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition State of Iowa Treasure Valley Central Coast Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership Land of Sky Coalition

124

METHOD OF LOCATING GROUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>This patent presents a method for locating a ground in a d-c circult having a number of parallel branches connected across a d-c source or generator. The complete method comprises the steps of locating the ground with reference to the mildpoint of the parallel branches by connecting a potentiometer across the terminals of the circuit and connecting the slider of the potentiometer to ground through a current indicating instrument, adjusting the slider to right or left of the mildpoint so as to cause the instrument to indicate zero, connecting the terminal of the network which is farthest from the ground as thus indicated by the potentiometer to ground through a condenser, impressing a ripple voltage on the circuit, and then measuring the ripple voltage at the midpoint of each parallel branch to find the branch in which is the lowest value of ripple voltage, and then measuring the distribution of the ripple voltage along this branch to determine the point at which the ripple voltage drops off to zero or substantially zero due to the existence of a ground. The invention has particular application where a circuit ground is present which will disappear if the normal circuit voltage is removed.

Macleish, K.G.

1958-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

125

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] 3250 Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Revision Number 1 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3250 31.2 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.462 0.014 Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package - Manual Transmission - All tests completed in ECO mode - EPA shift schedule modified based on vehicle shift light activity Revision Number 1 Notes: Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE Gasoline Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package

126

LBA-ECO DECAF Model Output Data Set Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECAF Model Output Data Set Published The ORNL DAAC announces the publication of the model output data product, Deforestation Carbon Flux (DECAF), from the LBA Land Use-Land Cover...

127

Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The waveguide power divider comprises an input waveguide of rectangular cross-section coupled to multiple reduced height output waveguides of rectangular cross-section. The input is coupled to the output waveguides by axial slots. The length of the slots is selected such that the wave direction of the input waveguide is preserved in the output waveguides. The width of the output guide is equal to the width of the input waveguide so that the input and output guides have the same cutoff wavelength. Waves will then travel with the same phase velocity in the input and output guides. The unused ends of the input and output guides are terminated in matched loads. The load at the end of the input guide absorbs power that is not coupled to the output guides.

Moeller, C.P.

1986-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Robust MPC with output feedback of integrating systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, it is presented a new contribution to the design of a robust MPC with output feedback, input constraints, and uncertain model. Multivariable predictive controllers have been used in industry to reduce the variability of the process output ...

J. M. Perez; D. Odloak; E. L. Lima

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chrysler 300 Chrysler 300 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 8/7/2013 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 4250 38.61 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.8894 0.01105 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Revision Number 3 Notes: Test Fuel Information 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Fuel type Tier II EEE HF437 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Fuel density [g/ml] Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 0.743 18490 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S

130

Output Performance and Payback Analysis of a Residential Photovoltaic System in Colorado: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Cost of installation and ownership of a 9.66-kilowatt (kW) residential photovoltaic system is described, and the performance of this system over the past 3 years is shown. The system is located in Colorado at 40 degrees latitude and consists of arrays on two structures. Two arrays are installed on a detached garage, and these are each composed of 18 Kyocera 130-W modules strung in series facing south at an angle of 40 degrees above horizontal. Each 18-panel array feeds into a Xantrex/Schneider Electric 2.8-kW inverter. The other two arrays are installed on the house and face south at an angle of 30 degrees. One of these arrays has twelve 205-W Kyocera panels in series, and the other is made up of twelve 210-Kyocera panels. Each of these arrays feeds into Xantrex/Schneider Electric 3.3-kW inverters. Although there are various shading issues from trees and utility poles and lines, the overall output resembles that which is expected from PVWatts, a solar estimate program. The array cost, which was offset by rebates from the utility company and federal tax credits, was $1.17 per watt. Considering measured system performance, the estimated payback time of the system is 9 years.

Johnston, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

WHY DO TUNA MAINTAIN ELEVATED SLOW MUSCLE TEMPERATURES? POWER OUTPUT OF MUSCLE ISOLATED FROM ENDOTHERMIC AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been hypothesised that regional endothermy has evolved in the muscle of some tunas to enhance the locomotory performance of the fish by increasing muscle power output. Using the work loop technique, we have determined the relationship between cycle frequency and power output, over a range of temperatures, in isolated bundles of slow muscle fibres from the endothermic yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and its ectothermic relative the bonito (Sarda chiliensis). Power output in all preparations was highly temperature-dependent. A counter-current heat exchanger which could maintain a 10 °C temperature differential would typically double maximum muscle power output and the frequency at which maximum power is generated (fopt). The deep slow muscle of the tuna was able to operate at higher temperatures than slow muscle from the bonito, but was more sensitive to Summary temperature change than more superficially located slow fibres from both tuna and bonito. This suggests that it has undergone some evolutionary specialisation for operation at higher, but relatively stable, temperatures. fopt of slow muscle was higher than the tailbeat frequency of undisturbed cruising tuna and, together with the high intrinsic power output of the slow muscle mass, suggests that cruising fish have a substantial slow muscle power reserve. This reserve should be sufficient to power significantly higher sustainable swimming speeds, presumably at lower energetic cost than if intrinsically less efficient fast fibres were recruited.

Ectothermic Fish; John D. Altringham; Barbara A. Block

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Input--output capital coefficients for energy technologies. [Input-output model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Input-output capital coefficients are presented for five electric and seven non-electric energy technologies. They describe the durable goods and structures purchases (at a 110 sector level of detail) that are necessary to expand productive capacity in each of twelve energy source sectors. Coefficients are defined in terms of 1967 dollar purchases per 10/sup 6/ Btu of output from new capacity, and original data sources include Battelle Memorial Institute, the Harvard Economic Research Project, The Mitre Corp., and Bechtel Corp. The twelve energy sectors are coal, crude oil and gas, shale oil, methane from coal, solvent refined coal, refined oil products, pipeline gas, coal combined-cycle electric, fossil electric, LWR electric, HTGR electric, and hydroelectric.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Using the output file from a Gaussian frequency calculation to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... extract the essential data from a Gaussian output file and compute thermodynamic functions at several temperatures. The basic data are also ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

Today in Energy - Seasonal hydroelectric output drives down ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased hydroelectric output in the Pacific Northwest drove daily, on-peak prices of electricity below $10 per megawatthour in late April (see chart above) at the ...

135

Distribution Fault Location Support Tools, Algorithms, and Implementation Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution grid modernization applications such as fault location and automatic sectionalizing require an accurate assessment of fault current. More-accurate prediction of fault locations will shorten the fault investigation (patrol) time, which in turn can reduce the total restoration time and duration of the outage experienced by the customer. This EPRI technical update report presents information on fault location applications, enumerates different methods used to detect the location of faults, ...

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Fuel Type Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Include private stations Not all stations are open to the public. Choose this option to also search private fueling stations. Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that stations are open, available to the public, and have the fuel prior to making a trip to that location. Some stations in our database have addresses that could not be located by the Station Locator application. This may result in the station appearing in the center of the zip code area instead of the actual location. If you're having difficulty, please contact the technical response team at

137

Mobility-supporting data management for location-based mobile systems: the special case of single category location repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Location-based mobile applications require timely generation of user-centric proximities from application-relevant repositories of business locations. The proximity generation requirement is poorly served by conventional query resolution methods which ...

James E. Wyse

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Digital time delay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

139

STARS: Sign tracking and recognition system using input-output HMMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

STARS is a vision based real time gestural interface that allows both communicative and manipulative 3D hand gestures, which vary in motion and appearance, to control target generic personal computer applications. This input-output HMM based framework ... Keywords: Adaptive threshold model, Gesture spotting, HCI, HCRF, Hand gesture recognition, IOHMM

C. Keskin; L. Akarun

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Dialog system for automatic data input/output and processing with two BESM-6 computers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a system for conducting experiments with fully automatic processing of data from multichannel recorders in the dialog mode. The system acquires data at a rate of 2.5 . 10/sup 3/ readings/sec, processes in real time, and outputs digital and graphical material in a multitasking environment.

Belyaev, Y.N.; Gorlov, Y.P.; Makarychev, S.V.; Monakov, A.A.; Shcherbakov, S.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modeling of the Output and Transfer Characteristics of Graphene Field-Effect Transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We obtain the output and transfer characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors by using the charge-control model for the current, based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation in the field-dependent relaxation time approximation. Closed expressions ...

Brett W. Scott; Jean-Pierre Leburton

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

PRISM 2.0: Simulated Solar Energy Output Data for the Lower 48 States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) engaged AWS Truepower (AWST) to provide simulated solar energy output data for the lower 48 states under the PRISM 2.0 Project. AWST obtained and processed historical modeled solar irradiance data over the 14-year period 1997–2010. The project team used the data to identify the best solar resource in each of the lower 48 states up to 1% of developable land area; generate solar power output time series for utility-scale sites for several ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mapping of Indian computer science research output, 1999---2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research output of India in computer science during 1999---2008 is analyzed in this paper on several parameters including total research output, its growth, rank and global publication share, citation impact, share of international collaborative ... Keywords: Computer science, Information technology, Mapping, Research priorities in computer

B. M. Gupta; Avinash Kshitij; Charu Verma

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

SLAC 16-channel differential TTL output module (Engineering Materials)  

SciTech Connect

The drawings listed on the Drawing List provide the data and specifications for constructing a SLAC 16-channel differential TTL output module as used in the SLAC PEP storage ring instrumentation and control system. It is a CAMAC module used as an output interface module from CAMAC signals.

Not Available

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Simple Technique for Multiple-Parameter Pattern Recognition with an Example of Locating Fronts in Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical pattern recognition technique called IREW is described. IREW has several strengths, such as fast execution, small storage requirements, and increments learning, that may make the technique useful for many meteorological pattern ...

Steven S. Fine; Alistair B. Fraser

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

SAS/GRAPH Output versus ODS Graphics................  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a hard-copy book: No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher, SAS Institute Inc. For a web download or e-book: Your use of this publication shall be governed by the terms established by the vendor at the time you acquire this publication. The scanning, uploading, and distribution of this book via the Internet or any other means without the permission of the publisher is illegal and punishable by law. Please purchase only authorized electronic editions and do not participate in or

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Optimization Online - Socially optimal location of facilities with fixed ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The choice of locations for such facilities influences not only distances for users traveling to the facilities but also user waiting times at the facilities. In contrast to ...

148

Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Precision zero-home locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Precision zero-home locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

Stone, W.J.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Utility Locating in the DOE Environment  

SciTech Connect

Some advances have been made in utility locating in recent years and standards have been recently published to try and categorize the level of information known about the utility in the subsurface. At the same time some characterization about the level of effort or technology in the geophysicist approach to utility locating may be generalized. The DOE environment poses some added difficulties and this presentation covers these issues, costs and the technical approach that has been developed at the INEEL to prevent utility hits and how it fits into the generalized classification of effort.

Clark Scott; Gail Heath

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

VCSEL fault location apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for locating a fault within an optical fiber is disclosed. The apparatus, which can be formed as a part of a fiber-optic transmitter or as a stand-alone instrument, utilizes a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to generate a test pulse of light which is coupled into an optical fiber under test. The VCSEL is subsequently reconfigured by changing a bias voltage thereto and is used as a resonant-cavity photodetector (RCPD) to detect a portion of the test light pulse which is reflected or scattered from any fault within the optical fiber. A time interval .DELTA.t between an instant in time when the test light pulse is generated and the time the reflected or scattered portion is detected can then be used to determine the location of the fault within the optical fiber.

Keeler, Gordon A. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

1984-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

155

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, James R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bemis, Jr., Curtis E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50-47676 March 2010 Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets Final Subcontract Report 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009 3TIER Seattle, Washington National...

157

Generalized Exponential Markov and Model Output Statistics: A Comparative Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a comparative verification of Model Output Statistics (MOS) against Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM), a single station forecasting technique which uses only the surface observation and climatology as input. The verification was ...

Thomas J. Perrone; Robert G. Miller

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Model-Inspired Predictors for Model Output Statistics (MOS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article addresses the problem of the choice of the predictors for the multiple linear regression in model output statistics. Rather than devising a selection procedure directly aimed at the minimization of the final scores, it is examined ...

Piet Termonia; Alex Deckmyn

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

160

Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

Methodology for designing the fuzzy resolver for a radial distribution system fault locator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Power System Automation Lab at Texas A&M University developed a fault location scheme that can be used for radial distribution systems. When a fault occurs, the scheme executes three stages. In the first stage, all data measurements and system information is gathered and processed into suitable formats. In the second stage, three fault location methods are used to assign possibility values to each line section of a feeder. In the last stage, a fuzzy resolver is used to aggregate the outputs of the three fault location methods and assign a final possibility value to each line section of a feeder. By aggregating the outputs of the three fault location methods, the fuzzy resolver aims to obtain a smaller subset of line sections as potential faulted sections than the individual fault location methods. Fuzzy aggregation operators are used to implement fuzzy resolvers. This dissertation reports on a methodology that was developed utilizing fuzzy aggregation operators in the fuzzy resolver. Three fuzzy aggregation operators, the min, OWA, and uninorm, and two objective functions were used to design the fuzzy resolver. The methodologies to design fuzzy resolvers with respect to a single objective function and with respect to two objective functions were presented. A detailed illustration of the design process was presented. Performance studies of designed fuzzy resolvers were also performed. In order to design and validate the fuzzy resolver methodology, data were needed. Due to the lack of real field data, simulating a distribution feeder was a feasible alternative to generate data. The IEEE 34 node test feeder was modeled. Time current characteristics (TCC) based protective devices were added to this feeder. Faults were simulated on this feeder to generate data. Based on the performance studies of designed fuzzy resolvers, the fuzzy resolver designed using the uninorm operator without weights is the first choice. For this fuzzy resolver, no optimal weights are needed. In addition, fuzzy resolvers using the min operator and OWA operator can be used to design fuzzy resolvers. For these two operators, the methodology for designing fuzzy resolvers with respect to two objective functions was the appropriate choice.

Li, Jun

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Job Location, Neighborhood Change, and Gentrification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper assesses the contribution of employment location to neighborhood change and to gentrification. At the tract level, average household income change is positively correlated both with the change in average pay for nearby jobs and with the start-year average pay for nearby jobs. The relationship between employment location and neighborhood change is stronger for tracts closer to downtown and for tracts in larger metropolitan areas. Change in job pay helps explain metropolitan gentrification within 2 miles of the CBD. The analysis combines Census tract household data for 1990-2000 from the Neighborhood Change Database and zip-code-level employment data for 1992-2000 from the National Establishment Time-Series database. I develop an algorithm for identifying changes in zip codes over time and for matching non-standard zip codes to Census tracts. Because causality between employment location and household location could run in both directions, I instrument for the tract-level change in average job pay with national-level industry growth and average pay.

Jed Kolko; Claudia Goldin; Rucker Johnson; Larry Katz; Jeffrey Lin; Stuart Rosenthal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fiber optic sensor for detecting damage location and shock wave velocity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival `points` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the `points` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

Weiss, J.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ota City : characterizing output variability from 553 homes with residential PV systems on a distribution feeder.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes in-depth analysis of photovoltaic (PV) output variability in a high-penetration residential PV installation in the Pal Town neighborhood of Ota City, Japan. Pal Town is a unique test bed of high-penetration PV deployment. A total of 553 homes (approximately 80% of the neighborhood) have grid-connected PV totaling over 2 MW, and all are on a common distribution line. Power output at each house and irradiance at several locations were measured once per second in 2006 and 2007. Analysis of the Ota City data allowed for detailed characterization of distributed PV output variability and a better understanding of how variability scales spatially and temporally. For a highly variable test day, extreme power ramp rates (defined as the 99th percentile) were found to initially decrease with an increase in the number of houses at all timescales, but the reduction became negligible after a certain number of houses. Wavelet analysis resolved the variability reduction due to geographic diversity at various timescales, and the effect of geographic smoothing was found to be much more significant at shorter timescales.

Stein, Joshua S.; Miyamoto, Yusuke (Kandenko, Ibaraki, Japan); Nakashima, Eichi (Kandenko, Ibaraki, Japan); Lave, Matthew

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Project Locations Biofuels Project Locations BlueFire Ethanol Biochemical Municipal Solid Waste (Mecca, CA) Poet Biochemical Corn Cob/Corn Fiber (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Biochemical Woody Biomass- Ag Residues (Grand Junction, CO) ICM Biochemical Switchgrass, Forage Sorghum, Stover (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa Biochemica Agricultural Residue (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) NewPage Thermochemical Woody Biomass - Mill Residues (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels Thermochemical Woody Waste (Soperton, GA) DSM Innovation Center Biochemical Various (Parsippany, NJ) Novozymes Biochemical Various (Davis, CA) Genencor Biochemical Various (Palo Alto, CA) Verenium Corp Biochemical Various (San Diego, CA)

167

Performance of joint transmit scheme assisted multiple-input multiple-output multi-carrier IDMA system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the performance of a multiple-input multiple-output multi-carrier interleave division multiple access (MC-IDMA) system assisted by combined vertical Bell Laboratories layered space-time architecture and space-time block code ...

K. S. Vishvaksenan, R. Seshasayanan, Yuvaraj Krishnamoorthy

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

METHOD OF MEASURING THE INTEGRATED ENERGY OUTPUT OF A NEUTRONIC CHAIN REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for measuring the integrated energy output of a reactor conslsting of the steps of successively irradiating calibrated thin foils of an element, such as gold, which is rendered radioactive by exposure to neutron flux for periods of time not greater than one-fifth the mean life of the induced radioactlvity and producing an indication of the radioactivity induced in each foil, each foil belng introduced into the reactor immediately upon removal of its predecessor.

Sturm, W.J.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Information about DOE Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information about DOE Locations Information about DOE Locations The following chart provides information about the FOIA program at each of the locations. You can link to the...

170

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects created with...

171

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects...

172

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

173

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

174

Maximal output purity and capacity for asymmetric unital qudit channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider generalizations of depolarizing channels to maps in which the identity channel is replaced by a convex combinations of unitary conjugations. We show that one can construct unital channels of this type for which the input which achieves maximal output purity is unique. We give conditions under which multiplicativity of the maximal p-norm and additivity of the minimal output entropy. We also show that the Holevo capacity need not equal log d - the minimal entropy as one might expect for a convex combination of unitary conjugations. Conversely, we give examples for which this condition holds, but the channel has no evident covariance properties.

Nilanjana Datta; Mary Beth Ruskai

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

175

station locations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288500 Varnish cache server station locations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, Source Alternative Fuels Data Center Date Released December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords alt fuel alternative fuels alternative fuels stations biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol

176

An approach to increase the scalability of location systems in WLAN networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a software layer designed to reduce the consumption of network resources and, at the same time, the amount of location traffic being carried by indoor location systems that are able to use a variety of location techniques. This new ... Keywords: A-GPS, WiFi fingerprinting, indoor location, location middleware

Israel Martin-Escalona; Francisco Barcelo-Arroyo

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Identification of Wiener systems with binary-valued output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is concerned with identification of Wiener systems whose outputs are measured by binary-valued sensors. The system consists of a linear FIR (finite impulse response) subsystem of known order, followed by a nonlinear function with a known parametrization ... Keywords: Binary-valued observations, Identification, Joint identifiability, Parameter estimation, Periodic inputs, Sensor thresholds, Wiener systems

Yanlong Zhao; Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin; Ji-Feng Zhang

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The continuity of the output entropy of positive maps  

SciTech Connect

Global and local continuity conditions for the output von Neumann entropy for positive maps between Banach spaces of trace-class operators in separable Hilbert spaces are obtained. Special attention is paid to completely positive maps: infinite dimensional quantum channels and operations. It is shown that as a result of some specific properties of the von Neumann entropy (as a function on the set of density operators) several results on the output entropy of positive maps can be obtained, which cannot be derived from the general properties of entropy type functions. In particular, it is proved that global continuity of the output entropy of a positive map follows from its finiteness. A characterization of positive linear maps preserving continuity of the entropy (in the following sense: continuity of the entropy on an arbitrary subset of input operators implies continuity of the output entropy on this subset) is obtained. A connection between the local continuity properties of two completely positive complementary maps is considered. Bibliography: 21 titles.

Shirokov, Maxim E [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Asymptotically efficient parameter estimation using quantized output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies identification of systems in which only quantized output observations are available. An identification algorithm for system gains is introduced that employs empirical measures from multiple sensor thresholds and optimizes their convex ... Keywords: Cramér-Rao bound, Efficient estimator, Quantized observation, System identification

Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

Pang, Grantham

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Choose best option for enhancing combined-cycle output  

SciTech Connect

This article describes several methods available for boosting the output of gas-turbine-based combined-cycle plants during warm-weather operation. The technology comparisons help choose the option that is most appropriate. Amidst the many advantages of gas-turbine (GT) combined cycles (CC), one drawback is that their achievable output decreases significantly as ambient temperature increases. Reason: The lower density of warm air reduces mass flow through the GT. Unfortunately, hot weather typically corresponds to peak power loads in many areas. Thus, the need to meet peak-load and power-sales contract requirements causes many plant developers to compensate for ambient-temperature-related output loss. The three most common methods of increasing output include: (1) injecting water or steam into the GT, (2) precooling GT inlet air, and/or (3) supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). All of these options require significant capital outlays and affect other performance parameters. In addition, they may uniquely impact the operation and/or selection of other components, including boiler feedwater and condensate pumps, valves, steam turbine/generators, condensers, cooling towers, and emissions control systems. Although plant-specific issues will have a significant effect on selecting an option, comparing the performance of different systems based on a theoretical reference plant can be helpful. The comparisons here illustrate the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of the major power augmentation technologies now in use.

Boswell, M.; Tawney, R.; Narula, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Improved Model Output Statistics Forecasts through Model Consensus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consensus forecasts are computed by averaging model output statistics (MOS) forecasts based on the limited-area fine-mesh (LFM) model and the nested grid model (NGM) for the three-year period 1990–92. The test consists of four weather elements (...

Robert L. Vislocky; J. Michael Fritsch

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of a 402.5 MHz 140 kW Inductive Output Tube  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of Phase I of an SBIR to develop a Pulsed Inductive Output Tube (IOT) with 140 kW at 400 MHz for powering H-proton beams. A number of sources, including single beam and multiple beam klystrons, can provide this power, but the IOT provides higher efficiency. Efficiencies exceeding 70% are routinely achieved. The gain is typically limited to approximately 24 dB; however, the availability of highly efficient, solid state drivers reduces the significance of this limitation, particularly at lower frequencies. This program initially focused on developing a 402 MHz IOT; however, the DOE requirement for this device was terminated during the program. The SBIR effort was refocused on improving the IOT design codes to more accurately simulate the time dependent behavior of the input cavity, electron gun, output cavity, and collector. Significant improvement was achieved in modeling capability and simulation accuracy.

R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read, Robert Jackson

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

184

Deadbeat control of a three-phase inverter with an output LC filter  

SciTech Connect

The discrete-time control of a three-phase inverter with an output LC filter is described based on space vectors. The mathematical model of the inverter-filter system is first obtained by using space vectors to represent three-phase quantities. Deadbeat control laws are derived for no-load and resistive-load cases. Then, a deadbeat control law is obtained for the case when the load draws current of any waveshape from the inverter-filter. It is shown that deadbeat control of output voltage can be achieved in two control steps. The manipulated variable, which is the voltage vector demanded from the inverter, is implemented using the space vector modulation technique. Simulation results for various operating conditions are presented.

Kuekrer, O. [Eastern Mediterranean Univ., G. Magosa (Turkey). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module.  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that a wide variety of current-pulse shapes can be generated using a linear-transformer-driver (LTD) module that drives an internal water-insulated transmission line. The shapes are produced by varying the timing and initial charge voltage of each of the module's cavities. The LTD-driven accelerator architecture outlined in [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)] provides additional pulse-shaping flexibility by allowing the modules that drive the accelerator to be triggered at different times. The module output pulses would be combined and symmetrized by water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 030401 (2008)].

Long, Finis W.; McKee, G. Randall; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McKenney, John Lee; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John L.; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; LeChien, Keith, R.; Van De Valde, David M. (EG& G, Albuquerque, NM)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Strategies for OPEC`s pricing and output decisions  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines OPEC pricing and output strategies, both to provide an understanding of OPECs unwise price doubling in 1979-80 and also to analyze what strategy might serve it best for the future. We focus on the unavoidable uncertainty regarding the underlying parameters that characterize the world oil market (price elasticities, income growth rates), and the sensitivity of discounted OPEC revenue to changes in these parameters, for various pricing strategies. In 1979-80, OPEC chose a high-price strategy, which could have yielded good results (like many other price-paths) if the market`s underlying parameters had been more favorable. But the price elasticities of demand and non-OPEC supply were much higher than anticipated, so that OPEC did very poorly-not only in absolute terms, but also relative to what it could have achieved if it had set its price more cautiously. We search for a robustly optimal strategy for OPEC in the future, which will serve it well relative to other strategies, regardless of the true parameter values underlying the market (within some plausible range). We conclude that OPEC`s interests will be served best by a policy of moderate output growth, at a rate no faster than that of world income growth. This will require that OPEC slow its rate of output growth since 1985, cutting it at least in half. Slowing its output growth will allow OPEC gradually to regain the market share lost after its disastrous 1979-80 price doubling, but without jeopardizing its revenue, as might a policy of more rapid increases in output. This will yield a consistently good result for OPEC, relative to alternative strategies, over a fairly wide range of demand and supply conditions. 53 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Gately, D. [New York Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

A transmission line fault locator based on Elman recurrent networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a transmission line fault location model which is based on an Elman recurrent network (ERN) has been presented for balanced and unbalanced short circuit faults. All fault situations with different inception times are implemented on a 380-kV ... Keywords: Elman networks, Fault location, Transmission lines, Wavelet transform

Sami Ekici; Selcuk Yildirim; Mustafa Poyraz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Vacuum State/Refiner/Location  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vacuum Vacuum State/Refiner/Location Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Barrels per Operating Idle Operating Idle Downstream Charge Capacity Thermal Cracking Delayed Fluid Coking Visbreaking Other/Gas Calendar Day Stream Day Distillation Coking Oil Table 3. Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2013 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) ......................................................... Alabama 120,100 0 130,000 0 48,000 32,000 0 0 0 Goodway Refining LLC 4,100 0 5,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................

189

Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

1962-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

190

Design and Evaluation of an Architecture for Location Privacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many operators of cellphone networks now offer location-based services to their customers, whereby an operator often outsources service provisioning to a third-party provider. Since a person’s location could reveal sensitive information about the person, the operator must ensure that the service provider processes location information about the operator’s customers in a privacy-preserving way. We propose an architecture for location-based services based on Trusted Computing and Secure Logging. Trusted Computing lets an operator query the configuration of a location-based service. The operator will hand over location information to the service only if the service is configured such that the service provider cannot get access to location information using software-based attacks. This includes passive attacks, where the provider monitors the composition or the timing of information flowing into and out of its service, and active attacks, where the provider modifies or injects customer queries to the service. We introduce several requirements that must be satisfied by a location-based service to defend against passive attacks. Furthermore, we present Secure Logging, an auditing mechanism to defend against active attacks. We present an implementation of our architecture and demonstrate its usefulness by building two sample location-based services on top of it. The evaluation of our architecture shows that its processing delay is hardly noticeable and that timing attacks are very unlikely to succeed. 1

Urs Hengartner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels Biofuels Project Locations Pacific Ethanol (Boardman, OR) BlueFire Ethanol (Corona, CA) POET (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Innovations (Commerce City, CO) ICM (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) NewPage (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels (Soperton, GA) DSM Innovation Center (Parsippany, NJ) Novozymes (Davis, CA) Genencor (Palo Alto, CA) Verenium Corp (San Diego, CA) Dupont (Wilmington, DE) Mascoma (Lebanon, NH) Cargill Inc (Minneapolis, MN) Regional Partnerships South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD Cornell University, Ithaca, NY University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

192

Optical device with conical input and output prism faces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

Brunsden, Barry S. (Chicago, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Analysis of Temporal and Spatial Characteristics on Output of Wind Farms with Doubly Fed Induction Generator Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the large number of wind turbines and covering too large area in a large wind farm, wake effects among wind turbines and wind speed time delays will have a greater impact of wind farms models. Taking wind farms with doubly fed induction generator(DFIG) ... Keywords: wind farm, modeling, temporal and spatial characteristics, DFIG, output characteristics

Shupo Bu, Xunwen Su

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The LHCb Vertex Locator performance and Vertex Locator upgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LHCb is an experiment dedicated to the study of new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point. The detector operates in a severe and highly non-uniform radiation environment. The small pitch and analogue readout result in a best single hit precision of 4 $\\rm \\mu$m. The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz event rate. The vertex detector will have to cope with radiation levels up to 10$^{16}$ 1 MeV$\\rm n_{eq}/cm^2$, more than an order of magnitude higher than those expected at the current experiment. A solution is under development with a pixel detector, based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips with 55 x 55 $\\rm \\mu m$ pixels. In addition a micro-strip solution is also under development, with finer pitch, higher granularity and lower mass than the current detector. The current status of the VELO will be described together with recent testbeam results.

Pablo Rodríguez Pérez; for the LHCb VELO Group; for the VELO Upgrade group

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

OPEC influence grows with world output in next decade  

SciTech Connect

World crude oil and condensate output will rise to 75 million bopd in 2004, concludes a recently released Petroconsultant study, entitled Worldwide Crude Oil 10-Year Forecast. It also projects that OPEC`s role in supplying demand will simultaneously grow to nearly 50% of total output. In reaching these conclusions, this report analyzed and predicted each of 94 significant producing nations for the 1995--2004 period. Output has been projected separately for the onshore and offshore sectors. Each nation, including the new republics of the former Soviet Union and individual emirates of the United Arab Emirates, is discussed within its regional and global framework; and key aspects of each of the seven major regions have been delineated. The study integrated full-cycle resource analysis, economics, infrastructure, politics, history, consumption levels and patterns, energy balances, and other pertinent data to cover both supply and demand pictures. The entire discovery and production history was used to frame exploration and development maturity. Future discovery potential has been estimated from largely geologic parameters.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well as recovering stolen vehicles. Because many applications require traveling vehicles, this thesis focused on the AirTouch system's ability to accurately locate a moving vehicle. Recent AirTouch vehicle location system reports were compiled and analyzed to distinguish what factors tend to affect the accuracy of the readings. Based on the results of the reports, two sites were selected to minimize the external effects that could create inaccurate readings. Six speeds were selected ranging from 0 to 80 kmph (O to 50 mph) in 16 kmph (10 mph) increments. Each velocity was tested 20 times at each site. The location readings were compared to differential Global Positioning System (dGPS) readings which currently provide the most accurate location readings available for civilian use. The dGPS readings were also collected at each test site. It was discovered that one site produced more accurate readings compared to the other site. In addition, the longitude differences accounted for most of the error in the readings. Finally, more error was prevalent in the readings associated with the vehicle's direction of travel as opposed to readings perpendicular to the direction of travel. Based on the data analysis, it was impossible to conclude if velocity affected the accuracy of the AirTouch system. The results of this thesis have suggested that the AirTouch system does decrease in accuracy as the velocity increases among traveling vehicles. However, in one case, the accuracy of the stationary readings were less accurate compared to the non-stationary readings. At 80 kmph (50 mph), AirTouch had an approximate inaccuracy of 50 meters (164 feet). When the data was adjusted for human error, this approximate inaccuracy decreased to 33 meters (107 feet). For transit services, these averages are appropriate. When dispatching a transit vehicle, two-way communication between dispatcher and driver can verify the vehicle's exact location. Furthermore, when a customer needs to know where a vehicle is and when it should arrive, 33 to 50 meters (107 to 164 feet) is sufficient for the customers' needs.

Henry, Tracy Lynn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Current mode instrumentation amplifier with rail-to-rail input and output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Current Mode Instrumentation Amplifier with rail-to-rail input and output is presented. It is based on constant gm input stages, and cascode output stages. Although this CMIA structure has a good Input Common Mode Voltage, it suffers from a poor output ... Keywords: analog integrated circuits, current mode instrumentation amplifier, rail-to-rail input and output

Filipe Costa Beber Vieira; Cesar Augusto Prior; Cesar Ramos Rodrigues; Leonardo Perin; Joao Baptista dos Santos Martins

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Brief paper: Speed regulation with measured output feedback in the control of heavy haul trains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach of output regulation with measurement feedback is proposed for the control of heavy haul trains. The objective is to regulate all cars' speeds to a prescribed speed profile. The output regulation problem of nonlinear systems with measurement ... Keywords: ECP braking system, Heavy haul trains, Measured output feedback, Output regulation, Quadratic programming

X. Zhuan; X. Xia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method and apparatus for measuring response time  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

Johanson, Edward W. (New Lenox, IL); August, Charles (Darien, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Method and apparatus for measuring response time  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

Johanson, E.W.; August, C.

1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

Gross, J.E.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

RSS Fingerprints Based Distributed Semi-Supervised Locally Linear Embedding (DSSLLE) Location Estimation System for Indoor WLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important requirement for many novel location based services, is to determine the locations of people, equipment, animals, etc. The accuracy and response time of estimation are critical issues in location estimation system. Most of the location estimation ... Keywords: Dimensional reduction techniques, Distributed systems, Locally linear embedding (LLE), Location aware services, Semi-supervised learning, User location and tracking, Wireless LANs

Vinod Kumar Jain; Shashikala Tapaswi; Anupam Shukla

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Gasoline Prices Vary Among Locations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The public is probably more knowledgeable about what they pay for gasoline than about anything else they use regularly. Most Americans are bombarded several times a day with the price of gasoline. Many people who phone our office don't only want to know why prices have risen, but why their prices are different than prices in some other area - the gasoline station two blocks away, the average price quoted on the news, the price their uncle is paying in a different region of the country. This chart shows some of the different state averages for a specific month. Besides taxes, these differences are due to factors such as distance from refining sources, and mix of reformulated versus conventional fuels. What this snapshot does not show,is that all of these prices can

204

Maps & Directions | Custom Map Location | Brookhaven National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Want to share a specific location with others? Drag the marker pin to a new location and then share the following URL: http:www.bnl.govmapspoint.php?Lat40.86827&Lng-72.88113...

205

Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that sites are open prior to making a...

206

Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for installation. Because of some testing problems with the Zenergy fault current limiter, installation was delayed until early 2009 with it being put into operation on March 6, 2009. A malfunction of the FCL controller caused the DC power supply to the superconducting magnet to be turned off. This inserted the FCL impedance into the circuit while it was in normal operation causing a voltage resonance condition. While these voltages never reached a point where damage would occur on customer equipment, steps were taken to insure this would not happen again. The FCL was reenergized with load on December 18, 2009. A fault was experienced on the circuit with the FCL in operation on January 14, 2010. The FCL operated properly and reduced the fault current by about 8%, what was expected from tests and modeling. As of the end of the project, the FCL was still in operation on the circuit. The third phase of the project involved the exploration of several advanced protection ideas that might be at a state where they could be applied to the Circuit of the Future and elsewhere in the SCE electrical system. Based on the work done as part of the literature review and survey, as well as a number of internal meetings with engineering staff at SCE, a number of ideas were compiled. These ideas were then evaluated for applicability and ability to be applied on the Circuit of the Future in the time remaining for the project. Some of these basic ideas were implemented on the circuit including measurement of power quality before and after the FCL. It was also decided that we would take what was learned as part of the Circuit of the Future work and extend it to the next generation circuit protection for SCE. Also at this time, SCE put in a proposal to the DOE for the Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration using ARRA funding. SCE was successful in obtaining funding for this proposal, so it was felt that exploration of new protection schemes for this Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration would be a good use of the project resources. With this in mind, a protection system that uses fault interrupting switches, hi

Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Factors of characteristic words: Location and decompositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let @a be an irrational number with 0Keywords: Characteristic word, Decomposition, Location, Overlap factor, Return words, Separate factor

Wai-Fong Chuan; Hui-Ling Ho

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Solar concentration of 50,000 achieved with output power approaching 1 kW  

SciTech Connect

The authors have achieved a 50,000 {+-} 3,000 times concentration of sunlight using a unique dielectric nonimaging concentrator in an experiment performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The scale of the experiment is several times larger than that of previous experiments. Total output power approaching 1 kW passes through a 4.6 mm diameter aperture. An extractor tip is added to the concentrator profile which allows measurement of flux levels using an air calorimeter. This new device has the potential to allow the use of dielectric concentrators at larger scale for thermal electric power generation. The authors report on the implications of this experiment for the future use of dielectric concentrators.

Jenkins, D.; Winston, R.; Bliss, J.; O`Gallagher, J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Lewandowski, A.; Bingham, C. [National Renewal Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach M. G. Ierapetritou and C. A. Floudas®elopment plan with well locations, gi®en a reser®oir property map and a set of infrastructure constraints, represents a ®ery challenging prob- lem. The problem of selecting the optimal ®ertical well locations

210

Location tracking via social networking sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of social media has steadily grown in recent years, and now more than ever, people are logging on to websites like Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, and Google Latitude with the aim of broadcasting their location information. The ability to 'check ... Keywords: disclosure, intention, location-based services, location-tracking, social networking, trust

Lisa Thomas; Pam Briggs; Linda Little

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Location, Decentralization, and Knowledge Sources for Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When firms seek to innovate, they must decide where to locate their innovation activity. This location choice requires firms to make a simultaneous choice about the organizational structure of innovation activity: almost by definition, multiple locations ... Keywords: decentralization, imitative innovation, new-to-the-market innovation, research and development

Aija Leiponen; Constance E. Helfat

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Open neighborhood locating-dominating in trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a graph G that models a facility or a multiprocessor network, detection devices can be placed at the vertices so as to identify the location of an intruder such as a thief or saboteur or a faulty processor. Open neighborhood locating-dominating sets ... Keywords: Domination, Open neighborhood locating-dominating set

Suk J. Seo; Peter J. Slater

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Modeling of Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability Preprint M. Sengupta To be presented at SOLAR 2011 Raleigh, North Carolina May 17-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-51105 April 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

214

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 -...

215

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 12:00am...

216

US-CERT Control System Center Input/Output (I/O) Conceputal Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Center of the National Cyber Security Division (NCSD) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs the federal departments to identify and prioritize critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the NCSD to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems; the I/O upgrade described in this document supports these goals. The vulnerability assessment Test Bed, located in the Information Operations Research Center (IORC) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), consists of a cyber test facility integrated with multiple test beds that simulate the nation's critical infrastructure. The fundamental mission of the Test Bed is to provide industry owner/operators, system vendors, and multi-agency partners of the INL National Security Division a platform for vulnerability assessments of control systems. The Input/Output (I/O) upgrade to the Test Bed (see Work Package 3.1 of the FY-05 Annual Work Plan) will provide for the expansion of assessment capabilities within the IORC facility. It will also provide capabilities to connect test beds within the Test Range and other Laboratory resources. This will allow real time I/O data input and communication channels for full replications of control systems (Process Control Systems [PCS], Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems [SCADA], and components). This will be accomplished through the design and implementation of a modular infrastructure of control system, communications, networking, computing and associated equipment, and measurement/control devices. The architecture upgrade will provide a flexible patching system providing a quick ''plug and play''configuration through various communication paths to gain access to live I/O running over specific protocols. This will allow for in-depth assessments of control systems in a true-to-life environment. The full I/O upgrade will be completed through a two-phased approach. Phase I, funded by DHS, expands the capabilities of the Test Bed by developing an operational control system in two functional areas, the Science & Technology Applications Research (STAR) Facility and the expansion of various portions of the Test Bed. Phase II (see Appendix A), funded by other programs, will complete the full I/O upgrade to the facility.

Not Available

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fueling Station Locator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Topics: Datasets Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured References: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Research: Data and Resources[1] Logo: Alternative Fueling Station Locator The alternative fuel station locator uses an address based search to find

218

Locational analysis for the aluminum industry  

SciTech Connect

A locational analysis for the aluminum industry suggests that its locational pattern is probably even more clear-cut than that of the steel industry. Because the smelting of alumina into aluminum requires a very large amount of electric power, aluminum has become an industry highly oriented to cheap-power locations. A quick analysis, taking into account present technological and economic conditions, reveals that the potential advantages of the minimum-transport-cost location for an aluminum plant are clearly outweighed by the large power cost savings accruing from locating the plant at a cheap-power location. This holds true even with a fairly small differential in power rates between the two locations.

Isard, W.; Parcels, L.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A H-infinity Fault Detection and Diagnosis Scheme for Discrete Nonlinear System Using Output Probability Density Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a H-infinity fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) scheme for a class of discrete nonlinear system fault using output probability density estimation is presented. Unlike classical FDD problems, the measured output of the system is viewed as a stochastic process and its square root probability density function (PDF) is modeled with B-spline functions, which leads to a deterministic space-time dynamic model including nonlinearities, uncertainties. A weighting mean value is given as an integral function of the square root PDF along space direction, which leads a function only about time and can be used to construct residual signal. Thus, the classical nonlinear filter approach can be used to detect and diagnose the fault in system. A feasible detection criterion is obtained at first, and a new H-infinity adaptive fault diagnosis algorithm is further investigated to estimate the fault. Simulation example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

Zhang Yumin; Lum, Kai-Yew [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117508 (Singapore); Wang Qingguo [Depa. Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Persistent Uniform Resource Locators (PURLs) | Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Persistent Uniform Resource Locators (PURLs) Persistent Uniform Resource Locators (PURLs) Print page Print page Email page Email page PURLs (Persistent Uniform Resource Locators) are Web addresses that act as permanent identifiers in the face of a dynamic and changing Web infrastructure. Instead of resolving directly to Web resources, PURLs describe an intermediate location that allows the underlying Web addresses of resources to change over time without negatively affecting systems that depend on them. This capability provides continuity of references to network resources that may migrate from machine to machine for various reasons. Operation PURLs look just like URLs because they are valid URLs. A PURL has three parts: the protocol used to access the PURL resolver, the resolver IP address or domain, and a user-assigned name.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Our Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Locations Home > About Us > Our Locations Our Locations The NNSA's nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to

222

Our Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Locations Home > About Us > Our Locations Our Locations The NNSA's nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to

223

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: August 13, 2: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on AddThis.com... Fact #482: August 13, 2007

225

Distribution Fault Location and Waveform Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated fault location algorithms for distribution systems require monitoring equipment to record voltage and current waveforms during an event. In addition, most of these algorithms require circuit-impedance parameters to evaluate the fault location. Locating incipient faults and fault waveform characterization is the main aim of this project. This project builds on work done in 2008 towards sub-cycle blip identification using an algorithm based on arc voltage.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Benchmarking of Fault-Location Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report resumes the studies on fault-location technologies that were conducted in 2009. These studies were undertaken in a joint project done with the collaboration of Hydro-Qubec, Long Island Power Authority, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Two fault-location technologies were tested, the Reactance to Fault (RTF) implemented in the PQView application and the Voltage Drop Fault Location (VDFL) implemented in the MILE application. The RTF is based on substation voltage and current me...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

SARAH 3.2: Dirac Gauginos, UFO output, and more  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SARAH is a Mathematica package optimized for the fast, efficient and precise study of supersymmetric models beyond the MSSM: a new model can be defined in a short form and all vertices are derived. This allows SARAH to create model files for FeynArts/FormCalc, CalcHep/CompHep and WHIZARD/OMEGA. The newest version of SARAH now provides the possibility to create model files in the UFO format which is supported by MadGraph 5, MadAnalysis, GoSam, and soon by Herwig++. Furthermore, SARAH also calculates the mass matrices, RGEs and one-loop corrections to the mass spectrum. This information is used to write source code for SPheno in order to create a precision spectrum generator for the given model. This spectrum-generator-generator functionality as well as the output of WHIZARD and CalcHep model files have seen further improvement in this version. Also models including Dirac Gauginos are supported with the new version of SARAH, and additional checks for the consistency of model implementations have been created.

Florian Staub

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fail safe controllable output improved version of the Electromechanical battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fail safe controllable output improved version of the electromechanical battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition. 4 figs.

Post, R.F.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

230

Locating Restricted Facilities on Binary Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The encoding could represent clean and polluted areas or desirable and undesirable zones. For this encoding, we consider several facility location problems to ...

231

2010 Hyundai LPI Hybrid Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyundai LPI Hybrid Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Alternative Fuel Hybrid...

232

Russian Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Russian Locations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

233

2010 Volkswagen Golf TDI Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Golf TDI Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop Vehicle...

234

The Facility Location Problem with Bernoulli Demands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper we address a discrete capacitated facility location problem in which ...... The type of instance for FLPBD (1, 2, 3, or 4) as described above.

235

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Albuquerque, New Mexico...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Albuquerque Housing Education Recreation Locations Life in Albuquerque Photo of New Mexico landscape Albuquerque is New Mexico's largest city, with a population of more than...

236

Procurement Information by Location | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procurement Information by Location Procurement Information by Location Procurement Information by Location As part of our Small Business Opportunity Tool, we are offering information about historical procurement by location. Find historical procurement data by state - check out the list of states below, and click on the state's name to learn more about their current programs and past procurement needs. Click on the state to learn more about our current procurement activity: California Colorado District of Columbia Georgia Idaho Illinois Iowa Louisana Maryland Missouri Nevada New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania South Carolina Tennessee Texas Virginia West Virginia Washington Wyoming

237

Hybrid TOA---AOA Location Positioning Techniques in GSM Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Positioning algorithms and their implementation in mobile networks are being investigated in the literature due to their importance in location services. Nowadays, the need for superior accuracy has cast attention to hybrid positioning techniques. In ... Keywords: Access delay, Angle of arrivals, GSM procedure, Hybrid techniques, Paging signalling, Time of arrivals

Nikos Deligiannis; Spiros Louvros

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Slide 1 Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

239

Updated Eastern Interconnect Wind Power Output and Forecasts for ERGIS: July 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AWS Truepower, LLC (AWST) was retained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to update wind resource, plant output, and wind power forecasts originally produced by the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS). The new data set was to incorporate AWST's updated 200-m wind speed map, additional tall towers that were not included in the original study, and new turbine power curves. Additionally, a primary objective of this new study was to employ new data synthesis techniques developed for the PJM Renewable Integration Study (PRIS) to eliminate diurnal discontinuities resulting from the assimilation of observations into mesoscale model runs. The updated data set covers the same geographic area, 10-minute time resolution, and 2004?2006 study period for the same onshore and offshore (Great Lakes and Atlantic coast) sites as the original EWITS data set.

Pennock, K.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Updated Eastern Interconnect Wind Power Output and Forecasts for ERGIS: July 2012  

SciTech Connect

AWS Truepower, LLC (AWST) was retained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to update wind resource, plant output, and wind power forecasts originally produced by the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS). The new data set was to incorporate AWST's updated 200-m wind speed map, additional tall towers that were not included in the original study, and new turbine power curves. Additionally, a primary objective of this new study was to employ new data synthesis techniques developed for the PJM Renewable Integration Study (PRIS) to eliminate diurnal discontinuities resulting from the assimilation of observations into mesoscale model runs. The updated data set covers the same geographic area, 10-minute time resolution, and 2004?2006 study period for the same onshore and offshore (Great Lakes and Atlantic coast) sites as the original EWITS data set.

Pennock, K.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Robotic location of underground chemical sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes current progress in a project to develop robotic systems for locating underground chemical sources. There are a number of economic and humanitarian applications for this technology. Finding unexploded ordinance, land mines, and sources ... Keywords: Chemical diffusion, Chemical source location, De-mining, Robotics

R. Andrew Russell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Adding Speech to Location-based Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first generation of Location-based Services (LBSs) did not succeed on the market. In order to prepare LBSs of the next generation for the challenges of pervasive service execution in different situations (e.g. while walking on the street or while ... Keywords: Human Computer Interaction (HCI), Location-based Services, Multimodality, Spoken Dialogue Systems

Patrick Nepper; Georg Treu; Axel Küpper

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Proxying location update for idle mode interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In cellular networks it is the mobile node's responsibility to update the network about its location change, especially when this one enters idle mode. We developed a new framework [8] where the idle interface is powered-off to save energy and thus could ... Keywords: MIH services, idle/active mode, location-update, proxied interface, proxied multi-radio interface, proxy entity

Hicham Mahkoum; Abdelhakim S. Hafid; Behcet Sarikaya

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Location-Based sponsored search advertising  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proliferation of powerful mobile devices with built-in navigational capabilities and the adoption in most metropolitan areas of fast wireless communication protocols have recently created unprecedented opportunities for location-based advertising. ... Keywords: game theory, location-based advertising, nash equilibrium

George Trimponias, Ilaria Bartolini, Dimitris Papadias

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Property:UtilityLocation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UtilityLocation UtilityLocation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name UtilityLocation Property Type Boolean Description Indicates this is the "mailing" location of the Utility. Usually is Yes if the information from EIA Form 861 File1_a is on the page. Pages using the property "UtilityLocation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3 Phases Energy Services + true + 4 4-County Electric Power Assn + true + A A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + true + AEP Generating Company + true + AEP Texas Central Company + true + AEP Texas North Company + true + AES Eastern Energy LP + true + AGC Division of APG Inc + true + AP Holdings LLC + true + APN Starfirst, L.P. + true + APNA Energy + true + Accent Energy Holdings, LLC + true +

246

Property:Event/Location | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Location Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Event/Location Property Type String Description The location in which an event will occur. Examples: 'Golden, Colorado' or 'Prestigious Hotel: 11 Rue Leroy, Paris, France'. Pages using the property "Event/Location" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading + Paris, France + 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Day 2 + Paris, France + 15th International Business Forum: Low Carbon High Growth - Business Models for a Changing Climate + Pretoria, South Africa + 18th Africa Partnership Forum + Paris, France + 2 2012 Bonn Climate Change Conference + Bonn, Germany + 7 7th Asia Clean Energy Forum + Manila, Philippines +

247

Far-Field Power of Lightning Strokes as Measured by the World Wide Lightning Location Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) is a long-range network capable of locating lightning strokes in space and time. While able to locate lightning to within a few kilometers and tens of microseconds, the network currently does not ...

Michael L. Hutchins; Robert H. Holzworth; Craig J. Rodger; James B. Brundell

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fault location in distribution systems is a critical component of outage management and service restoration, which directly impacts feeder reliability and quality of the electricity supply. Improving fault location methods supports the Department of Energy (DOE) “Grid 2030” initiatives for grid modernization by improving reliability indices of the network. Improving customer average interruption duration index (CAIDI) and system average interruption duration index (SAIDI) are direct advantages of utilizing a suitable fault location method. As distribution systems are gradually evolving into smart distribution systems, application of more accurate fault location methods based on gathered data from various Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) installed along the feeders is quite feasible. How this may be done and what is the needed methodology to come to such solution is raised and then systematically answered. To reach this goal, the following tasks are carried out: 1) Existing fault location methods in distribution systems are surveyed and their strength and caveats are studied. 2) Characteristics of IEDs in distribution systems are studied and their impacts on fault location method selection and implementation are detailed. 3) A systematic approach for selecting optimal fault location method is proposed and implemented to pinpoint the most promising algorithms for a given set of application requirements. 4) An enhanced fault location method based on voltage sag data gathered from IEDs along the feeder is developed. The method solves the problem of multiple fault location estimations and produces more robust results. 5) An optimal IED placement approach for the enhanced fault location method is developed and practical considerations for its implementation are detailed.

Lotfifard, Saeed

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Efficient Partitioning of Fragment Shaders for Multiple-Output Hardware  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partitioning fragment shaders into multiple rendering passes is an effective technique for virtualizing shading resource limits in graphics hardware. The Recursive Dominator Split (RDS) algorithm is a polynomial-time algorithm for partitioning fragment shaders for real-time rendering that has been shown to generate efficient partitions.

Tim Foley; Mike Houston; Pat Hanrahan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Output-sensitive Modular Algorithms for Polynomial Matrix Normal ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 27, 2006 ... of maintaining only one row in each of the m stripes. The recursion ... number of times a row in each stripe is used as a pivot in the elimination.

251

Efficient partitioning of fragment shaders for multiple-output hardware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partitioning fragment shaders into multiple rendering passes is an effective technique for virtualizing shading resource limits in graphics hardware. The Recursive Dominator Split (RDS) algorithm is a polynomial-time algorithm for partitioning fragment ...

Tim Foley; Mike Houston; Pat Hanrahan

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

PDP-6 LISP Input-Output for the Dataphone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A version of LISP 1.5 for the PDP-6 Computer has been extended to include IO through the dataphone. This makes possible communication between programs running in Project MAC time sharing and LISP programs running on the ...

Martin, William A.

1965-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Protecting location privacy: optimal strategy against localization attacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mainstream approach to protecting the location-privacy of mobile users in location-based services (LBSs) is to alter the users' actual locations in order to reduce the location information exposed to the service provider. The location obfuscation ... Keywords: location inference attacks, location privacy, location-based services, optimal defense strategy, privacy protection, service quality, stackelberg bayesian games

Reza Shokri; George Theodorakopoulos; Carmela Troncoso; Jean-Pierre Hubaux; Jean-Yves Le Boudec

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located 99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications Summary This EA was being prepared to evaluate potential environmental impacts of a proposal to dispose of nickel scrap that is volumetrically contaminated with radioactive materials and that DOE recovered from equipment it had used in uranium enrichment. This EA is on hold. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time.

255

New results in forecasting of photovoltaic systems output based on solar radiation forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate short term forecasting of photovoltaic (PV) systems output has a great significance for fast development of PV parks in South-East Europe

Laurentiu Fara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Export.gov - Export.gov - Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations Locations Print | E-mail Page Locations 800.872.8723 Domestic Offices International Offices Locations 800.872.8723 Call: 800.872.8723 (1-800-USA-TRAD(E)) Email: tic@trade.gov between 8:30 AM and 6 PM EST to receive immediate answers to your exporting questions on: Tariff and Tax Information Country-specific General Export Information Region-specific Export Information (Middle East, China, Latin America, EU, etc.) International Documentation, Regulations and Standards Logistics and Finance (HS/Schedule B numbers, Freight Forwarders, partners) Free Trade Agreements (qualifying products for FTA benefits, Certificates of origin.) Trade Data Export-related information offered by federal, state and local entities Export-related information related to other USG agencies Note for Importers: Please contact U.S. Customs at 877.227.5511

257

Russian Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Russian Locations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Russia Tri-Lab S&T Collaborations > Travel

258

Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Find Stations Plan a Route Location: Go Start: End: Go Fuel: All Fuels Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) more search options close × More Search Options Include private stations Include planned stations Owner All Private Federal State Local Utility Payment All American Express Discover MasterCard VISA Cash Checks CFN Clean Energy Fuel Man Gas Card PHH Services Voyager WEX Electric charger types Include level 1 Include level 2 Include DC fast Include legacy chargers Limit results to within 5 miles Limit results to within 5 miles 12,782 alternative fuel stations in the United States Excluding private stations

259

Developing a theory of nightclub location choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is an investigation of the factors that influence where nightclubs locate within a city. Nightclubs, like other social spaces, provide important social and economic benefits in the urban environment. As amenities, ...

Crim, Stephen J. (Stephen Johnson)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fault Detection, Location, Isolation and Reconnection in ...  

A University of Colorado research team led by Jae-Do Park has developed a fault detection, location and isolation scheme for a low-voltage DC-bus microgrid system, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Federating location-based data services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the emerging availability of small and portable devices which are able to determine their position and to communicate wirelessly, mobile and spatially-aware applications become feasible. These applications rely on information that is bound to locations ...

Bernhard Mitschang; Daniela Nicklas; Matthias Grossmann; Thomas Schwarz; Nicola Hönle

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Adaptive learning of semantic locations and routes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptation of devices and applications based on contextual information has a great potential to enhance usability and mitigate the increasing complexity of mobile devices. An important topic in context-aware computing is to learn semantic locations and ...

Keshu Zhang; Haifeng Li; Kari Torkkola; Mike Gardner

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Adaptive learning of semantic locations and routes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptation of devices and applications based on contextual information has a great potential to enhance usability and mitigate the increasing complexity of mobile devices. An important topic in context-aware computing is to learn semantic locations and ...

Keshu Zhang; Haifeng Li; Kari Torkkola; Mike Gardner

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Addressing endogeneity in residential location models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some empirical residential location choice models have reported dwelling-unit price estimated parameters that are small, not statistically significant, or even positive. This would imply that households are non-sensitive ...

Guevara-Cue, Cristián Angelo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Facility location for a hybrid manufacturing/remanufacturing system with carbon costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses inventory management and facility location for a hybrid manufacturing/remanufacturing system where remanufacturing lead-time is different from production lead-time. We also investigate the… (more)

Kim, Yusuk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Exploring temporal effects for location recommendation on location-based social networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Location-based social networks (LBSNs) have attracted an inordinate number of users and greatly enriched the urban experience in recent years. The availability of spatial, temporal and social information in online LBSNs offers an unprecedented opportunity ... Keywords: location recommendation, location-based social networks, temporal effects

Huiji Gao, Jiliang Tang, Xia Hu, Huan Liu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

Richard Coulter; Kevin Widener; Nitin Bharadwaj; Karen Johnson; Timothy Martin

268

Continuous-time nonlinear model predictive control of time-delayed Wiener-type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a novel method of continuous-time model predictive control for nonlinear time-delayed systems. The problems regarding time delays are solved by incorporating delayed and undelayed model outputs in the control-law derivation. Nonlinear-mapping ... Keywords: Wiener-type model, continuous system, nonlinear predictive control, time-delayed system

Simon Oblak; Igor Škrjanc

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Brief paper: Output tracking of continuous bioreactors through recirculation and by-pass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose to regulate the output of an auto-catalytic bioprocess (a biological process associated with a growth of a micro-organism) by means of a recirculation loop and by-pass. We give conditions on the volume of the reactor and the ... Keywords: Continuous bioreactor, Nonlinear control design, Output regulation, Recirculation loop

Jérôme Harmand; Alain Rapaport; Frédéric Mazenc

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

ANN Models for Steam Turbine Power Output Toward Condenser Circulating Water Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aimed the costliness and the complex process of performance test for steam turbine power output toward circulating water flux and in view of the non—linear advantage about neural network, it brings forward predicting the performance using artificial ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, steam turbine power output, performance prediction

Jia Ruixuan; Xu Hong

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Brief paper: A multi-regulator sliding mode control strategy for output-constrained systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a multi-regulator control scheme for single-input systems, where the setpoint of a regulated output must be changed under the constraint that a set of minimum-phase outputs remain within prescribed bounds. The strategy is based on ... Keywords: Aircraft engines, Control with constraints, Hybrid systems, Selector systems, Sliding modes

Hanz Richter

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Alternative Fueling Station Locations | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Station Locations Alternative Fueling Station Locations Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, view U.S. maps, and more. Access up-to-date fuel station data here: http://www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/data_download The dataset available for download here provides a "snapshot" of the alternative fueling station information for: compressed natural gas (CNG), E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), propane/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), biodiesel, electricity, hydrogen, and liquefied natural gas

273

Reconstructing Spatial Distributions from Anonymized Locations  

SciTech Connect

Devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and sensors are often equipped with GPS that accurately report a person's location. Combined with wireless communication, these devices enable a wide range of new social tools and applications. These same qualities, however, leave location-aware applications vulnerable to privacy violations. This paper introduces the Negative Quad Tree, a privacy protection method for location aware applications. The method is broadly applicable to applications that use spatial density information, such as social applications that measure the popularity of social venues. The method employs a simple anonymization algorithm running on mobile devices, and a more complex reconstruction algorithm on a central server. This strategy is well suited to low-powered mobile devices. The paper analyzes the accuracy of the reconstruction method in a variety of simulated and real-world settings and demonstrates that the method is accurate enough to be used in many real-world scenarios.

Horey, James L [ORNL; Forrest, Stephanie [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Groat, Michael [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Predicting the Energy Output of Wind Farms Based on Weather Data: Important Variables and their Correlation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind energy plays an increasing role in the supply of energy world-wide. The energy output of a wind farm is highly dependent on the weather condition present at the wind farm. If the output can be predicted more accurately, energy suppliers can coordinate the collaborative production of different energy sources more efficiently to avoid costly overproductions. With this paper, we take a computer science perspective on energy prediction based on weather data and analyze the important parameters as well as their correlation on the energy output. To deal with the interaction of the different parameters we use symbolic regression based on the genetic programming tool DataModeler. Our studies are carried out on publicly available weather and energy data for a wind farm in Australia. We reveal the correlation of the different variables for the energy output. The model obtained for energy prediction gives a very reliable prediction of the energy output for newly given weather data.

Vladislavleva, Katya; Neumann, Frank; Wagner, Markus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the potential to supply vast amounts of clean energy. But continuing to produce geothermal power efficiently and inexpensively can require innovative adjustments to the technology used to process it. Located in the Mayacamas Mountains of northern California, The Geysers is the world's larg- est geothermal complex. Encompassing 45 square miles along the Sonoma and Lake County border, the complex harnesses natural steam reservoirs to create clean renewable energy that accounts for one-fifth of the green power produced in California. In the late 1990s, the pressure of geothermal steam at The Geysers was falling, reducing the output of its power plants. NREL teamed with Pacific

276

Digestion time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digestion time Digestion time Name: Don Mancosh Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have always given the rule of thumb in class that material we eat is with us for about 24 hours before exiting the body. The question arises about the time value of liquids. Getting a big coke prior to a 3 hour drive generally means that there will be a stop along the way. Is there a generalization made about liquids in the body similar to the one for solid food? Replies: A physician would give a better answer, but I hazard this: the only liquids which people consume (deliberately) in significant quantities are water, ethyl alcohol and various oils. Water and alcohol are absorbed on a time scale of seconds to minutes through the mouth, stomach and digestive tract. The oils are huge molecules, so I'd guess like any other greasy food they get absorbed in the upper digestive tract. Some of them, perhaps the longest and most nonpolar, are not absorbed at all --- cf. the old-time remedy of mineral oil for constipation --- so there should be some average time-before-what's-left-is-excreted such as you're looking for, and my (wild) guess is that it would not differ substantially from that for food. You can define an average lifetime in the body for alcohol, since the natural level is zero. Rough guidelines are widespread in the context of drunk driving laws. But this is not really possible for water. One's body is normally full up to the brim with water, and there's no way for the body to distinguish between water molecules recently absorbed and molecules that've been moping around since the Beatles split up. Thus the water entering the toilet bowl after the pit stop is not in general the same water as was in the big coke. If you were to consider for water just the average time between drinking and peeing, it would seem to depend strongly on how well hydrated the body was before the drink, and how much was drunk. During sustained heavy exertion in the sun and dry air one can easily drink a pint of water an hour without peeing at all. On the other hand, if one is willing to drink enough water fast enough, so as to establish a high excess of body water one can pee 8 ounces 15 minutes or less after drinking 8 ounces.

277

SOLERAS - solar applications in remote locations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this international technology workshop was to promote the exchange of research information on solar applications in remote locations. Scientists and engineers from the United States, Saudia Arabia, Central and South America, Southeast Asia, and Oceania were represented at this sixth annual workshop conducted under the auspices of the SOLERAS program. The objective of the workshop was to address the issues of construction, operation, and maintenance of solar energy systems in remote locations. Photovoltaic, wind, solar thermal, biomass, and geothermal technologies were considered. Also considered was the use of solar energy for agricultural purposes. Each paper has been separately indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Khoshaim, B.H.; Williamson, J.S.; Meiners, A.; Mallory, R. (eds.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Property:Water Column Location | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Column Location Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Water Column Location Property Type Text Pages using the property "Water Column Location" Showing 1 page using this...

279

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Program Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations in the United States Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

280

Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Smart Grid Demonstration projects created...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Weather Effects on European Agricultural Output 1850-1913  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 4 The following correlation coefficients were calculated for the effects of weather shocks on production: Britain and France, r= 0.34; Britain and Germany, r=0.27; France and Germany, r=0.51. 5 The timing of tariff changes was also conditioned... are known to be weather sensitive, including construction and energy demand. Considering a broader set of sectors can clarify to what extent shocks were sector-specific. However, it should be emphasised that, in the period being analysed, the size...

Solomou, Solomos; Wu, Weike

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

New fault locating system for air-insulated substations using optical current detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a newly developed fault locating system. This fault locating system helps to shorten the time required for restoration of service after the occurrence of a busbar fault in an air-insulated distribution substation. Recent optical and electronic technologies allow highly accurate and compact fault locating system, which consists of optical current detectors using Faraday effect and a fault locating processor employing digital data processing technique. The fault location is made by discriminating the direction of zero-sequence currents. Through various tests and field operations it has been confirmed that the system has sufficient performance for practical application.

Yoshida, Y.; Kawazoe, S. (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)); Ibuki, K.; Yamada, K.; Ochi, N. (Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan). Itami Works)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper seeks to understand what temporal and spatial scales of variability in global horizontal radiation are important to a PV plants and what measurements are needed to be able to characterize them. As solar radiation measuring instruments are point receivers it is important to understand how those measurements translate to energy received over a larger spatial extent. Also of importance is the temporal natural of variability over large spatial areas. In this research we use high temporal and spatial resolution measurements from multiple sensors at a site in Hawaii to create solar radiation fields at various spatial and temporal scales. Five interpolation schemes were considered and the high resolution solar fields were converted to power production for a PV power plant. It was found that the interpolation schemes are robust and create ramp distributions close to what would be computed if the average solar radiation field was used. We also investigated the possibility of using time averaged solar data from 1 sensor to recreate the ramp distribution from the 17 sensors. It was found that the ramping distribution from using appropriately time averaged data from 1 sensor can reasonably match the distribution created using the 17 sensor network.

Sengupta, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper seeks to understand what temporal and spatial scales of variability in global horizontal radiation are important to a PV plants and what measurements are needed to be able to characterize them. As solar radiation measuring instruments are point receivers it is important to understand how those measurements translate to energy received over a larger spatial extent. Also of importance is the temporal natural of variability over large spatial areas. In this research we use high temporal and spatial resolution measurements from multiple sensors at a site in Hawaii to create solar radiation fields at various spatial and temporal scales. Five interpolation schemes were considered and the high resolution solar fields were converted to power production for a PV power plant. It was found that the interpolation schemes are robust and create ramp distributions close to what would be computed if the average solar radiation field was used. We also investigated the possibility of using time averaged solar data from 1 sensor to recreate the ramp distribution from the 17 sensors. It was found that the ramping distribution from using appropriately time averaged data from 1 sensor can reasonably match the distribution created using the 17 sensor network.

Sengupta, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

HLDB: location-based services in databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces HLDB, the first practical system that can answer exact spatial queries on continental road networks entirely within a database. HLDB is based on hub labels (HL), the fastest point-to-point algorithm for road networks, and ... Keywords: SQL, databases, large road networks, location services

Ittai Abraham; Daniel Delling; Amos Fiat; Andrew V. Goldberg; Renato F. Werneck

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach Belén Palop1,2 1Departamento de March 2009 Florida State University #12;Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model;Transportation Network Model Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model Network placement

Palop del Río, Belén

287

Location Games and Bounds for Median Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a two-person zero-sum game in which the maximizer selects a point in a given bounded planar region, the minimizer selects K points in that region,.and the payoff is the distance from the maximizer's location ...

Haimovich, Mordecai

288

Photonic Crystals: Enhancing the Light Output of Scintillation Based Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scintillator is a material which emits light when excited by ionizing radiation. Such materials are used in a diverse range of applications; From high energy particle physics experiments, X-ray security, to nuclear cameras or positron emission tomography. Future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments as well as next generation medical imaging applications are more and more pushing towards better scintillation characteristics. One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high index of refraction. As a consequence, most of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. The same problem also occurs with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and has for a long time been considered as a limiting factor for their overall efficiency. Recent developments in the area of nanophotonics were showing now that those limitations can be overcome by introducing a photonic crystal (PhC) slab at the outcoupling surface of the substrate. P...

Knapitsch, Arno Richard

289

Prediction of Boiler Output Variables Through the PLS Linear Regression Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this work, we propose to use the linear regression partial least square method to predict the output variables of the RA1G boiler. This method consists in finding the regression of an output block regarding an input block. These two blocks represent the outputs and inputs of the process. A criteria of cross validation, based on the calculation of the predicted residual sum of squares, is used to select the components of the model in the partial least square regression. The obtained results illustrate the effectiveness of this method for prediction purposes.

Abdelmalek Kouadri; Mimoun Zelmat; Alhussein Albarbar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A method for reducing harmonics in output voltages of a double-connected inverter  

SciTech Connect

A new method for reducing harmonics involved in output voltages of the double-connected inverter is proposed. By adding four auxiliary switching devices and an interphase transformer with secondary winding to the conventional 12-step inverter, output voltages of the proposed circuit can be almost the same waveforms as a conventional 36-step inverter. In this paper, circuit performances and output voltage waveforms are discussed, and the optimum parameters are derived. Then, effects on harmonic reductions can be clarified by theoretical and experimental results, and ratings of system components are investigated.

Masukawa, Shigeo; Iida, Shoji (Tokyo Denki Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Study of location management for next generation personal communication networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main target of location management is to maintain location of users while minimizing the system operation. The process consists of location update, paging, and database consideration. The location update and paging manages the user-network interaction ... Keywords: centralized database (CDB), distributed database (DDB), location area scheme, location update, timer-based update strategy, velocity paging (VP)

Teerapat Sanguankotchakorn; Panuvit Wibullanon

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Location of an agribusiness enterprise with respect to economic viability: a risk analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study analyzes the economic and geographic effects of alternative locations on risky investment decisions in a probabilistic framework. Historically, alternative locations for multi-million dollar investments are often evaluated with deterministic models that rely on expected values or best case/worst case scenarios. Stochastic simulation was used to estimate the probability distribution for select key output variables, including net present value (NPV), of a proposed biomass to ethanol production facility in three alternative regions in Texas. The simulated NPV probability distributions were compared using Stochastic Efficiency with Respect to a Function (SERF) to predict the location preference of decision makers with alternative levels of risk aversion. Risk associated with input availability and costs were analyzed for the proposed plant locations so each location resulted in different levels of economic viability and risk that would not have been observed with a traditional deterministic analysis. For all analyzed scenarios, the projected financial feasibility results show a positive NPV over the 16 year planning horizon with a small probability of being negative. The SERF results indicate the Central Region of Texas is preferred for risk averse decision makers compared to the Panhandle and Coastal Bend Regions. Risk premiums were calculated for the alternative locations and are consistent for all risk averse decision makers, indicating the ranking of alternative locations are robust. Positive community impacts and sensitivity elasticities for key variables were estimated in the model. The estimated positive economic gains for the local economy are quite large and indicate locating a production facility in the region could substantially impact the local economy. The calculated sensitivity elasticities show ethanol price, ethanol yield, and hydrogen price are the three variables that have the greatest affect on the feasibility of a biomass to ethanol production facility.

Lau, Michael H.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Livermore, California: Visiting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California Livermore, California administration building Our location and hours of operation Sandia/California is located at 7011 East Avenue in Livermore, Calif., a suburban community about 45 miles east of San Francisco. Positioned at the eastern edge of the San Francisco Bay Area, Sandia is within easy commuting distance of many affordable housing communities in San Joaquin County and the Central Valley. The official hours of operation at Sandia/California are from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. PST, Monday through Friday. General inquiries can be made by calling (925) 294-3000. See our contacts page for additional information. Getting here All three major airports in the San Francisco Bay Area provide access to Sandia/California. Oakland International Airport is the closest airport to

294

Truckstop Electrification Locator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckstop Electrification Locator Truckstop Electrification Locator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Truckstop Electrification Locator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Perpare a Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Implement the Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

295

New approach to the fault location problem using synchronized sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new approach to solving the problem of fault location on a transmission line using synchronized data from both ends of the line. The synchronized phase voltage and current samples taken during the fault transient are used to calculate the location of the fault. Time domain models of lines are used as a basis for derivation of two different algorithms. One algorithm is developed using the RL line model and the other one is developed using the traveling wave based line model. The main idea of the fault location concept is based on the general characteristics of any transmission line. At any location along the unfaulted line, the instantaneous values of voltage and current signals are related to the instantaneous values of the corresponding values of voltage and current signals at both ends of the line, line parameters, and distance between that particular location and each of the line ends. This enables the derivation of the generic fault location equation of the following form: [ ] where Lv is the linear operator, VA, t'A, VB, z'B are vectors of voltage and current samples at line ends, d is the length of the line, and x is the unknown distance to the fault point. For a particular transmission line, the generic equation has a unique form that determines the way it is solved. In any case, the Minimum Square Error Estimation Method is used since an overspecified system of linear equations needs to be solved. The performance evaluation of both algorithms was done using the Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP) generated data [1]. Obtained results indicate the high accuracy of the approach and its robustness regarding various fault conditions. The following are the conclusions based on the results presented in this thesis: The error of the approach is rather small and almost invariant to the various fault conditions and, hence, the technique provides a robust solution to the fault location problem. The new approach has high accuracy while the computational burden is still kept relatively low. The synchronized sampling technique required for this approach is emerging as a reliable and cost effective practice.

Mrkic, Jasna

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today the Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology. CASL researchers are using supercomputers to study the performance of light water reactors and to develop highly sophisticated modeling that will help accelerate upgrades at existing U.S. nuclear plants. These upgrades could improve the energy output of our existing reactor fleet by as much as seven reactors' worth at a fraction of the cost of building new reactors, while providing continued improvements in

297

Optimization of the optical output in a C-to-C pulsed gas laser  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of the optimum condition for maximum optical output in a C-to-C pulsed gas laser (N{sub 2} laser) showed that this condition does not happen when the two capacitances are equal (C{sub 1} = C{sub 2}) as this happens in the ``Doubling circuit`` case, but when the peaking capacitance obtains a critical value. This behavior is attributed to the electric pumping pulse formed by the temporary loading of the peaking capacitor. This electric pumping pulse increases as the peaking capacitor increases. However, for low values of the peaking capacitor the optical output follows the rise of the electric pumping pulse. On the other hand, for higher values of the peaking capacitor than a critical one, a part of the electric energy arrives at the laser channel after the laser output, while the exploitable electric energy decreases causing reduction of the optical output.

Persephonis, P.; Giannetas, V.; Parthenios, J.; Ioannou, A.; Georgiades, C. [Univ. of Patras, Patra (Greece). Dept. of Physics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Estimates of Cn2 from Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output and Comparison with Thermosonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Area-averaged estimates of Cn2 from high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) model output are produced from local estimates of the spatial structure functions of refractive index with corrections for the inherent smoothing and filtering ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Francois Vandenberghe; Wei Yu; Yubao Liu; Jason Knievel; George Jumper

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Diagnostic and Forecast Graphics Products at NMC Using High Frequency Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archived hourly output from the National Meteorological Center (NMC) prediction models has provided the basis for advanced graphic diagnostic and forecast tools. The high-frequency data are available on a regional selected station network. Each ...

David W. Plummer

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Application of Model Output Statistics to Precipitation Prediction in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model output Statistics (MOS) technique has been used to produce forecasts of both the probability of precipitation and the rain amount for seven major Australian cities in subtropical and middle latitudes. Single station equations were ...

R. G. Tapp; F. Woodcock; G. A. Mills

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Application of Model Output Statistics to the Development of a Local Wind Regime Forecast Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Output Statistics (MOS) approach is used to develop a procedure for forecasting the occurrence of a local wind regime at Rota, Spain known as the levante. Variables derived solely from surface pressure and 500 mb height forecast fields ...

Robert A. Godfrey

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting Using Ensemble Model Output Statistics and Minimum CRPS Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble prediction systems typically show positive spread-error correlation, but they are subject to forecast bias and dispersion errors, and are therefore uncalibrated. This work proposes the use of ensemble model output statistics (EMOS), an ...

Tilmann Gneiting; Adrian E. Raftery; Anton H. Westveld III; Tom Goldman

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Model Output Statistics Forecasts: Three Years of Operational Experience in the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Netherlands, one to five day Model Output Statistics (MOS) forecasts have been used operationally since November 1983. The weather elements predicted are the probability of precipitation, the conditional probability of frozen precipitation,...

C. Lemcke; S. Kruizinga

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Australian Experimental Model Output Statistics Forecasts of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model output statistics (MOS) forecasts of daily temperature maxima and minima are developed for seven Australian cities. The developmental data and method of derivation of the MOS equations are described and the equations briefly compared to ...

F. Woodcock

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Single-inductor, multiple-output buck converter with parallel source transient recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To address the need for multiple regulated voltage supplies in electronic devices, this thesis presents a modeling and design study of a single-inductor, multiple-output (SIMO) DC-DC buck converter with parallel source ...

King, Charles Jackson, III

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Reduced-basis output bound methods for parametrized partial differential equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An efficient and reliable method for the prediction of outputs of interest of partial differential equations with affine parameter dependence is presented. To achieve efficiency we employ the reduced-basis method: a weighted ...

Rovas, Dimitrios V. (Dimitrios Vasileios), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4e. Gross Output1by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002...

308

Exploring the Structure of Regional Climate Scenarios by Combining Synoptic and Dynamic Guidance and GCM Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of regional climate scenarios is constructed for two study regions in North America using a combination of GCM output and synoptic–dynamical reasoning. The approach begins by describing the structure and components of a climate scenario and ...

James S. Risbey; Peter J. Lamb; Ron L. Miller; Michael C. Morgan; Gerard H. Roe

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Use of Medium-Range Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output to Produce Forecasts of Streamflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines an archive containing over 40 years of 8-day atmospheric forecasts over the contiguous United States from the NCEP reanalysis project to assess the possibilities for using medium-range numerical weather prediction model output ...

Martyn P. Clark; Lauren E. Hay

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Shape control of conditional output probability density functions for linear stochastic systems with random parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a controller design for shaping conditional output probability density functions (pdf) for non-Gaussian dynamic stochastic systems whose coefficients are random and represented by their known pdfs. The moment-generating ...

Aiping Wang; Yongji Wang; Hong Wang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Experiments in probability of Precipitation Amount Forecasting Using Model Output Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modifications to current model output statistics procedures for quantitative precipitation forecasting were explored. Probability of precipitation amount equations were developed for warm and cool seasons in a region in the eastern United States. ...

Raymond W. Arritt; William M. Frank

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Mesoscale Forecasts Generated from Operational Numerical Weather-Prediction Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique called Model Output Enhancement (MOE) has been developed for the generation and display of mesoscale weather forecasts. The MOE technique derives mesoscale or high-resolution (order of 1 km) weather forecasts from synoptic-scale ...

John G. W. Kelley; Joseph M. Russo; Toby N. Carlson; J. Ronald Eyton

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Optimising maximum power output and minimum entropy generation of Atkinson cycle using mutable smart bees algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is optimising maximum power output (MPO) and minimum entropy generation (MEG) of an Atkinson cycle as a multi-objective constraint thermodynamic problem by a new improved artificial bee colony algorithm which utilises 'mutable ...

Mofid Gorji; Ahmad Mozaffari; Sina Mohammadrezaei Noudeh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Estimating Potential Evaporation from Vegetated Surfaces for Water Management Impact Assessments Using Climate Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin managers concerned with maintaining water supplies and mitigating flood risk in the face of climate change are taking outputs from climate models and using them in hydrological models for assessment purposes. While precipitation is the ...

Victoria A. Bell; Nicola Gedney; Alison L. Kay; Roderick N. B. Smith; Richard G. Jones; Robert J. Moore

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu)

316

Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

is well on its way to topping 8 million barrels per day by 2014. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects daily oil output will average 7.3...

317

Statistical Downscaling of Precipitation in Korea Using Multimodel Output Variables as Predictors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pattern projection downscaling method is applied to predict summer precipitation at 60 stations over Korea. The predictors are multiple variables from the output of six operational dynamical models. The hindcast datasets span a period of 21 yr ...

Hongwen Kang; Chung-Kyu Park; Saji N. Hameed; Karumuri Ashok

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration Studies Marissa Hummon 3 rd International Solar Power Integration Workshop October 20-22, 2013 London, UK NREL...

319

Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration Studies Preprint M. Hummon, A. Weekley, K. Searight, and K. Clark To be presented at the 3rd International...

320

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Monte Carlo simulation of the effect of miniphantom on in-air output ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of the study was to quantify the effect of miniphantoms on in-air output ratio measurements, i.e., to determine correction factors for in-air output ratio. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to simulate in-air output ratio measurements by using miniphantoms made of various materials (PMMA, graphite, copper, brass, and lead) and with different longitudinal thicknesses or depths (2-30 g/cm{sup 2}) in photon beams of 6 and 15 MV, respectively, and with collimator settings ranging from 3x3 to 40x40 cm{sup 2}. EGSnrc and BEAMnrc (2007) software packages were used. Photon energy spectra corresponding to the collimator settings were obtained from BEAMnrc code simulations on a linear accelerator and were used to quantify the components of in-air output ratio correction factors, i.e., attenuation, mass energy absorption, and phantom scatter correction factors. In-air output ratio correction factors as functions of miniphantom material, miniphantom longitudinal thickness, and collimator setting were calculated and compared to a previous experimental study. Results: The in-air output ratio correction factors increase with collimator opening and miniphantom longitudinal thickness for all the materials and for both energies. At small longitudinal thicknesses, the in-air output ratio correction factors for PMMA and graphite are close to 1. The maximum magnitudes of the in-air output ratio correction factors occur at the largest collimator setting (40x40 cm{sup 2}) and the largest miniphantom longitudinal thickness (30 g/cm{sup 2}): 1.008{+-}0.001 for 6 MV and 1.012{+-}0.001 for 15 MV, respectively. The MC simulations of the in-air output ratio correction factor confirm the previous experimental study. Conclusions: The study has verified that a correction factor for in-air output ratio can be obtained as a product of attenuation correction factor, mass energy absorption correction factor, and phantom scatter correction factor. The correction factors obtained in the present study can be used in studies involving in-air output ratio measurements using miniphantoms.

Li Jun; Zhu, Timothy C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Active-Site Inhibitors of mTOR Target Rapamycin-Resistant Outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active-Site Inhibitors of mTOR Target Rapamycin-Resistant Outputs of mTORC1 and mTORC2 Morris E. (2009) Active-site inhibitors of mTOR target rapamycin-resistant outputs of mTORC1 and mTORC2. PLoS Biol and activated by growth factor stimulation via the canonical phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)!Akt!mTOR pathway

Halazonetis, Thanos

323

Location-based services to control roller compaction quality for rock-fill dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is very important for rock-fill dams to carry out more accurately monitoring and remotely quality controlling in real time. Based on location based services, an integration platform, with the name of CRCQ-DAM, is proposed to control roller compaction ... Keywords: RTK, WebGIS, location-based services, rock-fill dams, roller compaction quality

Hao Wu; Qiankun Wang; Jiru Zhang; Qin Chen; Xupeng Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Using GIS and Satellite Imagery to Locate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to show it is possible to use remote sensing techniques to detect oil seeps and oil spills and use ArcView to determine the hydrocarbon locations. Modern remote sensing software was used to process NASA's ASTER Multispectral Images. The files were loaded with Band 3 (0.76- 0.86 µm) as Red, Band 2 (0.63- 069 µm) as Green and Band 1 (0.52- 0.60 µm) as Blue. ASTER's 15 m ground resolution and image enhancement techniques allowed the identification of offshore oil seeps in California and the detection of oil leaking from offshore production platforms in Azerbaijan.

Jay Rauschkolb

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluation of the potential to upgrade the Sandia Atomic Iodine Laser SAIL-1 to higher output energies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The predicted output energy of the Sandia Atomic Iodine Laser SAIL-1 is given for various numbers of preamplifier stages and for various small signal gains in each stage. Additional possibilities for further increasing the output energy are given.

Riley, M.E.; Palmer, R.E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The effect of small field output factor measurements on IMRT dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate how changes in the measured small field output factors affect the doses in intensity-modulated treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were created using Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The plans were optimized to treat a cylindrical target 2 cm in diameter and 2 cm in length. Output factors for 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} field sizes were changed by {+-}5%, {+-}10%, and {+-}20% increments from the baseline measurements and entered into the planning system. The treatment units were recommissioned in the treatment planning system after each modification of the output factors and treatment plans were reoptimized. All plans were delivered to a solid water phantom and dose measurements were made using an ionization chamber. The percentage differences between measured and computed doses were calculated. An Elekta Synergy and a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator were separately evaluated. Results: For the Elekta unit, decreasing the output factors resulted in higher measured than computed doses by 0.8% for -5%, 3.6% for -10%, and 8.7% for -20% steps. Increasing the output factors resulted in lower doses by 2.9% for +5%, 5.4% for +10%, and 8.3% for +20% steps. For the Varian unit no changes were observed for either increased or decreased output factors. Conclusions: The measurement accuracy of small field output factors are of importance especially when the treatment plan consists of small segments as in IMRT. The method proposed here could be used to verify the accuracy of the measured small field output factors for certain linear accelerators as well as to test the beam model. The Pinnacle treatment planning system model uses output factors as a function of jaw setting. Consequently, plans using the Elekta unit, which conforms the jaws to the segments, are sensitive to small field measurement accuracy. On the other hand, for the Varian unit, jaws are fixed and segments are modeled as blocked fields hence, the impact of small field output factors on IMRT monitor unit calculation is not evaluable by this method.

Azimi, Rezvan; Alaei, Parham; Higgins, Patrick [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Optimization of the LCLS X-ray FEL output performance in the presence of strong undulator wakefields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of the LCLS X-ray FEL output performance in the presence of strong undulator wakefields

Reiche, S; Emma, P; Fawley, W M; Huang, Z; Nuhn, H D; Stupakov, G V

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Upgrade of NSLS timing system  

SciTech Connect

We report on the progress of the new NSLS timing system. There are three types of requirements for NSLS timing system: clocks, synchronization and trigger circuits. All ring revolution frequency clocks are generated using ECL and high speed TTL logic. The synchronization circuits allows to fill both storage rings with any bunch pattern. The triggers are generated by using commercially available digital delay generators. The delay unit`s outputs are ultrastable, with a resolution of 5 ps, and are programmed by computer via IEEE 488 interface. The block diagrams, description of all major timing components and the present status are provided in this paper.

Singh, O.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Sheehan, J.; Smith, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Simulation of Daily Temperature Time Series from GCM Output. Part I: Comparison of Model Data with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For climate change impact analyses, local scenarios of surface variables at the daily scales are frequently required. Empirical transfer functions are a widely used technique to generate scenarios from GCM data at these scales. For successful ...

J. P. Palutikof; J. A. Winkler; C. M. Goodess; J. A. Andresen

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental study of biogas combustion characteristics andthe operation range of a biogas HCCI engine for powerOperating Conditions in a Biogas Fueled HCCI Engine for

Saxena, Samveg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels in Diesel engines. Biodiesel, for example, is one fuelalternative fuels like biodiesel. 2.2.3 Homogeneous charge

Saxena, Samveg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company, “Diesel Engine Aftertreatment: How Ford Knocks Outwhile a Diesel engine also requires expensive aftertreatmentfrom Diesel engines require the use of aftertreatment

Saxena, Samveg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a HCCI engine for power generation”, Energy Conversion andbiogas HCCI engine for power generation , Applied Energy, inHCCI Engine for Power Generation, ASME IC Engine Conference,

Saxena, Samveg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Simulation of Daily Temperature Time Series from GCM Output. Part II: Sensitivity Analysis of an Empirical Transfer Function Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical transfer functions have been proposed as a means for “downscaling” simulations from general circulation models (GCMs) to the local scale. However, subjective decisions made during the development of these functions may influence the ...

Julie A. Winkler; Jean P. Palutikof; Jeffrey A. Andresen; Clare M. Goodess

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistive-wall wake for a 1-nC LCLS bunch charge propagatingST Accel. Beams, 8, [3] LCLS CDR, SLAC Rpt. SLAC-R-593 (al. , “Optimization of the LCLS X-RAY FEL Performance in the

Bane, Karl L.F.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn; Stupakov, Gennady; Fawley, William M.; Reiche, Sven

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Kauai Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility P.O. Box 308 Waimea, Kauai HI 96796-0308 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time, M - F Steven Lautenschleger, Manager (505) 845-9234,...

337

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) 4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) Producer Type Number of Generators Generator Nameplate Capacity Net Summer Capacity Net Winter Capacity Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities 9,624 680,592 621,785 644,358 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 6,148 412,045 374,964 389,349 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 609 39,916 35,266 38,023 Total 16,381 1,132,554 1,032,015 1,071,729 Commercial and Industrial Sectors Commercial Sector 962 3,610 3,223 3,349 Industrial Sector 1,680 31,832 27,795 29,381 Total 2,642 35,442 31,018 32,730 All Sectors Total 19,023 1,167,995 1,063,033 1,104,459 Notes: In 2011, EIA corrected the NAICS codes of several plants which resulted in a net capacity shift from the electric utility sector to the commercial sector.

338

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 100-199 -- -- -- -- 200-299 -- -- 1.00 1.00 300-399 2.00 -- 4.00 6.00 400-599 14.00 -- 11.00 25.00 600+ -- -- -- -- Grand Total 16.00 -- 16.00 32.00 Sustained Automatic Outage Hours High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 100-199 -- -- -- -- 200-299 -- -- 27.58 27.58 300-399 153.25 -- 15.87 169.12 400-599 3,070.88 -- 258.37 3,329.25 600+ -- -- -- -- Grand Total 3,224.13 -- 301.82 3,525.95 Outage Hours per Outage Incident Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S.

339

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 " Pennsylvania",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 "East North Central",112,197,127,309,331,-6.8 " Illinois",34,45,29,79,66,18.9 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

340

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012" Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","Above 0","Zero2","Total Number" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to 100","to 50","to 10",,"of Employees" "Alabama",3415,97,655,317,160,224,54,105,5041 " Underground",2981,"-","-","-",36,88,"-",81,3190 " Surface",434,97,655,317,124,136,54,24,1851

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" 8. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",107.73,104.51,106.57,100.17,108.71,102.69,7.6,-3.9,3.8 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w"

342

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012" Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",139,20,12410,12570 "Arkansas",96,"-","-",96 "Colorado",757,"-",22889,23646 "Illinois",18969,"-",23868,42837 "Indiana",15565,"-","-",15565 "Kentucky Total",56179,2018,"-",58198 " Kentucky (East)",22090,2010,"-",24100 " Kentucky (West)",34089,9,"-",34098 "Maryland",797,"-","-",797 "Montana","-","-",5708,5708

343

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "Alabama",1.69,"-",0.66,1.8 "Alaska","-",5.98,"-","-" "Arizona","-",7.38,"-","-" "Arkansas","-","-",0.59,"-" "Colorado",4.9,6.09,6.02,4.45 "Illinois",2.09,"-",5.34,4.7 "Indiana","-","-",3.23,5.41 "Kentucky Total",3.02,2.45,2.36,3.06 " Kentucky (East)","-",2.45,1.64,2.65

344

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012" Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market1","Captive2","Total3" "Alabama",85.06,"-",106.57 "Alaska","w","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w" "Colorado",38.51,43.19,37.54 "Illinois",49.04,54.71,53.08 "Indiana",49.16,54.5,52.01 "Kentucky Total",61.85,73.08,63.12 " Kentucky (East)",75.8,73.08,75.62 " Kentucky (West)",48.6,"-",48.67 "Louisiana","w","-","w"

345

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 5. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants, by State, 2011 and 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Census Division and State Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 34,766 37,698 33 58 39 37 Connecticut 8,987 8,196 7 1 12 6 Maine 3,722 4,351 8 12 7 8 Massachusetts 14,346 16,404 15 22 14 14 New Hampshire 4,295 5,127 2 23 4 5 Rhode Island 3,403 3,595 0.03 0.07 2 3 Vermont 12 24 0.05 0.09 1 1 Middle Atlantic 161,786 171,603 275 370 187 203 New Jersey 16,120 16,917 4 5 14 13 New York 35,669 37,256 31 52 40 43 Pennsylvania 109,997 117,430 240 313 133 147

346

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(million short tons)" ,2012,,2011 "Coal-Producing","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Percent Change" "State","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage","Recoverable Coal" ,,,,,"Reserves" "Alabama",265,53.63,306,55.39,-13.2 "Alaska","w","w","w","w","w" "Arizona","w","w","w","w","w" "Arkansas","w","w","w","w","w"

347

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2010 January 10.49 9.55 6.50 10.17 9.28 February 10.89 9.89 6.55 10.48 9.47 March 11.11 9.95 6.53 10.28 9.48 April 11.71 9.95 6.55 10.52 9.53 May 11.91 10.15 6.64 10.52 9.72

348

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Period Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) End of Year Stocks 2002 141,714 43,935 1,711 116,952 29,601 328 24,761 14,334 1,383 2003 121,567 45,752 1,484 97,831 28,062 378 23,736 17,691 1,105 2004 106,669 46,750 937 84,917 29,144 627 21,751 17,607 309 2005 101,137 47,414 530 77,457 29,532 374 23,680 17,882 156 2006 140,964 48,216 674 110,277 29,799 456 30,688 18,416 217

349

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts Voltage Region Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 200-299 142 49 14 141 242 49 -- 484 1,121 AC 300-399 -- 88 107 95 46 56 80 165 637 AC 400-599 9 3 -- 22 86 -- -- 125 245 AC 600+ -- -- 6 9 -- -- -- -- 15 AC Total 151 140 127 267 374 105 80 774 2,018 DC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 200-299 -- 18 -- -- -- -- -- 5 23 DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 400-499 -- 5 -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 DC 500-599 -- -- -- 5 -- -- -- 17 22 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

350

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012" Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Continuous1","Conventional and","Longwall3","Total" ,,"Other2" "Alabama","w","-","w",107.73 "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","-",37.18,"w" "Illinois",48.08,"-",59.51,54.18 "Indiana",52.94,"-","-",52.94 "Kentucky Total","w","w","-",62.24 " Kentucky (East)","w","w","-",79.23 " Kentucky (West)",50.18,"-","-",50.18

351

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Steam Coal Exports by Customs District" Steam Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",4951041,5566950,6554494,10517991,11407664,-7.8 " Baltimore, MD",1275530,831976,1715016,2107506,2852092,-26.1 " Boston, MA",7,"-",12,7,24,-70.8 " Buffalo, NY",1180,1516,2826,2696,5257,-48.7 " New York City, NY",3088,2664,2168,5752,6106,-5.8 " Norfolk, VA",3578715,4697769,4760354,8276484,8443756,-2 " Ogdensburg, NY",36894,3610,3090,40504,6838,492.3 " Philadelphia, PA",55513,29255,34241,84768,56733,49.4

352

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2012" and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Underground",,"Surface",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production" "State and County" "Alabama",8,12570,38,6752,46,19321 " Bibb","-","-",2,119,2,119 " Blount","-","-",2,236,2,236 " Fayette",1,2249,"-","-",1,2249 " Franklin","-","-",2,137,2,137 " Jackson","-","-",3,152,3,152 " Jefferson",3,3589,9,1106,12,4695

353

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Tested Heat Rates by Prime Mover and Energy Source, 2007 - 2012 2. Average Tested Heat Rates by Prime Mover and Energy Source, 2007 - 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Prime Mover Coal Petroluem Natural Gas Nuclear 2007 Steam Generator 10,158 10,398 10,440 10,489 Gas Turbine -- 13,217 11,632 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,447 10,175 -- Combined Cycle W 10,970 7,577 -- 2008 Steam Generator 10,138 10,356 10,377 10,452 Gas Turbine -- 13,311 11,576 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,427 9,975 -- Combined Cycle W 10,985 7,642 -- 2009 Steam Generator 10,150 10,349 10,427 10,459 Gas Turbine -- 13,326 11,560 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,428 9,958 -- Combined Cycle W 10,715 7,605 -- 2010 Steam Generator 10,142 10,249 10,416 10,452 Gas Turbine -- 13,386 11,590 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,429 9,917 --

354

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 0 0 -- -- -- -- 18,671 18,256 3.44 3.52 24.7 3.03 2003 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 18,169 17,827 4.96 5.06 30.5 4.02 2004 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 16,176 15,804 5.93 6.07 21.9 4.58 2005 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 17,600 17,142 8.38 8.60 25.2 6.25 2006 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 21,369 20,819 8.33 8.55 30.7 6.42

355

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 3.A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 395,943 22,241 8,368 378,044 1,763 272,684 18,189 44,466 -1,309 8,612 1,149,001 2003 452,433 35,818 7,949 380,337 2,404 304,904 21,890 46,060 -1,003 8,088 1,258,879 2004 443,547 33,574 7,410 427,510 3,194 312,846 19,518 48,636 -962 7,856 1,303,129 2005 507,199 37,096 9,664 445,625 3,767 345,690 21,486 51,708 -1,174 6,285 1,427,346 2006 498,316 10,396 8,409 452,329 4,223 361,877 24,390 59,345 -1,277 6,412 1,424,421

356

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 1,787 2,998 -40% 520 898 1,257 2,087 0 0 10 12 Connecticut 297 317 -6.5% 0 0 297 317 0 0 0 0 Maine 11 14 -18% 0 0 6 7 0 0 5 6 Massachusetts 959 1,769 -46% 0 0 954 1,763 0 0 5 6 New Hampshire 520 898 -42% 520 898 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 44,000 53,658 -18% 6 16 43,734 53,052 4 1 256 589

357

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector 2002 through 2012 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 8.44 7.89 4.88 N/A 6.75 7.20 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 N/A 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 N/A 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 N/A 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 N/A 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 N/A 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 N/A 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 N/A 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 N/A 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 N/A 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 N/A 9.84 Full-Service Providers 2002 8.40 7.77 4.78 N/A 6.65 7.13 2003 8.68 7.89 5.01 6.82 N/A 7.38

358

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",65.1,63.67,73.81,64.48,78.9,-18.3 " Canada*",59.34,55.22,63.02,57.57,73.63,-21.8 " Dominican Republic",78.47,74.41,73.89,75.4,76.61,-1.6 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",69.42,73.33,82.64,70.83,86.44,-18.1 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

359

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012" Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal Thickness (inches)","Underground","Surface","Total" "Under 7","-",17,17 "7 - Under 13","-",2108,2108 "13 - Under 19",429,6688,7117 "19 - Under 25",111,14107,14217 "25 - Under 31",4147,12913,17060 "31 - Under 37",15128,19022,34150 "37 - Under 43",23868,17285,41153 "43 - Under 49",26035,15597,41632 "49 - Under 55",18909,22544,41453 "55 - Under 61",36946,11285,48231 "61 - Under 67",43146,15074,58220 "67 - Under 73",40983,8783,49766 "73 - Under 79",32914,10193,43107 "79 - Under 85",27011,3554,30565

360

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Factor (Pounds of CO2 Per Million Btu)*** Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 1 205.30000 Distillate Fuel Oil DFO Source: 1 161.38600 Geothermal GEO Estimate from EIA, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting 16.59983 Jet Fuel JF Source: 1 156.25800 Kerosene KER Source: 1 159.53500 Lignite Coal LIG Source: 1 215.40000 Municipal Solid Waste MSW Source: 1 (including footnote 2 within source) 91.90000 Natural Gas NG Source: 1 117.08000 Petroleum Coke PC Source: 1 225.13000 Propane Gas PG Sources: 1 139.17800 Residual Fuel Oil RFO Source: 1 173.90600 Synthetic Coal SC Assumed to have the emissions similar to Bituminous Coal. 205.30000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Imports by Customs District" Coal Imports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",469878,331008,156004,800886,350124,128.7 " Baltimore, MD","-","-",106118,"-",154318,"-" " Boston, MA",373985,154438,"-",528423,51185,"NM" " Buffalo, NY",44,"-","-",44,"-","-" " New York City, NY",1373,1402,487,2775,507,447.3 " Norfolk, VA","-",68891,"-",68891,35856,92.1 " Ogdensburg, NY","-",1,12,1,12,-91.7

362

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Exports" U.S. Coke Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",162796,79217,201795,242013,340944,-29 " Canada*",73859,17837,112348,91696,161596,-43.3 " Mexico",88535,60517,86721,149052,176163,-15.4 " Other**",402,863,2726,1265,3185,-60.3 "South America Total",223,217,591,440,1158,-62 " Other**",223,217,591,440,1158,-62 "Europe Total",48972,59197,"-",108169,6,"NM" " Other**",347,11743,"-",12090,"-","-"

363

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" 7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Coal Consumers" "Last Day of Quarter","Electric","Coke","Other","Commercial","Total","Coal Producers","Total" ,"Power","Plants","Industrial2","and",,"and" ,"Sector1",,,"Institutional Users",,"Distributors" 2007 " March 31",141389,2444,5756,"-",149588,34007,183595 " June 30",154812,2364,5672,"-",162849,32484,195333 " September 30",142666,1972,5811,"-",150448,30090,180538 " December 31",151221,1936,5624,"-",158781,33977,192758

364

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Unit of Measure Equivalents 5. Unit of Measure Equivalents Unit Equivalent Kilowatt (kW) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watts Megawatt (MW) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watts Gigawatt (GW) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watts Terawatt (TW) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watts Gigawatt 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatts Thousand Gigawatts 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Kilowatts Kilowatthours (kWh) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watthours Megawatthours (MWh) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watthours Gigawatthours (GWh) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watthours Terawatthours (TWh) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watthours Gigawatthours 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatthours Thousand Gigawatthours 1,000,000,000(One Billion Kilowatthours U.S. Dollar 1,000 (One Thousand) Mills U.S. Cent 10 (Ten) Mills Barrel of Oil 42 Gallons

365

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 75,711 2,677 0.63 17.68 4.98 126.0 1,680,518 1,634,734 3.68 3.78 72.3 1.53 2003 89,618 3,165 0.74 20.94 5.51 124.0 1,486,088 1,439,513 5.59 5.77 81.6 1.74 2004 107,985 3,817 0.89 25.15 5.10 92.0 1,542,746 1,499,933 6.15 6.33 82.9 1.87 2005 102,450 3,632 1.29 36.31 5.16 87.9 1,835,221 1,780,721 8.32 8.57 83.4 2.38

366

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 Census Division and State Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroleum Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change New England 1,030 1,389 -26% 2,483 2,680 -7.3% 0 0 -- Connecticut W W W 1,300 954 36% 0 0 -- Maine 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Massachusetts W 675 W 837 990 -15% 0 0 -- New Hampshire W W W W W W 0 0 -- Rhode Island 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Vermont 0 0 -- 51 49 3.0% 0 0 -- Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% 5,496 6,591 -17% W W W New Jersey 926 871 6.3% 1,084 1,113 -2.6% 0 0 --

367

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",25,54,32,79,90,-12 " Pennsylvania",25,54,32,79,90,-12 "East North Central",115,183,117,298,301,-0.9 " Illinois",31,42,28,73,67,8.1 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

368

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",627,587,637,1214,1254,-3.1 " New York",214,178,194,392,377,4

369

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" "Rank","Mine Name / Company","Mine Type","State","Production (short tons)" 1,"North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining Ll","Surface","Wyoming",107639188 2,"Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company Llc","Surface","Wyoming",93082919 3,"Cordero Mine / Cordero Mining Llc","Surface","Wyoming",39204736 4,"Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal Llc","Surface","Wyoming",34316314 5,"Belle Ayr Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",24227846 6,"Eagle Butte Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",22466733

370

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 835,481 553,390 241,892 3,953 36,243 2003 1,089,307 658,868 380,378 5,358 44,702 2004 1,031,954 651,712 350,093 4,544 25,606 2005 1,035,045 618,811 387,355 3,469 25,410 2006 459,392 335,130 105,312 1,963 16,987 2007 512,423 355,999 139,977 1,505 14,942 2008 332,367 242,379 79,816 957 9,215 2009 266,508 196,346 59,277 1,101 9,784 2010 244,114 188,987 49,042 970 5,115 2011 163,954 125,755 33,166 801 4,233 2012 134,956 105,179 24,081 1,618 4,078 2010 January 33,737 26,715 6,282 100 639

371

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 2005 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Year Internal Combustion Combustion Turbine Steam Turbine Hydro Wind Photovoltaic Storage Other Wind and Other Total Number of Generators Distributed Generators 2005 4,025.0 1,917.0 1,830.0 999.0 -- -- -- -- 995.0 9,766.0 17,371 2006 3,646.0 1,298.0 2,582.0 806.0 -- -- -- -- 1,081.0 9,411.0 5,044 2007 4,624.0 1,990.0 3,596.0 1,051.0 -- -- -- -- 1,441.0 12,702.0 7,103 2008 5,112.0 1,949.0 3,060.0 1,154.0 -- -- -- -- 1,588.0 12,863.0 9,591 2009 4,339.0 4,147.0 4,621.0 1,166.0 -- -- -- -- 1,729.0 16,002.0 13,006 2010 886.8 186.0 109.9 97.4 98.9 236.3 -- 372.7 -- 1,988.0 15,630

372

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 605,054 10,659 129,947 469 463,980 2003 519,294 16,545 139,852 437 362,460 2004 344,134 19,973 130,248 168 193,745 2005 355,250 27,373 138,407 207 189,263 2006 350,074 27,455 135,546 269 186,803 2007 353,025 31,568 132,953 284 188,220 2008 338,786 29,150 130,122 287 179,227 2009 320,444 29,565 130,894 274 159,712 2010 349,530 40,167 137,072 274 172,016 2011 347,623 35,474 130,108 482 181,559 2012 390,342 32,723 138,217 478 218,924 2010 January 29,578 3,731 11,954 23 13,870

373

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2007,11139,8786,14702,8405,16198,10559,17124,8597,59163,36347 2008,15802,7640,23069,8982,20321,8485,22329,9101,81519,34208 2009,13335,6325,12951,5426,15159,5441,17653,5447,59097,22639 2010,17807,4803,21965,5058,21074,4680,20870,4811,81716,19353 2011,26617,3381,26987,3419,25976,3588,27679,2700,107259,13088 2012,28642,2022,37534,2329,31563,2415,28006,2394,125746,9159

374

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 56 121 -54% 0 0 0 94 0 0 56 27

375

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors 2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Cyclone Boiler Fluidized Bed Boiler Opposed Firing Boiler Spreader Stoker Boiler Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Dry-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Wet-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Agricultural Byproducts AB Source: 1 Lbs per ton 1.20 1.20 1.20 N/A 1.20 Blast Furnace Gas BFG Sources: 1 (including footnote 7 within source); EIA estimates Lbs per MMCF 15.40 15.40 15.40 N/A 15.40 Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 2, Table 1.1-3 Lbs per ton 33.00 5.00 12.00 31.00 11.00 Black Liquor BLQ Source: 1 Lbs per ton ** 1.50 1.50 1.50 N/A 1.50

376

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

377

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",240.59,241.38,218.4,240.85,225.8,6.7 " Canada*",147.49,330.47,243.04,183.08,286.56,-36.1 " Mexico",316.57,211.63,189.12,273.97,171.71,59.6 " Other**",612.42,485.63,134.48,525.92,135.04,289.5 "South America Total",140.65,156.15,322.7,148.29,250.36,-40.8 " Other**",140.65,156.15,322.7,148.29,250.36,-40.8 "Europe Total",259.26,255.24,"-",257.06,427.83,-39.9

378

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program 2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, by Sector, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 15,284 24,803 10,242 -- 50,328 2003 12,914 24,758 10,031 551 48,254 2004 17,185 24,290 11,137 50 52,663 2005 18,894 28,073 11,986 47 59,000 2006 21,150 28,720 13,155 50 63,076 2007 22,772 30,359 14,038 108 67,278 2008 25,396 34,634 14,766 75 74,871 2009 27,395 34,831 14,610 76 76,912 2010 32,150 37,416 17,259 89 86,914 2011 46,790 50,732 23,061 76 120,659 2012 54,516 58,894 25,023 92 138,525 Energy Efficiency - Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) 2002 5,300 5,389 2,768 -- 13,457 2003 5,909 4,911 2,671 94 13,585

379

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,933,130 78,701 15,867 691,006 11,463 780,064 264,329 79,109 -8,743 13,527 3,858,452 2003 1,973,737 102,734 16,672 649,908 15,600 763,733 275,806 79,487 -8,535 14,045 3,883,185 2004 1,978,301 100,391 20,754 710,100 15,252 788,528 268,417 83,067 -8,488 14,232 3,970,555 2005 2,012,873 99,840 22,385 760,960 13,464 781,986 270,321 87,329 -6,558 12,821 4,055,423 2006 1,990,511 44,460 19,706 816,441 14,177 787,219 289,246 96,525 -6,558 12,974 4,064,702

380

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Kilowatthours) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 47,208 47,481 44,864 45,018 27,818 27,927 566 569 120,456 120,995 Connecticut 12,758 12,919 12,976 13,087 3,566 3,668 193 185 29,492 29,859 Maine 4,481 4,382 4,053 4,018 3,027 3,016 0 0 11,561 11,415 Massachusetts 20,313 20,473 17,723 17,767 16,927 16,974 350 357 55,313 55,570 New Hampshire 4,439 4,454 4,478 4,478 1,953 1,936 0 0 10,870 10,869 Rhode Island 3,121 3,129 3,640 3,660 923 916 24 27 7,708 7,732

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381

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Fossil Fuels and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) C. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Fossil Fuels and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Natural Gas Fired Combined Cycle Natural Gas Fired Combustion Turbine Other Natural Gas Coal Petroleum Coke Petroleum Liquids Other Gases Total Fossil Fuels Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 12,190.5 11,593.8 1,090.0 1,058.9 876.4 830.1 2,546.1 2,755.5 0.0 0.0 7,916.1 7,915.3 0.0 0.0 24,619.1 24,153.6 Connecticut 2,513.4 2,447.7 458.1 432.7 61.0 44.7 389.1 564.4 0.0 0.0 3,186.1 3,185.0 0.0 0.0 6,607.7 6,674.5 Maine 1,250.0 1,250.0 306.0 302.2 119.0 93.0 85.0 85.0 0.0 0.0 1,004.9 1,007.2 0.0 0.0 2,764.9 2,737.4

382

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" "NAICS Code","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" ,,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "311 Food Manufacturing",875,926,1015,-13.9 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",26,17,19,35.8 "313 Textile Mills",22,22,25,-13.9 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w" "322 Paper Manufacturing",570,583,743,-23.3 "324 Petroleum and Coal Products*",127,113,156,-18.7

383

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground",,"Surface",,"Total" "Mine Production Range","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery" "(thousand short tons)","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage" "Over 1,000",4874,57.96,11153,91.28,16028,81.15 "Over 500 to 1,000",531,47.14,226,81.9,757,57.49 "Over 200 to 500",604,52.72,333,69.16,938,58.57

384

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Middle Atlantic 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

385

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 18.64 W W 21.43 21.12 18.47 W Connecticut W 21.91 W 23.87 NM W 21.93 Maine W W W -- NM W W Massachusetts 17.17 19.76 -13% 17.45 NM 17.16 19.66 New Hampshire 23.23 W W 23.23 19.90 -- W Rhode Island -- W W -- NM -- W Vermont 24.11 NM NM 24.11 NM -- -- Middle Atlantic W 20.15 W 21.01 19.21 W 20.66 New Jersey 19.77 18.36 7.7% -- NM 19.77 20.28 New York W 19.66 W 21.01 20.00 W 19.36 Pennsylvania 21.84 22.19 -1.6% -- NM 21.84 22.19

386

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",14594,7967,22561,16102,8911,25013,-9.4,-10.6,-9.8 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w"

387

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013" Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons and dollars per short ton)" "Year and Quarter","Australia","Canada","Colombia","Indonesia","China","Venezuela","Other","Total" ,,,,,,,"Countries" 2007,66,1967,26864,3663,50,3425,311,36347 2008,149,2027,26262,3374,45,2312,39,34208 2009,152,1288,17787,2084,9,1297,21,22639 2010,380,1767,14584,1904,53,582,83,19353 2011,62,1680,9500,856,22,779,188,13088 2012 " January - March","-",260,1594,59,7,80,22,2022 " April - June","-",281,1728,49,21,170,80,2329 " July - September","-",297,1762,266,39,"-",51,2415

388

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" "Coal-Producing State and County","Number of Mines","Sales","Average Sales Price" ,,"(thousand short tons)","(dollars per short ton)" "Alabama",39,19021,106.57 " Bibb",1,"w","w" " Blount",2,"w","w" " Fayette",1,"w","w" " Franklin",1,"w","w" " Jackson",2,"w","w" " Jefferson",11,4298,146.04 " Marion",1,"w","w" " Tuscaloosa",7,8599,111.55 " Walker",11,2370,81.88

389

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic",62,58,56,10.9 " Pennsylvania",62,58,56,10.9 "East North Central",168,171,197,-14.7 " Illinois","w","w","w","w" " Indiana",75,76,75,0.5 " Michigan","w","w","w","w" " Ohio",25,15,19,27 " Wisconsin",5,5,3,59.1 "West North Central",66,75,97,-32.2

390

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013" 3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Coal Receipts","Average Price of Coal Receipts","Coal Used","Coal Stocks1" "Quarter",,"(dollars per short ton)" 2012 " January - March",2151,27.47,1756,771 " April - June",3844,25.42,3688,825 " July - September",5399,24.32,5286,812 " October - December",4919,24.55,4680,787 " Total",16313,25.06,15410 2013 " January - March",5067,24.6,4989,793 " April - June",4015,25.24,3754,756 " Total",9082,24.88,8744 "1 Reported as of the last day of the quarter." "Note: Average price is based on the cost, insurance, and freight (c.i.f. value). Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

391

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Proposed Transmission Capacity Additions by High-Voltage Size, 2013 - 2019 B. Proposed Transmission Capacity Additions by High-Voltage Size, 2013 - 2019 (Circuit Miles of Transmission) Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2015 Year 2016 Year 2017 Year 2018 Year 2019 All Years AC 100-199 954 1,222 992 1,047 392 382 176 5,165 AC 200-299 1,003 792 1,398 319 539 427 118 4,596 AC 300-399 4,779 839 1,532 1,527 502 1,650 349 11,178 AC 400-599 399 708 669 643 660 1,151 334 4,564 AC 600+ -- -- 14 -- -- 69 -- 83 AC Total 7,134 3,562 4,606 3,536 2,092 3,679 978 25,586 DC 100-199 2 11 5 -- -- 7 -- 25 DC 200-299 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- 333 -- -- 333 DC 400-599 -- -- 10 -- -- -- -- 10 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

392

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Connecticut -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Maine -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Massachusetts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New Hampshire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic -- W W -- -- -- W New Jersey -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New York -- W W -- -- -- W Pennsylvania -- -- -- -- -- -- -- East North Central W W W 4.10 4.01 W W

393

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Industrial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

394

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Total (Other Renewable Sources) Total (All Sectors) 2002 4,417 397 5,844 2,252 3,800 16,710 2003 5,995 397 5,871 2,133 3,758 18,153 2004 6,456 398 6,182 2,152 3,529 18,717 2005 8,706 411 6,193 2,285 3,609 21,205 2006 11,329 411 6,372 2,274 3,727 24,113 2007 16,515 502 6,704 2,214 4,134 30,069 2008 24,651 536 6,864 2,229 4,186 38,466 2009 34,296 619 6,939 2,382 4,317 48,552 2010 39,135 866 7,037 2,405 4,369 53,811 2011 45,676 1,524 7,077 2,409 4,536 61,221 2012 59,075 3,170 7,508 2,592 4,811 77,155

395

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery" "State","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage" ,"at Producing",,"at Producing",,"at Producing",,"at Producing"

396

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 Outage Type FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 151.00 163.00 127.00 272.00 374.00 105.00 80.00 796.00 2,068.00 Non-Automatic Outages (Operational) 77.00 44.00 97.00 230.00 192.00 27.00 45.00 337.00 1,049.00 Non-Automatic Outages (Planned) 2,650.00 453.00 512.00 2,050.00 2,450.00 369.00 472.00 2,744.00 11,700.00 Circuit Outage Hours Automatic Outages (Sustained) 2,852.28 1,312.97 14,244.87 19,857.23 7,123.70 1,509.51 682.60 24,238.64 71,821.80 Non-Automatic Outages (Operational) 186.87 27.08 67.68 186.08 426.59 3.32 13.96 67.59 979.17 Non-Automatic Outages (Planned) 872.65 710.33 1,222.36 1,095.46 503.01 357.44 105.06 1,105.43 5,971.74

397

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 21,196 695 18,300 2,087 115 2004 19,587 444 17,308 1,811 24 2005 19,370 560 17,033 1,753 25 2006 19,629 500 17,343 1,761 25 2007 19,576 553 17,116 1,785 122 2008 19,805 509 17,487 1,809 0 2009 19,669 465 17,048 2,155 0 2010 19,437 402 16,802 2,233 0 2011 16,972 388 14,625 1,955 4 2012 16,968 418 14,235 2,304 12 2010 January 1,546 30 1,332 184 0 February 1,384 25 1,215 144 0 March 1,650 36 1,434 180 0 April 1,655 33 1,426 196 0

398

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 9,595 9,945 -3.5% 0 0 9,074 9,945 520 0 0 0 Connecticut 595 624 -4.6% 0 0 595 624 0 0 0 0 Maine 518 524 -1.0% 0 0 518 524 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 3,603 3,623 -0.6% 0 0 3,603 3,623 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,790 1,485 21% 0 0 1,270 1,485 520 0 0 0 Rhode Island 2,409 3,037 -21% 0 0 2,409 3,037 0 0 0 0

399

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" 4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,,2011,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and" ,,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional" "New England",88.32,165.17,"-","-",87.62,"w","-","-",0.8,"w","-","-"

400

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,"Other Industrial",,,"Commercial and Institutional" "Year and","Electric","Coke","CHP2","Non-","Total","CHP4","Non-","Total","Total" "Quarter","Power","Plants",,"CHP3",,,"CHP5" ,"Sector1" 2007 " January - March",257516,5576,5834,8743,14578,547,510,1058,278727 " April - June",246591,5736,5552,8521,14074,426,279,705,267106 " July - September",283556,5678,5546,8180,13725,458,247,705,303665 " October - December",257478,5726,5605,8634,14238,495,563,1058,278500

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",51.17,49.59,50.96,50.35,50.94,-1.2 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",111.56,115.95,113.47,113.49,117.55,-3.5 "313 Textile Mills",115.95,118.96,127.41,117.4,128.07,-8.3 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

402

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 136,421 9,168 121,984 3,280 1,989 2004 143,844 11,250 125,848 4,081 2,665 2005 141,899 11,490 123,064 4,797 2,548 2006 160,033 16,617 136,108 6,644 664 2007 166,774 17,442 144,104 4,598 630 2008 195,777 20,465 169,547 5,235 530 2009 206,792 19,583 180,689 5,931 589 2010 218,331 19,975 192,428 5,535 393 2011 232,795 22,086 180,856 29,469 384 2012 256,376 25,193 201,965 26,672 2,545 2010 January 17,531 1,715 15,323 461 32 February 16,189 1,653 14,120 384 33

403

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Receipts (Thousand Barrels) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Receipts (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per MMBtu) 2002 884,287 0.94 1.25 25.52 120,851 1.64 3.34 20.77 5,607,737 3.56 1.86 2003 986,026 0.97 1.28 26.00 185,567 1.53 4.33 26.78 5,500,704 5.39 2.28 2004 1,002,032 0.97 1.36 27.42 186,655 1.66 4.29 26.56 5,734,054 5.96 2.48 2005 1,021,437 0.98 1.54 31.20 194,733 1.61 6.44 39.65 6,181,717 8.21 3.25

404

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 9,580 399 2.10 50.44 2.59 28.4 503 91 5.38 29.73 0.02 7.5 2003 8,835 372 1.99 47.24 2.43 20.5 248 43 7.00 40.82 0.04 3.1 2004 10,682 451 2.08 49.32 2.48 23.5 3,066 527 6.19 35.96 0.20 26.9 2005 11,081 464 2.57 61.21 2.43 24.2 1,684 289 8.28 48.22 0.17 18.3 2006 12,207 518 2.63 61.95 2.51 27.5 798 137 13.50 78.70 0.17 15.5

405

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants" Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",2303,2314,2365,4617,4754,-2.9 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",4152,4098,4104,8249,8233,0.2 "Coke Total",3954,3841,3863,7795,7721,1

406

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2002 1,838,901 5,757,283 943,531 28,963 8,568,678 2003 1,824,030 3,906,220 1,156,796 33,909 6,920,954 2004 1,923,440 3,756,175 1,053,364 25,996 6,758,975 2005 1,925,710 2,867,048 1,252,796 26,105 6,071,659 2006 1,698,389 2,446,104 1,321,342 27,638 5,493,473 2007 1,603,179 2,476,740 1,368,310 31,165 5,479,394 2008 1,576,976 2,718,661 1,355,017 30,079 5,680,733 2009 1,495,636 2,240,399 1,295,857 33,139 5,065,031 2010 1,541,554 2,946,452 1,404,137 37,068 5,929,211 2011 1,529,434 2,206,981 1,372,306 34,400 5,143,121

407

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, 2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Petroleum as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Petroleum-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Natural Gas Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Natural Gas Electric Utilities 26,732 7,640 28.6 7,224 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 18,644 7,867 42.2 6,628 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 317 -- -- -- Electric Power Sector Subtotal 45,693 15,507 33.9 13,852 Commercial Sector 443 21 4.8 21

408

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,836 2,125 3,580 2 1,130 2003 6,303 2,554 3,166 2 582 2004 7,677 4,150 2,985 1 541 2005 8,330 4,130 3,746 1 452 2006 7,363 3,619 3,286 1 456 2007 6,036 2,808 2,715 2 512 2008 5,417 2,296 2,704 1 416 2009 4,821 2,761 1,724 1 335 2010 4,994 3,325 1,354 2 313 2011 5,012 3,449 1,277 1 286 2012 3,675 2,105 756 1 812 2010 January 433 283 121 0.17 29 February 404 258 120 0.15 25 March 438 308 108 0.19 23 April 382 253 107 0.12 22 May 415 261 129 0 25

409

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Million Kilowatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 1,275,824 1,198,728 1,012,373 6,810 3,493,734 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,379,981 1,335,981 1,009,300 7,700 3,732,962 2009 1,364,474 1,307,168 917,442 7,781 3,596,865 2010 1,445,708 1,330,199 970,873 7,712 3,754,493 2011 1,422,801 1,328,057 991,316 7,672 3,749,846 2012 1,374,515 1,327,101 985,714 7,320 3,694,650 2010

410

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division" 3. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",3051,2997,3092,6048,6156,-1.8 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",5471,5280,5296,10751,10579,1.6 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure."

411

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,041 4,122 -2.0% 0 0 3,838 3,922 203 200 0 0 Connecticut 1,415 1,442 -1.9% 0 0 1,415 1,442 0 0 0 0 Maine 440 445 -1.3% 0 0 237 246 203 200 0 0 Massachusetts 2,017 2,063 -2.2% 0 0 2,017 2,063 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 169 172 -2.0% 0 0 169 172 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

412

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 37,951 55,164 430,396 101,251 54,296 53,267 -- -- 28,825 -- -- 154,459 38,298 55,833 117,032 696,376 2003 40,387 53,936 422,253 98,487 53,566 53,617 -- -- 28,775 -- -- 148,380 39,428 59,282 120,894 696,752 2004 42,243 51,580 419,349 95,300 52,049 50,499 -- -- 29,094 -- -- 153,024 39,383 58,531 121,205 692,908

413

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 29,643 N/A N/A N/A 0 3,825 N/A 2003 0 0 0 27,988 96 36 583 0 4,222 32,926 2004 0 0 0 28,367 120 30 647 0 3,248 32,413 2005 0 0 0 28,271 113 34 585 0 3,195 32,199 2006 0 0 0 28,400 29 35 509 0 2,899 31,872 2007 0 0 0 28,287 27 40 565 0 1,590 30,509 2008 0 0 0 26,641 21 0 800 0 1,676 29,138 2009 0 0 0 25,292 22 0 718 0 1,868 27,901 2010 0 2 0 25,706 15 0 853 0 1,668 28,244

414

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources 6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 2,153 2,019 6.7% 0 0 1,944 1,888 88 84 121 46 Connecticut 756 705 7.3% 0 0 756 704 0 0 0 1 Maine 424 390 8.7% 0 0 245 261 88 84 92 45 Massachusetts 906 860 5.5% 0 0 877 860 0 0 29 0 New Hampshire 66 64 2.6% 0 0 66 64 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 2,497 2,441 2.3% 0 0 1,924 1,975 465 344 107 122

415

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Steam Coal Exports" U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1619502,1246181,2153814,2865683,3065683,-6.5 " Canada*",797861,599752,841061,1397613,1280803,9.1 " Dominican Republic",51698,160672,124720,212370,312741,-32.1 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",717687,407422,1116653,1125109,1331754,-15.5 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

416

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight 2002 423,128 1.47 10.1 391,785 0.36 6.2 65,555 0.93 13.3 2003 467,286 1.50 10.0 432,513 0.38 6.4 79,869 1.03 14.4 2004 470,619 1.52 10.4 445,603 0.36 6.0 78,268 1.05 14.2 2005 480,179 1.56 10.5 456,856 0.36 6.2 77,677 1.02 14.0 2006 489,550 1.59 10.5 504,947 0.35 6.1 75,742 0.95 14.4 2007 467,817 1.62 10.3 505,155 0.34 6.0 71,930 0.90 14.0

417

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w",20,"w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",583,589,651,1171,1237,-5.3 " New York",155,181,206,337,374,-10.1

418

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 65,770 3,930 59,089 1,753 998 2004 69,331 5,373 60,514 2,093 1,351 2005 67,902 5,650 58,624 2,360 1,269 2006 75,970 8,287 63,950 3,388 345 2007 79,712 8,620 68,432 2,344 316 2008 94,215 10,242 81,029 2,668 276 2009 99,821 9,748 86,773 2,999 301 2010 105,835 10,029 92,763 2,837 205 2011 112,538 11,146 89,857 11,332 203 2012 124,297 12,721 99,938 10,356 1,282 2010 January 8,441 853 7,335 236 17 February 7,824 830 6,781 197 17 March 9,056 1,013 7,796 226 21

419

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,249,585 2,307,358 3,214,286 30,626 697,315 2003 5,735,770 1,809,003 3,200,057 39,424 687,286 2004 5,827,470 1,857,247 3,351,469 33,623 585,132 2005 6,212,116 2,198,098 3,444,875 34,645 534,498 2006 6,643,926 2,546,169 3,508,597 35,473 553,687 2007 7,287,714 2,808,500 3,872,646 34,872 571,697 2008 7,087,191 2,803,283 3,712,872 34,138 536,899 2009 7,301,522 2,981,285 3,750,080 35,046 535,111 2010 7,852,665 3,359,035 3,882,995 40,356 570,279 2011 8,052,309 3,511,732 3,906,484 48,509 585,584

420

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" 4. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",157.29,176.84,199.7,166.21,198.26,-16.2 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",157.26,171.51,191.48,163.85,190.51,-14

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Dollars) Year Energy Efficiency Load Management Direct Cost Indirect Cost Total Cost 2002 1,032,911 410,323 1,443,234 206,169 1,649,403 2003 807,403 352,137 1,159,540 137,670 1,340,686 2004 910,816 510,281 1,421,097 132,295 1,560,578 2005 1,180,576 622,287 1,802,863 127,925 1,939,115 2006 1,270,602 663,980 1,934,582 128,886 2,072,962 2007 1,677,969 700,362 2,378,331 160,326 2,604,711 2008 2,137,452 836,359 2,973,811 181,843 3,186,742 2009 2,221,480 944,261 3,165,741 394,193 3,607,076 2010 2,906,906 1,048,356 3,955,262 275,158 4,230,420 2011 4,002,672 1,213,102 5,215,774 328,622 5,544,396 2012 4,397,635 1,270,391 5,668,026 332,440 6,000,466

422

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 213 N/A N/A 709 N/A N/A N/A 1,402 242,302 N/A 2003 354 2 0 882 394 326 214 1,249 249,622 253,043 2004 405 6 0 1,209 460 198 166 1,248 245,546 249,238 2005 1,046 16 0 1,829 503 250 175 1,126 245,553 250,499 2006 2,351 15 0.18 1,937 705 228 190 1,162 261,864 268,452 2007 4,361 10 1 2,226 751 240 226 1,139 226,734 235,687 2008 6,899 16 1 1,888 844 211 252 1,197 229,645 240,953

423

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 134,415 88,595 39,035 826 5,959 2003 175,136 105,319 61,420 882 7,514 2004 165,107 103,793 56,342 760 4,212 2005 165,137 98,223 62,154 580 4,180 2006 73,821 53,529 17,179 327 2,786 2007 82,433 56,910 22,793 250 2,480 2008 53,846 38,995 13,152 160 1,538 2009 43,562 31,847 9,880 184 1,652 2010 40,103 30,806 8,278 164 855 2011 27,326 20,844 5,633 133 716 2012 22,604 17,521 4,110 272 702 2010 January 5,587 4,381 1,083 17 106 February 2,156 1,599 454 15 88

424

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) 4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) Operation Maintenance Year Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale 2002 9.00 2.59 3.71 3.26 5.04 2.67 2.62 2.38 2003 9.12 2.74 3.47 3.50 5.23 2.72 2.32 2.26 2004 8.97 3.13 3.83 4.27 5.38 2.96 2.76 2.14 2005 8.26 3.21 3.95 3.69 5.27 2.98 2.73 1.89 2006 9.03 3.57 3.76 3.51 5.69 3.19 2.70 2.16 2007 9.54 3.63 5.44 3.26 5.79 3.37 3.87 2.42 2008 9.89 3.72 5.78 3.77 6.20 3.59 3.89 2.72 2009 10.00 4.23 4.88 3.05 6.34 3.96 3.50 2.58 2010 10.50 4.04 5.33 2.79 6.80 3.99 3.81 2.73

425

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Imports" Price of U.S. Coal Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",147.86,138.39,191.01,144.86,197.96,-26.8 " Canada",147.86,138.39,191,144.86,197.95,-26.8 " Mexico","-","-",286.23,"-",286.23,"-" "South America Total",75.29,80.74,86.52,77.2,87.17,-11.4 " Argentina","-","-",504.7,"-",504.7,"-" " Colombia",74.87,80.74,83.03,76.96,85.25,-9.7 " Peru",87.09,"-","-",87.09,"-","-"

426

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, 4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Year of Initial Commercial Operation, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Year of Initial Commercial Operation Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Pre-1970 318 11,735 7,535 1970-1974 376 18,210 11,033 1975-1979 105 11,031 7,283 1980-1984 46 945 211 1985-1989 107 3,155 413 1990-1994 208 11,738 1,453 1995-1999 134 9,680 2,099 2000-2004 392 39,841 5,098 2005-2009 116 14,791 2,066 2010-2012 78 8,479 320 Total 1,880 129,604 37,510 Notes: Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion methodology), waste oil, and beginning in 2011, synthetic gas and propane. Prior to 2011, synthetic gas and propane were included in Other Gases.

427

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 5. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",2256,2561,1864,4817,4343,10.9 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",38,50,48,88,95,-7.7 "313 Textile Mills",31,29,21,60,59,2.2 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

428

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 148,110 5,766 128,947 13,095 302 2004 141,577 3,705 124,815 12,909 146 2005 144,339 4,724 126,529 12,923 164 2006 146,987 4,078 129,779 12,964 165 2007 146,308 4,557 127,826 13,043 881 2008 148,452 4,476 130,041 13,934 0 2009 146,971 3,989 126,649 16,333 0 2010 144,934 3,322 124,437 17,176 0 2011 135,241 3,433 115,841 15,933 34 2012 135,735 3,910 113,418 18,307 100 2010 January 11,540 244 9,886 1,410 0 February 10,313 190 9,030 1,094 0

429

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Period Average Btu per Pound Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Gallon Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Cubic Foot 2002 10,168 0.94 8.7 147,903 1.64 0.2 1,025 2003 10,137 0.97 9.0 147,086 1.53 0.1 1,030 2004 10,074 0.97 9.0 147,286 1.66 0.2 1,027 2005 10,107 0.98 9.0 146,481 1.61 0.2 1,028 2006 10,063 0.97 9.0 143,883 2.31 0.2 1,027 2007 10,028 0.96 8.8 144,546 2.10 0.1 1,027 2008 9,947 0.97 9.0 142,205 2.21 0.3 1,027 2009 9,902 1.01 8.9 141,321 2.14 0.2 1,025 2010 9,842 1.16 8.8 140,598 2.14 0.2 1,022

430

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power 5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -305 -435 -29.9% 0 0 -305 -435 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 3 6 -51.5% 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -308 -440 -30.1% 0 0 -308 -440 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic -1,022 -1,124 -9.0% -579 -630 -443 -494 0 0 0 0

431

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",78.29,77.25,102.62,77.88,105.14,-25.9 " Canada*",81.61,80.7,110.67,81.3,112.16,-27.5 " Dominican Republic",78.54,75.09,73.89,75.77,76.61,-1.1 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",73.45,75.81,94.36,74.35,100.95,-26.3 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

432

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 469,273 4,967 96,769 156,319 158,041 53,177 66,548 130,465 768,943 Projected 2013 42,532 59,969 447,171 5,022 91,644 144,378 152,949 53,177 65,901 129,278 744,851 Projected 2014 43,142 60,654 448,912 5,161 92,331 144,497 152,843 54,080 67,592 128,200 748,499 Projected 2015 43,812 61,428 457,865 5,270 93,017 147,568 157,287 54,722 69,679 129,553 762,336

433

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 21,525 3,196 1,207 79,013 9,493 0 3,825 30,489 0 3,832 152,580 2003 19,817 3,726 1,559 78,705 12,953 0 4,222 28,704 0 4,843 154,530 2004 19,773 4,128 1,839 78,959 11,684 0 3,248 29,164 0 5,129 153,925 2005 19,466 3,804 1,564 72,882 9,687 0 3,195 29,003 0 5,137 144,739 2006 19,464 2,567 1,656 77,669 9,923 0 2,899 28,972 0 5,103 148,254 2007 16,694 2,355 1,889 77,580 9,411 0 1,590 28,919 0 4,690 143,128

434

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Existing Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source and Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) A. Existing Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source and Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewable Sources Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total Total (All Sectors) 2002 315,350 59,651 312,512 2,008 98,657 79,356 16,710 20,371 686 905,301 2003 313,019 60,730 355,442 1,994 99,209 78,694 18,153 20,522 684 948,446 2004 313,020 59,119 371,011 2,296 99,628 77,641 18,717 20,764 746 962,942 2005 313,380 58,548 383,061 2,063 99,988 77,541 21,205 21,347 887 978,020 2006 312,956 58,097 388,294 2,256 100,334 77,821 24,113 21,461 882 986,215 2007 312,738 56,068 392,876 2,313 100,266 77,885 30,069 21,886 788 994,888

435

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.69 4.94 -25% 4.73 5.70 3.68 4.93 Connecticut 3.88 4.97 -22% 6.45 NM 3.87 4.96 Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 3.55 4.88 -27% 4.47 5.75 3.53 4.87 New Hampshire W W W 5.54 6.01 W W Rhode Island 3.86 5.01 -23% -- -- 3.86 5.01 Vermont 4.06 5.22 -22% 4.06 5.22 -- -- Middle Atlantic 3.52 5.14 -32% 3.86 5.32 3.46 5.11 New Jersey 3.52 5.11 -31% -- -- 3.52 5.11 New York 3.85 5.45 -29% 3.86 5.32 3.84 5.50

436

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, . Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, 2002 through 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear 2002 10,314 10,641 9,533 10,442 2003 10,297 10,610 9,207 10,422 2004 10,331 10,571 8,647 10,428 2005 10,373 10,631 8,551 10,436 2006 10,351 10,809 8,471 10,435 2007 10,375 10,794 8,403 10,489 2008 10,378 11,015 8,305 10,452 2009 10,414 10,923 8,159 10,459 2010 10,415 10,984 8,185 10,452 2011 10,444 10,829 8,152 10,464 2012 10,498 10,991 8,039 10,479 Coal includes anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coal. Waste coal and synthetic coal are included starting in 2002. Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1 and No. 2 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke, and waste oil.

437

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Natural Gas 0. Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 62,490 63,236 -1.2% 345 357 58,757 59,763 901 700 2,488 2,416 Connecticut 16,537 15,188 8.9% 6 NM 15,801 14,715 397 211 333 227 Maine 6,044 6,877 -12.1% 0 0 4,057 4,850 26 0.26 1,960 2,026 Massachusetts 24,672 25,940 -4.9% 278 240 23,812 25,120 416 443 166 136 New Hampshire 7,050 6,658 5.9% 58 80 6,947 6,552 16 0 29 26 Rhode Island 8,185 8,571 -4.5% 0 0 8,140 8,525 45 46 0 0

438

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "Pennsylvania" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "East North Central" " Btu",11928,12228,11682,12112,11933,1.5

439

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012" "Rank","Controlling Company Name","Production (thousand short tons)","Percent of Total Production" 1,"Peabody Energy Corp",192563,18.9 2,"Arch Coal Inc",136992,13.5 3,"Alpha Natural Resources LLC",104306,10.3 4,"Cloud Peak Energy",90721,8.9 5,"CONSOL Energy Inc",55752,5.5 6,"Alliance Resource Operating Partners LP",35406,3.5 7,"Energy Future Holdings Corp",31032,3.1 8,"Murray Energy Corp",29216,2.9 9,"NACCO Industries Inc",28207,2.8 10,"Patriot Coal Corp",23946,2.4 11,"Peter Kiewit Sons Inc",22725,2.2 12,"Westmoreland Coal Co",22215,2.2 13,"BHP Billiton Ltd",12580,1.2

440

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 106 79 35% 0 0 0 23 0 0 106 56 New Jersey 0 NM NM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NM

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441

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation 6. Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 120,887 123,338 -2.0% 3,278 4,408 111,191 112,613 1,178 949 5,240 5,368 Connecticut 36,118 33,745 7.0% 37 93 35,347 33,208 397 211 337 233 Maine 14,429 15,974 -9.7% 0.17 1 10,186 10,890 208 176 4,035 4,907 Massachusetts 36,198 38,055 -4.9% 591 610 34,321 36,783 469 490 817 172 New Hampshire 19,264 20,066 -4.0% 2,017 2,994 17,170 17,020 49 20 29 31

442

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Conventional Hydroelectric Biomass Sources Geothermal Total Renewable Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 784.1 422.8 49.2 13.9 0.0 0.0 1,956.9 1,946.9 1,367.5 1,421.6 0.0 0.0 4,157.7 3,805.2 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 122.2 121.7 172.5 178.2 0.0 0.0 294.7 299.9 Maine 427.6 322.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 742.3 742.3 534.6 576.0 0.0 0.0 1,704.5 1,640.8 Massachusetts 63.8 29.6 41.2 11.7 0.0 0.0 261.1 262.7 395.4 406.9 0.0 0.0 761.5 710.9

443

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 732 0.87 10.5 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Maine 32 0.80 7.0 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 700 0.88 10.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

444

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.59 3.68 -2.4% 4.07 3.55 3.34 3.74 Connecticut W W W -- -- W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts W W W -- -- W W New Hampshire 4.07 3.55 15% 4.07 3.55 -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic 2.50 2.68 -6.7% -- 2.92 2.50 2.63 New Jersey 4.05 4.18 -3.1% -- -- 4.05 4.18 New York 3.12 3.27 -4.6% -- 3.88 3.12 3.27 Pennsylvania 2.43 2.55 -4.7% -- 2.91 2.43 2.45

445

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 . Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewables Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total (All Sectors) 2002 633 1,147 1,649 40 66 1,426 682 38 28 2003 629 1,166 1,693 40 66 1,425 741 38 27 2004 625 1,143 1,670 46 66 1,425 749 39 28 2005 619 1,133 1,664 44 66 1,422 781 39 29 2006 616 1,148 1,659 46 66 1,421 843 39 29 2007 606 1,163 1,659 46 66 1,424 929 39 25 2008 598 1,170 1,655 43 66 1,423 1,076 39 29 2009 593 1,168 1,652 43 66 1,427 1,219 39 28 2010 580 1,169 1,657 48 66 1,432 1,355 39 32

446

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 3,846 138 0.76 21.20 5.91 9.1 852,547 828,439 3.36 3.46 66.8 2.88 2003 16,383 594 1.04 28.74 5.73 47.3 823,681 798,996 5.32 5.48 69.9 4.20 2004 14,876 540 0.98 27.01 5.59 40.4 839,886 814,843 6.04 6.22 68.4 4.76 2005 16,620 594 1.21 33.75 5.44 58.2 828,882 805,132 8.00 8.24 74.3 6.18

447

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2012 A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2012 Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- AC 200-299 6,018 7,813 1,538 6,933 21,757 2,948 -- 38,410 85,416 AC 300-399 -- 7,362 5,850 13,429 3,650 5,303 9,529 10,913 56,036 AC 400-599 1,201 543 -- 2,618 8,876 94 -- 12,794 26,125 AC 600-799 -- -- 190 2,226 -- -- -- -- 2,416 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 200-299 1,198 686 36 2,008 4,156 9 -- -- 8,092 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 300-399 -- 372 274 3,706 313 153 2,747 -- 7,564 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 400-599 -- -- -- 90 857 -- -- -- 947 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 600-799 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

448

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 211,116 286,199 2,301,321 567,897 273,907 279,264 -- -- 150,058 -- -- 835,319 194,876 280,269 666,696 3,745,601 2003 219,021 288,791 2,255,233 545,109 276,600 267,068 -- -- 153,918 -- -- 826,964 185,574 283,868 664,754 3,711,667 2004 220,335 292,725 2,313,180 553,236 283,646 274,760 -- -- 152,975 -- -- 856,734 191,829 289,146 682,053 3,797,439 2005 226,544 303,607 2,385,461 -- -- -- -- -- 216,633 -- 1,005,226 962,054 201,548 299,225 685,624 3,900,461

449

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports" U.S. Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",3122664,2010882,3565711,5133546,5327583,-3.6 " Canada*",1773644,943061,2101534,2716705,3176066,-14.5 " Dominican Republic",51792,211736,124720,263528,312741,-15.7 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",1244972,777750,1268077,2022722,1698391,19.1 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

450

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 Transformer Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning -- -- -- -- 1.00 -- -- -- 1.00 Lightning -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Environmental -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Contamination 1.00 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1.00 Foreign Interference -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Fire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed AC Substation Equipment 3.00 1.00 -- 1.00 5.00 -- -- 4.00 14.00 Failed AC/DC Terminal Equipment -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed Protection System Equipment -- 1.00 -- -- 3.00 -- -- -- 4.00

451

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units by Technology and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) A. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units by Technology and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Renewable Sources Fossil Fuels Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Storage Nuclear All Other Sources All Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,157.7 3,805.2 24,619.1 24,153.6 1,753.4 1,709.4 3.0 3.0 4,630.3 4,653.7 48.0 26.0 35,211.5 34,350.9 Connecticut 294.7 299.9 6,607.7 6,674.5 29.4 29.4 0.0 0.0 2,102.5 2,102.5 26.0 26.0 9,060.3 9,132.3 Maine 1,704.5 1,640.8 2,764.9 2,737.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 22.0 0.0 4,491.4 4,378.2 Massachusetts 761.5 710.9 11,155.2 10,637.8 1,724.0 1,680.0 3.0 3.0 677.3 684.7 0.0 0.0 14,321.0 13,716.4

452

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by State" by State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Coal-Producing Region","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Alabama",4649,4410,5171,9059,10150,-10.8 "Alaska",442,300,542,742,1091,-32 "Arizona",2184,1825,2002,4009,4169,-3.8 "Arkansas",2,4,11,6,33,-83.1 "Colorado",5297,5781,6885,11079,13914,-20.4 "Illinois",13474,13996,12487,27470,24419,12.5 "Indiana",9516,9422,9147,18938,18794,0.8 "Kansas",5,5,5,9,8,23.7 "Kentucky Total",20683,20594,22803,41276,49276,-16.2 " Eastern (Kentucky)",10392,10144,12444,20536,27516,-25.4

453

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Solar 0. Net Generation from Solar by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 35 7 427.1% 9 4 25 2 1 1 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 30 5 521.6% 9 4 20 0.14 1 1 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 5 2 179.0% 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 389 98 295.3% 41 19 303 65 37 8 8 5

454

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 / 2003 42,001 45,980 360,748 84,844 46,159 39,974 -- -- 23,090 -- -- 137,541 29,140 44,719 94,554 588,002 2003 / 2004 36,229 47,850 357,026 86,332 45,625 39,955 -- -- 24,042 -- -- 133,244 27,828 41,988 100,337 583,430 2004 / 2005 41,449 47,859 371,011 91,800 45,565 40,618 -- -- 24,446 -- -- 139,486 29,096 44,010 101,002 605,331

455

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 13 N/A N/A N/A 0 13 N/A 2003 0 0 0 13 152 717 420 0 72 1,374 2004 0 0 0 13 172 945 444 0 105 1,680 2005 0 0 0 16 218 953 486 0 86 1,759 2006 0 0 0 21 173 956 470 0 93 1,713 2007 0 0 0 15 203 962 434 0 77 1,691 2008 0 0.08 0 21 234 911 389 0 60 1,615 2009 0.21 0.04 0 20 318 1,045 386 0 71 1,839 2010 16 5 0 21 256 1,031 386 0 80 1,794 2011 51 84 0 26 952 971 393 0 26 2,502

456

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric 4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 8,557 8,015 6.8% 664 574 5,652 5,352 136 104 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 4,099 4,495 -8.8% 0 0 2,468 2,421 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,843 1,207 52.8% 68 48 1,198 1,145 11 13 566 0 New Hampshire 1,381 1,091 26.6% 347 291 1,003 800 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 102 130 -21.8% 0 0 102 130 0 0 0 0

457

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State" 3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England" " Btu",13323,13196,13391,13253,13339,-0.6 " Sulfur",0.84,0.89,0.72,0.87,0.72,20.3 " Ash",5.95,5.81,5.93,5.87,6.09,-3.6 "Maine" " Btu","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Sulfur","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Ash","w","w","w","w","w","w"

458

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke 9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 76 344 -78.0% 0 0 0 263 0 0 76 81 New Jersey 40 58 -30.6% 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 58

459

SAS Output  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B. U.S. Transformer Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 Outage Type Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 16.00 --...

460

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

components because of independent rounding." "Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, Form 7000-2, 'Quarterly Mine Employment and Coal Production...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

28,723 30,920 ......Production 17,714 18,143 19,559 20,752 23,921 25,799 ......Transmission 524 579 637 665 679 748 ......Distribution 1,589 1,681 1,787 1,860 1,895 2,037...

462

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Sector, 2002 through 2011 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 1,205 1,720 700 -- 3,625 2003 855...

463

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground - Minable...

464

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" ,"Number of Mining Operations2",,,"Number of Employees3",,,"Average Production per Employee Hour" ,,,"(short tons)4"...

465

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kingdom","-",115,10,115,10,"NM" "Asia Total",337715,127022,70962,464737,136534,240.4 " China",19536,8692,20964,28228,27697,1.9 " India","-",849,611,849,611,39 "...

466

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Quantity and Net Summer Capacity of Operable Environmental Equipment, 2001 - 2011 Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems Electrostatic Precipitators Baghouses Select Catalytic and...

467

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent"...

468

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Cooling Ponds Dry Cooling Systems Hybrid Wet and Dry Cooling Systems Other Cooling System Types Energy Source Quantity Associated Net Summer Capacity (MW) Quantity Associated Net...

469

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) 3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Description 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Utility Operating Revenues 219,609 230,151 238,759 265,652 275,501 270,964 ......Electric Utility 200,360 206,268 213,012 234,909 246,736 240,864 ......Other Utility 19,250 23,883 25,747 30,743 28,765 30,100 Utility Operating Expenses 189,062 201,057 206,960 236,786 245,589 241,198 ......Electric Utility 171,604 179,044 183,121 207,830 218,445 213,076 ............Operation 116,660 125,436 131,560 150,645 158,893 153,885 ..................Production 90,715 98,305 103,871 120,586 127,494 121,700 ........................Cost of Fuel 24,149 26,871 28,544 36,106 37,945 39,548

470

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Imports" U.S. Coke Imports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",10284,2293,159462,12577,183712,-93.2 " Canada",3009,2293,159462,5302,183712,-97.1 " Panama",7275,"-","-",7275,"-","-" "South America Total",25267,13030,88424,38297,106612,-64.1 " Brazil","-","-",78595,"-",78595,"-" " Colombia",25267,13030,9829,38297,28017,36.7 "Europe Total",6044,40281,165027,46325,485791,-90.5

471

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012" Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012" ,"Production (thousand short tons)",,,"Thickness (inches)" "Coalbed ID Number1","Underground","Surface","Total","Average2","Low","High" "Coalbed Name" "1699 Wyodak","-",351188,351188,778,160,913 "0036 Pittsburgh",52476,3871,56348,74,18,138 "0489 No. 9",42193,12181,54374,61,24,74 "0484 Herrin (Illinois No. 6)",48526,1910,50436,71,46,89 "0212 Pittsburgh",27355,76,27431,75,27,98 "1701 Smith","-",23847,23847,822,745,912 "1696 Anderson-Dietz 1-Dietz 2","-",18992,18992,932,660,960

472

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 15.71 15.89 13.68 14.31 11.83 12.55 6.68 7.85 14.02 14.49 Connecticut 17.34 18.11 14.65 15.57 12.67 13.24 9.69 10.25 15.54 16.35 Maine 14.66 15.38 11.53 12.29 7.98 8.88 -- -- 11.81 12.58 Massachusetts 14.91 14.67 13.84 14.33 12.57 13.38 4.91 6.14 13.79 14.11 New Hampshire 16.07 16.52 13.36 14.04 11.83 12.27 -- -- 14.19 14.74 Rhode Island 14.40 14.33 11.87 12.37 10.68 11.27 8.28 14.11 12.74 13.04

473

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 106,834 87,117 48,336 N/A 7,124 249,411 2003 111,249 96,263 51,741 514 N/A 259,767 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 N/A 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 N/A 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 N/A 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 N/A 343,703 2008 155,433 138,469 68,920 827 N/A 363,650 2009 157,008 132,940 62,504 828 N/A 353,280 2010 166,782 135,559 65,750 815 N/A 368,906 2011 166,714 135,926 67,606 803 N/A 371,049 2012 163,280 133,898 65,761 747 N/A 363,687

474

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1503162,764701,1411897,2267863,2261900,0.3 " Canada*",975783,343309,1260473,1319092,1895263,-30.4 " Dominican Republic",94,51064,"-",51158,"-","-" " Mexico",527285,370328,151424,897613,366637,144.8 "South America Total",2091488,2561772,2389018,4653260,4543747,2.4 " Argentina",104745,155806,203569,260551,253841,2.6 " Brazil",1921144,2352098,2185449,4273242,4022618,6.2

475

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 " Pennsylvania",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 "East North Central",87.62,97.3,87.11,93.56,95.13,-1.7 " Illinois",59.27,60.3,62.17,59.86,66.69,-10.2 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

476

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",87.05,93.03,93.73,89.93,95.68,-6 " New York",102.14,105.8,117.15,103.8,117.61,-11.7

477

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" 8. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" ,,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",1313,1177,1326,-1 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",2500,2207,2295,8.9 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure." "Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

478

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 3,710,847 182,482 1.37 27.96 1.15 87.0 186,271 30,043 4.19 25.98 0.61 76.4 2003 4,365,996 223,984 1.34 26.20 1.15 90.4 347,546 56,138 5.41 33.50 0.58 89.7 2004 4,410,775 227,700 1.41 27.27 1.13 93.3 337,011 54,152 5.35 33.31 0.61 93.6 2005 4,459,333 229,071 1.56 30.39 1.10 83.0 381,871 61,753 8.30 51.34 0.54 97.2

479

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",11716074,14136513,15167377,25852587,27578514,-6.3 " Baltimore, MD",2736470,4225450,5123600,6961920,9037970,-23 " Boston, MA","-","-","-","-",28873,"-" " Buffalo, NY",247714,121347,524040,369061,725698,-49.1 " Norfolk, VA",8730257,9784866,9519119,18515123,17784479,4.1 " Ogdensburg, NY",1633,4850,618,6483,1494,333.9 "Southern Total",3551564,3824484,4264938,7376048,8976503,-17.8

480

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by Census Divison, 2012 and 2011 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Census Division December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 December 2012 December 2011 Coal (Thousand Tons) New England 1,030 1,389 -25.9% W W W W Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% W W W W East North Central 36,139 37,262 -3.0% 27,069 27,316 9,070 9,946 West North Central 30,554 28,544 7.0% 30,554 28,544 0 0 South Atlantic 38,859 36,920 5.3% 35,527 33,163 3,331 3,757 East South Central 19,657 17,185 14.4% 19,657 17,185 0 0 West South Central 28,807 22,910 25.7% 17,047 15,125 11,760 7,785

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "output location time" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 19,996,890 15,517,857 4,215,043 9,168 254,821 2003 20,366,879 15,391,188 4,745,545 13,080 217,066 2004 20,375,751 15,610,335 4,606,584 8,251 150,581 2005 20,801,716 15,397,688 5,250,824 8,314 144,889 2006 20,527,410 15,211,077 5,166,001 7,526 142,807 2007 20,841,871 15,436,110 5,287,202 7,833 110,727 2008 20,548,610 15,189,050 5,242,194 8,070 109,296 2009 18,240,611 13,744,178 4,390,596 7,007 98,829 2010 19,196,315 14,333,496 4,709,686 6,815 146,318 2011 18,074,298 13,551,416 4,399,144 7,263 116,475

482

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,514,670 52,838 6,286 229,639 206 507,380 242,302 3,089 -7,434 480 2,549,457 2003 1,500,281 62,774 7,156 186,967 243 458,829 249,622 3,421 -7,532 519 2,462,281 2004 1,513,641 62,196 11,498 199,662 374 475,682 245,546 3,692 -7,526 467 2,505,231 2005 1,484,855 58,572 11,150 238,204 10 436,296 245,553 4,945 -5,383 643 2,474,846 2006 1,471,421 31,269 9,634 282,088 30 425,341 261,864 6,588 -5,281 700 2,483,656

483

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 2007 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Automated Meter Reading (AMR) 2007 25,785,782 2,322,329 44,015 109 28,152,235 2008 36,425,943 3,529,985 77,122 13 40,033,063 2009 41,462,111 4,239,531 107,033 11 45,808,686 2010 43,913,225 4,611,877 159,315 626 48,685,043 2011 41,451,888 4,341,105 172,692 77 45,965,762 2012 43,455,437 4,691,018 185,862 125 48,330,822 Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) 2007 2,202,222 262,159 9,106 2 2,473,489 2008 4,190,244 444,003 12,757 12 4,647,016 2009 8,712,297 876,419 22,675 10 9,611,401 2010 18,369,908 1,904,983 59,567 67 20,334,525 2011 33,453,548 3,682,159 154,659 7 37,290,373

484

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 2003 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Historical Data 2003 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 5,870 775 168 -- 6,813 2004 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 14,114 1,494 215 3 15,826 2005 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 19,244 1,565 337 -- 21,146 2006 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 30,689 2,553 376 -- 33,618 2007 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 44,450 3,513 391 -- 48,354 2008 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 64,400 5,305 304 -- 70,009 2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 88,205 7,365 919 -- 96,489 Photovoltaic 2010 697.890 517.861 243.051 -- 1,458.802 137,618 11,897 1,225 -- 150,740

485

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 (From Table 2.1.) Number of Ultimate Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

486

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Disposition by State, 2012" Coal Disposition by State, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market Sales1","Captive Sales / Transactions2","Exports3","Total" "Alabama",8688,"-",10333,19021 "Alaska","w","-",968,"w" "Arizona","w","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado",20836,4552,3468,28856 "Illinois",29252,5113,12341,46705 "Indiana",17127,18404,375,35906 "Kentucky Total",76602,6884,5668,89154 " Kentucky (East)",37324,6884,3588,47796 " Kentucky (West)",39277,"-",2081,41358

487

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,126,062 2,259,684 3,148,595 32,545 685,239 2003 5,616,135 1,763,764 3,145,485 38,480 668,407 2004 5,674,580 1,809,443 3,265,896 32,839 566,401 2005 6,036,370 2,134,859 3,349,921 33,785 517,805 2006 6,461,615 2,478,396 3,412,826 34,623 535,770 2007 7,089,342 2,736,418 3,765,194 34,087 553,643 2008 6,895,843 2,730,134 3,612,197 33,403 520,109 2009 7,121,069 2,911,279 3,655,712 34,279 519,799 2010 7,680,185 3,290,993 3,794,423 39,462 555,307 2011 7,883,865 3,446,087 3,819,107 47,170 571,501

488

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 460,887 461,590 -0.2% 3,652 4,218 428,781 432,350 8,630 6,287 19,824 18,735 Connecticut 120,380 110,546 8.9% 69 730 113,620 105,965 3,952 2,061 2,739 1,790 Maine 44,424 49,352 -10% 0 0 28,456 33,555 307 12 15,662 15,785 Massachusetts 184,330 190,063 -3.0% 2,792 2,393 176,497 182,865 3,749 3,761 1,293 1,045 New Hampshire 50,678 46,927 8.0% 754 1,046 49,655 45,765 139 0 131 115

489

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 34,775 2,456 15,859 4,566 11,894 2004 19,215 2,014 9,240 4,308 3,654 2005 17,852 2,485 7,365 4,677 3,325 2006 17,727 2,611 7,788 4,436 2,893 2007 19,083 2,992 8,861 4,049 3,181 2008 24,288 3,409 12,745 3,684 4,450 2009 24,847 3,679 13,231 3,760 4,177 2010 29,996 3,668 14,449 3,790 8,090 2011 30,771 4,488 16,115 3,816 6,352 2012 30,342 4,191 15,740 4,016 6,395 2010 January 2,223 189 1,078 321 635 February 2,336 275 1,208 291 561 March 2,287 311 1,079 302 594

490

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" 1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Production1","Imports","Waste Coal","Producer and","Consumption","Exports","Consumer","Losses and" "Quarter",,,"Supplied","Distributor",,,"Stocks2","Unaccounted" ,,,,"Stocks2",,,,"For3" 2007 " January - March",286041,8786,3264,34007,278727,11139,149588 " April - June",285687,8405,3387,32484,267106,14702,162849 " July - September",286035,10559,3697,30090,303665,16198,150448 " October - December",288872,8597,3727,33977,278500,17124,158781 " Total",1146635,36347,14076,,1127998,59163,,4085

491

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 294,234 13,659 1.45 31.29 1.56 52.1 29,137 4,638 3.55 22.33 1.24 26.5 2003 322,547 15,076 1.45 31.01 1.37 60.7 27,538 4,624 4.85 28.86 1.25 23.2 2004 326,495 15,324 1.63 34.79 1.43 57.6 25,491 4,107 4.98 30.93 1.38 18.5 2005 339,968 16,011 1.94 41.17 1.42 61.9 36,383 5,876 6.64 41.13 1.36 26.4

492

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

493

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity" "State","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization" ,,"Percent",,"Percent",,"Percent",,"Percent" "Alabama","w","w","-","-","w","w",14594,85.99

494

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 440,421 484,260 -9.1% 3,652 4,226 419,062 434,504 3,636 13,156 14,072 32,373 Connecticut 112,084 116,563 -3.8% 71 738 112,012 107,121 0 3,210 0 5,494 Maine 42,374 56,230 -25% 0 0 28,302 33,578 0 NM 14,072 22,639 Massachusetts 175,314 198,295 -12% 2,789 2,393 168,890 184,156 3,636 7,872 0 3,875 New Hampshire 50,408 47,137 6.9% 754 1,046 49,655 45,725 0 0 0 NM

495

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 AC & DC Circuit Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning 6.00 27.00 3.00 30.00 63.00 12.00 -- 69.00 210.00 Lightning 5.00 10.00 8.00 5.00 31.00 16.00 13.00 57.00 145.00 Environmental -- 1.00 1.00 5.00 -- 1.00 -- -- 8.00 Contamination 14.00 -- -- -- 22.00 3.00 6.00 7.00 52.00 Foreign Interference 34.00 3.00 -- 4.00 13.00 1.00 2.00 14.00 71.00 Fire -- 2.00 -- 1.00 6.00 3.00 1.00 85.00 98.00 Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- 2.00 -- -- 1.00 3.00 Failed AC Substation Equipment 18.00 16.00 35.00 63.00 57.00 16.00 15.00 65.00 285.00

496

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 / 2013 36,409 45,545 386,359 4,925 74,430 122,566 149,359 35,079 46,909 101,706 616,927 Projected 2013 / 2014 43,384 46,008 399,149 5,385 75,320 132,229 145,657 40,558 51,435 107,341 647,317 Projected 2014 / 2015 44,060 46,090 403,883 5,500 76,252 134,742 146,130 41,259 53,742 109,418 657,192 Projected 2015 / 2016 44,596 46,184 408,927 5,563 77,058 137,338 147,201 41,767 55,346 110,814 665,866

497

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Summer Peak Load (Megawatts) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 468,092 5,051 96,769 154,339 161,687 50,246 66,548 130,465 767,762 Projected 2013 45,668 59,969 469,857 5,109 96,192 155,553 159,032 53,971 67,998 133,523 777,015 Projected 2014 46,338 60,654 475,005 5,249 96,879 158,717 159,457 54,703 69,289 132,731 784,017 Projected 2015 47,053 61,428 484,637 5,360 97,565 162,216 164,150 55,346 71,423 134,183 798,724

498

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012" 3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","10 or Under","Total2" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to 100","to 50" "Alabama",1.69,2.5,1.95,1.72,1.83,0.69,0.55,1.68 " Underground",1.73,"-","-","-",1.08,0.31,"-",1.64 " Surface",1.36,2.5,1.95,1.72,2.11,1.19,0.55,1.75

499

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent"...

500

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze" "(thousand short tons and dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Commodity","April - June","January - March","April -...