Sample records for outlook residential demand

  1. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABORATORY Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030o r n i a Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously

  2. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L ABORATORY Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook tol i f o r n i a Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook toParticularly in Japan’s residential sector, where energy

  3. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

  4. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Residential Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil and Gas SupplyDemand

  5. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, ElectricityEnergy Source Demand per Household Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat,ton of oil equivalent Considerable increases in demand for

  6. Lead -- supply/demand outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnull, T. [Noranda, Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Japan goes--so goes the world. That was the title of a recent lead article in The Economist that soberly discussed the potential of much more severe global economic problems occurring, if rapid and coordinated efforts were not made to stabilize the economic situation in Asia in general, and in Japan in particular. During the first 6 months of last year, commodity markets reacted violently to the spreading economic problems in Asia. More recent currency and financial problems in Russia have exacerbated an already unpleasant situation. One commodity after another--including oil, many of the agricultural commodities, and each of the base metals--have dropped sharply in price. Many are now trading at multiyear lows. Until there is an overall improvement in the outlook for these regions, sentiment will likely continue to be negative, and metals prices will remain under pressure. That being said, lead has maintained its value better than many other commodities during these difficult times, finding support in relatively strong fundamentals. The author takes a closer look at those supply and demand fundamentals, beginning with consumption.

  7. SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK DRAFTSTAFFREPORT May ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B assessment of the capability of the physical electricity system to provide power to meet electricity demand

  8. Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook 2008-2017 0 ST98-2008 Energy Resources RESOURCES CONSERVATION BOARD ST98-2008: Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook 2008: Reserves Andy Burrowes, Rick Marsh, Nehru Ramdin, and Curtis Evans; Supply/Demand and Economics

  9. Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and Gas For Energy Infrastructure Summit September 15, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator 0 20 40 60...

  10. Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators are new actors in the energy scenario: they gather a group of energy consumers and implement a demand

  11. US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

  12. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

  13. Demand response-enabled autonomous control for interior space conditioning in residential buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xue

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of demand response for residential buildings. ProfessorDemand Response-enabled Autonomous Control for Interior Space Conditioning in Residential BuildingsDemand Response-enabled Autonomous Control for Interior Space Conditioning in Residential Buildings

  14. The residential demand for electricity in New England,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Paul F.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The residential demand for electricity, studied on the national level for many years, is here investigated on the regional level. A survey of the literature is first presented outlining past econometric work in the field ...

  15. Public goods and private interests: Understanding non-residential demand for green power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Fowlie, Meredith; Holt, Edward A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential Demand for Green Power Buying Green Power: Survey Results Profiling the Respondents The profile

  16. Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human dimension of demand response technology from a caseArens, E. , et al. 2008. Demand Response Enabling TechnologyArens, E. , et al. 2006. Demand Response Enabling Technology

  17. Control Mechanisms for Residential Electricity Demand in SmartGrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Larry

    Email: lvs2@lehigh.edu Abstract--We consider mechanisms to optimize electricity consumption both within subscription plan. Such methods for controlling electricity consumption are part of demand response, whichControl Mechanisms for Residential Electricity Demand in SmartGrids Shalinee Kishore Department

  18. Demand response-enabled autonomous control for interior space conditioning in residential buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xue

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Autonomous Controlssystem under the context of demand response for residential10] E. Arens et al. , Demand response enabling technology

  19. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 43% of total oil consumption. The residential sectorrepresenting 63% and oil consumption representing the rest.the diesel and fuel oil consumption are included, the total

  20. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Institute, “Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth: The Energyup Assessment of Energy Demand in India Transportationa profound effect on energy demand. Policy analysts wishing

  1. A residential energy demand system for Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labandeira Villot, Xavier

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sharp price fluctuations and increasing environmental and distributional concerns, among other issues, have led to a renewed academic interest in energy demand. In this paper we estimate, for the first time in Spain, an ...

  2. A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Raymond Steve

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

  3. Residential Demand Response under Uncertainty Paul Scott and Sylvie Thiebaux and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiébaux, Sylvie

    Residential Demand Response under Uncertainty Paul Scott and Sylvie Thi´ebaux and Menkes van den stochastic optimisation in residential demand response. 1 Introduction Electricity consumption in residential participate in smart grid activities such as demand response where loads are shifted to times favourable

  4. Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

  5. Impact of changes in length of stay on the demand for residential care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of changes in length of stay on the demand for residential care services in England on the demand for residential care services in England, Report commissioned by Bupa Care Services, PSSRU Discussion Paper 2771, Canterbury: PSSRU Introduction Residential care services constitute the largest

  6. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  7. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Commercial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5Are thereDemand Module This

  8. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5Are thereDemand

  9. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

  10. FACTORS DETERMINING RESIDENTIAL WATER DEMAND IN NORTH WESTERN ETHIOPIA, THE CASE OF MERAWI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    FACTORS DETERMINING RESIDENTIAL WATER DEMAND IN NORTH WESTERN ETHIOPIA, THE CASE OF MERAWI among different households of the town of Merawi, North Western Ethiopia. Understanding variables

  11. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    16 Figure 10. Residential Primary Energy Use in 2000 and3. Fuel Consumption in the Residential Sector in 2005 in10 Table 6. Residential Activity

  12. Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Nina

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 3. Basis for Residential Energy Demandand the subsequent energy demand and CO 2 emissionsa smaller share of total energy demand followed by space

  13. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

  14. The behavioral response to voluntary provision of an environmental public good: Evidence from residential electricity demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    residential electricity demand Grant D. Jacobsen a,n , Matthew J. Kotchen b,c , Michael P. Vandenbergh d online 25 February 2012 JEL classification: H41 Q42 G54 Keywords: Green electricity Voluntary environmental protection Carbon offset Renewable energy Moral licensing Residential electricity demand a b s t r

  15. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

  16. Effects of Price-Responsive Residential Demand on Retail and Wholesale Power Market Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Effects of Price-Responsive Residential Demand on Retail and Wholesale Power Market Operations/C) on integrated retail and wholesale power market operations. The physical operations of the A/C sys- tem at wholesale conditional on A/C load, and the retail energy prices offered to residential A/C consumers

  17. Residential energy demand modeling and the NIECS data base : an evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowing, Thomas G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the 1978-79 National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS) data base in terms of its usefulness for estimating residential energy demand models based on household appliance ...

  18. Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

  19. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Pump Air Conditioner District Heating Boiler Gas Boiler Electricity Figure 11 Space Heating Technology Shift in Residential

  20. Secondary residential demand trends in contemporary Japan and North Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Michael M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research paper attempts to address the opportunity and challenges for Vacation Residential Development in North Asia, with specific geographic focus on Japan first through an analysis of national and regional consumption, ...

  1. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andcan be measured using energy consumption per capita values.

  2. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of primary energy, not including biomass fuels which areResidential Energy Consumption by Fuel (with Biomass) FigurePrimay Energy Consumption by Fuel (without Biomass) 8 of 17

  3. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LPG is a major energy source, while coal and electricity areoil coal Figure 14 Residential Primary Energy Consumption bytotal primary energy supply in 2000, coal will drop to about

  4. Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    development that is built to conventional code). * This objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side...

  5. February/March2007 COLORADO WATER Residential Water Demand Management in Aurora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    February/March2007 COLORADO WATER 14 Residential Water Demand Management in Aurora: Learning from Assessment Kevin Reidy, Water Conservation Supervisor, Aurora Water Recent drought years in Colorado have provided a strong in- centive for reform and innovation. One example can be found in Aurora, where drought

  6. RESIDENTIAL WATER DEMAND MANAGEMENT: LESSONS FROM AURORA, COLORADO1 Douglas S. Kenney, Christopher Goemans, Roberta Klein, Jessica Lowrey, and Kevin Reidy2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    RESIDENTIAL WATER DEMAND MANAGEMENT: LESSONS FROM AURORA, COLORADO1 Douglas S. Kenney, Christopher). In this study of Aurora, Colorado, factors influencing residential water demand are reviewed during a turbulent Reidy, 2008. Residential Water Demand Management: Lessons from Aurora, Colorado. Journal of the American

  7. Public goods and private interests: Understanding non-residential demand for green power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Fowlie, Meredith; Holt, Edward A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the results of the first large-scale mail survey of non-residential green power customers in the United States. The survey explored the motivations, attitudes, and experiences of 464 business, non-profit, and public-sector customers that have voluntarily opted to purchase - and frequently pay a premium for - renewable electricity. Results of this study should be of value to marketers interested in targeting these customer segments, to policy makers interested in fostering and understanding non-residential demand for green power, and to academics pondering the motivations for firms to engage in such voluntary environmental initiatives.

  8. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space Heaters, Gas Cooking Appliances, Gas Water Heaters,Oil Water Heaters, Electric Toilet Seats, Vending MachinesFlorescent Lights Gas Water Heaters Oil Water Heaters

  9. Analysis of PG E's residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally acknowledged that improvements to end-use load shape and peak demand forecasts for electricity are limited primarily by the absence of reliable end-use data. In this report we analyze recent end-use metered data collected by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company from more than 700 residential customers to develop new inputs for the load shape and peak demand electricity forecasting models used by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the California Energy Commission. Hourly load shapes are normalized to facilitate separate accounting (by the models) of annual energy use and the distribution of that energy use over the hours of the day. Cooling electricity consumption by central air-conditioning is represented analytically as a function of climate. Limited analysis of annual energy use, including unit energy consumption (UEC), and of the allocation of energy use to seasons and system peak days, is also presented.

  10. Residential-energy-demand modeling and the NIECS data base: an evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowing, T.G.; Dubin, J.A.; McFadden, D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the 1978-1979 National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS) data base in terms of its usefulness for estimating residential energy demand models based on household appliance choice and utilization decisions. The NIECS contains detailed energy usage information at the household level for 4081 households during the April 1978 to March 1979 period. Among the data included are information on the structural and thermal characteristics of the housing unit, demographic characteristics of the household, fuel usage, appliance characteristics, and actual energy consumption. The survey covers the four primary residential fuels-electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas - and includes detailed information on recent household conservation and retrofit activities. Section II contains brief descriptions of the major components of the NIECS data set. Discussions are included on the sample frame and the imputation procedures used in NIECS. There are also two extensive tables, giving detailed statistical and other information on most of the non-vehicle NIECS variables. Section III contains an assessment of the NIECS data, focusing on four areas: measurement error, sample design, imputation problems, and additional data needed to estimate appliance choice/use models. Section IV summarizes and concludes the report.

  11. Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  12. New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forowicz, T.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an interactive on-line package for calculation of energy and cost demands for residential infiltration and ventilation, with input and output data entry through a web browser. This is a unique tool. It represents a new kind of approach to developing software employing user (client) and server (package provider) computers. The main program, servicing {open_quotes}intelligent{close_quotes} CGI (Common Gateway Interface) calls, resides on the server and dynamically handles the whole package performance and the procedure of calculations. The {open_quotes}computing engine{close_quotes} consists of two parts: RESVENT - the previously existing program for ventilation calculations and ECONOMICS - for heating and cooling system energy and cost calculations. The user interface is designed in such a way, that it allows simultaneous access by many users from all over the world.

  13. Development and Demonstration of the Open Automated Demand Response Standard for the Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen; Rasin, Josh; Perry, Tim

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to demonstrate a demand response system that can signal nearly every customer in all sectors through the integration of two widely available and non- proprietary communications technologies--Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) over lnternet protocol and Utility Messaging Channel (UMC) over FM radio. The outcomes of this project were as follows: (1) a software bridge to allow translation of pricing signals from OpenADR to UMC; and (2) a portable demonstration unit with an lnternet-connected notebook computer, a portfolio of DR-enabling technologies, and a model home. The demonstration unit provides visitors the opportunity to send electricity-pricing information over the lnternet (through OpenADR and UMC) and then watch as the model appliances and lighting respond to the signals. The integration of OpenADR and UMC completed and demonstrated in this study enables utilities to send hourly or sub-hourly electricity pricing information simultaneously to the residential, commercial and industrial sectors.

  14. Energy for 500 million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sourcesLBNL-2417E Energy for 500 million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*, Michael A. McNeil, Mark Levine Keywords

  15. California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) (EIA, 2005), and otherEnergy Consumption Survey (RECS) (EIA, 2005), and otherEIA). (2005). Residential Energy Consumption Survey. from

  16. Phase-Change Frame Walls (PCFWs) for On-Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Conservation in Residential Buildings: Development, Construction and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, M.; Medina, M. A.; King, J. B.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this work was to develop a thermally enhanced frame wall that would reduce peak load air conditioning demand, shift a portion of the thermal load, and conserve energy in residential buildings. A frame wall containing...

  17. GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

  18. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..............................................................................................................1 Drivers of Energy Demand ...................................................................................................................................... 6 Drivers of Residential Energy Demand .................................................................................................................................... 10 Drivers of Commercial Energy Demand

  19. PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Jane S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savings from Residential Energy Demand Feedback Devices. ”residential energy consumption, load shifting, consumption feedback

  20. Unobservables in Consumer Choice: Residential Energy and the Demand for Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Rubinfeld, Daniel L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November, pp. 378-387. Quigley, John M. , (1984) "Thepp. 555-567. A Quigley, John M. , (1984), "Residential374-386. Kaufman, Daniel and John M. Quigley, (1986), “The

  1. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

  2. Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally acknowledged that improvements to end-use load shape and peak demand forecasts for electricity are limited primarily by the absence of reliable end-use data. In this report we analyze recent end-use metered data collected by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company from more than 700 residential customers to develop new inputs for the load shape and peak demand electricity forecasting models used by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the California Energy Commission. Hourly load shapes are normalized to facilitate separate accounting (by the models) of annual energy use and the distribution of that energy use over the hours of the day. Cooling electricity consumption by central air-conditioning is represented analytically as a function of climate. Limited analysis of annual energy use, including unit energy consumption (UEC), and of the allocation of energy use to seasons and system peak days, is also presented.

  3. Demand-side Management Strategies and the Residential Sector: Lessons from International Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, Aoife Brophy; Jamasb, Tooraj; Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

    technological progress are needed (see also Steinbucks, 2011 for more analysis). 21 Products targeted by standards in the residential sector include appliances, ICT, lighting, heating and cooling equipments... characteristics of the political, economic, energy system make EE investments difficult Differences in degree of liberalisation of the electricity market (Blumstein et al., 2005); differences in economic level across regions; lack of technical skills...

  4. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

  5. Short-term energy outlook, Annual supplement 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This supplement is published once a year as a complement to the Short- Term Energy Outlook, Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts. Chap. 2 analyzes the response of the US petroleum industry to the recent four Federal environmental rules on motor gasoline. Chap. 3 compares the EIA base or mid case energy projections for 1995 and 1996 (as published in the first quarter 1995 Outlook) with recent projections made by four other major forecasting groups. Chap. 4 evaluates the overall accuracy. Chap. 5 presents the methology used in the Short- Term Integrated Forecasting Model for oxygenate supply/demand balances. Chap. 6 reports theoretical and empirical results from a study of non-transportation energy demand by sector. The empirical analysis involves the short-run energy demand in the residential, commercial, industrial, and electrical utility sectors in US.

  6. The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence...

  7. The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence...

  8. Factors Influencing Water Heating Energy Use and Peak Demand in a Large Scale Residential Monitoring Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchelle, M. P.; Parker, D. S.; Anello, M. T.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , as well as obtain improved appliance energy consumption indexes and load profiles. A portion of the monitoring measures water heater energy use and demand in each home on a 15-minute basis....

  9. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand (MW) 4000 Residential Hourly Average Load Profilesdaily profile showing average hourly demand. Residential:Total Demand (MW) 8 8 Residential Daily Averaqe Load Profile

  10. The Impact of Residential Air Conditioner Charging and Sizing on Peak Electrical Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, L.; O'Neal, D. L.

    rebate and maintenance programs for many years. The purpose of these programs was to improve the efficiency of the stock of air conditioning equipment and provide better demand-side management. This paper examines the effect of refrigerant charging... increases. The cooling load is assumed to be zero at an outdoor temperature of 70 F. This would assume an internal heat gain equal to approximately 8 F if the thermostat setting is at 78 F. The house load is also assumed to be equal to the test unit...

  11. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Standards in the Residential Electricity Sector.France. USDOE (2001). Residential Energy Consumption Survey,long-term response of residential cooling energy demand to

  12. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    commercial buildings participating in a demand?response (buildings participating in an Automated Demand Response buildings  participating  in  an  event?driven  demand?response  (

  13. Residential Demand Module

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    to the way they now behave. The intensity of end uses will change moderately in response to price changes. Electric end uses will continue to expand, but at a decreasing rate...

  14. Residential Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to the way they now behave. The intensity of end-uses will change moderately in response to price changes. Electric end uses will continue to expand, but at a decreasing...

  15. Residential Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical squestionnairesquestionnaires 3

  16. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    . 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 -1.4% Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 0 Table A4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption...

  17. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Information Administration (EIA). Residential EnergyInformation Administration (EIA). Annual Energy Outlook.Machine Ownership by Income Category and Building Type (EIA,

  18. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

  19. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by bundling energy efficiency, solar photovoltaics (PV), andby bundling energy efficiency, solar photovoltaics (PV), andPhotovoltaics Residential Conservation Service Residential Energy Efficiency

  20. International energy outlook 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

  1. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  2. National Action Plan on Demand Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the National Assessment of Demand Response study, the National Action Plan for Demand Response, and demand response as related to the energy outlook.

  3. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

  4. International energy outlook 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

  5. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

  6. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.5%) residential customers installed solar panels. 88% ofsolar thermal water heating, etc. Some key concerns from a customer’

  7. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback Contact Concessions Baltimore Neighborhood Energy Challenge Energy Smackdown Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP) Houston’s Residential

  8. Key Milestones/Outlook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Key Milestones/Outlook per the Department of Energy 2015 Congressional Budget Request, Environmental Management, March 2014

  9. WEST VIRGINIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    WEST VIRGINIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK 2009 BUREAU OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH College of Business and Economics West Virginia University #12;West Virginia Economic Outlook 2009 George W. Hammond, Associate Director, BBER, and Associate Professor of Economics West Virginia Economic Outlook 2009 is published

  10. Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

  11. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. Inbased demand response information to building controlDemand Response Standard for the Residential Sector. California Energy Commission, PIER Buildings

  12. International energy outlook 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

  13. Fuels outlook for oil/propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weigand, P.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The outlook for using oil and propane as fuels is outlined. The following topics are discussed: factors affecting price of the burner tip, supply and demand forecast, distribution costs and availability, alternate fuels economics, propane prices, No. 2 oil prices, natural gas vs. 1% residual HP prices, and future for industrial oil and propane consumers.

  14. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plan for the Bonneville Power Administration ResidentialOffice (GAO). 2004. Bonneville Power Administration: Betterpage 127) Bonneville Power Administration A History of Home

  15. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 17 Table A7. Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption (continued) Key indicators and consumption...

  16. Oil and Gas Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Outlook For Independent Petroleum Association of America November 13, 2014 | Palm Beach, FL By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Recent...

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Reference case Table A6. Industrial sector key indicators and consumption Energy Information Administration ...

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    36 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 6 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2010 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise...

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Reference case Table A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless...

  20. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Table G1. Heat rates Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts AK WA NV AZ OR...

  2. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    end of table. (continued on next page) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 116 Comparison with other projections Table 28. Comparison of coal...

  3. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, second quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates, are available on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The paper discusses outlook assumptions; US energy prices; world oil supply and the oil production cutback agreement of March 1998; international oil demand and supply; world oil stocks, capacity, and net trade; US oil demand and supply; US natural gas demand and supply; US coal demand and supply; US electricity demand and supply; US renewable energy demand; and US energy demand and supply sensitivities. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

  4. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs...

  5. Outlook export contacts and groups Migrate Outlook Contacts to gmail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Outlook export contacts and groups Migrate Outlook Contacts to gmail 1. In Outlook 2007 on the File menu, click Import and Export. 1a. For Outlook 2010 on the File menu, click Open, then Import 2. Click Export to a file, and then click Next. #12;3. Click Comma Separated Values (Windows), and then click Next

  6. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    average reduction of electricity use. Estimated lifecycle costaverage annual electricity savings per home. Estimated lifecycle costaverage reduction of electricity use 22% PEAK electricity savings in residential sector. Estimated lifecycle cost

  7. Black Hills Power- Residential Customer Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Black Hills Power offers cash rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment in their homes. Incentives exist for water heaters, demand control units, air...

  8. Demand Response: Load Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

  9. SUMMER 2006 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Average Forced and Planned)............................................ 15 Line 11: Zonal Transmission ............................................................................. 16 Line 14: High Zonal Transmission Limitation ................................................... 16, contractors, and subcontractors make no warrant, express or implied, and assume no legal liability

  10. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

  11. CONSULTANT REPORT 2009 CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Data collection was completed in early 2010. The study yielded energy consumption estimates for 27 statistical methods to combine survey data, household energy consumption data and weather information Commission, conditional demand analysis, CDA, unit energy consumption, UEC, residential, appliance

  12. sttesuhcassa RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    University Apartments To Amherst Center RON TNASAELPHT TS CENTRAL RESIDENTIAL AREA To Tillson Farm RESIDENTIAL AREA Lorden Field ATHLETIC FIELDS To Telecom, UMass Outreach & UMass Extension at 101 University Drive NORTHEAST RESIDENTIAL AREA ORCHARD HILL RESIDENTIAL AREA Chabad House HAIGIS MALL Newman Center

  13. sttesuhcassa RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Gordon To Amherst Center RON TNASAELPHT TS CENTRAL RESIDENTIAL AREA To Tillson Farm & Intermediate ORCHARD HILL DR. Track & Field ACO SDT KKG SK ADP IGU ZBT BUTTERFIELDTERRACE DZ SOUTHWEST RESIDENTIAL AREA NORTHEAST RESIDENTIAL AREA ORCHARD HILL RESIDENTIAL AREA Chabad House HAIGIS MALL Newman Center Textbook

  14. Energy Market Outlook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Energy Market Outlook: Helping Customers Meet Their Diverse Energy Goals, held on May 22-23, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

  15. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oil and natural gas outlook IAEE International Conference June 16, 2014 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas...

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Strategies Summit May 21, 2014 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil...

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic...

  19. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

  20. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  1. Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Aspen. 2006. Demand Response Enabling TechnologiesDon. 2007. “Pricing for Demand Response from Residential andthe Level of Demand Response,” Power Point Presentation, 24

  2. Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high.  Demand response helps to manage building electricity Building  Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.  Non?Residential Building in California.   Demand Response 

  3. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  4. Residential Furnace Blower Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditioner performance1 , standby power, as well as igniter and combustion air blower power. Energy savings for a typical three-and-a-half ton air conditioner with typical California ducts are 45 kWh. Peak demand combinations of blowers and residential furnaces were tested for air moving performance. The laboratory test

  5. International energy outlook 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

  6. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic expansion and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both a short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as a long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study presents a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. Over the past few years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced its China End-Use Energy Model which is based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. In addition, this analysis also evaluated China's long-term domestic energy supply in order to gauge the potential challenge China may face in meeting long-term demand for energy. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not necessarily be the case because saturation in ownership of appliances, construction of residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that China's 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

  7. Better Buildings Residential Network Driving Demand Peer Exchange Call Series: Leveraging Holidays and Other Events Call Slides and Discussion Summary, November 7, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher|for1, 20114,Residential&Driving

  8. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

  9. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    A n n u a l E n e r g y Ou t l o o k 2 0 1 2 For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under...

  10. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The principal users of the Outlook are managers and energy analysts in private industry and government. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1992 through the fourth quarter of 1993. Values for the second quarter of 1992, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

  11. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential cooling energy demand to climate change, Energy,M. Sivak, Potential energy demand for cooling in the 50of the potential cooling energy demand comes from developing

  12. Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.

  13. Residential Mail Procedures Residential Mail Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Residential Mail Procedures Residential Mail Services 23 Owens Hall Blacksburg, VA 24061 Phone.mailservices.vt.edu #12;Residential Mail Procedures Table of Contents General information.................................................................................8 #12;Residential Mail Procedures The following procedures have been establishes by the University

  14. australian residential early: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to TOU Rates University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: residential energy consumption, load shifting, consumption feedback monitors, demand response, air...

  15. Short-term energy outlook, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. International energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

  17. International energy outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

  18. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 LED Light emitting diode AEO2014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 LNG Liquefied natural gas ATRA American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 LPG Liquefied petroleum...

  19. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review provides a yearly comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO) beginning with 1982. This edition of the report adds the AEO 2012 projections and updates the historical data to incorporate the latest data revisions.

  20. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections: First quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.). The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the fourth quarter of 1992, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

  1. Short-term energy outlook, Quarterly projections. Third quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the second quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

  2. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the first quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  3. A tale of two houses: the human dimension of demand response enabling technology from a case study of an adaptive wireless thermostat.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A; Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Ed Arens. 2008. Demand Response-Enabled ResidentialEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006.The Human Dimension of Demand Response Enabling Technology

  4. Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, N.L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992. Global warming and electricity demand: A study ofValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of SolarCEC). 2002. 2002-2012 Electricity Outlook Report, P700- 01-

  5. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for residential ventilation systems, 2009. CEN, EN15251:The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a lowthe whole house ventilation system that implicitly assumes

  6. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes”.Delp. 2000. “Residential Commissioning: A Review of Relatedfor Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics” Lawrence

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Chart Gallery for April 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 Jan 2014...

  8. Outlook for Industrial Energy Benchmarking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Z.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OUTLOOK FOR INDUSTRIAL ENERGY BENCHMARKING Zoe Hartley Environmental Protection Specialist U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is exploring options to sponsor an ~d~ ~~gy...

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    day Forecast -1.0 2012 2013 2014 OPEC countries North America Russia and Caspian Sea Latin America North Sea Other Non-OPEC Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2013 -1 0...

  10. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    account for the most natural gas usage (33% and 51% of totalseasonal dependence in natural gas usage, and consequently,Natural gas demand exhibits a strong winter peak in residential usage

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook: Quarterly projections. Fourth quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the third quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications.

  12. Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a companion document to the Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94), (DOE/EIA-0383(94)), released in Jan. 1994. Part I of the Supplement presents the key quantitative assumptions underlying the AEO94 projections, responding to requests by energy analysts for additional information on the forecasts. In Part II, the Supplement provides regional projections and other underlying details of the reference case projections in the AEO94. The AEO94 presents national forecasts of energy production, demand and prices through 2010 for five scenarios, including a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. These forecasts are used by Federal, State, and local governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers in the public and private sectors.

  13. LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    December 2014 LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy LD+A Magazine

  14. Residential Services Headlease residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Residential Services Headlease residents handbook 2013-2014 #12;Map of Brighton inside front cover packs Rent 5 Residential Advisor (RA) network 6 Senior residential advisors Residential Student Support Contents Contents Brighton 1 #12;Welcome Congratulations on securing your place at Sussex. Residential

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April19.Data Series: Proved

  16. Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    centers. 4. Demand Response Strategies Building from theBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Building

  17. Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Junqiao

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response,Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building JunqiaoDemand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Building

  18. Regression Models for Demand Reduction based on Cluster Analysis of Load Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building”, CECBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response”,Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings

  19. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, first quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the fourth quarter of 1994, however, are preliminary EIA estimates or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the first quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. The EIA model is available on computer tape from the National Technical Information Service.

  20. Residential Solar Valuation Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

  1. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

  2. The outlook for natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The proceedings of the Institute of Gas Technology`s Houston Conference on the Outlook for Natural Gas held October 5, 1993 are presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. The solar electric power outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, J.W.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The outlook for solar electric power plants is discussed. The following topics are discussed: Amoco/Envon solar vision, multi-megawatt solar power projects, global carbon dioxide emission estimates, pollution and electric power generation, social costs of pollution economies of scale, thin-film power module, rooftop market strategy, regulatory issues regarding rooftop systems, and where do we go from here?

  4. The Role of Demand Response Policy Forum Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Role of Demand Response Policy Forum Series Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Future and Demand Response #12;Historic focus on Seasonal Grid Stress PG&E Demand Bid Test Day 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 Communication Latency #12;Bottom Up Review of End-Use Loads for Demand Response 5 Commercial Residential

  5. Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D.V. Jr.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

  6. Distributed Control of Residential Energy Systems using a Market Maker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    , in particular reverse power flow during daytime periods of peak generation coupled with low residential load distribution networks and shave peak demand without large-scale capital costs for feeder replacement.weller}@newcastle.edu.au) Abstract: The recent rapid uptake of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) installations provides many

  7. Potential Peak Load Reductions From Residential Energy Efficient Upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meisegeier, D.; Howes, M.; King, D.; Hall, J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential peak load reductions from residential energy efficiency upgrades in hot and humid climates. First, a baseline scenario is established. Then, the demand and consumption impacts of individual upgrade measures are assessed. Several of these upgrades...

  8. Residential Learning University Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    Residential Learning & University Housing Handbook 2008 - 2009 A Guide for Residential Living on the Campus of Rowan University #12;Welcome to Residential Learning & University Housing! The primary purpose of the Office of Residential Life & University Housing is to assist and support students in the pursuit

  9. RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES NORTHWESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    c RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES NORTHWESTERN #12;#12;Dear Northwestern Student: I hope you will review residential colleges. A residential college is a place where you can grow emotionally and intellectually, get and residential college fellows. More than a third of the first-year students living on campus choose to live

  10. Residential Colleges NORTHWESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Residential Colleges NORTHWESTERN #12;#12;Dear Northwestern Student: I hope you will review residential colleges. A residential college is a place where you can grow emotionally and intellectually, get and residential college fellows. More than a third of the first-year students living on campus choose to live

  11. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nuclear hydro Energy output Own Uses Transmission and distribution loses Electricity delivered Primary factor The Agriculture

  12. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rural, k=Kerosene m=rural, k=biogas m =urban, k=LPG m=urban,k=LPG k=wood k=kerosene k=biogas k=electricity k=electricity

  13. California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be 750 megawatts (MW) lower because of ongoing repairs to the Pacific Northwest DC transmission line, 2, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulation

  14. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ministry of Chemical and Petrochemical (MoCP), 2005. “AnnualMinistry of Chemical and Petrochemical Ministry of Petroleumpotential. 3.3.2.6 Petrochemicals and Chemicals India ranks

  15. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency in Electricity Consumption", HWWA Discussionconsumption. Even electricity consumption, which isData Adjustment Electricity consumption from farmers is un-

  16. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11% oil, 6% coal, and traditional energy. A survey conductedand Renewable Energy Ministry of Coal Ministry of Commerce &in Figure 10, coal represents the largest energy product

  17. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5% of its reserve is coking coal used by the steel industry.imports around 70% of coking coal annually. More recently,

  18. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. DOE, 2006, “Buildings Energy Data Book 2006”, Septembersame period (US Buildings Energy Data Book). Over the next

  19. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    input Coal gas oil nuclear hydro Energy output Own Uses Transmission and distribution loses Electricity delivered Primary factor The Agriculture

  20. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel, 18% Primary Electricity Diesel, 49% Electricty,51% Electricty Data Adjustment Electricity consumption from

  1. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activity, 2005-06 8India's GDP, with 54% in 2005-06 (MOSPI, 2007b) and is alsoby Economic Activity, 2005-06 GDP Share AAGR (billion of GDP

  2. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    patterns of energy consumption, trends in saturation and1 shows the trend in total primary energy consumption overvalue added – energy consumption. This trend can be observed

  3. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T&D) technical and commercial losses are substantial,losses. T&D losses include technical loses and commercial

  4. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Transportation Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil and Gas

  5. Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : 42Q)2Q)6)2k(STEO)

  6. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : 42Q)2Q)6)2k(STEO)

  7. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agency (IEA). 2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECDlines in the 2009 World Energy Outlook 450 ppm scenario.Agency (IEA)’s 2009 World Energy Outlook 450 ppm scenario.

  8. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, fourth quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for printed publication in January, April, July, and October in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates on or about the 6th of each interim month, are available on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the fourth quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. 19 tabs.

  9. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, third quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the second quarter of 1996, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the third quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  10. Annual energy outlook 1995, with projections to 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents projections and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1995 and 1996 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1995). Forecast tables for the five cases examined in the AEO95 are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendix A gives historical data and forecasts for selected years from 1992 through 2010 for the reference case. Appendix B presents two additional cases, which assume higher and lower economic growth than the reference case. Appendix C presents two cases that assume higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix D presents a summary of the forecasts in units of oil equivalence. Appendix E presents a summary of household energy expenditures. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO95 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO95 forecast assumptions. Appendix H presents a stand-alone high electricity demand case. Appendix 1 provides a table of energy conversion factors and a table of metric conversion factors. 89 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A10. Electricity...

  12. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 7 Table A7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption (Continued) Key Indicators and Consumption...

  13. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gain perspective on how variations in key assumptions can lead to different outlooks for energy markets. To provide a basis against which alternative cases and policies can be...

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gain perspective on how variations in key assumptions can lead to different outlooks for energy markets. In addition to the alternative cases prepared for AEO2015, EIA has...

  15. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data...

  16. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    January STEO Annual projections to 2040 International projections All projections reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Annual Energy Outlook related...

  17. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  18. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, first quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the fourth quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the first quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook.

  20. International energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Energy Outlook 1997 (IE097) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2015.

  1. World Biodiesel Markets The Outlook to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Biodiesel Markets The Outlook to 2010 A special study from F.O. Licht and Agra CEAS This important new study provides a detailed analysis of the global biodiesel market and the outlook for growth, including the regulatory and trade framework, feedstock supply and price developments, biodiesel production

  2. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2001

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment...

  3. Annual energy outlook 1994: With projections to 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents projects and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based for the first time on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is the latest in a series of computer-based energy modeling systems used over the past 2 decades by EIA and its predecessor organization, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze and forecast energy consumption and supply in the midterm period (about 20 years). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1994 and 1995 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1994). Forecast tables for 2000, 2005, and 2010 for each of the five scenarios examined in the AEO94 are provided in Appendices A through E. The five scenarios include a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO94 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly described the NEMS and the major AEO94 forecast assumptions. Appendix H summarizes the key results for the five scenarios.

  4. Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

  5. Residential Solar Investment Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2012, the CT Green Bank* unveiled its solar photovoltaic residential investment program with the ultimate goal to support 30 megawatts of residential solar photovoltaics (PV). HB 6838...

  6. Residential Energy Audits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of events coupled with the last five years experience performing Residential Conservation Service (RCS) audits have resulted in renewed efforts by utilities to evaluate the role of residential energy audits. There are utilities where...

  7. Leasing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses the adoption, consequences and current market status of the leasing of residential photovoltaic systems. It addresses attributed energy savings and market potential of residential system leasing.

  8. Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential...

  9. Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Residential Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy...

  10. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution...

  11. Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network...

  12. Short-term energy outlook, annual supplement 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (Supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  13. Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  14. Housing and Residential Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 Housing and Residential Life Guidebook 2014-2015 LivingCampus #12;2 fau.edu/housing Welcome! The Housing & Residential Life staff is excited that you've moved home! Florida Atlantic University residence halls and apartments are your home for the 2014-2015 school year. The Housing & Residential Life staff

  15. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  16. PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION MANUAL (ACM) APPROVAL METHOD for the 2013 2012 CEC400201200715DAY #12;201308 Residential ACM Approval Manual 2-2 1. Overview Minimum Modeling Capabilities 1. Overview This Manual explains the requirements for approval of residential Alternative

  17. Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are numerous programs sponsored by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and utility or state efficiency programs that have an objective of reducing peak demand. Most of these programs have targeted the residential and commercial sector, however...

  18. Residential Wood Residential wood combustion (RWC) is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential Wood Combustion Residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe because PM2.5. Furthermore, other combustion- related sources of OA in Europe may need to be reassessed. Will it affect global OA emission estimates? Combustion of biofuels is globally one of the major OA sources

  19. Chapter 17: Residential Behavior Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, J.; Todd, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential behavior-based (BB) programs use strategies grounded in the behavioral social sciences to influence household energy use. Strategies may include providing households with real-time or delayed feedback about their energy use; supplying energy-efficiency education and tips; rewarding households for reducing their energy use; comparing households to their peers; and establishing games, tournaments, and competitions. BB programs often target multiple energy end uses and encourage energy savings, demand savings, or both. Savings from BB programs are usually a small percentage of energy use, typically less than 5%.

  20. Annual outlook for US electric power, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes summary information on the ownership structure of the US electric utility industry, a description of electric utility regulation, and identification of selected factors likely to affect US electricity markets from 1985 through 1995. This Outlook expands upon projections first presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1985, offering additional discussion of projected US electricity markets and regional detail. It should be recognized that work on the Annual Energy Outlook 1985 had been completed prior to the sharp reductions in world oil prices experienced early in 1986.

  1. DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE Residential Life Staff Manual.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    1 Appendix A DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE Residential Life Staff Manual. Residential Life Program Listing #12;2 MISSOURI S&T RESIDENTIAL LIFE DEPARTMENT Staff Resource Manual 2010--2012 Department of Residential Life Mission: To create educational environments emphasizing learning and development. Service

  2. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 2: Final residential and commercial building prototypes and DOE-2.1E developed UECs and EUIs; Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section contains the detailed measured impact results and market segment data for each DSM case examined for this building type. A complete index of all base and measure cases defined for this building type is shown first. This index represents an expansion of the base and measure matrix presented in Table 1 (residential) or Table 2 (commercial) for the applicable sector. Following this index, a summary report sheet is provided for each DSM measure case in the order shown in the index. The summary report sheet contains a host of information and selected graphs which define and depict the measure impacts and outline the market segment data assumptions utilized for each case in the DBEDT DSM Forecasting models. The variables and figures included in the summary report sheet are described. Numerous tables and figures are included.

  3. 2015 NASEO Energy Policy Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BETO Director Jonathan Male will be speaking at the National Association of State Energy Organization Energy Policy Outlook Conference, which will be taking place from February 3–6 at the Washington, D.C.

  4. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    23.60 28.73 28.99 28.68 27.92 27.22 0.6% Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 4 Table A6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption...

  5. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Report Number: DOEEIA-0383ER(2012) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy...

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Reference case Table A14. Oil and gas supply Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A14. Oil and gas supply Production and supply Reference case...

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    day Forecast -0.9 2012 2013 2014 OPEC countries North America Russia and Caspian Sea Latin America North Sea Other Non-OPEC Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2013 -1...

  8. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outlook 2015 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013...

  9. Agricultural Outlook Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment ofATVMAgricultural Outlook Forum Agricultural Outlook

  10. Residential Transactive Control Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Arguably the most exciting aspect of the smart grid vision is the full participation of end-use resources with all forms of generation and energy storage in the reliable and efficient operation of an electric power system. Engaging all of these resources in a collaborative manner that respects the objectives of each resource, is sensitive to the system and local constraints of electricity flow, and scales to the large number of devices and systems participating is a grand challenge. Distributed decision-making system approaches have been presented and experimentation is underway. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a residential demand response demonstration that uses the bidding transactions of supply and end-use air conditioning resources communicating with a real-time, 5 minute market to balance the various needs of the participants on a distribution feeder. The nature of the demonstration, the value streams being explored, and the operational scenarios implemented to characterize the system response are summarized along with preliminary findings.

  11. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

  12. RESIDENTIAL SERVICES STUDENT CHARTER Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    RESIDENTIAL SERVICES STUDENT CHARTER Introduction This Charter sets out the standards of provision. Residential Services are committed to encouraging diversity and inclusiveness within University residences via the Residential Services Annual Report and the internet. Consultation This Charter was developed

  13. Essays on residential desegregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Maisy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many ethnically diverse countries have policies that encourage integration across ethnic groups. This dissertation investigates the impact and welfare implications of a residential desegregation policy in Singapore, the ...

  14. Residential Solar Rights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, New Jersey enacted legislation preventing homeowners associations from prohibiting the installation of solar collectors on certain types of residential properties. The term "solar...

  15. Citizens Gas- Residential Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Citizens Gas of Indiana offers rebates to its residential customers for the installation of several types of efficient natural gas appliances. Rebates are generally available for residential homes...

  16. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    electricity consumption for these appliances than was projected in the AEO2013 Reference case. For AEO2014, outdoor lighting was added to the residential model as a separate...

  17. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of residential lighting applications, including wider representation of light emitting diode (LED) lighting and outdoor lighting, based on the 2009 RECS and two U.S....

  18. The U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Production Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil and Natural Gas Production Outlook for PRG Energy Outlook Conference September 22, 2014 by Adam Sieminski, Administrator 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005...

  19. Energy Impacts of Envelope Tightening and Mechanical Ventilation for the U.S. Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on change in home site energy demand by IECC climate zone.residential sector site energy demand by 2.9 quads (3.1 EJ).programs could reduce the energy demand by 0.7 quads (0.74

  20. A First-Generation Prototype Dynamic Residential Window Christian Kohler, Howdy Goudey, and Dariush Arasteh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    October 26, 2004 Abstract We present the concept for a "smart" highly efficient dynamic window in residential buildings. We describe a prototype dynamic window that relies on an internal shade, which deploys technology have significantly reduced window-related energy use and peak demand in residential buildings

  1. ICEPT Working Paper Comparison of Fuel Cell and Combustion Micro-CHP under Future Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICEPT Working Paper Comparison of Fuel Cell and Combustion Micro-CHP under Future Residential and Combustion Micro-CHP under Future Residential Energy Demand Scenarios A.D. Hawkes2 and M.A. Leach Centre heat and power (micro-CHP) - a technology to provide heat and some electricity to individual

  2. AN INNOVATIVE RTP-BASED RESIDENTIAL POWER SCHEDULING SCHEME FOR SMART GRIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Larry

    as demand response for residential power usage. In this scheme, the Energy Management Controller (EMCAN INNOVATIVE RTP-BASED RESIDENTIAL POWER SCHEDULING SCHEME FOR SMART GRIDS Chen Chen , Shalinee power usage profile plays the leader level game. The sequential equilib- rium is obtained through

  3. DOE/EIA-0383(2009) Annual Energy Outlook 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE/EIA-0383(2009) March 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 With Projections to 2030 #12;For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, under for the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 during 2009. Other contributors to the report include Justine Barden, Joseph

  4. OECD Internet Economy Outlook 2012 Access the complete publication at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weske, Mathias

    From: OECD Internet Economy Outlook 2012 Access the complete publication at: http://dx.doi.org/10 and development", in OECD Internet Economy Outlook 2012, OECD Publishing. http://dx.doi.org/10 of international law. #12;OECD Internet Economy Outlook © OECD 2012 63 Chapter 2 Internet trends and development

  5. 1822 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 3, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2012 Real-Time Price-Based Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    , real-time price-based demand response management, residential appli- ances, robust optimization1822 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 3, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2012 Real-Time Price-Based Demand Response Management for Residential Appliances via Stochastic Optimization and Robust Optimization Zhi Chen

  6. Estimating the Market Penetration of Residential Cool Storage Technology Using Economic Cost Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijo, R. O.; and Brown, D. R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use, which occur on hot summer days for summer peaking utilities. Cool storage technology, developed for both commercial and residential applications, is one solution to meeting peak power needs. Demand for this technology is derived from... utilities' hesitancy to pay the extremely high-capacity costs (per kW) required to generate electricity for use at peak periods. This technology does not save energy--it merely shifts its use to a time when residential, commercial, and industrial demand...

  7. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, 2nd quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1994 through the fourth quarter of 1995. Values for the first quarter of 1994, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available. The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1994 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the STIFS. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. The EIA model is available on computer tape from the National Technical Information Service.

  8. Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call...

  9. Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margulis, Harry L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    465– Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

  10. Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.govbbrn What Is the Residential Network? The Better Buildings Residential Network connects...

  11. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation StandardsCharacterization of Residential New Construction PracticesJ - Load Calculation for Residential Winter and Summer Air

  12. Key Residential Building Equipment Technologies for Control and Grid Support PART I (Residential)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL; DeVault, Robert C [ORNL

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical energy consumption of the residential sector is a crucial area of research that has in the past primarily focused on increasing the efficiency of household devices such as water heaters, dishwashers, air conditioners, and clothes washer and dryer units. However, the focus of this research is shifting as objectives such as developing the smart grid and ensuring that the power system remains reliable come to the fore, along with the increasing need to reduce energy use and costs. Load research has started to focus on mechanisms to support the power system through demand reduction and/or reliability services. The power system relies on matching generation and load, and day-ahead and real-time energy markets capture most of this need. However, a separate set of grid services exist to address the discrepancies in load and generation arising from contingencies and operational mismatches, and to ensure that the transmission system is available for delivery of power from generation to load. Currently, these grid services are mostly provided by generation resources. The addition of renewable resources with their inherent variability can complicate the issue of power system reliability and lead to the increased need for grid services. Using load as a resource, through demand response programs, can fill the additional need for flexible resources and even reduce costly energy peaks. Loads have been shown to have response that is equal to or better than generation in some cases. Furthermore, price-incentivized demand response programs have been shown to reduce the peak energy requirements, thereby affecting the wholesale market efficiency and overall energy prices. The residential sector is not only the largest consumer of electrical energy in the United States, but also has the highest potential to provide demand reduction and power system support, as technological advancements in load control, sensor technologies, and communication are made. The prevailing loads based on the largest electrical energy consumers in the residential sector are space heating and cooling, washer and dryer, water heating, lighting, computers and electronics, dishwasher and range, and refrigeration. As the largest loads, these loads provide the highest potential for delivering demand response and reliability services. Many residential loads have inherent flexibility that is related to the purpose of the load. Depending on the load type, electric power consumption levels can either be ramped, changed in a step-change fashion, or completely removed. Loads with only on-off capability (such as clothes washers and dryers) provide less flexibility than resources that can be ramped or step-changed. Add-on devices may be able to provide extra demand response capabilities. Still, operating residential loads effectively requires awareness of the delicate balance of occupants health and comfort and electrical energy consumption. This report is Phase I of a series of reports aimed at identifying gaps in automated home energy management systems for incorporation of building appliances, vehicles, and renewable adoption into a smart grid, specifically with the intent of examining demand response and load factor control for power system support. The objective is to capture existing gaps in load control, energy management systems, and sensor technology with consideration of PHEV and renewable technologies to establish areas of research for the Department of Energy. In this report, (1) data is collected and examined from state of the art homes to characterize the primary residential loads as well as PHEVs and photovoltaic for potential adoption into energy management control strategies; and (2) demand response rules and requirements across the various demand response programs are examined for potential participation of residential loads. This report will be followed by a Phase II report aimed at identifying the current state of technology of energy management systems, sensors, and communication technologies for demand response and load factor control applications

  13. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  14. Configure Outlook 2010 with Exchange Server

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Configure Outlook 2010 with Exchange Server #12;1. Navigate to the Windows Start Menu (or press. #12;14. E-mail server settings will now auto configure. 15. Once the Auto Account Setup is configured server settings or additional server types. 3. Click the Next > button. #12;4. Select Microsoft Exchange

  15. Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the AEO using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO projections.

  16. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    r) 9.8 9.8 9.0 8.9 8.9 9.0 9.2 -0.2% Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2011 2 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Continued)...

  17. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    . 8.60 8.49 8.98 9.48 9.93 10.47 11.03 1.0% Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 2 Table A5. Commercial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption...

  18. Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize the status of three-flavour neutrino oscillations with date of Oct. 2007, and provide an outlook for the developments to be expected in the near future. Furthermore, I discuss the status of sterile neutrino oscillation interpretations of the LSND anomaly in the light of recent MiniBooNE results, and comment on implications for the future neutrino oscillation program.

  19. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  20. Residential New Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Residential New Construction Program includes three service tiers that can be achieved by completing various energy efficiency measures. The tiers are: Energy Code Plus (Bronze), Vermont ENER...

  1. TES for Residential Settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage approaches for residential buildings. This article addresses both brick bank storage and phase change material technologies. The energy savings and market potential of these thermal energy storage methods are reviewed as well.

  2. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Press. IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. Pan Kexi. (IEA 2008, various years. World Energy Outlook. Paris: OECD/s total IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. World Energy

  3. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IEA 2008, various years. World Energy Outlook. Paris: OECD/Press. IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. Pan Kexi. (s total IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. World Energy

  4. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    share). Coal Oil Gas Hydropower Biomass Figure 5 ResidentialRenewables Oil Nuclear Gas Hydropower Figure 6 ResidentialCoal Oil Nuclear Gas Hydropower Figure 10 Commercial Primary

  5. New England electricity supply outlook: Summer 1998 -- and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New England is in the third summer of a protracted electricity supply shortage that began with the shutdown of a substantial quantity of nuclear generating capacity, particularly the 2,630 megawatts (MW) from the three Millstone units located in Connecticut and owned and operated by Northeast Utilities. This report was prepared in response to a request from Senator Christopher Dodd and Senator Joseph Lieberman, both of Connecticut, that the Department of Energy provide an update of its June 1997 report, New England Electricity Supply Outlook, Summer 1997--and Beyond, which examines measures that might be taken to ease the supply shortage, particularly measured to relieve transmission constraints that restrict the import of electricity into Connecticut. In the interval since the 1997 report, three changes have occurred in the region`s overall electric supply context that are particularly significant: the Millstone 3 nuclear unit (1,150 MW) has been put back into service at full capacity; electricity demand is higher, due primarily to regional economic growth. The region`s projected 1998 peak demand is 22,100 MW, 1,531 MW higher than the region`s 1997 peak; and many new additions to the region`s generating capacity have been announced, with projected completion dates varying between 1999 and 2002. If all of the announced projects were completed--which appears unlikely--the total additions would exceed 25,000 MW. A small number of new transmission projects have also been announced.

  6. Annual energy outlook 1999, with projections to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an Overview summarizing the AEO99 reference case. The next section, Legislation and Regulations, describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. Issues in Focus discusses current energy issues--the economic decline in East Asia, growth in demand for natural gas, vehicle emissions standards, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO99 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present a summary of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. The AEO99 projections are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1998. Pending legislation and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the forecasts. Historical data used for the AEOI99 projections were the most current available as of July 31, 1998, when most 1997 data but only partial 1998 data were available.

  7. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides Presentation slides for the Building Technologies...

  8. Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Presents conference agenda including a general...

  9. 5/2/2005 Industry Seminar -April 2005 The Housing Market and Demand for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5/2/2005 Industry Seminar - April 2005 The Housing Market and Demand for Building Materials Charlotte, NC April 27, 2005 #12;Changes that will impact demand for residential building materials ·Demographics - demand for shelter ·Housing Construction - industrialization - substitution ·Globalization - new

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 29.3 29.5 30.8 32.1 32.4 33.2 34.7 0.6% Non-renewable energy expenditures by sector (billion 2013 dollars) Residential...

  11. Impacts of Temperature Variation on Energy Demand in Buildings (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the residential and commercial sectors, heating and cooling account for more than 40% of end-use energy demand. As a result, energy consumption in those sectors can vary significantly from year to year, depending on yearly average temperatures.

  12. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    footage of both new construction and existing structures, based on trends in new construction and remodeling. Industrial Demand Module The Industrial Demand Module (IDM)...

  13. Bryant Residential Tutorship BRYANT RESIDENTIAL TUTORSHIP REGULATIONS FOR 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waikato, University of

    Bryant Residential Tutorship 1 BRYANT RESIDENTIAL TUTORSHIP REGULATIONS FOR 2013 BACKGROUND The D. V. Bryant Trust established Bryant Hall on land leased from the University of Waikato in 1971, Bryant Hall has provided a supportive residential environment for first-year students and has also

  14. RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING Live on-campus in 2014-15 and participate in a unique as part of a residential community in Arroyo Vista! Open to all undergraduate students with 2-3 years

  15. Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New York Department of Taxation and Finance publishes a variety of sales tax reports detailing local tax rates and exemptions, including those for residential energy services. The residential...

  16. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vehicle for Residential PV Installations: Opportunities andfor Financing Residential PV Systems Mark Bolinger, Lawrencefor residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing

  17. Questions Asked during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar...

  18. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agency (IEA). 2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECDsection of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the sameEnergy Agency (IEA)’s World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2009, which

  19. Short-term energy outlook, October 1998. Quarterly projections, 1998 4. quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from October 1998 through December 1999. Values for third quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the October 1998 version of the Short-term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

  20. Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section of the Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 present the major assumptions of the modeling system used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in Appendix B. A synopsis of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented. The NEMS is developed and maintained by the office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projection of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by various government agencies and the private sector.

  1. Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993 is a companion document to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 1993 (AEO). Supplement tables provide the regional projections underlying the national data and projections in the AEO. The domestic coal, electric power, commercial nuclear power, end-use consumption, and end-use price tables present AEO forecasts at the 10 Federal Region level. World coal tables provide data and projections on international flows of steam coal and metallurgical coal, and the oil and gas tables provide the AEO oil and gas supply forecasts by Oil and Gas Supply Regions and by source of supply. All tables refer to cases presented in the AEO, which provides a range of projections for energy markets through 2010.

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING CEC-CF-6R-LTG-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-LTG-01 Residential Lighting (Page 1 of 6) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: 2008 Residential Compliance Forms August 2009 1. Kitchen Lighting Does project

  3. Residential & Business Services Director's Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Residential & Business Services Director's Office Butts Wynd, North Street, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 by students for students are an integral part of student life and intrinsic to the student residential the residential environment. However, experience tells us that events require careful planning and organisation

  4. Permanent Home Number: Residential Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    Permanent Home Number: Residential Number: Mobile: Please update my contact details. Signature nominated correspondence address as indicated below. Permanent Home Adress Residential Address Other Address (Must not be a PO Box) Residential Address (Must not be a PO Box) Other - Postal/Optional Address

  5. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  6. Building Technologies Residential Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secrest, Thomas J.

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

  7. International energy outlook 1995, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Energy Outlook 1995 (IEO95) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the international energy market outlook through 2010. The report is an extension of the EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). US projections appearing in the IEO95 are consistent with those published in the AEO95. IEO95 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projects are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 295(c). The IEO95 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1994. IEO95 displays projections according to six basic country groupings. The regionalization has changed since last year`s report. Mexico has been added to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and a more detailed regionalization has been incorporated for the remainder of the world, including the following subgroups: non-OECD Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China is included in non-OECD Asia. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are combined in the EE/FSU subgroup.

  8. Short-term energy outlook, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2012 Data Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    75. Imported Liquids by Source XLS Table 76. Conversion Factors XLS About the Annual Energy Outlook Contact information and staff Press release AEO2012 Early Release AEO2012...

  10. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2011 Data Tables

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    75. Imported Liquids by Source XLS Table 76. Conversion Factors XLS About the Annual Energy Outlook Contact Information and Staff About the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)...

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office...

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office...

  13. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2013 Data Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Income and Employment by Region Table 74. Conversion Factors About the Annual Energy Outlook Contact information and staff Press release Press conference presentation...

  14. Outlook for Energy and Implications for Irrigated Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patton, W. P.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 87 1977 Outlook for Energy and Implications for Irrigated Agriculture W.P. Patton R.D. Lacewell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  15. Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administrati...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    January STEO Annual projections to 2040 International projections All projections reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Annual Energy Outlook related...

  16. A Framework for Modelling Residential Prosumption Devices and Electricity Tariffs for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the cost of electricity production, and to give incentives to consumers to improve their load profile Systems, Resi- dential electricity pricing models, residential load models, power scheduling, Linear], which include direct load control, interruptible/curtailable programs, demand bidding, emergency demand

  17. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  18. High SEER Residential AC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the new offerings of residential air conditioning systems with very high Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) ratings, the two regional areas dictating operations standards ("hot, humid" and "hot, dry"), and the potential energy savings these new systems can provide. The article concludes with a brief review of current market potential.

  19. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning EngineersLBNL 4591E Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide

  20. STORM WATER Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

  1. Photovoltaics for residential applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is given about the parts of a residential photovoltaic system and considerations relevant to photovoltaic power use in homes that are also tied to utility lines. In addition, factors are discussed that influence implementation, including legal and environmental factors such as solar access and building codes, insurance, utility buyback, and system longevity. (LEW)

  2. Agriculture Residential College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture Students Design Build Solar Pavilion in Old South Baton Rouge Louisiana Sustainable BuildingAgriculture Residential College LSU Sustainability Denise Newell LSU Planning, Design-year institutions Denise S. Newell, PE LEED AP Sustainability Manager scribner@lsu.edu Contact Info "If you had

  3. Residential Mechanical Precooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research conducted by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical air conditioner pre-cooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling evaluated two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes.

  4. Annual energy outlook 2009 with projections to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO009), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an 'early release' version of the AEO009 reference case in December 2008. The report begins with an 'Executive Summary' that highlights key aspects of the projections. It is followed by a 'Legislation and Regulations' section that discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including a summary of recently enacted legislation, such as the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (EIEA2008). The next section, 'Issues in Focus,' contains discussions of selected topics, including: the impacts of limitations on access to oil and natural gas resources on the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS); the implications of uncertainty about capital costs for new electricity generating plants; and the result of extending the Federal renewable production tax credit (PTC). It also discusses the relationship between natural gas and oil prices and the basis of the world oil price and production trends in AEO2009.

  5. Annual energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2015 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). These projections are based on results of EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report begins with a summary of the reference case, followed by a discussion of the legislative assumptions and evolving legislative and regulatory issues. ``Issues in Focus`` discusses emerging energy issues and other topics of particular interest. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO97 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present summaries of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. Twenty-three other cases explore the impacts of varying key assumptions in NEMS--generally, technology penetration, with the major results shown in Appendix F. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO97 assumptions, with a summary table. 114 figs., 22 tabs.

  6. Annual energy outlook 2006 with projections to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an 'Overview' summarizing the AEO2006 reference case and comparing it with the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, 'Legislation and Regulations', discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and some that are proposed. 'Issues in Focus' includes a discussion of the basis of EIA's substantial revision of the world oil price trend used in the projections. Other topics examined include: energy technologies on the cusp of being introduced; mercury emissions control technologies; and U.S. greenhouse gas intensity. 'Issues in Focus' is followed by 'Energy Market Trends', which provides a summary of the AEO2006 projections for energy markets. The analysis in AEO2006 focuses primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and lower and higher energy price cases. In addition, more than 30 alternative cases are included in AEO2006. Complete tables for the five primary cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Major results from many of the alternative cases are provided in Appendix D. Appendix E briefly describes NEMS and the alternatives cases. 112 figs., 25 tabs., 7 apps.

  7. Annual energy outlook 2005 with projections to 2025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modelling System (NEMS). The report begins with an 'Overview' summarizing the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, 'Legislation and Regulations', discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues in the USA. Issues in Focus includes discussions on key energy market issues and examines their potential impacts. In particular, it includes a discussion of the world oil price assumptions used in the reference case and four alternative world oil price cases examined in AEO2005. 'Issues in Focus' is followed by 'Market Trends', which provides a summary of energy market trends in the AEO2005 forecast. The analysis in AEO2005 focuses primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and four alternative oil price cases, a low world oil price case, an October oil futures case, and two high world oil price cases. Forecast tables for those cases are provided in Appendixes A through D. The major results for the alterative cases, which explore the impacts of varying key assumption in NEMS (such as rates of technology penetration), are summarized in Appendix E. Appendix F briefly describes NEMS and the alternative cases. 115 figs., 38 tabs., 8 apps.

  8. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Domestic Electric Storage Water Heater (DESWH) Test Methodsfans, washing machines, water heaters and space heaters.and Space Heating Water heater intensities and electric

  9. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 90% of household electricity consumption in China. Usinggives an annual electricity consumption of 12kWh assumingto look at is electricity consumption at the household

  10. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating and Space Heating Water heater intensities and electric equipment marketheating intensities per region (North and Transition) were also taken from that study, along with conditioned floor space and equipment market

  11. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account forDomestic Electric Storage Water Heater (DESWH) Test Methodswashing machines, water heaters and space heaters. BUENAS

  12. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    replaced with heat pump water heaters (efficiency of 250%).electric storage water heaters and heat pumps as shown infor Electric Water Heaters and Heat Pumps End Use Elec WH HP

  13. Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesOutlook and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesPresident, Emerging Markets Online http://www.emerginghttp://www.emerging--markets.commarkets.com Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market SurveyAuthor, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey Columnist

  14. Colorado 2014 Economic Outlook: There are No Guarantees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado 2014 Economic Outlook: There are No Guarantees Dr. Martin Shields Regional Economics Institute Colorado State University #12;The Important Economic Issues · The economy is no longer "recovering the recovery looked like · 2014 outlook · Does economic growth improve individual well-being? #12;"Recovery

  15. Electricity Markets Meet the Home through Demand Response Lazaros Gkatzikis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) programs motivate home users through dynamic pricing to shift electricity consumption from peak demand incentives to the users, usually in the form of dynamic pricing, to reduce their electricity consumption. For example, the residential sector in UK accounts for 31% of the total electricity consumption

  16. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Agency (2004). World Energy Outlook 2004, OECD. M.A.consumption. The World Energy Outlook (WEO) developed by thefrom the IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2002 (2000 data), and

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 SeptemberSetting theSheldonOctoberOutlook September

  18. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1InformationDieselAnnual Energy Outlook 2015 Release

  19. Annual Energy Outlook Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon Capture and SequestrationAnemoi RenovablesAnjanOutlook

  20. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 with Projections to 2035

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The projections in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. Under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain unchanged throughout the projections, the AEO2011 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy production, consumption, technology, and market trends and the direction they may take in the future. It also serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in energy policies. But AEO2011 is not limited to the Reference case. It also includes 57 sensitivity cases (see Appendix E, Table E1), which explore important areas of uncertainty for markets, technologies, and policies in the U.S. energy economy. Key results highlighted in AEO2011 include strong growth in shale gas production, growing use of natural gas and renewables in electric power generation, declining reliance on imported liquid fuels, and projected slow growth in energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions even in the absence of new policies designed to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. AEO2011 also includes in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect the energy outlook. They include: impacts of the continuing renewal and updating of Federal and State laws and regulations; discussion of world oil supply and price trends shaped by changes in demand from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development or in supply available from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries; an examination of the potential impacts of proposed revisions to Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for light-duty vehicles and proposed new standards for heavy-duty vehicles; the impact of a series of updates to appliance standard alone or in combination with revised building codes; the potential impact on natural gas and crude oil production of an expanded offshore resource base; prospects for shale gas; the impact of cost uncertainty on construction of new electric power plants; the economics of carbon capture and storage; and the possible impact of regulations on the electric power sector under consideration by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some of the highlights from those discussions are mentioned in this Executive Summary. Readers interested in more detailed analyses and discussions should refer to the 'Issues in focus' section of this report.

  1. Ris Energy Report 5 Renewable energy outlook for selected regions 1 4 Renewable energy outlook for selected regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø Energy Report 5 Renewable energy outlook for selected regions 1 4 Renewable energy outlook, are now gradually expanding their role in global energy supply. In 2004, renewable energy from all sources.2 0.0% Biomass 48.3 10.4% Total renewable 60.9 13.1% Total global primary energy consumption 465.4 100

  2. Comparison of the 1984 DOE/EIA annual energy outlook and the 1984 GRI baseline projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashby, A.; Holtberg, P.; Woods, T.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative analysis of the Gas Research Institute (GRI) Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand with the DOE/EIA 1984 Annual Energy Outlook shows many similar assumptions, but many cases of widening differences between the projections of primary energy consumption and sector-specific energy consumption. The DOE/EIA expects a faster and more significant decline in the electricity to natural gas price ratio, lower sector-specific end-use prices of refined petroleum products, and a faster growth in industrial raw material energy demand. In contrast to the GRI report, it also omits an estimate of industrial cogeneration and does not retire any exisiting generating capacity. The report examines the basic assumptions and results of both projections using five scenarios. 17 tables.

  3. Decentralized Control of Aggregated Loads for Demand Response Di Guo, Wei Zhang, Gangfeng Yan, Zhiyun Lin, and Minyue Fu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    Decentralized Control of Aggregated Loads for Demand Response Di Guo, Wei Zhang, Gangfeng Yan of residential responsive loads for vari- ous demand response applications. We propose a general hybrid system and effectively reduce the peak power consumption. I. INTRODUCTION Demand response has the potential to shift

  4. Lehigh University Office of Residential Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Lehigh University Office of Residential Services Resident Check-Out Form Students are expected and furniture of all personal property. Residential Services is not responsible for any personal items left and residential administration staff for billing purposes. Signature

  5. RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY DATE: November 25, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY DATE: November 25, 2014 INCIDENT / LOCATION: Residential Burglary in Vista Del 22, 2014, at approximately 11:07 pm, the UCI Police Department received a report of a residential

  6. http://warren.ucsd.edu 1 Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    http://warren.ucsd.edu 1 Warren Resources Residential Life Student Conduct University Resources Off and Employment 10 Section II: Residential Life Introduction 11 Residential Life Policies 13 Section III: Student

  7. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy (2009a). Annual energy outlook 2009 with projectionsEnergy (2008). Annual energy outlook 2008 with projectionsfrom the 2008 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO 2008) (U.S.

  8. Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration (2009). Annual Energy Outlook. ReportAdministration (2009). Annual Energy Outlook. ReportReport: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case

  9. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration (EIA). Annual Energy Outlook. 2007. Energyfootage from the Annual Energy Outlook [Energy Informationobtained from the Annual Energy Outlook for 2007 (EIA,

  10. Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James E.; McNeil, Michael; Lutz, Jim

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration. Annual Energy Outlook 2003: With ProjectionsAdministration, Annual Energy Outlook 2002: With Projectionschanges in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003) [4] to

  11. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy (2009a). Annual energy outlook 2009 with projectionsEnergy (2008). Annual energy outlook 2008 with projectionsfrom the 2008 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO 2008; US Department

  12. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration (2003). Annual Energy Outlook 2003. DOE/EIA-SP SWAT TVA USDA Annual Energy Outlook American Wind Energyaccording to the 2003 Annual Energy Outlook. Although this

  13. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Residential commissioning is a solution to this problem. This guide is the culmination of a 30-month project that began in September 1999. The ultimate objective of the project is to increase the number of houses that undergo commissioning, which will improve the quality, comfort, and safety of homes for California citizens. The project goal is to lay the groundwork for a residential commissioning industry in California focused on end-use energy and non-energy issues. As such, we intend this guide to be a beginning and not an end. Our intent is that the guide will lead to the programmatic integration of commissioning with other building industry processes, which in turn will provide more value to a single site visit for people such as home energy auditors and raters, home inspectors, and building performance contractors. Project work to support the development of this guide includes: a literature review and annotated bibliography, which facilitates access to 469 documents related to residential commissioning published over the past 20 years (Wray et al. 2000), an analysis of the potential benefits one can realistically expect from commissioning new and existing California houses (Matson et al. 2002), and an assessment of 107 diagnostic tools for evaluating residential commissioning metrics (Wray et al. 2002). In this guide, we describe the issues that non-experts should consider in developing a commissioning program to achieve the benefits we have identified. We do this by providing specific recommendations about: how to structure the commissioning process, which diagnostics to use, and how to use them to commission new and existing houses. Using examples, we also demonstrate the potential benefits of applying the recommended whole-house commissioning approach to such houses.

  14. Residential Clean Energy Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland's Residential Clean Energy Grant Program, administered by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), provides financial incentives to homeowners that install solar water-heating systems or...

  15. NYSEG (Gas)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG is offering residential natural gas customers rebates for installing energy efficient equipment. Customers can complete one rebate application for multiple pieces of equipment as long as...

  16. Unitil- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Unitil offers New Hampshire residential customers a number of programs to encourage more energy efficient homes. The Energy Star Appliance Program provides rebates for clothes washers, air...

  17. Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency Vermont provides financial incentives for its residential customers to install energy efficient equipment in their homes. Eligible Energy Star equipment includes dehumidifiers (seasonal...

  18. Efficient Residential Water Heaters Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by Jerone Gagliano, director of Energy Engineering Performance Systems Development, about residential water heating technology and how to choose the right water heater.

  19. Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy...

  20. Flint Energies- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flint Energies has partnered with Robins Federal Credit Union to offer affordable financing options to residential customers who wish to upgrade the energy efficiency of homes and residential...

  1. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 On this page, you may link...

  2. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting: October 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting: October 2011 On...

  3. Covered Product Category: Residential Central Air Conditioners...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Central Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Residential Central Air Conditioners The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential...

  4. Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link...

  5. Entergy Mississippi- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Entergy Mississippi offers residential energy efficiency programs to help residential customers save energy by providing rebates for lighting, heating and cooling equipment, A/C tune ups, and...

  6. Solar Now! Residential Brochure | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information Resources Solar Now Residential Brochure Solar Now Residential Brochure Four Oregon organizations have teamed up to help Oregon homeowners learn about and install...

  7. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress as part of the DOE Better Buildings Program. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program...

  8. Sharyland Utilities- Residential Standard Offer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sharyland Utilities offers the Residential and "Hard-to-Reach" Standard Offer Programs, which encourage residential customers to pursue energy saving measures and equipment upgrades in their homes....

  9. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Judy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential electricity tariffs Judy Lai, Nicholas DeForest,residential electricity tariffs Judy Lai – Senior Researchfrom the current 5-tiered tariff to time variable pricing,

  10. Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting Summary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting Summary Report Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting Summary Report This report summarizes key findings...

  11. Tacoma Power- Residential Weatherization Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tacoma Power helps residential customers increase the energy efficiency of homes through the utility's residential weatherization program. Weatherization upgrades to windows are eligible for an...

  12. Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Network Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships, from the U.S....

  13. Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Membership Form Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form Membership form from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network Recommended...

  14. Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Peer Exchange Call Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Peer Exchange Call January 22, 2015...

  15. SRP- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SRP's Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program is designed to encourage residential SRP customers to utilize energy efficient appliances and measures at home. Rebates and discounts are...

  16. Residential Exchange History Fact Sheet - June 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    history of BPA's Residential Exchange Program June 2007 F rom its start, the Residential Exchange Program (REP) has been a source of nearly continuous controversy. Its roots go...

  17. Direct Adaptive Control of Electricity Demand S. Keshav and C. Rosenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    Report CS-2010-17 ABSTRACT The legacy electrical grid upper-bounds a customer's en- ergy demand using An electrical grid supplies reliable power to residential, industrial, and commercial customers by dynamicallyDirect Adaptive Control of Electricity Demand S. Keshav and C. Rosenberg School of Computer Science

  18. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been influenced by expected higher electricity prices that reflect a rapid rise in fuel prices and emerging carbon-emission penalties. For example, residential consumer retail electricity prices of this projected demand growth. The electricity demand increase is driven primarily by significant growth in two

  19. Residential Air Conditioner Direct Load Control "Energy Partners Program"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, J. D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESIDENTIAL AIR CONDITIONER DIRECT LOAD CONTROL "ENERGY PARTNERS PROGRAMn John D. Cook Supervisor Houston ABSTRACT Demand side management programs like Energy Partners can provide an effective peak reducing capability which within a.... In this partnership the customer allows HLfP to install a I switch on his/her air conditioner or heat pump and i periodically cycle the unit off during the hottest summer 1 days. In return the customer benefits by receiving an incentive payment, as well...

  20. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis ofenergy consumption in China. It recalibrates official Chinese governmentstatistics by reallocating primary energy into categories more commonlyused in international comparisons. It also provides an analysis of trendsin sectoral energy consumption over the past decades. Finally, itassesses the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020,based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity,availability of energy services, and energy intensities. The followingare some highlights of the study's findings: * A reallocation of sectorenergy consumption from the 2000 official Chinese government statisticsfinds that: * Buildings account for 25 percent of primary energy, insteadof 19 percent * Industry accounts for 61 percent of energy instead of 69percent * Industrial energy made a large and unexpected leap between2000-2005, growing by an astonishing 50 percent in the 3 years between2002 and 2005. * Energy consumption in the iron and steel industry was 40percent higher than predicted * Energy consumption in the cement industrywas 54 percent higher than predicted * Overall energy intensity in theindustrial sector grew between 2000 and 2003. This is largely due tointernal shifts towards the most energy-intensive sub-sectors, an effectwhich more than counterbalances the impact of efficiency increases. *Industry accounted for 63 percent of total primary energy consumption in2005 - it is expected to continue to dominate energy consumption through2020, dropping only to 60 percent by that year. * Even assuming thatgrowth rates in 2005-2020 will return to the levels of 2000-2003,industrial energy will grow from 42 EJ in 2005 to 72 EJ in 2020. * Thepercentage of transport energy used to carry passengers (instead offreight) will double from 37 percent to 52 percent between 2000 to 2020,.Much of this increase is due to private car ownership, which willincrease by a factor of 15 from 5.1 million in 2000 to 77 million in2020. * Residential appliance ownership will show signs of saturation inurban households. The increase in residential energy consumption will belargely driven by urbanization, since rural homes will continue to havelow consumption levels. In urban households, the size of appliances willincrease, but its effect will be moderated by efficiency improvements,partially driven by government standards. * Commercial energy increaseswill be driven both by increases in floor space and by increases inpenetration of major end uses such as heating and cooling. Theseincreases will be moderated somewhat, however, by technology changes,such as increased use of heat pumps. * China's Medium- and Long-TermDevelopment plan drafted by the central government and published in 2004calls for a quadrupling of GDP in the period from 2000-2020 with only adoubling in energy consumption during the same period. A bottom-upanalysis with likely efficiency improvements finds that energyconsumption will likely exceed the goal by 26.12 EJ, or 28 percent.Achievements of these goals will there fore require a more aggressivepolicy of encouraging energy efficiency.

  1. PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Jane S.; Moezzi, Mithra; Lutzenhiser, Susan; Woods, James; Dethman, Linda; Kunkle, Rick

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Into Action, Inc. and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) worked together to conduct research on the behaviors and energy use patterns of SMUD residential customers who voluntarily signed on to a Time-of-Use rate pilot launched under the PowerChoice label. The project was designed to consider the how and why of residential customers ability and willingness to engage in demand reduction behaviors, and to link social and behavioral factors to observed changes in demand. The research drew on a combination of load interval data and three successive surveys of participating households. Two experimental treatments were applied to test the effects of increased information on households ability to respond to the Time-of-Use rates. Survey results indicated that participants understood the purpose of the Time-of-Use rate and undertook substantial appropriate actions to shift load and conserve. Statistical tests revealed minor initial price effects and more marked, but still modest, adjustments to seasonal rate changes. Tests of the two information interventions indicated that neither made much difference to consumption patterns. Despite the lackluster statistical evidence for load shifting, the analysis points to key issues for critical analysis and development of residential Time-of-Use rates, especially pertinent as California sets the stage for demand response in more California residences.

  2. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of rampant growth in heavy industries as the leading causeis largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is

  3. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about 3 million family biogas units have been installed,resulting in an estimated biogas consumption of 8PJ in 2005MJ/ca/month converted in biogas with an estimated efficiency

  4. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Boiler Electricity Figure 10 Efficiency of the SpaceEfficiency Index baseyear =100 District Heating Gas Boilerboilers and more efficient heat pumps. The projection is based on assumption that both the efficiency

  5. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agency, 2003. “Cool Appliances”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.of Non-OECD Countries 2004- 2005”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.Use in the New Millenium”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France. Indian

  6. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tokyo, Japan International Energy Agency (IEA),2004.30 Years of Energy Use in IEA Countries,Paris: IEA/OECD. Lin, J, 2003. A Light Diet for a Giant

  7. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15 Figure 9. Electricity Consumption per Household per year,vi Annexes Annex 1. Model of Electricity Consumption by MPCEAnnex 1. Model of Electricity Consumption by MPCE Class

  8. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change of space heating technology. For instance, thein Table 4. Heat Pump heating Technology Efficiency IndexEfficiency of the Space Heating Technologies Percentage (%)

  9. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in India: is rural electrification a remedy? ” Viewpoint.A 1. Electrification Regression Results for Urban and RuralDiffusion Rural Households Urban Households Electrification

  10. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses andof the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and

  11. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    patterns of energy consumption, trends in saturation andtrend in passenger transport in Mumbai and Maharashtra, and estimated the energy consumption

  12. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freightconsiderably. In addition, oil consumption used for freightof energy consumption over time from the Ministry of Oil and

  13. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas boiler boiler stove district heating heat pump airrespectively, followed by district heating of 22%, while inaddition to the existing district heating system in northern

  14. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    reflects increased domestic petroleum and natural gas production, increased use of biofuels (much of which are produced domestically), and demand reductions resulting from...

  15. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    reflects increased domestic crude oil and natural gas production, increased use of biofuels (much of which are produced domestically), and demand reductions resulting from the...

  16. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    about the use of those fuels relative to natural gas. Augmentation of the construction and mining models in the Industrial Demand Model to better reflect AEO2013...

  17. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    on increases in the labor force, growth of capital stocks, and improvements in productivity. Long-term demand growth depends on labor force growth,income growth, and...

  18. STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL ADDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL ADDITIONS CEC- CF-1R ADD (Revised 03/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Prescriptive Certificate of Compliance: CF-1R ADD Residential Additions (Page 1 of 8) Site Address Orientation: N, E, S, W or Degrees ________ Conditioned Floor Area of Addition (CFA): New Addition Size: Less

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 with Projections to 2040

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013), prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2040, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System. The report begins with an “Executive summary” that highlights key aspects of the projections. It is followed by a “Legislation and regulations” section that discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues, including a summary of recently enacted legislation and regulations, such as: Updated handling of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for industrial boilers and process heaters; New light-duty vehicle (LDV) greenhouse gas (GHG) and corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards for model years 2017 to 2025; Reinstatement of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) after the court’s announcement of intent to vacate the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR); and Modeling of California’s Assembly Bill 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32), which allows for representation of a cap-and-trade program developed as part of California’s GHG reduction goals for 2020. The “Issues in focus” section contains discussions of selected energy topics, including a discussion of the results in two cases that adopt different assumptions about the future course of existing policies, with one case assuming the elimination of sunset provisions in existing policies and the other case assuming the elimination of the sunset provisions and the extension of a selected group of existing public policies—CAFE standards, appliance standards, and production tax credits. Other discussions include: oil price and production trends in AEO2013; U.S. reliance on imported liquids under a range of cases; competition between coal and natural gas in electric power generation; high and low nuclear scenarios through 2040; and the impact of growth in natural gas liquids production. The “Market trends” section summarizes the projections for energy markets. The analysis in AEO2013 focuses primarily on a Reference case, Low and High Economic Growth cases, and Low and High Oil Price cases. Results from a number of other alternative cases also are presented, illustrating uncertainties associated with the Reference case projections for energy demand, supply, and prices. Complete tables for the five primary cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Major results from many of the alternative cases are provided in Appendix D. Complete tables for all the alternative cases are available on EIA’s website in a table browser at http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo/tablebrowser. AEO2013 projections are based generally on federal, state, and local laws and regulations in effect as of the end of September 2012. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards (and sections of existing legislation that require implementing regulations or funds that have not been appropriated) are not reflected in the projections. In certain situations, however, where it is clear that a law or regulation will take effect shortly after the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is completed, it may be considered in the projection.

  20. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, NREL developed this tool to help users determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for improving energy efficiency of existing homes. Software developers who require residential retrofit performance and cost data for applications that evaluate residential efficiency measures are the primary audience for this database. In addition, home performance contractors and manufacturers of residential materials and equipment may find this information useful. The database offers the following types of retrofit measures: 1) Appliances, 2) Domestic Hot Water, 3) Enclosure, 4) Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), 5) Lighting, 6) Miscellaneous.

  1. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CA Control Areas CO 2 Carbon Dioxide CHP Combined Heat and Power CPP Critical Peak Pricing DG Distributed Generation DOE Department of Energy DR Demand Response DRCC Demand...

  2. The U.S. Natural Gas and Shale Production Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas and Shale Production Outlook for North American Gas Forum September 29, 2014 by Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas...

  3. Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook was undertaken to characterize the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market and to examine recent trends and future prospects in the LNG market.

  4. ASHRAE and residential ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the logical place to provide leadership. This leadership has been demonstrated most recently by the publication of the first nationally recognized standard on ventilation in homes, ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2003, which builds on work that has been part of ASHRAE for many years and will presumably continue. Homeowners and occupants, which includes virtually all of us, will benefit from the application of Standard 62.2 and use of the top ten list. This activity is exactly the kind of benefit to society that the founders of ASHRAE envisioned and is consistent with ASHRAE's mission and vision. ASHRAE members should be proud of their Society for taking leadership in residential ventilation.

  5. Better Buildings Residential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher|for1, 20114,Residential 2014 Building

  6. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) -heating oil pricepropane price05, 2014 Residential

  7. An ANFIS Based Sensor Network for a Residential Energy Management System D. Senthilkumar, S. Kumar, Y. Ozturk and G. Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Sunil

    An ANFIS Based Sensor Network for a Residential Energy Management System D. Senthilkumar, S. Kumar management system project, an Integrated and Cognitive Home Energy Management System for Demand Response (DR management system which addresses demand response with efficient energy consumption. 1. Introduction State

  8. Energy Optimization (Electric)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Optimization Programs, administered by WECC, provides residential electric incentives for the following Michigan utilities:

  9. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration. 2010. Annual Energy Outlook 2010 withthe price forecasts in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2010. The

  10. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

  11. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

  12. Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40% of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, the Energy Information Administration has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. The Annual Energy Outlook 2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

  13. Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This memo explains what Berkeley Lab has learned about how the residential central air-conditioning (CAC) end use is represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is an energy model maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) that is routinely used in analysis of energy efficiency standards for residential appliances. As part of analyzing utility and environmental impacts related to the federal rulemaking for residential CAC, lower-than-expected peak utility results prompted Berkeley Lab to investigate the input load shapes that characterize the peaky CAC end use and the submodule that treats load demand response. Investigations enabled a through understanding of the methodology by which hourly load profiles are input to the model and how the model is structured to respond to peak demand. Notably, it was discovered that NEMS was using an October-peaking load shape to represent residential space cooling, which suppressed peak effects to levels lower than expected. An apparent scaling down of the annual load within the load-demand submodule was found, another significant suppressor of the peak impacts. EIA promptly responded to Berkeley Lab's discoveries by updating numerous load shapes for the AEO2002 version of NEMS; EIA is still studying the scaling issue. As a result of this work, it was concluded that Berkeley Lab's customary end-use decrement approach was the most defensible way for Berkeley Lab to perform the recent CAC utility impact analysis. This approach was applied in conjunction with the updated AEO2002 load shapes to perform last year's published rulemaking analysis. Berkeley Lab experimented with several alternative approaches, including modifying the CAC efficiency level, but determined that these did not sufficiently improve the robustness of the method or results to warrant their implementation. Work in this area will continue in preparation for upcoming rulemakings for the other peak coincident end uses, commercial air conditioning and distribution transformers.

  14. About the Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Residential Network About the Better Buildings Residential Network The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share...

  15. What Explains Manhattan's Declining Share of Residential Construction?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DAVIDOFF, THOMAS

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Share of Residential Construction? Thomas Davido? ? June 20,market. Residential construction in Manhattan has fallento total US residential construction over the last 45 years.

  16. Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA.   CEC (2008b).  Residential Alternative Calculation Standard for Air Handlers in Residential Space Conditioning of Standards Options for Residential Air Handler Fans.   

  17. Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Slides from "Guide to Benchmarking Residential...

  18. Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of panel titled “Financing Residential and Small CommercialL ABORATORY Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects:1 2. Policy Support for Non-Residential PV

  19. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rudd. 2007. Review of residential ventilation technologies.2009. EISG Final Report: Residential Integrated VentilationDesign and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems. Proc.

  20. Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.R. Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricitydemand response to residential critical peak pricing (CPP)analysis of California residential customer response to

  1. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  2. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

  3. Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is an update to the 2005 Energy Efficiency Potential Study completed by KEMA for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) and identifies potential energy efficiency opportunities in the residential sector on Kauai (KEMA 2005). The Total Resource Cost (TRC) test is used to determine which of the energy efficiency measures analyzed in the KEMA report are cost effective for KIUC to include in a residential energy efficiency program. This report finds that there remains potential energy efficiency savings that could be cost-effectively incentivized through a utility residential demand-side management program on Kauai if implemented in such a way that the program costs per measure are consistent with the current residential program costs.

  4. INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON OF RESIDENTIAL ENERGY USE: INDICATORS OF RESIDENTIAL ENERGY USE AND EFFICIENCY PART ONE: THE DATA BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Analysis of Swedish Residential Energy Use Data 1960-80.1980. International Residential Energy Use and ConservationInternational Comparison of Residential Energy ! Js~. Report

  5. Jasper County REMC- Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jasper County REMC, in conjunction with Wabash Valley Power Association's Power Moves programs, offers a range of rebates to its residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy...

  6. U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration. 2004a. Annual Energy Outlook 2004. U.S.Assumptions of the Annual Energy Outlook 2004. DOE/EIA-0554(and Definitions AEO – Annual Energy Outlook ArcGIS - ESRI

  7. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011).pdf. ———. 2012a. “Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2012. ”2013. “Annual Energy Outlook - Model Documentation. ”forecast, the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (DOE EIA 2012a).

  8. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  9. Residential Solar Water Heating Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire offers a rebate for residential solar water-heating systems and solar space-heating systems. The rebate is equal to $1,500 for systems with an annual estimated output of 5.5 MMBTU to...

  10. Residential Solar Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York enacted legislation in July 2005 exempting the sale and installation of residential solar-energy systems from the state's sales and compensating use taxes. The exemption was extended to...

  11. Residential Freezers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    v1.7.xlsx More Documents & Publications Residential Freezers (Appendix B) Refrigerator-Freezer Appendix A1 Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers (Appendix A1 after May 2, 2011)...

  12. Portland's Residential Solar Permitting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program guide outlines the application and review procedures for obtaining the necessary permit(s) to install a solar energy system for a new or existing residential building. The guide also...

  13. Gas energy supply outlook through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalisch, R.B.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late in 1984 the American Gas Association published a study by the Gas Supply Committee titled, ''The Outlook for Gas Energy Through 2010.'' This study was a joint effort by many people of the gas industry including GRI, IGT and AGA. The study observed that come 1646 Tcf of natural gas is judged to be ultimately recoverable in the US. Of this total, 665 Tcf were produced up to year-end 1984. At that time an additional 197 Tcf were categorized as proved reserves, i.e., known to exist with reasonable certainty and producible under current economic and operating conditions. An additional 784 Tcf were classified as potential supply. In short, about 60 % of the nation's ultimately recoverable resource still is available; only 40 % has been produced to data. This is a formidable gas resource for the lower-48; in 1984 the production level was about 17 Tcf; proved reserves were approximately 163 Tcf - more than nine times the 1984 production. 2 references, 2 tables.

  14. Legal improvements brighten North Africa production outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    North Africa`s three main oil producing countries soon will reap benefits of past moves by their governments to encourage investment by international companies. Production of crude oil and natural gas in Algeria, Egypt, and Libya is ready to increase from suppressed levels of the recent past, says International Energy Agency, Paris. The gains are possible despite political risks, total reserves accounting for only 4% of the world`s crude reserves, and oil prices well below levels of the 1980s, when the countries` flow rates peaked. The reason: producing oil in North Africa is profitable. In a recent study entitled North Africa Oil and Gas, IEA attributes the bright production outlook to improvements that the countries` governments have made in the past decade to hydrocarbon laws and the fiscal terms they offer international investors. According to announced plans, the three countries` combined capacity to produce crude oil will rise 18% by the year 2000 to 3.65 million b/d, and a further gain of 700,000 b/d is possible. IEA expects production capacity for natural gas to increase 50% from its 1995 level by 2000 to a combined 139.4 billion cu m/year. This paper discusses production capacities, Algeria`s record, improvements in Egypt, and Libya`s changes.

  15. Distributed and Decentralized Control of Residential Energy Systems Incorporating Battery Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    is increasingly being considered by utilities seeking to reinforce distribution networks and shave peak demand consists of solar PV generation, battery storage and an inelastic energy load. Each RES is connected--The recent rapid uptake of residential solar photo- voltaic (PV) installations provides many challenges

  16. Benefits of the International Residential Code's Maximum Solar heat Gain Coefficient Requirement for Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas adopted in its residential building energy code a maximum 0.40 solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for fenestration (e.g., windows, glazed doors and skylights)-a critical driver of cooling energy use, comfort and peak demand. An analysis...

  17. Designing a Residential Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System Based on the Energy Buffering Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    such as the Consolidated Edison Company of New York (conEdison) employ time-of-day pricing policy [2], with higher unitDesigning a Residential Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System Based on the Energy Buffering companies generally raise electrical energy price during periods of high load demand. A grid

  18. Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities Status and Outlook for the U.S....

  19. Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. 8: David Shields, Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook:of California, Berkeley Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook:and the Environment in Mexico, 2005. No. 14: Kevin P.

  20. Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyMexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyA ccelerates Mexico’s crude oil production, which reached a

  1. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : 42Q)2Q)6)2k(STEO) To

  2. Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment ofOil'sEnergy8OrganicOsmoticOutdoor Solar

  3. Statistical Review of UK Residential Sector Electrical Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsagarakis, G; Kiprakis, A E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a comprehensive statistical review of data obtained from a wide range of literature on the most widely used electrical appliances in the UK residential load sector. It focuses on individual appliances and begins by consideration of the electrical operations performed by the load. This approach allows for the loads to be categorised based on the electrical characteristics, and also provides information on the reactive power characteristics of the load, which is often neglected from standard consumption statistics. This data is particularly important for power system analysis. In addition to this, device ownership statistics and probability distribution functions of power demand are presented for the main residential loads. Although the data presented is primarily intended as a resource for the development of load profiles for power system analysis, it contains a large volume of information which provides a useful database for the wider research community.

  4. PROGRESS IN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRY PERSPECTIVE -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference, "New Energy Conservation Technologies", Berlin,IN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRYIN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRY

  5. Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits Template, from the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Residential Network.

  6. Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits FAQ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits FAQ, from the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Residential Network.

  7. WEST VIRGINIA SPECIAL THANKS TO THE 2014 ECONOMIC OUTLOOK CONFERENCE SPONSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2015 WEST VIRGINIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK #12;SPECIAL THANKS TO THE 2014 ECONOMIC OUTLOOK CONFERENCE SPONSORS: WEST VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHAMBERS ENDOWED PROGRAM FOR ELECTRONIC BUSINESS #12;Cover WEST VIRGINIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOKWest Virginia Economic Outlook 2015 is published by: Bureau of Business

  8. Energy Efficiency Program for Residential Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Reopening of the Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Program for Residential Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Reopening of the Comment Period

  9. Electric power supply and demand for the contiguous United States, 1980-1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A limited review is presented of the outlook for the electric power supply and demand during the period 1980 to 1989. Only the adequacy and reliability aspects of bulk electric power supply in the contiguous US are considered. The economic, financial and environmental aspects of electric power system planning and the distribution of electricity (below the transmission level) are topics of prime importance, but they are outside the scope of this report.

  10. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agency. 2008. ?2008 World Energy Outlook. ? Japan Petroleumbelow the 2008 World Energy Outlook‘s projection (FigureSource: IEA, 2008 World Energy Outlook; LBNL CLU Model. 4.2

  11. 2008 Residential2008 Residential Energy Plan ReviewEnergy Plan Reviewe gy la eviewe gy la eview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Residential2008 Residential Energy Plan ReviewEnergy Plan Reviewe gy la eviewe gy la eview #12;2008 Residential Energy Plan2008 Residential Energy Plan Review ChecklistReview Checklist Simplification ChecklistsOther Available Checklists 2005 and 2008 Residential Energy Documentation2005 and 2008 Residential

  12. Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban neighbourhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban the Queen in Right of Canada 2013 Abstract Estimating the relative importance of vegetation on residential land (gardens, yards, and street-trees) and vegetation on non-residential land (parks and other large

  13. Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Dan

    Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Paper: Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building John residential light- frame wood buildings and wave and surge loading be- cause often little is left residential structures and wave loading. To do this, one-sixth scale residen- tial building models typical

  14. Outlook and Challenges for Chinese Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. The rapid growth of coal demand since 2001 has created deepening strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about supply security. Although China's coal is 'plentiful,' published academic and policy analyses indicate that peak production will likely occur between 2016 and 2029. Given the current economic growth trajectory, domestic production constraints will lead to a coal gap that is not likely to be filled with imports. Urbanization, heavy industry growth, and increasing per-capita consumption are the primary drivers of rising coal usage. In 2006, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement accounted for 71% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units could save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand. If China follows Japan, steel production would peak by 2015; cement is likely to follow a similar trajectory. A fourth wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. New demand from coal-to-liquids and coal-to-chemicals may add 450 million tonnes of coal demand by 2025. Efficient growth among these drivers indicates that China's annual coal demand will reach 4.2 to 4.7 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not been able to reduce China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Few substitution options exist: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth would require over 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas, 48 GW of nuclear, or 86 GW of hydropower capacity. While these alternatives will continue to grow, the scale of development using existing technologies will be insufficient to substitute significant coal demand before 2025. The central role of heavy industry in GDP growth and the difficulty of substituting other fuels suggest that coal consumption is inextricably entwined with China's economy in its current mode of growth. Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on its current growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Broadening awareness of the environmental costs of coal mining, transport, and combustion is raising the pressure on Chinese policy makers to find alternative energy sources. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China is short of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport. Transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transport oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 mt by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets. The looming coal gap threatens to derail China's growth path, possibly undermining political, economic, and social stability. High coal prices and domestic shortages will have regional and global effects. Regarding China's role as a global manufacturing center, a domestic coal gap will increase prices and constrain growth. Within the Asia-Pacific region, China's coal gap is likely to bring about increased competition with other coal-importing countries including Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and India. As with petroleum, China may respond with a government-supported 'going-out' strategy of resource acquisition and vertical integration. Given its population and growing resource constraints, China may favor energy security, competitiveness, and local environmental protection over global climate change mitigation. The possibility of a large coal gap suggests that Chinese and international policy makers should maximize institutional and financial support

  15. Edmond Electric- Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Edmond Electric offers rebates to residential customers who install energy-efficient heat pumps. This program applies to installations in both new and existing residential homes and complexes. Air...

  16. Low-rise Residential New Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     NYSERDA’s Low-rise Residential New Construction Programs are designed to encourage more industry involvement in the building of single-family homes and low-rise residential units that are more...

  17. CC: Security, Residential Life Evacuation Assistance Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    CC: Security, Residential Life Evacuation Assistance Form Voluntary Self-Identification If you have will be kept confidential and used only by Environmental Health and Safety, Residential Life (if applicable

  18. Department of Residential Life University of Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    Department of Residential Life University of Missouri may 11 >> halls close, 5 p.m. summer to June 1). Sign up forms are available at 0780 Defoe-Graham in the Residential Life Administration Office

  19. BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE PROCEDURES FOR THE USE OF HOLIDAY DECORATIONS by the Office of Residential Life. In these instances, candles and incense may never be left unattended and any

  20. Residential Properties 5100 South Dorchester Avenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    Residential Properties 5100 South Dorchester Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60615 T 773.753-2200 F 733 for specific answers to: residential@uchicago.edu. Thank you, in advance, for your patience during this process

  1. BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE PROCEDURES FOR THE USE OF HOLIDAY DECORATIONS in a location established by the Office of Residential Life. In these instances, candles and incense may never

  2. Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Residential Retrofitting | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Residential Retrofitting Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Residential Retrofitting July 30, 2010 - 10:50am Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this mean for...

  3. Piedmont Natural Gas- Residential Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates on high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters, tank water heaters and furnaces. Customers on the 201-Residential Service Rate or 221-Residential Service...

  4. System design and dynamic signature identification for intelligent energy management in residential buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Jaehwi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Intelligent Energy Management in Residential Buildingsfor Intelligent Energy Management in Residential Buildingsthat can provide autonomous energy management to residential

  5. Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agency). 2011. Annual Energy Outlook 2011. Web-accessed atproduction based on Annual Energy Outlook ( AEO) regional

  6. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DECC aggregator managed portfolio automated demand responseaggregator designs their own programs, and offers demand responseaggregator is responsible for designing and implementing their own demand response

  7. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings,Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings",demand response and energy efficiency functions into the design of buildings,

  8. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  9. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparative Evaluation of Ventilation Systems. ” ASHRAEChimneys for Residential Ventilation. ” AIVC 25 Conference.1995. “Controlled Ventilation Options for Builders. ” Energy

  10. Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    bbrpscdemopresentation061814.pdf More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Presentation: Better Buildings...

  11. Residential Clothes Dryers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dryerappendixdv1.1.xlsx More Documents & Publications Illuminated Exit Signs Beverage Vending Machines Residential Clothes Dryer (Appendix D2...

  12. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Brandon J [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  13. Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated and by the California Energy Commission under Pier Contract 500-08-061. Key terms: residential, ventilation.C. and C.P. Wray. 2013. Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning

  14. Humidity Implications for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL-62182 Humidity Implications for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements Iain S. Walker for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements ABSTRACT In 2003 ASHRAE approved the nation's first residential ventilation standard, ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Because meeting this standard can significantly change

  15. Children in Residential Care: A wicked problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Children in Residential Care: A wicked problem? Mary McKenna Flinders Law School 29 Nov 11 Mary in residential care · At what level of the system should changes occur? · Numbers in residential care in SA-discovery of child abuse in 1970s · Legislation & policy changes · Reporting and investigation · Types of abuse #12

  16. Graduate Hall Director Office of Residential Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Page 1 Graduate Hall Director Office of Residential Programs Housing Guidelines #12;Page 2 Graduate Hall Director for Residential Programs Guidelines for Residence This document is intended for the Office of Residential Programs Graduate Hall Directors (GHDs) who obtain housing on campus as part

  17. Siena College Office of Residential Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siena College Office of Residential Life New Student Housing Application Instructions #12;Welcome students who are admitted as "Residential" students. Commuters DO NOT need to complete the application for "Residential Life (My Housing)" is under the "Personal Information" Tab #12;Within the "Personal Information

  18. Residential Life Luggage Program Summer 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Residential Life Luggage Program Summer 2014 International and out-of-state students who should be addressed as follows: Residential Life Luggage Program Physical Plant/CDS University. · Residential Life will not be held responsible for items lost or damaged in handling. We advise against sending

  19. CC: Security, Residential Life Evacuation Assistance Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    CC: Security, Residential Life Evacuation Assistance Form Voluntary Self-Identification If you have will be kept confidential and used only by Environmental Health and Safety, Residential Life (if applicable:_______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ #12;CC: Security, Residential Life If this is a temporary request, please provide a date when

  20. Characterizing Residential Broadband Networks Marcel Dischinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saroiu, Stefan

    Characterizing Residential Broadband Networks Marcel Dischinger MPI for Software Systems mdischin and rapidly growing proportion of users connect to the Internet via residential broadband networks such as Dig- ital Subscriber Lines (DSL) and cable. Residential networks are often the bottleneck in the last mile

  1. Illinois Institute of Technology Housing & Residential Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Illinois Institute of Technology Housing & Residential Services Student Guide to 20102011 Room and Board Contract Cancellation The Housing & Residential Services 20102011 Room and Board, if applicable, within two business days by email. Upon MoveOut, Housing & Residential Services will update

  2. living and learning Department of Residential Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Columbia, University of

    living and learning Accessible housing at Mizzou Department of Residential Life University is important to us. The Department of Residential Life at MU is committed to providing and improving accessible spaces for students with disabilities. Residential Life will help provide appropriate housing

  3. WARREN RESIDENTIAL LIFE RESIDENT ASSISTANT POSITION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    WARREN RESIDENTIAL LIFE RESIDENT ASSISTANT POSITION DESCRIPTION The position of Resident Assistant for students living within the Warren College residential community. Resident Assistant's (RA's) are principle members of the Warren Residential Life staff. In accordance with the University of California's Personnel

  4. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  5. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

  6. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

  7. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

  8. US energy outlook: 1980-1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although US energy demand will continue to grow throughout the 1980s, the rate of growth will be slower than that experienced during the 1970s probably only 1.2%/yr. National energy policy calls for reducing US dependence on foreign oil via more efficient energy utilization, vigorous production of domestic oil and gas, and development of energy forms that supplement or replace oil and gas (coal, nuclear energy, synthetic fuels, shale oil, and renewable resources). Through the 1980s, widespread conservation efforts will continue to be spurred by rising energy prices and by government policies. Natural gas supply will decline despite new Alaskan gas, additional Lower-48 discoveries, higher import levels, and more unconventional sources. This decline reflects the approaching maturity of the large reserves base in the Lower 48 States. SNG from coal will not become a major gas source before 1990. Even with a lower energy-demand growth rate, domestic production will not meet requirements; imports in 1990 will supply 22% of US energy demand, only slightly less than in 1978. Sixty percent of US gas imports will be in the form of LNG.

  9. Energy use and conservation in China`s residential and commercial sectors: Patterns, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the determinants of residential and commercial energy demand, profiles the patterns and problems of energy consumption, and evaluates popular energy conservation measures of the People`s Republic of China. It also discusses technological and institutional opportunities for realizing greater energy conservation. General characteristics related to energy use include: population growth, economic growth, residential and commercial energy, and improved standards of living. Specific end-use areas that are examined in detail are space heating, cooking and water heating, and lighting and appliances.

  10. Update and Outlook for the Fusion Energy Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update and Outlook for the Fusion Energy Sciences Program E.J. Synakowski Associate Director, Office of Science Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting Washington, D.C. December Energy Sciences 3D topologies Samuel Barish, Lead,: Validation Platforms, Stellarators Steve Eckstrand

  11. Viewpoints, Outlook Nov. 22, 2007, 7:35PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

    Viewpoints, Outlook Nov. 22, 2007, 7:35PM $100 oil means it's time for the Sputnik treatment Energy for the world. In a welcome sign, Congress recently handled energy in a refreshingly high-minded way when and population densities were low, we could slide. But we live in an increasingly energy-hungry world

  12. Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Wolfgang

    Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;Contents Our Breaking News 35 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse University of South Australia Mawson Lakes Campus Mawson Lakes SA 5095 Telephone: +61 (08) 8302 3338 Fax: +61 (08) 8302 3386 Web: unisa.edu.au/water

  13. CSUF ECONOMIC OUTLOOK AND FORECASTS MIDYEAR UPDATE -APRIL 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CSUF ECONOMIC OUTLOOK AND FORECASTS MIDYEAR UPDATE - APRIL 2014 Anil Puri, Ph.D. -- Director-year increase in the debt ceiling -- both of which proceeded without the usual drama. Second, the private sector, corporate coffers are flush with cash, and low US energy prices have dramatically improved the global

  14. The 2009 Outlook for Texas Rural Land Values 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinefelter, Danny A.

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    use. When a market is Danny Klinfelter* E-550 3/09 The 2009 Outlook for Texas Rural Land Values Agriculture and the 2008 Credit Crisis in equilibrium, only the top producers would actually earn a profit through superior management, while...

  15. Still Crazy After All These Years: Understanding the Budget Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    1 Still Crazy After All These Years: Understanding the Budget Outlook Alan J. Auerbach, Jason spending enacted since then, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO, 2007b) currently projects a baseline surplus of $586 billion in the unified budget over the next 10 years. Under the baseline, the deficit

  16. The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2040

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    Southeast Asia Latin America Fertility Rate* Children per Woman * Source: World Bank & United Nations OECD Biomass Other Renewables Oil Nuclear Quadrillion BTUs OECD Coal Gas ExxonMobil 2013 Outlook for Energy #12 Nuclear Other Renewables Source: Smil, Energy Transitions (1800-1960) #12;Conclusions ExxonMobil 2013

  17. Scoping Study for Demand Respose DFT II Project in Morgantown, WV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping study describes the underlying data resources and an analysis tool for a demand response assessment specifically tailored toward the needs of the Modern Grid Initiatives Demonstration Field Test in Phase II in Morgantown, WV. To develop demand response strategies as part of more general distribution automation, automated islanding and feeder reconfiguration schemes, an assessment of the demand response resource potential is required. This report provides the data for the resource assessment for residential customers and describes a tool that allows the analyst to estimate demand response in kW for each hour of the day, by end-use, season, day type (weekday versus weekend) with specific saturation rates of residential appliances valid for the Morgantown, WV area.

  18. Energy Demand Staff Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 2007 USChina #12;Overview:Overview: Key Energy Demand DriversKey Energy Demand Drivers · 290 million new urban residents 1990-2007 · 375 million new urban residents 2007

  19. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projectionsis taken from the annual energy outlook (AEO) 2010 (DOE/EIA-

  20. Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

  1. Demand Response In California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

  2. RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS* Max Sherman Nance Matson Energy Performance Berkeley, California The role of ventilation in the housing stock is to provide fresh air and to dilute to provide this ventilation service, either directly for moving the air or indirectly for conditioning

  3. Comparing Residential Furnace Blowers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of air conditioner performance, standby power, as well as igniter and combustion air blower power results in 10% lower air conditioner efficiency. For heating, the advantage of the BPM blower was to assess the performance of residential furnace blowers for both heating, cooling and air distribution

  4. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Reserves Circular. Beijing: MLR, cited in IEA. 2009.Cleaner Coal in China. Paris: IEA. Ghee Peh, Wei Ouyang. (London: WEC Press. IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007.

  5. Controlling electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eikenberry, J.

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, demand control has not been viewed as an energy conservation measure, its intent being to reduce the demand peak to lower the electric bill demand charge by deferring the use of a block of power to another demand interval. Any energy savings were essentially incidental and unintentional, resulting from curtailment of loads that could not be assumed at another time. This article considers a microprocessor-based multiplexed system linked to a minicomputer to control electric power demand in a winery. In addition to delivering an annual return on investment of 55 percent in electric bill savings, the system provides a bonus in the form of alarm and monitoring capability for critical processes.

  6. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the increase in crude oil demand is driven by a burgeoningwith growing share of oil demand. While other sectors havewill reach 66% share of oil demand in 2050 in CIS. This is

  7. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand, bunker fuel (heavy oil) demand will continue to riseFigure 57Figure 58). Demand for heavy oil for ship bunkersElectricity Ethanol Gasoline Heavy Oil Jet Kerosene LPG

  8. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s 2007 primary plastics demand per person by 2025). Inand per capita demand for plastics. For each sub-sector, weof continuing growth of demand for plastics (reaching Japan’

  9. Residential Services Area Missing Students living in University Managed Accommodation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Residential Services Area Missing Students living in University Managed Accommodation 1.0 Where then report to the Building Manager or to the Residential Student Support Team or the Residential Services issues Residential Student Support Manager or the Residential Services Manager should be contacted

  10. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grenzeback, L. R.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Hutson, N.; Lamm, C. R.; Pei, Y. L.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Winebrake, J. J.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Freight transportation demand is projected to grow to 27.5 billion tons in 2040, and to nearly 30.2 billion tons in 2050. This report describes the current and future demand for freight transportation in terms of tons and ton-miles of commodities moved by truck, rail, water, pipeline, and air freight carriers. It outlines the economic, logistics, transportation, and policy and regulatory factors that shape freight demand, the trends and 2050 outlook for these factors, and their anticipated effect on freight demand. After describing federal policy actions that could influence future freight demand, the report then summarizes the capabilities of available analytical models for forecasting freight demand. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  11. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Generation Shares Demand Reduction from EE CIS Emissions Powercoal and electricity in demand sectors, and the decarbonization of the power sector. Under AIS, annual emissions

  12. Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency Standards for the U.S. Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D O E . 1996a. Annual Energy Outlook 1996, with ProjectionsELA) 1996 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (US D O E 1996a).1055.1 Joules. The Annual Energy Outlook (1996) forecast for

  13. Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration (2006). Annual Energy Outlook 2006. U.S.and projections in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2006. 4 Theseforecast by EIA in its Annual Energy Outlook 2006, as EIA’s

  14. Realized and prospective impacts of U.S. energy efficiency standards for residential appliances: 2004 update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen; McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration (2004). Annual Energy Outlook 2004. U.S.EIA’s projection in Annual Energy Outlook 2004 shows pricesprojections in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004. These data

  15. Realized and projected impacts of U.S. federal efficiency standards for residential appliances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen; McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael; Liu, Xiaomin

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration (2001b). Annual Energy Outlook 2002, U.S.Administration (2001). Annual Energy Outlook 2002, U.S.Energy Review and Annual Energy Outlook. These data yield an

  16. Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

  17. The outlook for US oil dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

    1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  18. Do Photovoltaic Energy Systems Effect Residential Selling Prices? Results from a California Statewide Investigation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS AFFECT RESIDENTIAL SELLING PRICES?PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS AFFECT RESIDENTIAL SELLING PRICES?

  19. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential electricity consumption include disaggregationfor annual residential electricity consumption through 2050.Saturation and unit electricity consumption are projected

  20. Air Flow Distribution in a Mechanically-Ventilated High-Rise Residential Building* Richard C. Diamond and Helmut E. Feustel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    energy efficiency in public housing as part of a utility's Demand Side Management (DSM) Program of the supply ventilation register for each corridor. The building is exposed on all sides to the windAir Flow Distribution in a Mechanically-Ventilated High-Rise Residential Building* Richard C