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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation section in the U.S. Department section in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;ppaappeerr ttoo bbeeLBNL-292E Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards

2

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japan Long-Term Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering EnergyResidential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook tol i f o r n i a Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook toParticularly in Japan’s residential sector, where energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

5

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

6

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

7

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

8

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

9

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

10

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030 under EnvironmentalEnergy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy EfficiencyEnergy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

12

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

13

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"  

SciTech Connect

As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity and Natural Gas Demand in Japanese ResidentialWater Heating Natural Gas Demand Mtoe Actual Projection Mtoe

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japan’s population, an important factor in predicting residential energy demand as well

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

step is to calculate energy service demand in each category,mainly determine the energy service demand while pricesthe energy source. In both energy service demand and energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibitfrom 44% in 2006. In electricity demand, its usage in plugRuns, Average Value) Electricity Demand Power/Electricity

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Residential Sector Demand Module 1999, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the fifth edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It reflects changes made to themodule over the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999.

John H. Cymbalsky

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

22

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

23

Residential Sector Demand Module 1995, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This updated version of the NEMS Residential Module Documentation includes changesmade to the residential module for the production of the Annual Energy Outlook 1995.

John H. Cymbalsky

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Residential Sector Demand Module 1998, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the fourth edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It reflects changes made to themodule over the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. Since last year, severalnew end-use services were added to the module, including: Clothes washers,dishwashers, furnace fans, color televisions, and personal computers. Also, as with allNEMS modules, the forecast horizon has been extended to the year 2020.

John H. Cymbalsky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energymillion Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energyconsumption, future outlook, end-use, bottom-up analysis

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Residential Sector Demand Module 1997, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the third edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System. It reflects changes made to the moduleover the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997. Since last year, a subroutinewas added to the model which allows technology and fuel switching when space heaters,heat pump air conditioners, water heaters, stoves, and clothes dryers are retired in bothpre-1994 and post-1993 single-family homes. Also, a time-dependant function forcomputing the installed capital cost of equipment in new construction and the retail costof replacement equipment in existing housing was added.

John H. Cymbalsky

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and clothes drying. In addition to the major equipment-driven and clothes drying. In addition to the major equipment-driven end-uses, the average energy consumption per household is projected for other electric and nonelectric Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 19 Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Figure 5. United States Census Divisions Source:Energy Information Administration,Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

28

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

29

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills 1

30

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - How2008). The Boom of Electricity Demand in the residential2005). Forecasting Electricity Demand in Developing

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook Ashuckian, Manager Electricity Analysis Office Terrence O'Brien, Deputy Director Systems Assessment

32

Residential Sector Demand Module 2000, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Residential Sector Demand Module 2004, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Residential Sector Demand Module 2001, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Residential Sector Demand Module 2002, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Residential Sector Demand Module 2005, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Residential Sector Demand Module 2003, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Residential Sector Demand Module 2008, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Residential Sector Demand Module 2006, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Residential Sector Demand Module 2009, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Residential Sector Demand Module 2007, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

Impact of improved building thermal efficiency on residential energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The impact of improved building shell thermal efficiency on residential energy demand is explored in a theoretical framework. The important economic literature on estimating the price elasticity of residential energy demand is reviewed. The specification of the residential energy demand model is presented. The data used are described. The empirical estimation of the residential energy demand model is described. (MHR)

Adams, R.C.; Rockwood, A.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

44

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

45

Residential sector: the demand for energy services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to project the demand for residential services, and, thereby, the demand for energy into the future. The service demands which best represent a complete breakdown of residential energy consumption is identified and estimates of the amount of energy, by fuel type, used to satisfy each service demand for an initial base year (1978) are detailed. These estimates are reported for both gross (or input) energy use and net or useful energy use, in the residential sector. The various factors which affect the consumption level for each type of energy and each identified service demand are discussed. These factors include number of households, appliance penetration, choice of fuel type, technical conversion efficiency of energy using devices, and relative energy efficiency of the building shell (extent of insulation, resistance to air infiltration, etc.). These factors are discussed relative to both the present and expected future values, for the purpose of projections. The importance of the housing stock to service demand estimation and projection and trends in housing in Illinois are discussed. How the housing stock is projected based on population and household projections is explained. The housing projections to the year 2000 are detailed. The projections of energy consumption by service demand and fuel type are contrasted with the various energy demand projections in Illinois Energy Consumption Trends: 1960 to 2000 and explains how and why the two approaches differ. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

47

Residential demand response using reinforcement learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — We present a novel energy management system for residential demand response. The algorithm, named CAES, reduces residential energy costs and smooths energy usage. CAES is an online learning application that implicitly estimates the impact of future energy prices and of consumer decisions on long term costs and schedules residential device usage. CAES models both energy prices and residential device usage as Markov, but does not assume knowledge of the structure or transition probabilities of these Markov chains. CAES learns continuously and adapts to individual consumer preferences and pricing modifications over time. In numerical simulations CAES reduced average end-user financial costs from 16 % to 40 % with respect to a price-unaware energy allocation. I.

Marco Levorato; Andrea Goldsmith; Urbashi Mitra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

Information Center

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

Information Center

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

50

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995 by Tancred Lidderdale* Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gaso- line in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. Refor- mulated motor gasoline is expected to constitute about one-third of total motor gasoline demand in 1995, and refiners will have to change plant opera- tions and modify equipment in order to meet the higher demand. The costs incurred are expected to create a wholesale price premium for reformu- lated motor gasoline of up to 4.0 cents per gallon over the price of conventional motor gasoline. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining

51

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

52

Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand and Price Outlook for Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 Tancred Lidderdale and Aileen Bohn (1) Contents * Summary * Introduction * Reformulated Gasoline Demand * Oxygenate Demand * Logistics o Interstate Movements and Storage o Local Distribution o Phase 2 RFG Logistics o Possible Opt-Ins to the RFG Program o State Low Sulfur, Low RVP Gasoline Initiatives o NAAQS o Tier 2 Gasoline * RFG Production Options o Toxic Air Pollutants (TAP) Reduction o Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Reduction o Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Reduction o Summary of RFG Production Options * Costs of Reformulated Gasoline o Phase 1 RFG Price Premium o California Clean Gasoline Price Premium o Phase 2 RFG Price Premium o Reduced Fuel Economy

53

Residential Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2013 November 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis ...

54

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand for renewable fuels increasing the fastestincluding E85 and biodiesel fuels for light-duty vehicles, biomass for co-firing at coal-fired electric power plants, and...

55

Projecting market demand for residential heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

Primarily because of technological improvements and sharp increases in energy prices after the 1970s energy crises, the sale of residential electric heat pumps rose ninefold from 1970 to 1983. This report describes current and future market demand for heat pumps used for space heating and cooling. A three-step approach was followed. In the first step, the historical growth of residential electric heat pumps was analyzed, and factors that may have affected market growth were examined. Also examined were installation trends of heat pumps in new single-family and multifamily homes. A market segmentation analysis was used to estimate market size by categories. In the second step, several methods for forecasting future market demand were reviewed and evaluated to select the most suitable one for this study. The discrete-choice approach was chosen. In the third step, a market penetration model based on selected discrete-choice methods was developed to project heat pump demand in key market segments such as home type (single-family or multifamily), new or existing construction, and race-ethnic origin of household (black, Hispanic, or white).

Teotia, A.P.S.; Raju, P.S.; Karvelas, D.; Anderson, J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

57

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

58

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

59

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

60

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

62

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

63

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

64

Outlook for US lube oil supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the domestic demand for automotive and industrial lubricants to the year 2000 and evaluates the ability of U.S. refiners to meet the associated demand for base stocks. Changes in the supply/demand picture over the past several years are also reviewed. In the late 1970's, lube base stocks had been in short supply as healthy increases in demand pushed U.S. refiners to near maximum operating levels. Imports were increased to what were then record high levels and exports were reduced. This situation began to reverse itself in mid-1980 as marketers began to feel the impact of recession here and abroad. U.S. base stock consumption has since declined dramatically, to a level in 1982 estimated to be 17.5% below that of 1979's peak. In the meantime, refiners had added another 7.0 MB/CD to manufacturing capacity. 1982 lube plant operations are estimated to have dropped as low as 62% of nameplate capacity. The outlook for recovery is conservative. Due to continued depressed demand in certain market segments, 1983's increase in base oil demand is projected to be held to only 2%. Gains in 1984 and 1985 will be more robust, in the area of 6% per year. Thereafter, the overall rate of growth will drop to under 1% per year. The outlooks for automotive and industrial lubricants demand are summarized. Due to a forecast of greater relative growth in synthetic and water-based lubricants, base stock consumption is forecast to increase at a slower pace than that of the total finished lubricants volume.

Brecht, F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past Trend and Future Outlook",LBNL forthcoming. de la Rue2006. “Building up India: Outlook for India’s real estate”,2006a. “World Energy Outlook”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand Natural Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Natural Gas Demand Figure 72. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 73. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Fastest Increase in Natural Gas Use Is Expected for the Buildings Sectors In the reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 21.7 trillion cubic feet in 2006 to a peak value of 23.8 trillion cubic feet in 2016, followed by a decline to 22.7 trillion cubic feet in 2030. The natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 22 percent in 2006

67

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

68

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project...

69

Model Documentation Report: Residential Demand Module of the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

rebates used in demand-side management programs), can be modified at the equipment level. Housing ... Residential retired equipment efficiencies of 2005 stock

70

Analysis of Distribution Level Residential Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

Control of end use loads has existed in the form of direct load control for decades. Direct load control systems allow a utility to interrupt power to a medium to large size commercial or industrial customer a set number of times a year. With the current proliferation of computing resources and communications systems the ability to extend the direct load control systems now exists. Demand response systems now have the ability to not only engage commercial and industrial customers, but also the individual residential customers. Additionally, the ability exists to have automated control systems which operate on a continual basis instead of the traditional load control systems which could only be operated a set number of times a year. These emerging demand response systems have the capability to engage a larger portion of the end use load and do so in a more controlled manner. This paper will examine the impact that demand response systems have on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers

72

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comleted Copy in PDF Format Comleted Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO 2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The

75

Assessment of Residential Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a description of what a residential energy management system comprises, with a focus on demand response applications. It includes findings from a survey of residential energy management system technology vendors; system pricing and availability; an overview of technology components and features; customer load monitoring and control capabilities; utility demand response control functions; communications protocols and technologies supported; and options for demand response si...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

76

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

77

The residential demand for electricity in New England,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The residential demand for electricity, studied on the national level for many years, is here investigated on the regional level. A survey of the literature is first presented outlining past econometric work in the field ...

Levy, Paul F.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform - REDRAMP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project description * Subdivision energy efficiency features * Home energy monitoring * Demand side management * Feeder loading * Battery Energy Storage System * Future Work Team Members Project Objective and Methodology * The main objective is to reduce peak power demand of a housing subdivision by 65% (compared to housing development that is built to conventional code). * This objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side Management - Battery Energy Storage System Project schematic Diagram Project Physical Location: Las Vegas, NV Red Rock Hotel/Casino

79

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the utility. The electricity rates were generated basedat the different electricity rates and the user’s discomfortrates. Demand response measures have the effect of adding elasticity to the electricity

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A residential energy demand system for Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharp price fluctuations and increasing environmental and distributional concerns, among other issues, have led to a renewed academic interest in energy demand. In this paper we estimate, for the first time in Spain, an ...

Labandeira Villot, Xavier

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the utility. The electricity rates were generated basedat the different electricity rates and the user’s discomfortrates. Demand response measures have the effect of adding elasticity to the electricity

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Title Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-2322E Year of Publication 2009 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 06/2009 Keywords Air Conditioners, Appliance Efficiency, appliance energy efficiency, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, india, Labels, MEPS, refrigerators, Standards and labeling URL https://isswprod.lbl.gov/library/view-docs/public/output/rpt77250.PDF Refereed Designation Unknown Attachment Size

83

Modeling the residential demand for energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand for energy is derived from the demand for services that appliances and energy together provide. This raises a number of serious econometric issues when estimating energy-demand functions: delineation of short-run and long-run household responses, specification of the price variable and in particular, the assumption that the model is recursive, or in other words, that the appliance choice equation and the energy consumption equation are uncorrelated. The dissertation utilizes a structural model of energy use whose theoretical underpinnings derive from the conditional logit model and an extension of that model to the joint-discrete/continuous case by Dubin and McFadden (1980). It uses the 1978 to 1979 National Interim Energy Comsumption Survey. Three appliance portfolio choices are analyzed; choice of water and space heating and central air-conditioning; choice of room air conditioners; and choice of clothes dryers, either as multinomial logit or binary probit choices. Results varied widely across the appliance choice considered; use of Hausman's test led to acceptance of the null hypothesis of orthogonality in some cases but not in others. Demand for electricity and natural gas tended to be price inelastic; however, estimated own-price effects differed considerably when disaggregated by appliance categories and across methods of estimation.

Kirby, S.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - HowThe Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector instraightforward. Electricity demand per end use and region

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Control Mechanisms for Residential Electricity Demand in SmartGrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Mechanisms for Residential Electricity Demand in SmartGrids Shalinee Kishore Department of the emerging SmartGrid, use both prices and user preferences to control power usage across the home. We first, accounts for the potential for electricity capacity constraints. I. INTRODUCTION The emerging SmartGrid

Snyder, Larry

86

Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

Hartman, Raymond Steve

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure RDM incorporates the effects of four broadly-defined determinants of energy consumption: economic and demographic effects, structural effects, technology turnover and advancement effects, and energy market effects. Economic and demographic effects include the number, dwelling type (single-family, multi-family or mobile homes), occupants per household, and location of housing units. Structural effects include increasing average dwelling size and changes in the mix of desired end-use services provided by energy (new end uses and/or increasing penetration of current end uses, such as the increasing popularity of electronic equipment and computers). Technology effects include changes in the stock of installed equipment caused by normal turnover of old, worn out equipment with newer versions which tend to be more energy efficient, the integrated effects of equipment and building shell (insulation level) in new construction, and in the projected availability of even more energy-efficient equipment in the future. Energy market effects include the short-run effects of energy prices on energy demands, the longer-run effects of energy prices on the efficiency of purchased equipment and the efficiency of building shells, and limitations on minimum levels of efficiency imposed by legislated efficiency standards.

89

Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 (Released in the STEO August 1999)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article presents projections of demand and the market price premium for Phase 2 RFG in the year 2000. The projections in this article are based on forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook, which is published monthly by the Energy Information Administration.

Information Center

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Industrial Demand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial.gif (5205 bytes) The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing...

91

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated

92

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 2 - Liquid Fuels World liquids consumption in the IEO2009 reference case increases from 85 million barrels per day in 2006 to 107 million barrels per day in 2030. Unconventional liquids, at 13.4 million barrels per day, make up 12.6 percent of total liquids production in 2030. Figure 25. World Liquids Consumption by Region and Country Group, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 26. World Liquids Supply in Three Cases, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2006-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

93

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

94

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

95

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

SciTech Connect

The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

96

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Release date: June 2008 Next release date: March 2009 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Petroleum Market Module

97

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

98

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

99

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The energy-intensive industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow accounting procedure, whereas the nonenergy-intensive and the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 14). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data.

100

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

SciTech Connect

Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

103

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

104

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

105

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5318 bytes) transportation.gif (5318 bytes) The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

106

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook”. January 2007. LBNL-India: Past Trend and Future Outlook Stephane de la Rue duSectoral Trends and Future Outlook (Zhou et al. , 2007)

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

108

The behavioral response to voluntary provision of an environmental public good: Evidence from residential electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity demand Grant D. Jacobsen a,n , Matthew J. Kotchen b,c , Michael P. Vandenbergh d online 25 February 2012 JEL classification: H41 Q42 G54 Keywords: Green electricity Voluntary environmental protection Carbon offset Renewable energy Moral licensing Residential electricity demand a b s t r

Kotchen, Matthew J.

109

U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007-R-3 Water is an essential resource in the U.S. economy. It plays a crucial role in supporting many economic activities and ensuring the quality of human life and the health of ecological systems. Despite this, the value of water may not be widely appreciated because only some water resources and water uses are easily visible or noticed while others are not. Among the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) Future Directions program activities are the identification of emerging water challenges and opportunities and the tactical engagement of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) senior leaders on these issues. Such critical thinking is an essential prerequisite to strategy development and planning. IWR has developed this series of Water Resources Outlook papers, commissioned utilizing outside experts, to identify emerging issues and implications for the Nation. These issues and implications will be presented in the form of “provocation sessions ” with external and internal subject matter experts and stakeholders and will inform the USACE strategic planning process. U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook Given the overall importance of water, the long-term adequacy of water supply is a major national concern. This first in a series of Water Resources Outlook papers reviews future trends

Jack C. Kiefer, Ph.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook EIA Glossary Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0554(2004) Release date: February 2004 Next release date:February 2005 The Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook. Table of Contents Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Household Expenditures Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module Appendix A Adobe Acrobat Logo

111

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Petroleum Market Module

112

Propane demand modeling for residential sectors- A regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a forecasting model for the propane consumption within the residential sector. In this research we explore the dynamic behavior of different variables… (more)

Shenoy, Nitin K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 Figure 10. Residential Primary Energy Use in 2000 and3. Fuel Consumption in the Residential Sector in 2005 in10 Table 6. Residential Activity

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

SciTech Connect

The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

ANN-based residential water end-use demand forecasting model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom-up urban water demand forecasting based on empirical data for individual water end uses or micro-components (e.g., toilet, shower, etc.) for different households of varying characteristics is undoubtedly superior to top-down estimates originating ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Residential water demand forecasting, Water demand management, Water end use, Water micro-component

Christopher Bennett; Rodney A. Stewart; Cara D. Beal

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Residential energy demand modeling and the NIECS data base : an evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate the 1978-79 National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS) data base in terms of its usefulness for estimating residential energy demand models based on household appliance ...

Cowing, Thomas G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Secondary residential demand trends in contemporary Japan and North Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research paper attempts to address the opportunity and challenges for Vacation Residential Development in North Asia, with specific geographic focus on Japan first through an analysis of national and regional consumption, ...

Lam, Michael M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2010 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions Download the Report Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Report Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

119

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2009 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions

120

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexico’s energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexico’s crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexico’s electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario – investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario – analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martínez; Autónoma México; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martínez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Communication Modularity: A Practical Approach to Enabling Residential Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important part of the smart grid vision is enabling communication-connectedness with residential devices so that they can be informed of grid conditions, including energy price, critical peaks, and other curtailment events. Communicating with intelligent devices, rather than cutting their power with a remotely managed switch, provides more flexibility for consumers and allows manufacturers to innovate, discovering creative ways to maximize energy savings while minimizing user inconvenience. This white...

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

2012 SG Peer Review - Dramatic Residential Demand Reduction in...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2. Include PV on the residences. FY08 - FY13 (now FY15) 6948k 3. Develop a demand control system that gives the customer options and that is enhanced by an artificial...

125

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This reference document provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. The NEMS Residential Sector Demand Module is currently used for mid-term forecasting purposes and energy policy analysis over the forecast horizon of 1993 through 2020. The model generates forecasts of energy demand for the residential sector by service, fuel, and Census Division. Policy impacts resulting from new technologies, market incentives, and regulatory changes can be estimated using the module. 26 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Econometric analysis of residential demand for fuelwood in the United States, 1980-1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an econometric study of residential fuelwood demand in the United States. It is based on a residential energy consumption survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy in 1980-1981. Estimates are derived of the probability that a particular household will burn wood and of the wood that will be burned. Aggregate fuelwood demand is predicted for five census regions and for the contiguous United States. The predicted average probability of burning wood is 0.32, and the average predicted quantity burned is 1.57 cords. Residential fuelwood demand is found to be quite responsive to changes in the price of nonwood heating fuel. 16 references.

Hardie, I.W.; Hanssan, A.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 27 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing

128

Residential electricity demand: a suggested appliance stock equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author develops a simple appliance stock equation for estimating seasonal patterns of power demand elasticity. The equation relates an index of appliances (estimates of typical use) to marginal price per kWh, to income, to average price of alternative fuels, to climate (cooling degree days and heating degree days), to age of the household head, to family size, and to race. Price elasticity is -0.785 for the winter and 0.493 for the summer, with all estimates significant to 0.001. The appliance stock coefficient is 0.801 for the winter and 0.971 for the summer. The equation may be useful in studies that do not require elaborate disaggregation of appliance stock. 7 references, 2 tables.

Garbacz, C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in residential space conditioning are affected byinto space heating, air conditioning, appliances, cookingSpace heating North Transition Ordinary efficient Highly efficient Incandescent Florescent CFL Air conditioning

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

National micro-data based model of residential electricity demand: new evidence on seasonal variation  

SciTech Connect

Building on earlier estimates of electricity demand, the author estimates elasticities by month to determine differences between heating and cooling seasons. He develops a three equation model of residential electricity demand that includes all the main components of economic theory. The model generates seasonal elasticity estimates that generally support economic theory. Based on the model using a national current household data set (monthly division), the evidence indicates there is a seasonal pattern for price elasticity of demand. While less pronounced, there also appears to be seasonal patterns for cross-price elasticity of alternative fuels, for the elasticity of appliance stock index, and for an intensity of use variable.

Garbacz, C.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook Title Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook Publication Type...

132

The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence of residential solar water heating on electric utility demand. The electric demand of solar water hears was found to be approximately 0.39 kW lass than conventional electric water heaters during the late late afternoon, early evening period in the summer months when the Austin utility experiences its peak demand. The annual load factor would be only very slightly reduced if there were a major penetration of solar water heaters in the all electric housing sector. Thus solar water heating represents beneficial load management for utilities experiencing summer peaks.

Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2013 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the full report. The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) focus on the factors that shape the

134

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Release Date: June 25, 2012 | Next Early Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2012) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2012 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete June 2012 published report. Executive summary The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) focus on the factors that shape the

135

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2013 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the full report. The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) focus on the factors that shape the

136

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of incentives for residential energy-conservation. Eval.CEC). (2001). Residential Alternative Calculation Method (2004). California Statewide Residential Appliance Saturation

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New challenges of Japanese energy efficiency program by Topto 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards “Top-Runnerof Energy for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economy, demography and energy prices, which implies thatgrowth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the futuredemand is determined by energy price indicators, taking into

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for energy-consuming appliances, called the “Top-Runnercooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensivelyof electric and other appliances, it is important to

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Impact of Residential Air Conditioner Charging and Sizing on Peak Electrical Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities have had a number of air conditioner rebate and maintenance programs for many years. The purpose of these programs was to improve the efficiency of the stock of air conditioning equipment and provide better demand-side management. This paper examines the effect of refrigerant charging (proper servicing of the equipment), system sizing, and efficiency on the steady-state, coincident peak utility demand of a residential central air conditioning system. The study is based on the results of laboratory tests of a three-ton, capillary tube expansion, split-system air conditioner, system capacity and efficiency data available from manufacturer's literature, and assumptions about relative sizing of the equipment to cooling load on a residence. A qualitative discussion is provided concerning the possible impacts of transient operation and total energy use on utility program decisions. The analysis indicates that proper sizing of the unit is the largest factor affecting energy demand of the three factors (sizing, charging, and efficiency) studied in this paper. For typical oversizing of units to cooling loads in houses, both overcharging and undercharging showed significant negative impact on peak demand. The impacts of SEER changes in utility peak demand were found to be virtually independent of oversizing. For properly sized units, there was a small peak benefit to higher efficiency air conditioners.

Neal, L.; O'Neal, D. L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Description of the global petroleum supply and demand outlook updated for the 1993 edition of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand, December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategic planning of the research and development program carried out by Gas Research Institute (GRI) is supported by an annual GRI baseline projection of U.S. energy supply and demand. Because petroleum products compete in a wide variety of energy uses, oil prices serve as a market clearing force for the entire energy system. A significant portion of the U.S. petroleum supply is imported, and the price of crude oil to U.S. refiners is determined by the international oil trade. Any projection of the U.S. energy situation, therefore, requires the evaluation of the global oil market and the impact of oil price changes on the supply/demand balances of market participants. The 1992 edition of the projection completed in August 1991 assumed that in the aftermath of the war in the Middle East the fundamentals of oil trade would reassert their influence. This did indeed occur and with astonishing speed. In the face of this outlook, GRI has revised its 1993 oil price track downward.

Dreyfus, D.A.; Koklauner, A.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ORNL Residential Reference House Energy Demand model (ORNL-RRHED). Volume 4. Case studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the use and structure of the ORNL Residential Reference House Energy Demand Model (RRHED). RRHED is a computer-based engineering-economic end-use simulation model which forecasts energy demand based on a detailed evaluation of how households use energy for particular appliances. The report is organized into four volumes. The first volume provides an overview of the modeling approach and gives a short summary of the material presented in the other three volumes. The second volume is a user reference guide which provides the details necessary for users of the model to run the code and make changes to fit their particular application. Volume 3 presents the basic theoretical rationale for the RRHED model structure. The last volume reports on the application of the model to the analysis of two different kinds of issues: one is the examination of conservation policy impacts and the other is the forecasting of electricity demand in a need for power assessment. The report has two major objectives. The first is to provide a reader with little background in end-use modeling with an introduction to how the RRHED model works. The second is to provide the details needed by a user of the model to understand not only the theory behind the model specification, but also the structure of the code. This information will allow for the modification of subroutines to fit particular applications.

Hamblin, D.M.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Maddigan, R.J.; Forman, C.W. Jr.; Bibo, L.J.; McKeehan, K.M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Natural Gas Winter Outlook 2000-2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is based on the Winter Fuels Outlook published in the 4th Quarter Short-Term Energy Outlook and discusses the supply and demand outlook from October 2000 through March 2001.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents an interactive on-line package for calculation of energy and cost demands for residential infiltration and ventilation, with input and output data entry through a web browser. This is a unique tool. It represents a new kind of approach to developing software employing user (client) and server (package provider) computers. The main program, servicing {open_quotes}intelligent{close_quotes} CGI (Common Gateway Interface) calls, resides on the server and dynamically handles the whole package performance and the procedure of calculations. The {open_quotes}computing engine{close_quotes} consists of two parts: RESVENT - the previously existing program for ventilation calculations and ECONOMICS - for heating and cooling system energy and cost calculations. The user interface is designed in such a way, that it allows simultaneous access by many users from all over the world.

Forowicz, T.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global LNG Trade  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is adapted from testimony by Jay Hakes, Administrator of the Energy Information Administration, before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on July 23, 1997. The hearing focused on the examination of certain aspects of natural gas into the next century with special emphasis on world natural gas supply and demand to 2015.

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: April 26, 2011 | Next Early Release Date: January 23, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2011) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Changes from Previous AEO Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2011 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete April 2011 published report. Changes from previous AEO2010 Significant update of the technically recoverable U.S. shale gas

149

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: April 26, 2011 | Next Early Release Date: January 23, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2011) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Changes from Previous AEO Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2011 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete April 2011 published report. Changes from previous AEO2010 Significant update of the technically recoverable U.S. shale gas

150

Patterns of residential energy demand by type of household: white, black, Hispanic, and low- and nonlow-income  

SciTech Connect

This report compares patterns of residential energy use by white, black, Hispanic, low-income, and nonlow-income households. The observed downward trend in residential energy demand over the period of this study can be attributed primarily to changes in space-heating energy demand. Demand for space-heating energy has experienced a greater decline than energy demand for other end uses for two reasons: (1) it is the largest end use of residential energy, causing public attention to focus on it and on strategies for conserving it; and (2) space-heating expenditures are large relative to other residential energy expenditures. The price elasticity of demand is thus greater, due to the income effect. The relative demand for space-heating energy, when controlled for the effect of climate, declined significantly over the 1978-1982 period for all fuels studied. Income classes do not differ significantly. In contrast, black households were found to use more energy for space heating than white households were found to use, although those observed differences are statistically significant only for houses heated with natural gas. As expected, the average expenditure for space-heating energy increased significantly for dwellings heated by natural gas and fuel oil. No statistically significant increases were found in electricity expenditures for space heating. Electric space heat is, in general, confined to milder regions of the country, where space heating is relatively less essential. As a consequence, we would expect the electricity demand for space heating to be more price-elastic than the demand for other fuels.

Klein, Y.; Anderson, J.; Kaganove, J.; Throgmorton, J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption

152

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption

153

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in daily household energy consumption. Proceedings of thefeedback into energy consumption. Oxford: Environmentalin Residential Energy Consumption. Proceedings of the 2008

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A presentation to the National Association of State Energy Officials 2005 Energy Outlook Conference, in Washington, DC, on February 17, 2005, giving EIA's outlook for petroleum and natural gas supply, demand, and prices.

Information Center

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006. fromEngaging our Customers in Demand Response. Retrieved OctoberAdvanced Metering and Demand Response in Electricity

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Annual Energy Outlook Report | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Outlook Report Jump to: navigation, search Topics in AEO 2011 Energy Sources OilLiquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity RenewableAlternative Nuclear Sectors Residential...

157

Responsiveness of residential electricity demand to changes in price, information, and policy .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study analyzes consumers' behavioral responsiveness to changes in price and policy regarding residential electricity consumption, using a hybrid method of econometric analyses and energy… (more)

Baek, Youngsun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statewide Residential Appliance Saturation Study ( No. 300-Energy. (2005). Estimating Appliance and Home Electronicconsumer/your_home/appliances/index.cfm/mytopic Energy

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

160

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discount Rates Residential electricity rates are much lowerrates in India. Residential electricity rates are subsidizedand electricity rates between commercial and residential

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Contacts Specific questions about the information in this report may be directed to: Introduction Paul D. Holtberg 202/586-1284 Macroeconomic Activity Module Ronald F. Earley Yvonne Taylor 202/586-1398 202/586-1398 International Energy Module G. Daniel Butler 202/586-9503 Household Expenditures Module/ Residential Demand Module John H. Cymbalsky 202/586-4815 Commercial Demand Module Erin E. Boedecker 202/586-4791 Industrial Demand Module T. Crawford Honeycutt 202/586-1420 Transportation Demand Module John D. Maples 202/586-1757 Electricity Market Module Laura Martin 202/586-1494 Oil and Gas Supply Module/Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Joseph Benneche 202/586-6132 Petroleum Market Module Bill Brown 202/586-8181

164

WOPR Seminar Series Responsiveness of Residential Electricity Demand to Changes in Price and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy policy makers and scholars have sought to understand behavioral patterns of the residential energy consumers so as to design effective policies. Along the guideline of the literature, this study probes how consumers respond to changes in energy price in the short run with individual household survey data and analyzes how the consumers ’ behavioral attributes and

Youngsun Baek

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Demand-side Management Strategies and the Residential Sector: Lessons from International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in producing a given level of output or activity. It is measured by the quantity of energy required to perform a particular activity (service) expressed as energy per unit of output or activity measure of service (EERE, 2010). In the residential sector...

Haney, Aoife Brophy; Jamasb, Tooraj; Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

166

GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

167

Engineering Methods for Estimating the Impacts of Demand-Side Management Programs: Volume 1: Fundamentals of Engineering Simulations for Residential and Commercial End Uses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook focuses on the use of building energy computer simulations for planning and evaluating demand-side management (DSM) measures. It presents techniques for estimating energy and demand savings for a list of common residential and commercial DSM technologies using widely available public-domain and EPRI computer programs.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to inform people of their energy usage. We tested the systemcertain quality and energy usage standards of variousprice and household energy usage to enable demand response

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Impact of Elasticity in Domestic Appliances on Aggregate Residential Power Demands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Power grids in today's developed societies are designed to meet consumer demands in a highly reliable manner. In order to guarantee reliability to consumers, the… (more)

Srikantha, Pirathayini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Interim Data Changes in the Short-term Energy Outlook Data Systems Related to Electric Power Sector and Natural Gas Demand Data Revisions (Released in the STEO December 2002)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Beginning with the December 2002 issue of EIAs Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO),electricity generation and related fuel consumption totals will be presented on a basis that isconsistent with the definitions and aggregates used in the 2001 edition of EIAs Annual EnergyReview (AER). Particularly affected by these changes are the demand and balancing itemtotals for natural

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Outlook For NY Energy Forum October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Agenda * Winter Fuels Outlook * Drilling Productivity Report * Geopolitical...

174

Residential demand for natural gas by black and nonblack households in the Midwest  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comparative analysis of natural gas demand by black and nonblack households in the Midwest census region. Historically, such comparative analyses have been grounded in comparisons of the share of income spent for energy (see Newman and Day, 1975; Grier, 1979; and Brazzel and Hunter, 1979). Because of theoretical flaws associated with this approach, our analysis is couched within a complete demand system (see Morrissey, 1984) in which certain restrictions required by consumer demand theory are imposed on our energy demand system. This approach should provide more precise measurement of the relative nature of natural gas demand. Philips (1983), Deaton and Muellbauer (1980), and Theil (1980), along with Morrissev, provide fine discussions of the complete demand system. Our working hypothesis is that the structural demand relationship for natural gas is different for black and nonblack households and that this difference reflects the greater vulnerability of blacks to rising prices of natural gas. Because of deficient economic resources and a long legacy of institutional constraints such as financial red-lining and housing discrimination, as well as lingering behavioral characteristics, it remains difficult for blacks to move out of energy-inefficient housing. This, in turn, corresponds directly to a larger energy demand burden for blacks in the Midwest. This paper is organized into four sections. The first section provides the historical background upon which our analysis is based. The second section is a discussion of our demand model. Our empirical results are described in the third section. In the fourth and final section, our conclusions and suggestions for future research are presented. 18 refs., 7 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Johnson, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts -- final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes findings from a unique project to improve the end-use electricity load shape and peak demand forecasts made by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). First, the direct incorporation of end-use metered data into electricity demand forecasting models is a new approach that has only been made possible by recent end-use metering projects. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the joint-sponsorship of this analysis has led to the development of consistent sets of forecasting model inputs. That is, the ability to use a common data base and similar data treatment conventions for some of the forecasting inputs frees forecasters to concentrate on those differences (between their competing forecasts) that stem from real differences of opinion, rather than differences that can be readily resolved with better data. The focus of the analysis is residential space cooling, which represents a large and growing demand in the PG&E service territory. Using five years of end-use metered, central air conditioner data collected by PG&E from over 300 residences, we developed consistent sets of new inputs for both PG&E`s and CEC`s end-use load shape forecasting models. We compared the performance of the new inputs both to the inputs previously used by PG&E and CEC, and to a second set of new inputs developed to take advantage of a recently added modeling option to the forecasting model. The testing criteria included ability to forecast total daily energy use, daily peak demand, and demand at 4 P.M. (the most frequent hour of PG&E`s system peak demand). We also tested the new inputs with the weather data used by PG&E and CEC in preparing their forecasts.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in use patterns and electricity rates between commercial andRates Residential electricity rates are much lower thanin India. Residential electricity rates are subsidized to a

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Evaluation of government and utility companies' programs toward demarketing residential energy demands  

SciTech Connect

The assessment of whether existing financial incentives are effective in promoting residential energy conservation is of concern to government and utility companies. This study focused upon low income homeowners to determine their level of awareness and participation in existing incentive programs. The study also exmained factors that influcence homeowners' investments in energy conservation, including the role, if any, of financial institutions as a causal factor in determining such investment. A survey-type research design, utilizing the personal interview technique, was adopted. A descriptive-elemental approach was chosen to investigate the research questions. The sample groups of 50 homeowners and 20 financial officers were selected and interviewed in San Diego, CA. Approximately 50% of the homeowner sample surveyed was not aware of incentive programs. Among homeowners that were aware, the actual level of participation was very low due to their lack of extensive investment in energy conservation. Essential factors dissuading such investment were: lack of initial funds, length of the payback period, inability to finance, nature of the incentives, perceived ability to save energy without investment, and lack of adequate information. The majority of financial institutions surveyed did not offer special considerations for residential energy conservation investment.

Mousavinia, S.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Propane Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Propane Outlook Conclusion. Lower residential prices possible this winter U.S. inventories likely to be ample prior to the heating season. However, Midwest ...

179

Factors Influencing Water Heating Energy Use and Peak Demand in a Large Scale Residential Monitoring Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A load research project by the Florida Power Corporation (FPC) is monitoring 200 residences in Central Florida, collecting detailed end-use load data. The monitoring is being performed to better estimate the impact of FPC's load control program, as well as obtain improved appliance energy consumption indexes and load profiles. A portion of the monitoring measures water heater energy use and demand in each home on a 15-minute basis.

Bouchelle, M. P.; Parker, D. S.; Anello, M. T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgA New Look at Residential Electricity Demand Using Household Expenditure Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate residential electricity demand for different regions of the country, assuming that consumers respond to average electricity prices. We circumvent the need for individual billing information by developing a novel generalized method of moments approach that allows us to estimate demand based on household electricity expenditure data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey, which does not have quantity and price information. We find that price elasticity estimates vary across the four census regions—the South at –1.02 is the most price-elastic region and the Northeast at –0.82 is the least—and are essentially equivalent across income quartiles. In general, these price elasticity estimates are considerably larger in magnitude than those found in other studies using household-level data that assume that consumers respond to marginal prices. We also apply our elasticity estimates in a U.S. climate policy simulation to determine how these elasticity estimates alter consumption and price outcomes compared to the more conservative elasticity estimates commonly used in policy analysis.

Harrison Fell; Shanjun Li; Anthony Paul; Harrison Fell; Shanjun Li; Anthony Paul; Monte Carlo Analysis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NASEO Energy Outlook Conference  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NASEO Energy Outlook Conference NASEO Energy Outlook Conference 2/26/01 Click here to start Table of Contents NASEO Energy Outlook Conference Retail Product Prices Are Driven By Crude Oil WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 Annual World Oil Demand Growth by Region, 1991-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* Fundamentals Explain High Crude Oil Prices Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand Balance U.S. Distillate Inventories Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter Heating Oil Imports Strong in 2001 Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs Propane prices Influenced by Crude Oil and Natural Gas

182

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 with Projections to 2025 4 with Projections to 2025 Report #: DOE/EIA-0383(2004) Release date: January 2004 Next release date: January 2005 Errata August 25, 2004 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a midterm forecast and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 Table of Contents Summary Tables Adobe Acrobat Logo Yearly Tables MS Excel Viewer Regional and other detailed tables (Supplemental) MS Excel Viewer Overview Market Drivers Trends in Economic Activity Economic Growth Cases International Oil Markets Energy Demand Projections Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Alternative Technology Cases Electricity Forecast Electricity Sales Electricity Generating Capacity Electricity Fuel Costs and Prices Electricity from Nuclear Power

183

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Appendix I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I I International Energy Outlook 2006 Appendix I: System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) The projections of world energy consumption appearing in IEO2006 are based on EIA’s international energy modeling tool, SAGE. SAGE is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Projections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region’s existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

184

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference 2010  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation at the 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference in Washington, DC, outlined EIA's current forecast for U.S. crude oil, distillate, natural gas, propane and gasoline supply, demand, and markets over the coming winter season.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protocols  for  Demand  Response  Load  Impacts  Estimates, Potter  2006.     The  Demand  Response Baseline, v.1.75.   Assessment  of  Demand  Response  and  Advanced  Metering, 

Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Short-term energy outlook, Annual supplement 1995  

SciTech Connect

This supplement is published once a year as a complement to the Short- Term Energy Outlook, Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts. Chap. 2 analyzes the response of the US petroleum industry to the recent four Federal environmental rules on motor gasoline. Chap. 3 compares the EIA base or mid case energy projections for 1995 and 1996 (as published in the first quarter 1995 Outlook) with recent projections made by four other major forecasting groups. Chap. 4 evaluates the overall accuracy. Chap. 5 presents the methology used in the Short- Term Integrated Forecasting Model for oxygenate supply/demand balances. Chap. 6 reports theoretical and empirical results from a study of non-transportation energy demand by sector. The empirical analysis involves the short-run energy demand in the residential, commercial, industrial, and electrical utility sectors in US.

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Short run price elasticity of residential electricity demand within income levels and the implications for CO2 policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the relationship between price and use of electricity in residential homes in order to understand the impact of CO2 policy. A model… (more)

Green, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Heterogeneous Responses to Water Conservation Programs: The Case of Residential Users in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. “Estimation of Residential Water Demand: A State ofand Income Elasticities of Residential Water Demand: A Meta-D. Green, 2000. “Do residential water demand side management

Hanemann, W. Michael; Nauges, Celine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook Figure 12. World marketed energy consumption, 1990-2035 Figure 13. World marketed energy consumption:OECD and Non-OECD, 1990-2035 Figure 14. Shares of world energy consumption in the United States, China, and India, 1990-2035 Figure 15. Marketed energy use in the Non-OECD economies by region, 1990-2035 Figure 16. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 17. Coal consumption in selected world regions, 1990-2035 Figure 18. World electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 19. Renewable electricity generation in China by energy source, 2007-2035 Figure 20. World nuclear generating capacity by region, 2007 and 2035

190

Residential Demand Module...................................................................................................................... 27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA’s data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

IEA World Energy Outlook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IEA World Energy Outlook IEA World Energy Outlook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IEA World Energy Outlook Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations References: World Energy Outlook[1] The 2010 "edition of the World Energy Outlook - the International Energy Agency's flagship publication and leading source of analysis of global energy trends - presents updated projections of energy demand, production, trade and investment, fuel by fuel and region by region to 2035. WEO-2010 includes, for the first time, the result of a new scenario that takes account of the recent commitments that governments have made to

192

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

193

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand and Supply Electricity Demand and Supply Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Electricity Demand and Supply Continued Growth in Electricity Use Is Expected in All Sectors Figure 66. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Total electricity sales are projected to increase at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent in the AEO2005 reference case, from 3,481 billion kilowatthours in 2003 to 5,220 billion kilowatthours in 2025 (Figure 66). From 2003 to 2025, annual growth in electricity sales is projected to average 1.6 percent in the residential sector, 2.5 percent in the commercial sector, and 1.3 percent in the industrial sector.

194

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

195

Summer_Gas_Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) 1 Summer 2001 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary April 2001 For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to once again exhibit a very tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.49 per gallon, slightly lower than last summer's average of $1.53 per gallon, but still above the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of $1.35 recorded in 1981. Nominal prices are expected to reach a peak of $1.52 per gallon in June but then decline gradually to about $1.43 by December. These projections presume no

196

One: California Economic Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: AN IMPROVED POWER SITUATIONwas sluggish. An improved outlook for consumer spending inforecast compared with the outlook of UCLA's Anderson

Lieser, Tom K

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Propane Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 of 24 4 of 24 Notes: EIA expects lower residential propane prices this winter compared to the high prices seen last winter. As of now, it appears that propane inventories will be more than adequate going into this winter. Although inventories in the Midwest remain low, there is still time for the ample inventories in the Gulf Coast to make their way up into the Midwest before heating season begins in earnest. As always, the major uncertainties affecting demand this winter are the weather and the economy. Other uncertainties affecting the propane market this winter are crude oil and natural gas prices. If natural gas prices this winter are around what EIA expects them to be, we will likely see very little, if any, propane production shut-in at gas plants. However, as the current situation with the TET shows, there could be short

198

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(83/3Q) (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

199

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

200

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 1 - World Energy and Economic Outlook In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use; OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the NON-OECD Economies by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

New Zealand Energy Outlook (2010): Electricity and Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to...

202

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

203

Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 presents a projection and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the ...

204

Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency Standards in the Residential Electricity Sector.France. USDOE (2001). Residential Energy Consumption Survey,long-term response of residential cooling energy demand to

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Evaluation, 2005 1 Outlook Evaluation, 2005 1 Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005 * Then Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose or advocate future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes,

206

2012 SG Peer Review - Dramatic Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest - Robert Boehm, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S t G id P 2012 Smart Grid Program Peer Review Meeting "D ti D d R d ti "Dramatic Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest" Robert F Boehm Robert F. Boehm Center for Energy Research University of Nevada Las Vegas June 8, 2012 "Dramatic Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest" in the Desert Southwest Objective Decrease the peak electrical demand by 65% over code-built houses in a new development of 185 homes. Life-cycle Funding ($K) FY08 - FY13 (now FY15) Technical Scope 1. Build energy conserving residences. 2. Include PV on the residences. FY08 - FY13 (now FY15) $6948k 3. Develop a demand control system that gives the customer options and that is enhanced by an artificial intelligence supplemental system. Instantaneous December 2008 power pricing information will be available

207

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

When EIA's demand forecast is combined with its outlook for production and net imports, distillate stocks are projected to remain low for the rest of the year. - Distillate fuel...

208

Petroleum Outlook:.More Volatility?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook: More Volatility? Outlook: More Volatility? 3/19/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Petroleum Outlook: More Volatility? Product Price Volatility-This Year and in the Future WTI Crude Oil Price: Potential for Volatility Around Base Case OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 Annual World Oil Demand Growth by Region, 1991-2001 Low Total OECD Oil Stocks* Keep Market Balance Tight Fundamentals Explain High Crude Oil Prices Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Reflect Product Market-Based Volatility U.S. Distillate Inventories Distillate Winter Demand Stronger Than Temperatures Would Imply High Production Offset Lack of Inventory High Production Came From High Yields & High Inputs High Margins Bring High Imports Gasoline Price Volatility Is a Concern This Summer Gasoline Volatility

209

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Oil Markets World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million bar- rels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last year's outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period. To meet the projected increase in world oil demand in the IEO2006 reference case, total petroleum supply in 2030 will need to increase

210

International Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1997 April 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

211

International Energy Outlook 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1995 May 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

212

Annual Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1998 With Projections to 2020 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administra- tion and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other or- ganization. The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Informa- tion Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling

213

International Energy Outlook - Electicity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2004 Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2004 projections. Developing nations in Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 60. World Net Electricity Consumptin, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 61. World Net Electricity Consumptin by Region, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World net electricity consumption is expected nearly double to over the next two decades, according to the International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) reference case forecast. Total demand for electricity is projected to increase on average by 2.3 percent per year, from 13,290

214

Annual Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2) 2) December 2001 Annual Energy Outlook 2002 With Projections to 2020 December 2001 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@ eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@ eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director, Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director, Oil and Gas Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA's National

215

Annual Energy Outlook 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Annual Energy Outlook 2001 With Projections to 2020 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2001 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses the macroeconomic projections, world oil and natural gas markets, oxygenates in gasoline, distributed electricity generation, electricity industry restructuring, and carbon dioxide emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

216

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

217

Natural Gas Demand: New Domestic Uses and LNG Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Natural Gas Demand: New Domestic Uses and LNG Exports Natural Gas Demand Outlook

218

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

Fuller, Merrian C.

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Appendix J  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J - System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) J - System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) International Energy Outlook 2007 Appendix J - System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) Projections of world energy consumption and supply in IEO2007 were generated using EIA’s SAGE model. SAGE is used to project energy use in detail at the end-use sector level. It is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Projections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region’s existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

220

Outlook [Caring About Places...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Donlyn Lyndon editor Outlook James F. Fulton publisher T o dn w h i c h they join — outlook or lookout — carries subtlydesign assistant watchman. Outlook becomes a point of view,

Lyndon, Donlyn

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption is projected to grow by 57 percent over the 2004 to 2030 period. Total world energy use rises from 447 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 qua- drillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). Global energy demand grows despite the relatively high world oil and natural gas prices that are projected to persist into the mid-term outlook. The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2004 to 2030 is projected for nations outside

222

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

223

World Energy Outlook 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OECD/IEA - OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 To Cover... To Cover To Cover ... ... Transport Energy and CO 2 Where are we going? What are the dangers? How do we change direction? Primarily reporting on: IEA WEO 2008 IEA ETP 2008 On-going work with IEA's Mobility Model One or two detours to talk about modelling © OECD/IEA - 2008 0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 14 000 16 000 18 000 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Mtoe Other renewables Hydro Nuclear Biomass Gas Coal Oil World energy demand expands by 45% between now and 2030 - an average rate of increase of 1.6% per year - with coal accounting for more than a third of the overall rise Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook 2008 Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook

224

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999-Summer Gasoline Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook This year's base case outlook for summer (April-September) motor gasoline markets may be summarized as follows: * Pump Prices: (average regular) projected to average about $1.13 per gallon this summer, up 9-10 cents from last year. The increase, while substantial, still leaves average prices low compared to pre-1998 history, especially in inflation-adjusted terms. * Supplies: expected to be adequate, overall. Beginning-of-season inventories were even with the 1998 level, which was at the high end of the normal range. However, some refinery problems on the West Coast have tightened things up, at least temporarily. * Demand: up 2.0 percent from last summer due to solid economic growth and low (albeit rising) fuel prices; highway travel may reach 1.4 trillion miles for the

227

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - DRAFT - June 12, 2012 1 Table B1. Total energy...

228

Annual Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4) January 2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 With Projections to 2025 January 2004 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) was prepared by the Energy...

229

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Household Expenditures Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Residential Demand Module Petroleum Market Module...

230

Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats, and Opportunities Facing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

0 0 Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats, and Opportunities Facing the Propane Industry Through 2020 P r e s e n T e d B y : Declining Sales in the Recent Past and Near-Term Future After peaking in 2003, nationwide propane consumption fell by more than 10 percent through 2006. Although propane demand rebounded somewhat in 2007 and 2008 due to colder weather, propane demand appears to have declined again in 2009. The collapse of the new housing market, combined with decreases in fuel use per customer resulting from efficiency upgrades in homes and equipment, resulted in a decline in residential propane sales. The recession also reduced demand in the industrial and commercial sectors. Colder weather in the last half of 2009 and in January

231

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

232

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook For NASEO Winter Fuels Outlook Conference November 1, 2013| Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA works closely...

234

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA ABSTRACT Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

International energy outlook 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook 09/15/2000 Click here to start Table of Contents Winter Distillate Outlook Distillate Prices Increasing With Crude Oil Factors Driving Prices & Forecast First Factor Impacting Distillate Prices: Crude Oil Prices High Crude Prices Go With Low Inventories Second Price Component: Spread Impacted by Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Distillate Stocks are Low – Especially on the East Coast Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Winter Demand Impacted by Weather Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999 Dec 1999 & Jan 2000 Production Fell, But Rebounded with Price Higher Yields Can Be Achieved Unusual Net Imports May Only Be Available at a High Price

237

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Growth in energy use is projected worldwide through 2020. The demand for electricity in homes, business, and industry is growing in all regions, as is the demand for petroleum-powered personal transportation. The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) reference case forecast indicates that by 2020, the world will consume three times the energy it consumed 28 years ago in 1970 (Figure 2). Much of the projected growth in energy consumption is attributed to expectations of rapid increases in energy use in the developing world—especially in Asia. Although the economic downturn in Asia that began in mid-1997 and continues into 1998 has lowered expectations for near-term growth in the region, the forecast still suggests that almost half the world’s projected increase in energy

239

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

240

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of BaselineLoad Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California  

SciTech Connect

Both Federal and California state policymakers areincreasingly interested in developing more standardized and consistentapproaches to estimate and verify the load impacts of demand responseprograms and dynamic pricing tariffs. This study describes a statisticalanalysis of the performance of different models used to calculate thebaseline electric load for commercial buildings participating in ademand-response (DR) program, with emphasis onthe importance of weathereffects. During a DR event, a variety of adjustments may be made tobuilding operation, with the goal of reducing the building peak electricload. In order to determine the actual peak load reduction, an estimateof what the load would have been on the day of the event without any DRactions is needed. This baseline load profile (BLP) is key to accuratelyassessing the load impacts from event-based DR programs and may alsoimpact payment settlements for certain types of DR programs. We testedseven baseline models on a sample of 33 buildings located in California.These models can be loosely categorized into two groups: (1) averagingmethods, which use some linear combination of hourly load values fromprevious days to predict the load on the event, and (2) explicit weathermodels, which use a formula based on local hourly temperature to predictthe load. The models were tested both with and without morningadjustments, which use data from the day of the event to adjust theestimated BLP up or down.Key findings from this study are: - The accuracyof the BLP model currently used by California utilities to estimate loadreductions in several DR programs (i.e., hourly usage in highest 3 out of10 previous days) could be improved substantially if a morning adjustmentfactor were applied for weather-sensitive commercial and institutionalbuildings. - Applying a morning adjustment factor significantly reducesthe bias and improves the accuracy of all BLP models examined in oursample of buildings. - For buildings with low load variability, all BLPmodels perform reasonably well in accuracy. - For customer accounts withhighly variable loads, we found that no BLP model produced satisfactoryresults, although averaging methods perform best in accuracy (but notbias). These types of customers are difficult to characterize withstandard BLP models that rely on historic loads and weather data.Implications of these results for DR program administrators andpolicymakersare: - Most DR programs apply similar DR BLP methods tocommercial and industrial sector customers. The results of our study whencombined with other recent studies (Quantum 2004 and 2006, Buege et al.,2006) suggests that DR program administrators should have flexibility andmultiple options for suggesting the most appropriate BLP method forspecific types of customers.

Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote,Sila

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The23 Electricity Demandand commercial electricity demand per census division from

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart...

243

One: The California Economic Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Christopher Thornberg,signs of having peaked. The outlook for 2006 is dominated by

Thornberg, Christopher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook - Regional Enhancements Starting with this edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA is introducing regional projections (the scope of which will vary by fuel) of energy prices, consumption, and production. The addition of regional data and forecasts will allow us to examine regional fuel demands and prices, regional fuel inventory trends, the interaction between regional electricity demand shifts, and regional electric generating capacity. This edition of STEO includes regional projections for heating oil, propane, and gasoline prices and natural gas and electricity demand and prices. Over the next 2 months, we will include additional regional

245

Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

Not Available

1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Release date: March 2006 Next release date: March 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Petroleum Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Coal Market Module

247

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Petroleum Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Coal Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Renewable Fuels Module . . . . . . . . . . .

248

PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOU) Pricing and Demand- Response (DR) Programs. Washington,Earle. 2006. “Demand Response and Advanced Metering. ”on Residential Demand Response. ” May 11. Discussion Paper.

Peters, Jane S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

250

International energy outlook 1998  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 143 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 8.82 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEER for central air conditioner and heat pumps, increasing to 12 SEER in 2006. Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, c. Water Heaters Electric: Current standard .86 EF, incr easing to .90 EF in 2004. Gas: Curren

252

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

253

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

254

Annual Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2000 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses current energy issues—appliance standards, gasoline and diesel fuel standards, natural gas industry expansion, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

255

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2003 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected to nearly double between 2001 and 2025, with the most robust growth in demand expected among the developing nations. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption in the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case. Consumption of natural gas worldwide is projected to increase by an average of 2.8 percent annually from 2001 to 2025, compared with projected annual growth rates of 1.8 percent for oil consumption and 1.5 percent for coal. Natural gas consumption in 2025, at 176 trillion cubic feet, is projected to be nearly double the 2001 total of 90 trillion cubic feet (Figure 40). The natural gas share of total energy consumption is projected to increase from 23 percent in 2001 to 28 percent in 2025.

256

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 per MMBtu during the last 3 months of 2003 and increase to $4.32 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2003). Prices have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather and reduced industrial demand allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 3, 2003, working gas levels were only 1 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to be about 13 percent less than last winter ($4.17 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). But prices in the residential sector are projected to be about 9 percent higher than last winter, as the recent decline in wellhead prices is too recent and insufficient to offset the impact of the substantial spring-summer increase in wellhead prices on residential prices. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.75 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $3.86 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

257

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

D Results from side cases Table D1. Key results for demand sector technology cases 187 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Results from side...

258

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis: Studies in Residential Energy Demand. AcademicHousing Characteristics 1987, Residential Energy ConsumptionHousing Characteristics 1990, Residential Energy Consumption

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand and Economic Outlook Demand and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 Figure 9 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 Figure 10 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 11 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 12. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type,1990-2030 Figure 12 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 13. Coal Consumption in Selected World Regions,1980-2030 Figure 13 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

260

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO 2008 AEO 2008 Annual Energy Outlook 2008 The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008) presents projections and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2008 includes the reference case, additional cases examining energy markets, and complete documentation. Analytical Overview: Energy Trends to 2030 In preparing projections for AEO2008, we evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets between today and 2030. The overview focuses on one case, the reference case. ...see full Overview Section You are encouraged to review the full range of alternative cases included in the analysis of other sections of AEO2008 -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2006 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) reference case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a

262

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

263

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about $3.49 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.76 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released November 7, 2002). Natural gas prices were higher than expected in October as storms in the Gulf of Mexico in late September temporarily shut in some gas production, causing spot prices at the Henry Hub and elsewhere to rise above $4.00 per million Btu for most of October. In addition, early winter-like temperatures, particularly in the Midwest and Northeast, increased demand for natural gas, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.84 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.56 per MMBtu, which is about $1.20 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.81 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. In 2003, wellhead prices are projected to average $3.28 per MMBtu, or about $0.44 per MMBtu more than in 2002, owing to expectations of increasing economic growth, little or no change in the annual average crude oil price for 2003, and lower storage levels for most of 2003 compared with 2002 levels.

264

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.20 per MMBtu through January 2003 and then increase to $4.61 in February and $4.23 in March (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released January 8, 2003). Wellhead prices for the overall heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average about $4.10 per MMBtu, or $1.74 more than last winter's levels, while prices to residential customers are expected to average $8.51 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. Natural gas prices were higher than expected in November and December as below-normal temperatures throughout much of the nation increased heating demand, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Spot prices at the Henry Hub climbed above $5.00 per MMBtu in the second week of December and stayed near or above this threshold through the end of the month. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average $2.90 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. In 2003, average wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.00 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $3.90 per MMBtu, owing to expectations of higher demand levels than in 2002 and lower storage levels for most of the year compared with 2002 levels.

265

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) The projections of world energy consumption appearing in IEO2006 are based on EIA's international energy modeling tool, SAGE. SAGE is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Pro- jections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

266

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) Projections of world energy consumption and supply in IEO2007 were generated using EIA's SAGE model. SAGE is used to project energy use in detail at the end- use sector level. It is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Projections of energy con- sumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well

267

International energy outlook 1996  

SciTech Connect

This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Outlook for Biomass Ethanol Production and Demand  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents a midterm forecast for biomass ethanol production under three different technology cases for the period 2000 to 2020, based on projections developed from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. An overview of cellulose conversion technology and various feedstock options and a brief history of ethanol usage in the United States are also presented.

Information Center

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8 2.7 3.8 5.0 6.3 7.8 9.2 5.7 Total 6.9 8.3 10.3 12.5 15.0 17.7 20.0 3.6 Commercial Liquids 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 -0.8 Natural gas 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.8 7.1 Coal 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.1 Electricity 0.7 1.0 1.4 1.9 2.6 3.5 4.4 6.5 Total 2.5 2.8 3.5 4.3 5.3 6.4 7.6 3.8 Industrial Liquids 8.4 10.2 11.4 12.2 12.7 13.0 13.0 1.5 Natural gas 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.8 4.2 4.5

270

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8 16.5 18.6 21.3 24.3 27.5 31.1 2.5 Total 28.9 30.8 33.6 37.1 40.9 44.8 49.0 1.8 Industrial Liquids 57.2 61.6 66.4 70.1 74.2 78.2 82.1 1.2 Natural gas 45.5 48.8 54.3 59.0 63.4

271

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.0 Total 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1.1 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 1.6 Total 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 1.2 Industrial Liquids 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.4 Natural gas 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.4 Coal 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Electricity

272

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6 Electricity 4.9 4.7 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 0.7 Total 11.4 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.2 11.4 11.6 0.1 Commercial Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 -0.3 Natural gas 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 0.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.7 Electricity 4.5 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 0.8 Total 8.6 8.8 8.9 9.2 9.5 9.9 10.2 0.6 Industrial Liquids 8.4 8.2 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.7 0.1 Natural gas 8.0 8.7 9.6 9.8 9.9 10.1 10.4 0.9 Coal 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6

273

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2 Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Total 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 2.4 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 5.5 Total 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Industrial Liquids 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 Natural gas 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.2 2.6 3.0 2.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 3.1 Electricity

274

ShortShort--Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis ShortShort--Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook Chart Gallery for Chart Gallery for ...

275

1999-2000 Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

supplies of space-heating fuels are expected to be more than adequate to meet winter demand. ... Residential Heating Oil Prices: Weather Scenarios $0.00 $0.20 $0.40 $ ...

276

Residential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

277

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Short Short- -Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook Chart Gallery for Chart Gallery for November...

278

2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Key factors driving the short-term outlook. 2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook. 2 • Disruption of crude oil and liquefied natural gas supply from

279

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Appendix I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I - Comparisons With International Energy Agency and IEO2006 Projections I - Comparisons With International Energy Agency and IEO2006 Projections International Energy Outlook 2007 Appendix I - Comparisons With International Energy Agency and IEO2006 Projections Comparisons with IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Agency (IEA) provides projections comparable with those in IEO2007 in its World Energy Outlook 2006. Because IEA releases projections only for the years 2015 and 2030, two time periods are compared here—2004 to 2015 and 2015 to 2030. In the 2004 to 2015 projection period, both IEO2007 and IEA expect world energy demand to increase by an average of 2.1 percent per year (Table I1). Not surprisingly, both outlooks project much faster growth in energy demand among the non-OECD nations than in the OECD, with non-OECD energy use growing three times as rapidly. There are, however, some regional differences. IEA’s expectations for demand growth in OECD Asia, for instance, are much higher than those in IEO2007, and the projected 1.4-percent annual growth rate projected by IEA for the region exceeds the 1.3-percent rate in the IEO2007 high economic growth case.

280

Residential Humidity Control Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Humidity Control Strategies Residential Humidity Control Strategies Armin Rudd Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas 2 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control goals  Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality  Control indoor humidity year-around, just like we do temperature  Durability and customer satisfaction  Reduce builder risk and warranty/service costs 2 3 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control challenges 1. In humid cooling climates, there will always be times of the year when there is little sensible cooling load to create thermostat demand but humidity remains high * Cooling systems that modify fan speed and temperature set point based on humidity can help but are still limited

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2009-2040...

282

Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Outlook National Association of State Energy Officials State Heating Oil and Propane Conference August 30, 2004 William Trapmann Energy Information ...

283

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Non-OECD Statistics" (2012), www.iea.org (subscription site). Projections: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013, DOEEIA-0383(2013) (Washington, DC: April 2013); AEO2013 National...

284

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Table G1. Heat rates Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton...

285

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

36 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 6 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2010 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise...

286

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 234 Regional maps Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information...

287

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 22 Table A10....

288

Baryons 2002: Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary and outlook presented at the 9th International Conference on the Structure of Baryons (BARYONS 2002), Jefferson Lab, March 3-8, 2002

Wolfram Weise

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F17. Delivered energy...

290

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections: EIA, AEO2012 National Energy Modeling System run REF2012.D020112C. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 160 Reference case Table...

291

Residential Gateways and Controllers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy companies are exploring two-way residential communications to help reduce the cost of providing standard energy-related services, such as itemized billing or demand reduction, as well as to provide nontraditional services, such as diagnostic services and e-mail. This report covers the key to development of these services -- residential gateways and controllers. The report was prepared with both technical and financial energy company managers in mind, for use as a reference tool and strategic plann...

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Residential Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Performance: guidelines, analysis and measurements of window and skylight performance Windows in residential buildings consume approximately 2% of all the energy used...

293

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F F Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping This page inTenTionally lefT blank 225 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8

295

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecast Evaluation 2005 Forecast Evaluation 2005 Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005 Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005 * Then Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose or advocate future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected.

296

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Markets Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 3: World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million barrels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last year’s outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period.

297

Assumptiions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Petroleum Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Coal Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Renewable Fuels Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation

298

Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, second quarter 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates, are available on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The paper discusses outlook assumptions; US energy prices; world oil supply and the oil production cutback agreement of March 1998; international oil demand and supply; world oil stocks, capacity, and net trade; US oil demand and supply; US natural gas demand and supply; US coal demand and supply; US electricity demand and supply; US renewable energy demand; and US energy demand and supply sensitivities. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 3 6 Table A18. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source (Million Metric Tons, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 80 73 68 64 61 58 -1.2% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 259 261 263 263 262 260 0.0% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 -1.1% Electricity 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 872 820 757 778 833 878 916 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1220 1160 1092 1110 1161 1202 1234 0.2% Commercial Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 43 39 38 38 37 37 -0.5% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 169 183 189 193 200 207 0.8% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

300

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

NONE

1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

302

Black Hills Power- Residential Customer Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Black Hills Power offers cash rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment in their homes. Incentives exist for water heaters, demand control units, air...

303

18-Month Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of the security and adequacy of the Ontario Electricity System for the 18-month period from April 2002 through September 2003. This assessment is based on forecasts of electricity demand and available supply combined with current information on the configuration and capability of the transmission system. Outage plans of generators and transmitters are based on information available as of February 2002. During the Outlook period, the IMO forecasts show that Ontario’s available generation exceeds projected demands. Over this period, approximately 3,000 MW of additional generation resources are expected to either return to service or be placed in service for the first time – thereby enhancing the reliability of the Ontario electricity system. During the first half of the Outlook there are periods when Ontario’s available reserves are forecast to be between 2,000 and 2,500 MW. These reserves are below the IMO’s required planning reserve levels, but do not account for additional resources from outside Ontario that are expected to be available. Reserves are planning buffers identified to address circumstances that cannot be accurately predicted such as weather variations and unscheduled maintenance. The IMO anticipates that the Ontario market will be effective in attracting additional resources to provide adequate reliability. However, there

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook ... State gasoline taxes ... that occurred between spring 1999 and fall 2001, ...

305

The California Economy: The Long Term Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1996. First, we cover the outlook for the main macroeconomicin the two economies. The outlook calls for moderate growthunderlies the macroeconomic outlook. Good jobs offer high

Kimbell, Larry J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 per MMBtu during the last 2 months of 2003 and increase to $4.36 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2003). Prices have fallen in the past few months as mild weather and reduced industrial demand have allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 31, 2003, working gas levels had reached 3,155 Bcf, which is about 3 percent higher than the 5-year average and the first time since October 2002 that stocks exceeded the year-earlier levels. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the current heating season (November through March) are expected to be about 12 percent less than last winter ($4.12 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). However, prices in the residential sector will likely be about 8 percent higher than last winter, as accumulated natural gas utility costs through 2003 are recovered in higher household delivery charges. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.76 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 18 percent, to $3.88 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

307

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

range from $2.91 to $3.19 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.53 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2002). Natural gas prices climbed sharply in late September as hurricanes Isidore and Lili caused production shut downs in the Gulf of Mexico. However, this price surge is expected to be short-lived, unless the weather in October is unusually cold or if additional storm activity in the Gulf curbs production further. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.76 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.32 per MMBtu, which is about $0.96 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.55 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter.

308

Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Table G1. Heat Rates Fuel Units Approximate Heat Content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.933 Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.800 Coke Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 26.327 Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.911 Residential and Commercial . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.284 Electric Power Sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.536 Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton

309

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 2005 February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about

310

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2005 January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about 20 percent this winter.

311

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector and source (million metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Petroleum .............................................................. 85 78 71 66 62 59 57 -1.1% Natural gas ............................................................ 267 256 245 241 236 230 225 -0.5% Coal ....................................................................... 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 -0.8% Electricity 1 .............................................................. 875 828 744 776 817 862 888 0.2%

312

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

313

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2010 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a projection and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2035. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2010 includes Reference case, additional cases examining alternative energy markets. Executive Summary Issues in Focus includes: Market Trends in Economic Activity No Sunset and Extended Policies cases Energy Demand Projections World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 Electricity Projections Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Oil and Natural Gas Projections Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Coal Projections Factors affecting the relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices

314

Residential Programmable Communicating Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential programmable communicating thermostats (PCTs) enable demand response and offer a convenient energy management option for the consumer. PCTs allow customers to program and control temperature set-points remotely, primarily through the Internet. Additionally, some of these thermostats can be remotely controlled by utilities or third parties to curtail heating and cooling loads during periods of peak electricity demand. This Technology Brief, prepared for the Energy Efficiency Initiative, presen...

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

315

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the most natural gas usage (33% and 51% of total demanddependence in natural gas usage, and consequently, Januarygas demand exhibits a strong winter peak in residential usage

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F15. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Asia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.7 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Electricity 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.8 3.2 Total 2.1 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.6 2.7 Commercial Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.7 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 -- Electricity 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.9 Total 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.3 Industrial Liquids 4.8 4.7 5.5 6.2 7.1 8.2 9.6 2.4 Natural gas 3.3 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.6 5.2

319

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F19. Delivered energy consumption in Other Central and South America by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 3.2 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.9 Total 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.0 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.5 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 2.4 Total 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 2.2 Industrial Liquids 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 0.5 Natural gas 2.6 2.7

320

Key Drivers Affecting the Outlook for Renewables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release, International Energy Outlook 2011 . ... AECO Germany - BEB Hub Netherlands - TTF Belgium - Zeebrugge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Martin Aspen. 2006. Demand Response Enabling TechnologiesDon. 2007. “Pricing for Demand Response from Residential andthe Level of Demand Response,” Power Point Presentation, 24

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential customers with peak demand greater than 350 kWs) Eligible Customers (peak demand) Optional hourly pricingis relatively small; the peak demand of its large, non-

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Short-term energy outlook: Annual supplement 1989  

SciTech Connect

This Supplement is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook, Quarterly Projections (Outlook). The purpose is to review the accuracy of the forecasts presented in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts. A brief description of the content of each chapter follows below: Chapter 2 evaluates the accuracy of the short-term energy forecasts published in the last 6 issues of the Outlook, for 1988/1989. Chapter 3 discusses the economics of the petrochemical feedstock market, and describes a new model which more fully captures the determinants of feedstock demand. Chapter 4 examines present and proposed new methods of forecasting short-term natural gas prices at the wellhead and spot prices. Chapter 5 discusses the modeling of natural demand in the short term. Chapter 6 discusses regional trends in the demand for fuel by electric utilities. Chapter 7 focuses on industrial coal use trends in recent years. Chapter 8 compares EIA's base case energy projections as published in the Outlook (89/2Q) with recent projections made by three other major forecasting groups. The chapter focuses on macroeconomic assumptions, primary energy demand, and primary energy supply, showing the differences and similarities in the four forecasts.

1989-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in IEO99 are consistent with those published in AEO99. IEO99 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private

325

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

235 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions...

326

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Brazil July 24, ... Germany Non-OECD OECD 108.00 86.00 69.00 44.00 35.00

327

Learning from Multiple Outlooks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider semi-supervised learning from multiple outlooks of the same learning task, that is, learning from different representations of the same type of data. As opposed to learning from multiple views where it is assumed that the exact same instances have multiple representations, we only assume the availability of samples of the same learning task in different domains. We develop an algorithmic framework that is based on mapping the (unlabeled) data followed by adjusting the mapping using the scarcer labeled data. The mapped data from all the outlooks can then be used for a generic classification algorithm. We further provide sample complexity results under the assumption that the different outlooks are inherently low dimension Gaussian mixtures. Experiments with real-world data indicate the performance boost from using multiple outlooks.

Gal-on, Maayan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F11. Delivered energy consumption in Russia by end-use sector and fuel,...

329

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F7. Delivered energy consumption in Japan by end-use sector and fuel,...

330

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Evaluation Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Esmeralda Sanchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: Over the last two decades, there have been many significant changes in laws, policies, and regulations that could not have been anticipated and were not assumed in the projections prior to their implementation. Many of these actions have had significant impacts on energy supply, demand, and prices; however, the impacts were not incorporated in the AEO projections until their enactment or effective dates in accordance with EIA's requirement to remain policy neutral and include only current laws and regulations in the AEO reference case projections.

331

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2040. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

332

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) quarterly forecasts of short-term energy supply, demand, and prices are revised in January, April, July, and October for publication in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes previous forecast errors, compares recent projections by other forecasters, and discusses current topics of the short-term energy markets (see Short- Term Energy Outlook: Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The principal users of the Outlook are managers and energy analysts in private industry and government. The projections in this volume extend through the fourth quarter of 1990. The forecasts are produced using the Short-term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model uses two principal driving variables: a macroeconomic forecast and world oil price assumptions. Macroeconomic forecasts produced by data Resources, Inc., (DRI), are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic forecast. EIA's Oil Market Simulation Model is used to project world oil prices. 20 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Short-term energy outlook, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review 1 Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006) * The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations

335

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 October 7, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on November 1 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Originally scheduled for October 8, the conference has been rescheduled due to the shutdown of the Federal government. This supply and demand forecast event will address the effects of projected weather and market factors that may affect the supply, distribution and prices of petroleum, natural gas and electricity this winter. For more information and to register for the

336

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

337

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

338

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

339

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

highlights.gif (3388 bytes) highlights.gif (3388 bytes) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 65 percent from 1996 to 2020. The current economic problems in Asia and Russia have lowered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for this International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), world energy consumption reaches 612 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) by 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1)—an increase of 65 percent over the 24-year projection period. The IEO99 projection for the world’s energy demand in 2020 is about 4 percent (almost 30 quadrillion Btu) lower than last year’s projection. The downward revision is based on events in two parts of the world: Asia and Russia. In Asia, the economic crisis that began in early 1997 persisted throughout 1998, as economic

340

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by by Esmeralda Sanchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: * Over the last two decades, there have been many significant changes in laws, policies, and regulations that could not have been anticipated and were not assumed in the projections prior to their implementation. Many of these actions have had significant impacts on energy supply, demand, and prices; however, the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contact.gif (4492 bytes) contact.gif (4492 bytes) The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441), Director of the International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gas Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; or Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Modeling Analyst. Detailed questions about the forecasts and related model components may be addressed to the following analysts:

342

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage For Further Information... The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Modeling Analyst. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA’s National Energy Information Center. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows:

343

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013 1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights The U.S. Energy Information ...

344

Annual Energy Outlook 1998 Forecasts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA Administrator's Press Briefing on the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) Annual Energy Outlook 1998 - Errata as of 3698 Data from the AEO98 Assumptions to the AEO98 (Nat'Gas...

345

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Residential Demand Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. NEMS Residential Module Equipment Summary Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Characteristics of Selected Equipment Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from

346

Winter Distillate .and Propane Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Distillate .and Propane Outlook. Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration State Heating Oil and Propane Program August 2000

347

Evaluation of the Heating & Cooling Energy Demand of a Case Residential Building by Comparing The National Calculation Methodology of Turkey and EnergyPlus through Thermal Capacity Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In all around the world, because of the rapid population growth and exhausting energy sources over time, energy efficiency and energy conservation gradually come into prominence. Hence, in 2002, a directive (EPBD) which obligates reducing energy usage and energy performance in buildings was published by European Union. In this scope, Turkey has developed a National Building Energy Performance Calculation Methodology, BepTr, which is based on simple hourly method in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document to determine the energy performance of buildings. The aim of the paper is to display the energy demand differences resultant from only the envelope’s thermal capacity between simplified method which is projected in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document and EnergyPlus which is based on full dynamic simulation method.

Atamaca, Merve; Kalaycioglu, Ece; Yilmaz, Zerrin

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Outlook positive over long term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trends established in 1987 will be very important in reestablishing some level of confidence in future price expectations. The authors expect prices to fluctuate widely in the coming year as OPEC makes and breaks various production quota agreements. Continued price instability will certainly all but negate short term marginally economic exploration and development prospects. Utilization rates will suffer accordingly. But on the positive side, the long term outlook is considerably more stable. Rock-bottom prices will increase the demand for cheap oil substantially. We're already seeing world demand figures rise. Increased demand will cause the world's (mainly OPEC's) excess production to be depleted over the next three to five years. Prices will rise slowly in parallel with the decline in excess production capacity over several years. Banking on upward price pressure, financially sound operators with solid cash flow will want to take advantage of low exploration and development costs. Utilization, then, can be expected to follow oil prices in a slow upward spiral over the next three to five years. Next year, the industry should begin to feel the effect of the beginning of that upward trend.

Not Available

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

International Energy Outlook - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2004 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2004 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2004 projections are based on U.S. and foreign government laws in effect on October 1, 2003.

352

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 53 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing industries are modeled with less detail because processes are simpler and there is less available data. The petroleum refining

353

Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Outlook 2010 Restrospective Review July 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Depa rtment of Energy W ashington, DC 20585 This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review While the integrated nature of NEMS may result in some feedback that slightly modifies the initial assumptions about world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment, these feedbacks tend to be relatively small, so that the initial assumptions for world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment largely determine the overall projection environ- ment. To the extent that this general environment deviates from the initial assumptions, the NEMS projection results will also deviate. Table 2 provides a summary of the percentage of years in

354

Conoco details energy outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the U.S., government should adopt policies that encourage U.S. petroleum companies to diversify crude oil sources around the world, says Conoco Inc. That's the key them underlying Conoco's latest world energy outlook through 2000. In its 1989 outlook, Conoco called on the U.S. government to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain to exploration and development and provide a tax credit of $5/bbl of oil equivalent (BOE) for production from U.S. frontier areas as keys to reducing U.S. oil import dependence. Although Conoco included opening the ANWR Coastal Plain and more of the U.S. offshore among U.S. policy recommendations in its current outlook, the company placed the greatest emphasis on incentives for worldwide exploration.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

355

Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2002 October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $29.75 in September, about $3.50 per barrel above the year-ago level and about $10 per barrel above a low point seen last January. Home Heating Costs Outlook: While fuel supplies should remain sufficient under normal weather

356

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2008 reference case in December 2007; however, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), which was enacted later that month, will have a major impact on energy markets, and given the year-long life of AEO2008 and its use as a baseline for analyses of proposed policy changes, EIA decided to update the reference case to reflect the provisions of EISA2007.

357

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

358

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

natgas.jpg (4355 bytes) natgas.jpg (4355 bytes) Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO99 forecast. Because it is a cleaner fuel than oil or coal and not as controversial as nuclear power, gas is expected to be the fuel of choice for many countries in the future. Prospects for natural gas demand worldwide remain bright, despite the impact of the Asian economic recession on near-term development. Natural gas consumption in the International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) is somewhat increased from last year’s outlook, and the fuel remains the fastest growing primary energy source in the forecast period. Worldwide gas use more than doubles in the reference case projection, reaching 174 trillion cubic feet in 2020 from 82 trillion cubic feet in 1996 (Figure

359

Annual Energy Outlook 1998 Forecasts - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 With Projections to 2020 1998 With Projections to 2020 Annual Energy Outlook 1999 Report will be Available on December 9, 1998 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO98 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses three current energy issues—electricity restructuring, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis

360

Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Outlook Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans Tancred Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Supply and Demand 3. Ethanol Supply 4. Gasoline Supply 5. Gasoline Prices A. Long-Term Equilibrium Price Analysis B. Short-Term Price Volatility 6. Conclusion 7. Appendix A. Estimating MTBE Consumption by State 8. Appendix B. MTBE Imports and Exports 9. Appendix C. Glossary of Terms 10. End Notes 11. References 1. Summary The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories and higher prices than last year. Recovery from this tight gasoline market could be made more difficult by impending State bans on the blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into gasoline that are scheduled to begin later this year. Three impending State bans on MTBE blending could significantly affect gasoline

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

362

International energy outlook 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

364

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

365

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992. Global warming and electricity demand: A study ofValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of SolarCEC). 2002. 2002-2012 Electricity Outlook Report, P700- 01-

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalent and its electricity demand at 19 Mtoe. If wastemeet water heating and electricity demand in the residentialJournal Vol.4, No.4 electricity demand, fuel requirements

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

SciTech Connect

As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic expansion and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both a short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as a long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study presents a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. Over the past few years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced its China End-Use Energy Model which is based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. In addition, this analysis also evaluated China's long-term domestic energy supply in order to gauge the potential challenge China may face in meeting long-term demand for energy. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not necessarily be the case because saturation in ownership of appliances, construction of residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that China's 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Short-term energy outlook: Annual supplement, 1987  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes forecasts of short-term energy supply, demand, and prices in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). This volume, Short-Term Energy Outlook, Annual Supplement, (Supplement) discusses major changes in the forecasting methodology, analyzes previous forecast errors, and examines current issues that affect EIA's short-term energy forecasts. The principal users of the Supplement are managers and energy analysts in private industry and government. Chapter 2 evaluates the accuracy of previous short-term energy forecasts and the major assumptions underlying these forecasts published in the last 13 issues of the Outlook. Chapter 3 compares the EIA's present energy projections with past projections and with recent projections made by other forecasting groups. Chapter 4 analyzes the 1986 increase in residual fuel oil demand after 8 consecutive years of decline. Sectoral analysis shows where and why this increase occurred. Chapter 5 discusses the methodology, estimation, and forecasts of fossil fuel shares used in the generation of electricity. Chapter 6 presents an update of the methodology used to forecast natural gas demand, with an emphasis on sectoral disaggregation. Chapter 7 compares the current use of generation data as a representation of short-term electricity demand with proposed total and sectoral sales equations. 8 refs., 7 figs., 63 tabs.

1987-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

369

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.

None

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Sector Residential Peak Demand (MW) Commercial IndustrialTable 16. Non-coincident peak demand by sector. growth Avg.IEPR Projected non-coincident peak demand (MW) 3.1.2. Hourly

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Forecasts & Analysis > Annual Energy Outlook 2011 : Annual Energy Outlook 2011 with Projections to 2035

372

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

373

Kaons: Review and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a review of recent results and an outlook of kaon physics. After enjoying a renaissance, the discipline is now becoming and endangered species. Action will be needed to keep kaon physics at the heart of future FPCP meetings.

Augusto Ceccucci

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hadronic Physics: an Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief outlook, in two senses, is presented for hadronic physics. The likely near term future for experiment and lattice effort is sketched and I speculate on future directions in theory. I also look out at other fields, presenting a short review of QCD ideas in ''Beyond the Standard Model'' physics.

Swanson, Eric S. [Dept of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA 15260 (United States)

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) ... 930.90 540.30 1982.00 2836.01 1193.30 1092.45 550.26 1983.00 3033.53

376

Residential Energy Display Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential energy display devices provide direct feedback to consumers about their electricity use and cost, direct feedback that potentially can help customers manage electricity consumption. EPRI tested five different stand-alone display devices in its Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Living Laboratory to assess whether devices functioned according to manufacturer specifications. In addition to providing results of these tests, this Technology Brief describes how display devices operate, summariz...

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The provincial government?s plan to phase out coal?fired generation in favour of cleaner forms of generation represents one of the most significant undertakings in the 100?year history of Ontario?s electricity sector. Aging generation facilities and the continued increase in demand for electricity add to the urgency of proceeding with new generating and transmission facilities over the next 10 years. Over the last 12 months 650 MW of new gas?fired generation has been put in place and 515 MW of nuclear generation and 370 MW of renewable generation is expected to be in service within the next 18 months. There are also a number of projects totalling more than 9,000 MW of additional capacity that are in various stages of discussion, development or negotiation. Timely progress to achieve this additional capacity must continue if Ontario is to ensure a reliable supply of electricity over the next decade and beyond. This 10?year Outlook from the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) provides an assessment of the demand?supply picture for the province over the next decade and provides a plan identifying the timing and requirements of system changes needed to meet the government’s coal shutdown timeframe. Under the provisions of Bill 100, the Ontario Power

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate California electricity consumption (GWh) Over two-thirds of total electricity demand is concentrated in the residential andrate N/A PG&E SMUD SCE LADWP SDGE BGP Other All CA 2005 IEPR Residential electricity

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Sorting in Patrick Geddes' Outlook Tower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n g in P a t r i c k Outlook Tower Geddes' JÈ Joyce Barleythree months at the Outlook 'lower in Edinburgh, sorting theand services. • The Outlook Tower was a disused observatory

Earley, Joyce

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

One: The California Long-Term Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA LONG-TERM OUTLOOK Tom K. Lieser, ExecutiveThe California Long-Term Outlook: Projections to 2020," TheThe California Long-Term Outlook: Projections to 2020," The

Lieser, Tom K

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth Issues In Focus. Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth The AEO2004 reference case economic forecast is a projection of possible economic growth, from the short term to the longer term, in a consistent framework that stresses demand factors in the short term and supply factors in the long term [33]. Productivity is perhaps the most important concept for the determination of employment, inflation, and supply of output in the long term. Productivity is a measure of economic efficiency that shows how effectively economic inputs are converted into output. Advances in productivity—that is, the ability to produce more with the same or less input—are a significant source of increased potential national income. The U.S. economy has been able to produce more goods and services over time, not only by requiring a proportional increase of labor time but also by making production more efficient. To illustrate the importance of productivity improvements, on the eve of the American Revolution, U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) per capita stood at approximately $765 (in 1992 dollars) [34]. Incomes rose dramatically over the next two centuries, propelled upward by the Industrial Revolution, and by 2002 GDP per capita had grown to $30,000 (1992 dollars). Productivity improvements played a major role in the increase in per capita GDP growth.

382

Short-term energy outlook, July 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Special Analysis Special Analysis + EXPAND ALL Feature Articles Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields September 2013 PDF EIA Estimates of Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply Disruptions September 2013 PDF 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 PDF Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 PDF Key drivers for EIA's short-term U.S. crude oil production outlook February 2013 PDF Constraints in New England likely to affect regional energy prices this winter January 2013 PDF Change in STEO Regional and U.S. Degree Day Calculations September 2012 PDF Changes to Electricity and Renewables Tables August 2012 PDF Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast July 2012 PDF 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico June 2012 PDF

384

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte In this paper, the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluates the projections published in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), (1) by comparing the projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1982 through the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 with actual historical values. A set of major consumption, production, net import, price, economic, and carbon dioxide emissions variables are included in the evaluation, updating similar papers from previous years. These evaluations also present the reasons and rationales for significant differences. The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an

385

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

386

A Reference Design for Residential Energy Gateways: Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

perspective. It is our hope that this talk will provide insight into the intricacies of residential demand side energy management and will foster new collaborative efforts with...

387

An energy standard for residential buildings in south China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: residential, buildings, energy standard, energyspiraling demand for building energy use, China’s Ministryand implementing building energy standards, starting with a

Huang, Yu Joe; Lang, Siwei; Hogan, John; Lin, Haiyan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Winter Distillate and Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Winter Distillate and Natural Gas Outlook. Distillate Prices Increasing With Crude Oil. Distillate Outlook. When Will Crude Oil Prices Fall?

389

EIA Short -Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2008 NASEO 2008/09 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 7, 2008 Washington, DC Howard Gruenspecht Acting ...

390

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontario’s electricity system faces significant challenges over the next 10 years. The uncertainty surrounding the return to service of Pickering A nuclear units, the lack of new generation investment and the commitment to shut down 7,500 MW of coal fired generation by December 31, 2007, all contribute to a potentially severe shortfall. New transmission, supply and demand side initiatives are urgently needed to address this gap and secure Ontario’s energy future. The need is most pressing in the Toronto area, to deal with the immediate impact of the April 30, 2005 shutdown of the Lakeview Thermal Generating Station. Plans are being implemented to address this in the short term. In the longer term, additional generation is also required in the Toronto area to replace the Lakeview generating capacity and to meet load growth in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Each year the Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO) publishes an integrated assessment of the security and adequacy of the Ontario electricity system over the next 10 years. This report presents the IMO assessment for the 10-year period from 2005 to 2014. It is based on the IMO’s forecast of electricity demand, information provided by Ontario generators on the supply that will be available and the latest information on the configuration and capability of the transmission system. Electricity Supply Outlook Additional Ontario electricity supply and demand-side measures are required to maintain supply adequacy into the future and to reduce Ontario’s dependency on supply from other jurisdictions.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release) > Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Release) > Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 (Early Release) The early release version of the AEO2008 reference case does not include consideration of the H.R.6, "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007," that was signed into law on December 19, 2007. EIA is compiling a revised reference case that includes the impact of H.R.6. Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption

392

DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013 DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013 September 26, 2013 - 11:12am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. This supply and demand forecast event will address the effects of projected weather and market factors that may affect the supply, distribution and prices of petroleum, natural gas and electricity this winter. For more information and to register for the event, visit the 2013 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference website.

393

Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 September 19, 2011 - 4:55pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the National Association of State Energy Officials invite you to participate in the 2011 - 2012 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference. This important supply and demand forecast event will be held on Wednesday, October 12, 2011, from 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. at The Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20001. Event Information Winter Fuels Conference Site Preliminary Agenda Online Registration Addthis Related Articles Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 10, 2012

394

An Outlook on Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief outlook on low-energy nuclear physics is presented. Selected recent developments in nuclear structure theory are highlighted and a few open questions are discussed.

A. B. Balantekin

2013-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

An Outlook on Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief outlook on low-energy nuclear physics is presented. Selected recent developments in nuclear structure theory are highlighted and a few open questions are discussed.

Balantekin, A B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those...

397

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook Briefing for the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference Orlando, Florida Mike Burdette

398

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2/9/2005: Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook. This presentation contains content that your browser may not be able to show properly.

399

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

400

2013 Propane Market Outlook  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

3 3 Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats, and Opportunities Facing the Propane Industry Through 2020 P R E S E N T E D B Y : Prepared for the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) by: ICF International, Inc. 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 Tel (703) 218-2758 www.icfi.com Principal Authors: Mr. Michael Sloan msloan@icfi.com Mr. Warren Wilczewski wwilczewski@icfi.com Propane Market Outlook at a Glance ÂĄ Total consumer propane sales declined by more than 17 percent between 2009 and 2012, including 3.3 percent in 2011 and 10 to 12 percent in 2012. The declines in 2011 and 2012 were due primarily to much warmer than normal weather, as well as the impact of higher propane prices and continuing efficiency trends. Sales are expected to rebound in 2013 with a return to more

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012

402

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Admin- istration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). Projections in IEO2007 are divided according to Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and non-members (non-OECD). There are

403

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), and the U.S. projections that appear in the IEO are consistent with those published in the AEO. World energy consumption in this year's IEO2000 is projected to

404

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 with projections to 2020 March 16, 2000 Jay E. Hakes Energy Information Administration Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO),

405

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administra- tion (EIA) of the outlook for international energy mar- kets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). IEO2006 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Non- marketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included

406

Annual Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) Annual Energy Outlook 1999 With Projections to 2020 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222).

407

Electric Industry Outlook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Challenges and Opportunities that Impact EEI Members and Their Federal Customers Steve Kiesner Director National Customer Markets Federal Utility Partnership Working Group May 22, 2013 San Francisco, CA Agenda  Necessary infrastructure investments to address:  Reliability  Environmental and other policy requirements  And continue the development of a grid for the 21 st Century  Our move to natural gas and what it means to customers  How technology is changing our world and those of our customers  Potential Federal-Utility Partnerships with Electrification as a transportation fuel 2 Infrastructure Investments Richard McMahon Vice President, Finance and Energy Supply Commission lays out U.S. energy efficiency roadmap through 2030

408

Annual Energy Outlook 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96) 96) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1996 With Projections to 2015 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/ 586-1130),

409

Annual Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1997 With Projections to 2015 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441),

410

International energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

house and HVAC system. We have also developed optimizationoptimization, the system starts from default values and learns the dynamic behavior of a house and HVACHVAC system is completely under control of the DREAM. Test focuses on optimization

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration, & Air-Conditioning Engineers. Auslander,existing patterns of air conditioning and heating.in conjunction with air conditioning), the main actuation in

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Graphic Data Figure 1. Total liquid fuels demand by sector Figure 1 Data Figure 2. Total natural gas supply by source Figure 2 Data Figure 3. New light-duty vehicle sales shares by type Figure 3 Data Figure 4. Proposed CAFE standards for passenger cars by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 4 Data Figure 5. Proposed CAFE standards for light trucks by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 5 Data Figure 6. Average fuel economy of new light-duty vehicles in the AEO2008 and AEO2009 projections, 1995-2030 Figure 6 Data Figure 7. Value of fuel saved by a PHEV compared with a conventional ICE vehicle over the life of the vehicles, by gasoline price and PHEV all-electric driving range

415

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release Summary Presentation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release Energy Information Administration December 17, 2008 www.eia.doe.gov 2 EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Presentation -- December 17, 2008 The economy, oil prices, resources, policies, and behavior drive the AEO2009 reference case * Long-term economic growth averages about 2.5 percent per year between 2007 and 2030 * World crude oil prices recover from a near-term decline and reach $130 per barrel (in 2007 dollars) by 2030 * A robust domestic natural gas resource base allows for a steady expansion of production given projected growth in demand and prices * Recently-enacted policies and concerns over greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, combined with high energy prices, moderate projected growth in energy consumption and

416

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 8 S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 8 N e x t R e l e a s e D a t e : S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 9 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Retrospective Review 1 Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and

417

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

418

Short-term energy outlook, Quarterly projections. Third quarter 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the second quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

NONE

1993-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the first quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

NONE

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

420

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.1% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 2.32 2.18 2.53 2.67 2.82 3.08 3.65 1.8% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.0%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1%

422

A tale of two houses: the human dimension of demand response enabling technology from a case study of an adaptive wireless thermostat.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ed Arens. 2008. Demand Response-Enabled ResidentialEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006.The Human Dimension of Demand Response Enabling Technology

Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A; Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2006 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

424

Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Provides instructions for remote Outlook access using...

425

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook Nan Zhou, Michael A.2001, International Energy Outlook 2001 , Report No. DOE/The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) , Washington

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Global and U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook, 2008. No.Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyPatterns, Issues, and Outlook Philip Martin Professor of

Martin, Philip

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy...

428

World coal outlook to the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The 1983 edition of the World Coal Outlook to the Year 2000 examines the worldwide impact of lower oil prices and lower economic activity on the demand, production, and international trade in coal. The report includes detailed regional forecasts of coal demand by end-use application. Regions include the US, Canada, Western Europe, Japan, Other Asia, Latin America, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, Communist Europe, and Communist Asia. In addition, regional coal production forecasts are provided with a detailed analysis of regional coal trade patterns. In all instances, the changes relative to Chase's previous forecasts are shown. Because of the current situation in the oil market, the report includes an analysis of the competitive position of coal relative to oil in the generation of electricity, and in industrial steam applications. The report concludes with an examination of the impact of an oil price collapse on the international markets for coal.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Macroeconomic Forecasting with the Revised National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) Phasing Out MTBE in Gasoline World Oil Demand and Prices Distributed Electricity Generation Resources Natural Gas Supply Availability Restructuring of State Retail Markets for Electricity Carbon Dioxide Emissions in AEO2001 Macroeconomic Forecasting with the Revised National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) The NIPA Comprehensive Revision Economic activity is a key determinant of growth in U.S. energy supply and demand. The derivation of the forecast of economic activity is therefore a critical step in developing the energy forecast presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001). In turn, the forecast of economic activity is rooted fundamentally in the historical data series maintained by a

430

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 17 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents interactions between the U.S. economy and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP), is a key determinant of growth in the demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected

431

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 with Projections to 2025 5 with Projections to 2025 Report #: DOE/EIA-0383(2005) Release date full report: January 2005 Next release date full report: January 2006 Early Release Reference Case date: December 2005 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a midterm forecast and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. AEO2005 includes a reference case and over 30 sensitivities. Data Tables Summary Tables Adobe Acrobat Logo Yearly Tables Excel logo Regional and other detailed tables Excel logo (Supplemental) Contents Overview Market Drivers Trends in Economic Activity Economic Growth Cases International Oil Markets Energy Demand Projections Buildings Sector

432

FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outlook) for the City of San Diego which presented a comprehensive examination of the City’s long range fiscal condition. The Financial Outlook has proven to be an important planning tool for the City of San Diego. The Outlook guided the City in establishing the fiscal year 2008 annual budget and has served throughout the year as the basis for longer term fiscal decisionmaking. The Outlook has communicated the City’s fiscal priorities along with the City’s strengths and the challenges that remain in achieving a balanced General Fund budget and fiscal health. The updated Five-Year Financial Outlook (2009-2013 Outlook) includes revised revenue and expenditure projections for fiscal years 2009 through 2013 as well as additional fiscal commitments that have emerged since the 2008-2012 Outlook was issued. Similar to the 2008-2012 Outlook, the revised revenue and expenditure estimates in the 2009-2013 Outlook are based on a variety of assumptions in the context of current and projected economic conditions. The updated Outlook not only identifies revenue and expenditure trends but also discusses risks and opportunities that affect fiscal decisions and the City’s ability to accomplish its strategic goals over the next five-year period. Those goals include: • Preservation of City services to the fullest extent possible. Fund the operations of new public facilities. • Meet contractual obligations and fund mandated programs. • Contribute the full payment of the Annual Required Contribution (ARC) for the City’s pension system. • Establish and maintain adequate General Fund reserves according to City Charter Section 91 and the City Reserve Policy recently approved by the City Council. • Address other significant financial obligations with a longer-term strategy.

Jerry Sanders; Jay M. Goldstone

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

434

EIA Data: 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Sector Key Indicators and Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. Source EIA Date Released December 16th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 62.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm

435

International Energy Outlook - Table of Contents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook International Energy Outlook EIA Glossary International Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0484(2004) Release date: April 2004 Next release date: July 2005 The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S.projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Table of Contents Appendixes Highlights World Energy and Economic Outlook Outlook for Primary Energy Consumption Energy End Use Outlook for Carbon Dioxide Emissions World Economic Outlook Alternative Growth Case Trends in Energy Intensity

436

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections November 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .lort lort lort lort <.ort ort Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Nrm ,iergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short-

437

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2QH 2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Tern Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

438

DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short

439

DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short Short

440

DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term' Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

442

Guidelines for residential commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes”.Delp. 2000. “Residential Commissioning: A Review of Relatedfor Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics” Lawrence

Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B B World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal-computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product [GDP]) and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and

444

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 projections, end-use energy consumption in the 6 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy mar- kets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transpor- tation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and polit- ical, social, and demographic factors. This chapter out- lines the IEO2006 projections for delivered energy consumption by end-use sector in the OECD and non- OECD regions. Residential Sector

445

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

446

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H13. World net liquids-fired electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 93 74 68 66 64 62 60 -1.5 United States a 37 20 17 18 18 18 18 -2.3 Canada 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 -1.0 Mexico/Chile 49 47 45 42 40 38 36 -1.0 OECD Europe 77 73 70 66 63 60 57 -1.0 OECD Asia 112 157 102 97 92 87 83 -1.0 Japan 92 137 83 79 75 71 68 -1.0 South Korea 18 17 16 15 15 14 13 -1.0 Australia/New Zealand 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 -1.0 Total OECD 282 303 239 229 219 209 200 -1.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

447

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 894 899 932 978 1,032 1,054 1,030 1,066 0.6 United States a 799 807 820 885 912 908 875 903 0.4 Canada 86 86 99 81 99 117 118 118 1.0 Mexico/Chile 10 6 12 12 21 29 37 46 7.3 OECD Europe 840 867 892 929 1,045 1,065 1,077 1,073 0.7 OECD Asia 406 415 301 447 490 551 557 576 1.1 Japan 266 274 103 192 200 206 209 209 -0.9 South Korea 140 141 198 255 291 346 348 367 3.2 Australia/NewZealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 2,140 2,181 2,124 2,354 2,567 2,670 2,664 2,715 0.7 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 272 274 344 414 475 533 592 630 2.8 Russia

448

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,511 1,563 1,686 1,793 1,888 1,987 2,114 2,233 1.2 United States a 1,222 1,266 1,357 1,404 1,431 1,468 1,528 1,570 0.7 Canada 170 162 171 199 223 240 255 271 1.7 Mexico/Chile 119 135 158 190 234 279 331 392 3.6 OECD Europe 1,024 1,082 1,086 1,123 1,144 1,215 1,277 1,348 0.7 OECD Asia 347 377 408 438 478 505 539 561 1.3 Japan 205 215 242 257 276 288 293 293 1.0 South Korea 72 90 91 98 110 117 136 148 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 70 71 75 83 91 101 110 119 1.7 Total OECD 2,882 3,022 3,180 3,353 3,510

449

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home heating oil retail price includes taxes. 16 Source: EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2012 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 10, 2012.

450

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

451

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

452

Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

International Energy Outlook - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2004 World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2004 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, including large increases for the developing economies of Asia. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2025. Figure 12. World Primary Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 Figure Data Figure 13. World Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 14. World Primary Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data

454

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2001.

455

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2000.

456

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2000

457

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2000.

458

Pharmaceutical crops have a mixed outlook in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crops have a mixed outlook in California by Michelle Marvieras environmental harm. The outlook for the production of

Marvier, Michelle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0202(98/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use

460

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

& Analysis > AEO 2009 & Analysis > AEO 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Service Report, April 2009 The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009) reference case was updated to reflect the provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) that were enacted in mid-February 2009. The reference case in the recently published AEO2009, which reflected laws and regulations in effect as of November 2008, does not include ARRA. The need to develop an updated reference case following the passage of ARRA also provided the Energy Information Administration (EIA) with an opportunity to update the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of the EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in the IEO2001 are consistent with those published in the AEO2001. IEO2001 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in

462

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A presentation to the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference, in Orlando, Florida, on February 3, 2005, giving EIAżs outlook for petroleum supply and prices, with particular attention to jet fuel.

Information Center

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

International Energy Outlook - Download Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

PDF Highlights PDF World Energy and Economic Outlook PDF World Oil Markets PDF Natural Gas PDF Coal PDF Electricity PDF Environmental Issues and World Energy Use PDF Index PDF...

464

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The World Oil Market The World Oil Market Oil prices are expected to remain relatively low, and resources are not expected to constrain substantial increases in oil demand through 2020. Oil usecontinues to dominate transportation energy markets. Oil Demand Growth in Industrialized Countries Oil Demand Growth in Nonindustrialized Countries Oil Demand and Transportation The Composition of World Oil Supply Worldwide Petroleum Trade in the Reference Case World Oil Price Projections Other Views of Prices and Production Policies To Lessen Environmental Damage from Transportation Fuel Use In the early 1990s, oil demand was relatively flat: oil consumption worldwide was only 1 million barrels per day higher in 1993 than it was in 1989. Since 1993, however, the world’s demand for oil has risen by almost

465

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

overview.gif (2907 bytes) overview.gif (2907 bytes) Key Issues A major issue in energy markets today is carbon emissions. Because the Kyoto Protocol has not been ratified by the United States and no specific policies for carbon reduction have been enacted, such policies are not included in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), although the Protocol and EIA’s recent analysis of its potential impacts are discussed. Economic developments in Asia over the past 18 months have weakened worldwide oil demand and lowered world oil prices—a trend that is likely to continue for several years and, therefore, is included in the AEO99 analysis of oil markets and prices. As in AEO98, the projections in AEO99 reflect ongoing changes in the financial structure of the U.S. electricity industry and cost reductions that are becoming evident with increased competition. A transition to retail competitive pricing is assumed in five regions—California, New York, New England, the Mid-Atlantic Area Council (Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, and Maryland), and the Mid-America Interconnected Network (Illinois and parts of Wisconsin and Missouri). Provisions of the California legislation on stranded cost recovery and price caps are also included. In the other regions, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008. No national renewable portfolio standard has been passed, but State standards and other programs intended to encourage renewables are included as enacted. The new standards for control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by electricity generators are also incorporated.

466

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John Conti, Director, International, Economic and Greenhouse Gases Division (202/586-4430). Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041 or linda.doman@eia.doe.gov) or the following analysts: Macroeconomic Assumptions Nasir Khilji (nasir.khilji@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1294) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Natural Gas Phyllis Martin (phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9592) Justine Bardin (justine.baren@eia.doe.gov 202/586-3508) Coal Michael Mellish (michael.mellish@eia.doe.gov,

467

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred toLinda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Arthur Andersen (art.andersen@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441) Linda E. Doman (linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Perry Lindstrom (perry.lindstrom@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-0934) Reformulated Gasoline

468

International Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 3 May 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director,

469

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

470

International Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 8 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office

471

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data Graphic Data International Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2003-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Use by Energy Type, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. Fuel Shares of World Marketed Energy Use, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

472

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

473

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is projected to continue. Although total world consumption of coal in 2001, at 5.26 billion short tons,12 was more than 27 percent higher than the total in 1980, it was 1 percent below the 1989 peak of 5.31 billion short tons (Figure 56). The International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 2001 and 2025, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent (on a tonnage basis), but with considerable variation among regions.

474

International Energy Outlook 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 4 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222),

475

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 7 May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office of

476

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Preface Highlights World Energy Consumption The World Oil Market (Errata as of May 13, 1998) Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Power Hydroelectric and Other Renewable Energy Electricity Appendix A-World Energy Consumption, Oil Production, and Carbon Emissions Tables (PDF) Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A1-A13 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A14-A26 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A27-A39 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A40-A50 Appendix B-World Energy Projection System Appendix C-A Status Report on Developing Transportation for Caspian Basin Oil and Gas Production Preface The Energy Information Administration’s outlook for world energy trends is presented in this report. Model projections now extending to the year 2020 are reported, and regional trends are discussed.

477

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparisons With Other Forecasts, and Performance of Past IEO Forecasts for 1990, 1995, and 2000 Forecast Comparisons Energy Consumption by Region Three organizations provide forecasts comparable with the projections in IEO2006, which extend to 2030 for the first time. The International Energy Agency (IEA) pro- vides "business as usual" projections to 2030 in its World Energy Outlook 2004; Petroleum Economics, Ltd. (PEL) publishes world energy projections to 2025; and Petro- leum Industry Research Associates (PIRA) provides projections to 2020. For comparison, 2002 is used as the base year for all the projections. Comparisons between IEO2006 and IEO2005 extend only to 2025, the last year of the IEO2005 projections. Regional breakouts vary among the different projec- tions, complicating the comparisons. For example, IEO2006, PIRA, and IEA

478

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contacts.gif (2957 bytes) contacts.gif (2957 bytes) The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen, Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: Report Contact World Energy Consumption Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041 linda.doman@eia.doe.gov World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler - 202/586-9503 gbutler@eia.doe.gov Stacy MacIntyre - 202/586-9795- (Consumption) stacy.macintyre@eia.doe.gov Natural Gas Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041

479

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 6 June 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov,

480

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Residential...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The end-use services for which equipment stocks are modeled include space conditioning (heating and cooling), water heating, refrigeration, freezers, dishwashers, clothes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "outlook residential demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EIA - 2009 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2009 The International Energy Outlook 2009 (IEO2009) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2009 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), (March 2009). A revised, updated AEO2009 reference case projection was released on April 17, 2009. It reflects the impact of provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA2009), enacted in mid-February 2009, on U.S. energy markets. The revised AEO2009 reference case includes updates for the U.S. macroeconomic outlook, which has been changing at an unusually rapid rate in recent months. Throughout IEO2009, significant changes to the U.S. outlook relative to the published AEO2009 reference case are noted for the reader's reference. The complete revised AEO2009 reference case results for the United States can be viewed on the EIA web site: http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo.

482

Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California Homes Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California Homes Title Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California Homes Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-938e Year of Publication 2008 Authors Walker, Iain S., and Alan K. Meier Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, home networks & controls Abstract This report summarizes results of a literature review, a workshop, and many meetings with demand response and thermostat researchers and implementers. The information obtained from these resources was used to identify key issues of thermostat performance from both energy savings and peak demand perspectives. A research plan was developed to address these issues and activities have already begun to pursue the research agenda.

483

Short-Term Energy Outlook: Quarterly projections. Fourth quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the third quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications.

Not Available

1993-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

484

Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4%

485

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

486

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

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